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Encyclopedia > William McKinley
William McKinley
William McKinley

In office
March 4, 1897 – September 14, 1901
Vice President Garret A. Hobart (1897-1899),
none (1899-1901),
Theodore Roosevelt (1901)
Preceded by Grover Cleveland
Succeeded by Theodore Roosevelt

In office
January 11, 1892 – January 13, 1896
Lieutenant Andrew Lintner Harris
Preceded by James E. Campbell
Succeeded by Asa S. Bushnell

Born January 29, 1843(1843-01-29)
Niles, Ohio
Died September 14, 1901 (aged 58)
Buffalo, New York
Political party Republican
Spouse Ida Saxton McKinley
Occupation Lawyer
Religion Methodist
Signature

William McKinley, Jr. (January 29, 1843September 14, 1901) was the 25th President of the United States, and the last veteran of the American Civil War to be elected. William McKinley can refer to: William McKinley (1843-1901), 25th President of the United States William B. McKinley (1856-1926), a U.S. Representative and Senator from Illinois Bill McKinley (1910-1980), a baseball umpire Bill McKinley (football) (born 1949), a player for the 1971 Buffalo Bills Category: ... Denali redirects here. ... president William McKinley Source: Library of Congress Full size image from http://teachpol. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Andrew Lintner Harris (also known as The Farmer-Statesman) (November 17, 1835 – September 13, 1915) was one of the heroes of the Battle of Gettysburg and the last Civil War general to serve as a governor in the U.S., serving as the 44th governor of Ohio. ... James Edwin Campbell (July 7, 1843 - December 18, 1924) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Asa Smith Bushnell (September 16, 1834 _ January 15, 1904) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Niles is a city in Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie First Settled 1789 Founded 1801 Incorporated (City) 1832 Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... This article is about the state. ... The Republican Party was born in 1854 and is one of the two dominant parties today. ... Ida Saxton McKinley (June 8, 1847 – May 26, 1907), wife of William McKinley, was First Lady of the United States from 1897 to 1901. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links William_McKinley_signature. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


By the 1880s, this Ohio native was a nationally known Republican leader; his signature issue was high tariffs on imports as a formula for prosperity, as typified by his McKinley Tariff of 1890. As the Republican candidate in the 1896 presidential election, he upheld the gold standard, and promoted pluralism among ethnic groups. His campaign, designed by Mark Hanna, introduced new advertising-style campaign techniques that revolutionized campaign practices and beat back the crusading of his arch-rival, William Jennings Bryan. The 1896 election is often considered a realigning election that marked the beginning of the Progressive Era. The Republican Party was born in 1854 and is one of the two dominant parties today. ... The McKinley Tariff of 1890 was what set the average ad valorem tariff rate for imports to the United States at 48. ... The United States presidential election of November 3, 1896 saw Republican William McKinley defeat Democrat William Jennings Bryan in a campaign considered by historians to be one of the most dramatic in American history. ... Mark Hanna Mark A. Hanna (September 24, 1837–February 15, 1904), born Marcus Alonzo Hanna, was an industrialist and Republican politician from Ohio. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... The United States presidential election of November 3, 1896 saw Republican William McKinley defeat Democrat William Jennings Bryan in a campaign considered by historians to be one of the most dramatic in American history. ... Realigning election or political realignment are terms from political science and political history describing a dramatic change in the political system. ... In the United States, the Progressive Era was a period of reform which lasted from the 1890s to the 1920s. ...


McKinley presided over a return to prosperity after the Panic of 1893 and was reelected in 1900 after another intense campaign against Bryan, this one focused on foreign policy. As president, he fought the Spanish-American War. McKinley for months resisted the public demand for war, which was based on news of Spanish atrocities in Cuba, but was unable to get Spain to agree to implement reforms immediately. Later he annexed the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Guam, as well as Hawaii, and set up a protectorate over Cuba. He was assassinated by Leon Czolgosz, an anarchist, and succeeded by Theodore Roosevelt. The Panic of 1893 was a serious decline in the economy of the United States that began in 1893 and was precipitated in part by a run on the gold supply. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Leon Frank Czolgosz (pronounced choll-gosh), (1873 – October 29, 1901) (also used his mothers maiden name Nieman and variations thereof[1]) was the assassin of U.S. President William McKinley. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life

McKinley at 19, in 1862
McKinley at 19, in 1862

Born in Niles, Ohio, on January 29, 1843, William McKinley was the seventh of nine children. In 1869, he made Canton, Ohio his permanent residence and remained there until he died. Most of his siblings lived within Stark County. His parents, William and Nancy (Allison) McKinley, were of Scots-Irish and English ancestry.[1] He graduated from Poland Academy and attended Allegheny College for one term in 1860, where he was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Image File history File links WmMcKnly-19y. ... Image File history File links WmMcKnly-19y. ... Niles is a city in Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... Stark County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Scots-Irish (also called Ulster Scots) is a Scottish ethnic group that historically resided in Ireland which ultimately traces its roots back to settlers from Scotland, and to a lesser extent, England. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Allegheny College is a private liberal arts college located in northwestern Pennsylvania which prides itself as being one of the oldest colleges in the United States. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Look up fraternity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In June 1861, at the start of the American Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army, as a private in the Twenty-third Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.The regiment was sent to western Virginia where it spent a year fighting small Confederate units. His superior officer, another future U.S. President, Rutherford B. Hayes, promoted McKinley to commissary sergeant for his bravery in battle. For driving a mule team delivering rations under enemy fire at Antietam, Hayes promoted him to Second Lieutenant. This pattern repeated several times during the war, and McKinley eventually mustered out as Captain and brevet Major of the same regiment in September 1865. In 1869, the year he entered politics, McKinley met and began courting his future wife, Ida Saxton, marrying her two years later when she was 23 and he was 27. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... A commissary is someone delegated by a superior to execute a duty or an office. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee Strength 87,000 45,000 Casualties 12,401 (2,108 killed, 9,540 wounded, 753 captured/missing) 10,316 (1,546 killed, 7,752 wounded, 1,018 captured/missing) The Battle of Antietam (also... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... For other uses, see Captain (disambiguation). ... In the US military, brevet referred to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... Ida Saxton McKinley (June 8, 1847 – May 26, 1907), wife of William McKinley, was First Lady of the United States from 1897 to 1901. ...


Legal and early political career

Following the war, McKinley attended Albany Law School in Albany, New York and was admitted to the bar in 1867. He practiced law in Canton, and served as prosecuting attorney of Stark County from 1869 to 1871. He first became active in the Republican party when he made "speeches in the Canton area for his old commander, Rutherford Hayes, then running for governor" in the state of Ohio.[2] Albany Law School is an ABA accredited law school based in Albany, New York. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ...

Rep. William McKinley.
Rep. William McKinley.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 483 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (538 × 667 pixel, file size: 30 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 483 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (538 × 667 pixel, file size: 30 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ...

United States House of Representatives

With the help of Rutherford B. Hayes, McKinley was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and first served from 1877 to 1882, and second from 1885 to 1891. He was chairman of the Committee on Revision of the Laws from 1881 to 1883. He presented his credentials as a member-elect to the 48th Congress and served from March 4, 1883, until May 27, 1884, when he was succeeded by Jonathan H. Wallace, who successfully contested his election. McKinley was again elected to the House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1885 to March 4, 1891. He was chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means from 1889 to 1891. In 1890, he authored the McKinley Tariff, which raised rates to the highest in history, devastating his party in the off-year Democratic landslide of 1890. He lost his seat by the narrow margin of 300 votes, partly due to the unpopular tariff bill and partly due to gerrymandering. Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... GOP redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Jonathan Hasson Wallace (October 31, 1824 - October 28, 1892) was born in St. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The McKinley Tariff of 1890 was what set the average ad valorem tariff rate for imports to the United States at 48. ... The U.S. House election, 1890 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1890 which occurred in the middle of President Benjamin Harrisons term. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The Gerry-Mander first appeared in this cartoon-map in the Boston Gazette, 26 March 1812 Gerrymandering is a form of redistricting in which electoral district or constituency boundaries are manipulated for an electoral advantage. ...


Governor of Ohio

After leaving Congress, McKinley won the governorship of Ohio in 1891, defeating Democrat James E. Campbell; he was reelected in 1893 over Lawrence T. Neal. He was an unsuccessful presidential hopeful in 1892 but campaigned for the reelection of President Benjamin Harrison. As governor, he imposed an excise tax on corporations, secured safety legislation for transportation workers and restricted anti-union practices of employers. Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... An excise is an indirect tax or duty levied on items within a country. ... A corporation (usually known in the United Kingdom and Ireland as a company) is a legal entity (distinct from a natural person) that often has similar rights in law to those of a Civil law systems may refer to corporations as moral persons; they may also go by the name...


The 1896 election

The McKinley House.
The McKinley House.

Governor McKinley left office in early 1896 and, at the instigation of his friend Marcus Hanna began actively campaigning for the Republican party's presidential nomination. After sweeping the 1894 congressional elections, Republican prospects appeared bright at the start of 1896. The Democratic Party was split on the issue of silver and many voters blamed the nation's economic woes on incumbent Grover Cleveland. McKinley's well-known expertise on the tariff issue, successful record as governor, and genial personality appealed to many Republican voters. His major opponent for the nomination, House Speaker Thomas B. Reed of Maine, had acquired too many enemies within the party over his political career, and his supporters could not compete with Hanna's organization. After winning the nomination, he went home and conducted his famous "front porch campaign." Hanna, a wealthy industrialist, headed the McKinley campaign. His opponent was William Jennings Bryan, who ran on a single issue of "free silver" and money. McKinley was against silver because it was a debased currency and overseas markets used gold, so it would harm foreign trade. McKinley promised that he would promote industry and banking and guarantee prosperity for every group in a pluralistic nation. A Democratic cartoon ridiculed the promise, saying it would rock the boat. McKinley replied that the protective tariff would bring prosperity to all groups, city and country alike, while Bryan's free silver would create inflation but no new jobs, would bankrupt railroads, and would permanently damage the economy. McKinley was able to succeed in getting votes from the urban areas and ethnic labor groups. Campaign manager Hanna raised $3.5 million from big business, and adopted newly invented advertising techniques to spread McKinley's message.[3] Although Bryan had been ahead in August, McKinley's counter-crusade put him on the defensive and gigantic parades for McKinley in every major city a few days before the election undercut Bryan's allegations that workers were coerced to vote for McKinley. He defeated Bryan by a large margin. His appeal to all classes marked a realignment of American politics. His success in industrial cities gave the Republican party a grip on the north comparable to that of the Democrats in the south. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 699 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (953 × 817 pixel, file size: 269 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 699 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (953 × 817 pixel, file size: 269 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File... Marcus Alonzo Hanna (September 24, 1837 - February 15, 1904) was an American industrialist and politician from Cleveland, Ohio. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... Thomas Brackett Reed, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives from Maine Thomas Buck Reed, U.S. Senator from Kentucky This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... In American political parlance, a front porch campaign is one in which the candidate remains at home, making speeches to supporters who come to visit, but does not travel around or otherwise actively campaign. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Presidency 1897-1901

Chief Justice Melville Fuller administering the oath to McKinley as president in 1897. Out-going president, Grover Cleveland, stands to the right.
Chief Justice Melville Fuller administering the oath to McKinley as president in 1897. Out-going president, Grover Cleveland, stands to the right.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (843x524, 35 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (843x524, 35 KB) http://hdl. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial... Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ...

Domestic policies

McKinley validated his claim as the "advance agent of prosperity" when the year 1897 brought a revival of business, agriculture and general prosperity. This was due in part to the end, at least for the time, of political suspense and agitation, in part to the confidence which capitalists felt in the new Administration. In economics, a business (also called firm or enterprise) is a legally recognized organizational entity designed to provide goods and/or services to consumers or corporate entities such as governments, charities or other businesses. ...


On June 16, 1897, a treaty was signed annexing the Republic of Hawaii to the United States. The Government of Hawaii speedily ratified this, but it lacked the necessary 2/3 vote in the U.S. Senate. The solution was to annex Hawaii by joint resolution, which required only a simple majority of both houses of Congress. The resolution provided for the assumption by the United States of the Hawaiian debt up to $4,000,000. The Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) was extended to the islands, and Chinese immigration from Hawaii to the mainland was prohibited. The joint resolution passed on July 6, 1898, a majority of the Democrats and several Republicans, among these Speaker Reed, opposing. Shelby M. Cullom, John T. Morgan, Robert R. Hitt, Sanford B. Dole, and Walter F. Frear, made commissioners by its authority, drafted a territorial form of government, which became law April 30, 1900. is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Iolani Palace in Honolulu, formerly the residence of the Hawaiian monarch, was the capitol of the Republic of Hawaii. ... This article is about the former U.S. law. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other persons named Thomas Reed, see Thomas Reed (disambiguation). ... Shelby Moore Cullom (1829 - 1914) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Tyler Morgan John Tyler Morgan (June 20, 1824 – June 11, 1907) was a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War and a postbellum six-term U.S. senator from the state of Alabama. ... Robert Roberts Hitt (January 16, 1834 – September 20, 1906) was born in Urbana, Ohio to Reverend Thomas Smith Hitt and Emily John Hitt. ... Former advisor to Queen Liliuokalani and justice of the Hawaii judiciary, Sanford B. Dole assumed the role of President of the Republic of Hawaii. ... Walter F. Frear, formally Walter Francis Frear (October 29, 1863 - January 22, 1948), was the third Territorial Governor of Hawaii from 1907 to 1913. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ğ: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ...


In Civil Service administration, McKinley reformed the system in order to make it more flexible in critical areas. The Republican platform, adopted after President Cleveland's extension of the merit system, emphatically endorsed this, as did McKinley himself. Against extreme pressure, particularly in the Department of War, the President resisted until May 29, 1899. His order of that date withdrew from the classified service 4,000 or more positions, removed 3,500 from the class theretofore filled through competitive examination or an orderly practice of promotion, and placed 6,416 more under a system drafted by the Secretary of War. The order declared regular a large number of temporary appointments made without examination, besides rendering eligible, as emergency appointees, without examination, thousands who had served during the Spanish War. The Roman civil service in action. ... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Republicans pointed to the deficit under the Wilson Law with much the same concern manifested by President Cleveland in 1888 over the surplus. A new tariff law must be passed, and, if possible, before a new Congressional election. An extra session of Congress was therefore summoned for March 15, 1897. The Ways and Means Committee, which had been at work for three months, forthwith reported through Chairman Nelson Dingley the bill which bore his name. With equal promptness the Committee on Rules brought in a rule, at once adopted by the House, whereby the new bill, in spite of Democratic pleas for time to examine, discuss, and propose amendments, reached the Senate the last day of March. More deliberation marked procedure in the Senate. This body passed the bill after toning up its schedules with some 870 amendments, most of which pleased the Conference Committee and became law. The act was signed by the President July 24, 1897. The Dingley Act was estimated by its author to advance the average rate from the 40 percent of the Wilson Bill to approximately 50 percent, or a shade higher than the McKinley rate. As proportioned to consumption the tax imposed by it was probably heavier than that under either of its predecessors. The Revenue Act or Wilson-Gorman tariff of 1894 slightly reduced the U.S. tariff rates from the numbers set in the 1890 McKinley tariff. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Nelson Dingley, Jr. ... The Committee on Rules, or (more commonly) Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... A conference committee in the United States Congress is a committee appointed by the members of the upper and lower houses to resolve disagreements on a bill passed in different versions of each House. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Dingley Act of 1897, introduced by U.S. Representative Nelson Dingley, Jr. ...


Reciprocity, a feature of the McKinley Tariff, was suspended by the Wilson Act. The Republican platform of 1896 declared protection and reciprocity twin measures of Republican policy. Clauses graced the Dingley Act allowing reciprocity treaties to be made, "duly ratified" by the Senate and "approved" by Congress.Under the third section of the Act some concessions were given and received, but the treaties negotiated under the fourth section, which involved lowering of strictly protective duties, met summary defeat when submitted to the Senate. In international relations and treaties, the principle of reciprocity states that favours, benefits, or penalties that are granted by one state to the citizens or legal entities of another, should be returned in kind. ... The McKinley Tariff of 1890 was what set the average ad valorem tariff rate for imports to the United States at 48. ...


Foreign policies

McKinley campaigns on gold coin (gold standard) with support from soldiers, businessmen, farmers and professions, claiming to restore prosperity at home and victory abroad.
McKinley campaigns on gold coin (gold standard) with support from soldiers, businessmen, farmers and professions, claiming to restore prosperity at home and victory abroad.

McKinley hoped to make American producers supreme in world markets, and so his administration had a push for those foreign markets, which included the annexation of Hawaii and interests in China. While serving as a Congressman, McKinley had been an advocate for the annexation of Hawaii because he wanted to Americanize it and establish a naval base, but he was unable to get the two-thirds vote. One notable observer of the time, Henry Adams, declared that the nation at this time was ruled by "McKinleyism," a "system of combinations, consolidations, and trusts realized at home and abroad." This reflects the policies President McKinley pursued. Many of his diplomatic appointments went to political friends such as former Carnegie Steel president John George Alexander Leishman (minister to Switzerland and Turkey). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (815x1201, 307 KB) Summary USA campaign poster 1900 Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (815x1201, 307 KB) Summary USA campaign poster 1900 Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Henry Adams Henry Brooks Adams (February 16, 1838 – March 27, 1918) was an American historian, journalist and novelist. ... Carnegie Steel is the steel corporation originally founded and headed by steel magnate Andrew Carnegie. ...


During this time there were some overseas conflicts, mainly with Spain. The U.S. had interests in Cuba, the Philippines, Hawaii and China. McKinley did not want to fully annex Cuba, just control it. In the Philippines, he wanted a base there to deal with China that would give the U.S. a voice in Asian affairs. Stories began to emerge of horrible atrocities committed in Cuba and of Spain's use of concentration camps and brutal military force to quash the Cubans' rebellion. Spain began to show it was no longer in control as rebellions within the rebellion broke out. The Spanish repeatedly promised new reforms, then repeatedly postponed them. American public opinion against Spain became heated, and created a demand for war coming mostly from Democrats and the sensationalist yellow journalism of William Randolph Hearst's newspapers. McKinley and the business community opposed the growing public demand for war, aided by House Speaker Reed. Asian may refer to: Asian people - The people from Asia. ... A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... Nasty little printers devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ...


As a matter of protection for U.S. interests around Havana, a new warship, the U.S.S. Maine, was dispatched to Havana harbor. On February 15, 1898, it mysteriously exploded and sank, causing the deaths of 260 men. (In 1950, the Navy ruled that "the Maine had been sunk by a faulty boiler" and not by attack as was assumed at the time).[4] Public opinion heated up and a greater demand for war ensued. McKinley turned the matter over to Congress, which voted for war, and gave Spain an ultimatum for an armistice and a permanent peace. Although the Army was poorly prepared, militia and national guard units rushed to the colors, most notably Theodore Roosevelt and his "Rough Riders." The naval war in Cuba and the Philippines was a success, the easiest and most profitable war in U.S. history, and after 113 days, Spain agreed to peace terms at the Treaty of Paris in July. Secretary of state John Hay called it a "splendid little war." The United States gained ownership of Guam, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico, and temporary control over Cuba. McKinley had said, "we need Hawaii just as much as we did California," and Hawaii was annexed (see above). McKinley had begun by wanting only a naval base in the Philippines at Manila; in the end, he decided to take all of the Philippines. For other ships of the same name, see USS Maine. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Roosevelt and the Rough Riders atop San Juan Heights, 1898 The Rough Riders was the name bestowed by the American press on the 1st U.S. ... The Treaty of Paris of 1898, signed on December 10, 1898, ended the Spanish-American War. ... John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838 – July 1, 1905) was an American statesman, diplomat, author, journalist, and private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other meanings of the word, see Manila (disambiguation). ...


Throughout these ordeals, McKinley controlled American policy and news with an "iron hand". McKinley was the first president to have the use of telephones and telegraphs giving him access to battlefield commanders and reporters in mere minutes, and he used this to his full advantage. He censored the news at home about the war abroad.[citation needed] These ordeals also gave life to an Anti-Imperialist League movement at home. Anti-imperialism is a current within the political left advocating the collapse of imperialism. ...


Election of 1900

McKinley was re-elected in 1900, this time with foreign policy paramount. Bryan had demanded war with Spain (and volunteered as a soldier), but strongly opposed annexation of the Philippines. He was also running on the same issue of free silver as he did before, but since the silver debate was ended with the passage of the Gold Standard Act of 1900, McKinley easily won reelection. Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Significant events during presidency

The Dingley Act of 1897, introduced by U.S. Representative Nelson Dingley, Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... Belligerents United States Philippine Constabulary Philippine Scouts First Philippine Republic several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar several unofficial leaders post-1902 Strength 126,000 soldiers[1] First Philippine Republic: 80,000 soldiers Casualties and losses ~5,000-7,000[1][2] ~12,000... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire French Third Republic United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50... The Gold Standard Act of the United States was passed in 1900 (ratified on March 14) and established gold as the only standard for redeeming paper money, stopping bimetallism (which had allowed silver in exchange for gold). ...

Administration and cabinet

President McKinley and his cabinet.
President McKinley and his cabinet.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 626 × 423 pixelsFull resolution (626 × 423 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 626 × 423 pixelsFull resolution (626 × 423 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | Judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit | U.S. Secretaries of State | Spanish-American War people | American lawyers | 1849 births | 1923 deaths ... John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838 – July 1, 1905) was an American statesman, diplomat, author, journalist, and private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Lyman Judson Gage Lyman Judson Gage (June 28, 1836–January 26, 1927) was an American financier and Presidential Cabinet officer. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... {{Infobox US Cabinet official | name=Russell Alexander Alger | image=Russell Alexander Alger2. ... Elihu Root (February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman and the 1912 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Joseph McKenna (August 10, 1843–November 21, 1926) was an American politician who served in all three branches of the U.S. federal government, as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, as U.S. Attorney General and as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. ... John William Griggs (July 10, 1849–November 28, 1927) was an American politician. ... Philander C. Knox Philander Chase Knox (May 6, 1853–October 12, 1921) was an American lawyer and politician who served as Attorney General and U.S. Senator and was Secretary of State from 1909-1913. ... The Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... James Albert Gary (1833 - 1920) was a U.S. political figure. ... Charles Emory Smith (February 18, 1842 _ January 19, 1908), American journalist and political leader, was born in Mansfield, Connecticut. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... John Davis Long (October 27, 1838–August 28, 1915) was a U.S. political figure. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Cornelius Newton Bliss (January 26, 1833 - ?) was an American merchant and politician. ... Ethan Allen Hitchcock (1835-1909) served under Presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt as U.S. Secretary of the Interior. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... James Wilson (August 16, 1835 – August 26, 1920) was a Scots born United States politician, serving as United States Secretary of Agriculture from 1897 – 1913. ...

Supreme Court appointment

McKinley appointed the following Justice to the Supreme Court of the United States: The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ...

Joseph McKenna (August 10, 1843–November 21, 1926) was an American politician who served in all three branches of the U.S. federal government, as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, as U.S. Attorney General and as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. ...

Assassination

McKinley on steps of Temple of Music.
McKinley on steps of Temple of Music.
Leon Czolgosz shoots President McKinley with a concealed revolver.
Leon Czolgosz shoots President McKinley with a concealed revolver.
Main article: William McKinley assassination

President and Mrs. McKinley attended the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York. He delivered a speech about his positions on tariffs and foreign trade on September 5, 1901. On the second day, McKinley was at the Temple of Music, greeting the public. Leon Frank Czolgosz waited in line with a pistol in his right hand concealed by a handkerchief. At 4:07 P.M. Czolgosz fired twice at the president. The first bullet grazed the president's shoulder. The second, however, went through McKinley's stomach, colon, and kidney, and finally lodged in the muscles of his back. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 545 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (970 × 1067 pixel, file size: 233 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 545 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (970 × 1067 pixel, file size: 233 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File... Download high resolution version (600x639, 93 KB)Drawing of the McKinley assassination from http://teachpol. ... Download high resolution version (600x639, 93 KB)Drawing of the McKinley assassination from http://teachpol. ... Leon Czolgosz shoots President McKinley with a concealed revolver. ... The Electric Tower, the crowning feature of the Exposition Temple of Music where William McKinley was shot. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie First Settled 1789 Founded 1801 Incorporated (City) 1832 Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Leon Frank Czolgosz (Zol-gash), (1873 – October 29, 1901) (often anglicized to ) was the assassin of U.S. President William McKinley. ... In anatomy, the stomach is a bean-shaped hollow muscular organ of the gastrointestinal tract involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Large intestine. ... The kidneys are the organs that filter wastes (such as urea) from the blood and excrete them, along with water, as urine. ...


One bullet was easily found and extracted, but doctors were unable to locate the second bullet. It was feared that the search for the bullet, using the medical techniques of the time, might cause more harm than good. In addition, McKinley appeared to be recovering, so doctors decided to leave the bullet where it was.[5]


The newly-developed X-ray machine was displayed at the fair, but doctors were reluctant to use it on McKinley to search for the bullet because they did not know what side effects it might have on him. The operating room at the exposition's emergency hospital did not have any electric lighting, even though the exteriors of many of the buildings at the extravagant exposition were covered with thousands of light bulbs. The surgeons were unable to operate by candlelight because of the danger created by the flammable ether used to keep the president unconscious. So the doctors were forced to use pans instead to reflect sunlight onto the operating table while they treated McKinley's wounds. Mrs. ... Light bulb redirects here. ...

McKinley casket at Capitol.
McKinley casket at Capitol.
McKinley's remains passing Treasury building.
McKinley's remains passing Treasury building.

McKinley's doctors believed he would recover, and the President convalesced for more than a week in Buffalo at the home of the exposition's director. On the morning of 12 September, he felt strong enough to receive his first food orally since the shooting — toast and a small cup of coffee.[6] However, by afternoon he began to experience discomfort and his condition rapidly worsened. McKinley began to go into shock. At 2:15 A.M. on September 14, 1901, eight days after he was shot, he died from gangrene surrounding his wounds. His last words were "It is God's way; His will be done, not ours."[7] and he was buried in Canton, Ohio. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 481 pixel Image in higher resolution (1566 × 941 pixel, file size: 414 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 481 pixel Image in higher resolution (1566 × 941 pixel, file size: 414 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 601 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (953 × 951 pixel, file size: 319 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 601 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (953 × 951 pixel, file size: 319 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the medical condition. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Gangrene is a complication of necrosis (i. ...


Czolgosz was later found guilty of murder, and was executed by electric chair at Auburn Prison on October 29, 1901. The electric chair is an execution method in which the person being put to death is strapped to a chair and electrocuted through electrodes placed on the body. ... Auburn Prison is a prison located in Auburn, New York, USA. Constructed in 1816, it was the first state prison in New York, the site of the first execution via electric chair, and the namesake of the Auburn System, a correctional system believed to rehabilitate prisoners William Kemmler, who murdered... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Monuments and memorials

A funeral was held at the Milburn Mansion in Buffalo, after which the body was removed to Buffalo City Hall where it lay in-state for a public viewing. It was taken later to the United States Capitol and finally to the late president's home in Canton for a memorial. Memorials for the president were held in London, England at Westminster Abbey and St Paul's Cathedral.[8][9] The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ...

The $500 Bill with McKinley's portrait.
The $500 Bill with McKinley's portrait.
  • McKinley Park in Soudan, Minnesota - a state park and campground named in his honor
  • Obelisk that was created to honor a visit from McKinley in Tower, Minnesota

Muskegon is a city located in Muskegon County, Michigan. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Apotheosis of Saint Louis, St. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... Niles is a city in Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... The McKinley Monument is a 96 foot tall obelisk in Niagara Square, Buffalo, New York, in memory of William McKinley, 25th President of the United States, who was fatally shot while attending the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo on September 6, 1901. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie First Settled 1789 Founded 1801 Incorporated (City) 1832 Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... Scranton redirects here. ... Adams is a town located in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. ... McKinley County is a county located in the state of New Mexico. ... Denali redirects here. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Map of California showing the location of Arcata Coordinates: , Country State County Humboldt Settlement 1850 Incorporated 1858 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Mark Wheetley  - City manager Michael Hackett Area  - Total 11. ... McKinleyville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Humboldt County, California, United States. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... Walden is a village located in the Town of Montgomery in Orange County, New York. ... Redlands is a city in San Bernardino County, California, United States. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee Strength 87,000 45,000 Casualties 12,401 (2,108 killed, 9,540 wounded, 753 captured/missing) 10,316 (1,546 killed, 7,752 wounded, 1,018 captured/missing) The Battle of Antietam (also... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Philadelphia City Hall is the seat of government for the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Nickname: Location within the island of Puerto Rico Coordinates: , Country Territory Founded July 19 1760 Government  - Mayor José Guillermo Rodríguez Rodríguez (PPD)  - Senatorial dist. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie First Settled 1789 Founded 1801 Incorporated (City) 1832 Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... McKinley Mall, which opened in 1985, is a shopping mall south of Buffalo, New York, USA. The mall is located in the Town of Hamburg at the intersection of McKinley Parkway and Milestrip Road (NYS 179) immediately east of the New York State Thruway. ... Position within Erie County. ... Erie County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about a United States Army Fort. ... Bay Ridge is a neighborhood in the southwest corner of Brooklyn, New York, USA. It is bounded by 65th Street on the North, Interstate 278 on the East, and the Belt Parkway-Shore Road on the West. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ... Marion is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Marion County[4]. The city is located in northern Ohio, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of Columbus. ... Lakewood is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. ... Fort Gratiot Township is a charter township of St. ... A statue of Thomas Edison with the Blue Water Bridge in the background. ... Sault Ste. ... Casper is the only city in Natrona County, Wyoming, United States, although the county is home to a number of small towns and Casper suburbs. ... Bakersfield redirects here. ... Redlands is a city in San Bernardino County, California, United States. ... Location in Oregon Coordinates: , Country State County Washington Incorporated 1893 Government  - Mayor Rob Drake Area  - Total 16. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... Abington Township is a township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Location in Wood County in the State of West Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State West Virginia County Wood Incorporated 1810 Government  - Mayor Robert Newell Area  - City  12. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country United States State Pennsylvania County York Incorporated  - Borough September 24, 1787  - City January 11, 1887 Government  - Mayor John Brenner Area  - City  5. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For the city and county of Honolulu, see City & County of Honolulu. ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... Niles is a city in Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. ... Sebring is a village located in Mahoning County, Ohio. ... For the Canadian restaurant, see Baton Rouge (restaurant). ... Nickname: Gateway City, Gateway to the West, or Mound City Motto: Official website: http://stlouis. ... For the Canadian restaurant, see Baton Rouge (restaurant). ... Nickname: Location in the State of Iowa Coordinates: , Country State County Linn Incorporated 1849 Government  - Mayor Kay Halloran (D) Area  - City 64. ... Dearborn is a city of nearly 98,000 people located in the Metro Detroit metropolitan area and Wayne County, Michigan. ... Allegheny College is a private liberal arts college located in northwestern Pennsylvania which prides itself as being one of the oldest colleges in the United States. ... Meadville is the county seat of Crawford County, Pennsylvania, USA. The city is generally considered part of the Pittsburgh Tri-State and is within 20 miles of Erie, Pennsylvania. ... Today, the currency of the United States, the U.S. dollar, is printed in bills in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. ... Image File history File links 500-2f. ... Image File history File links 500-2f. ... Tower is a city located in St. ...

Media

  • Campaign speech of 1896
    McKinley gives a campaign speech from his front porch and talks about the Civil War.
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.
  • Inauguration of 1897

    Video clip of the "Black Horse Cavalry" leading the presidential delegation down Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington D.C. for the inauguration of McKinley.


    William McKinley campaign speech 1896. ... William McKinley 1897 inauguration. ... William McKinley 1897 inauguration. ...

  • Problems seeing the videos? See media help.

Disputed quotation

In 1903, an elderly supporter named James F. Rusling recalled that in 1899, McKinley had said to a religious delegation:

"The truth is I didn't want the Philippines, and when they came to us as a gift from the gods, I did not know what to do with them.... I sought counsel from all sides - Democrats as well as Republicans - but got little help. I thought first we would take only Manila; then Luzon; then other islands, perhaps, also. I walked the floor of the White House night after night until midnight; and I am not ashamed to tell you, gentlemen, that I went down on my knees and prayed Almighty God for light and guidance more than one night." "And one night late it came to me this way - I don't know how it was, but it came: (1) That we could not give them back to Spain - that would be cowardly and dishonorable; (2) that we could not turn them over to France or Germany - our commercial rivals in the Orient - that would be bad business and discreditable; (3) that we could not leave them to themselves - they were unfit for self-government - and they would soon have anarchy and misrule over there worse than Spain's was; and (4) that there was nothing left for us to do but to take them all, and to educate the Filipinos, and uplift and civilize and "Christianize them, and by God's grace do the very best we could by them, as our fellow men for whom Christ also died." And then I went to bed and went to sleep and slept soundly."

The question is whether McKinley said any such thing as is italicized in point #4, especially regarding "Christianize" the natives, or whether Rusling added it. McKinley was a religious person but never said God told him to do anything. McKinley never used the term Christianize (and indeed it was rare in 1898). McKinley operated a highly effective publicity bureau in the White House and he gave hundreds of interviews to reporters, and hundreds of public speeches to promote his Philippines policy. Yet no authentic speech or newspaper report contains anything like the purported words or sentiment. The man who remembered it—an American Civil War veteran—had written a book on the war that was full of exaggeration. The supposed highly specific quote from memory years after the event is unlikely enough—especially when the quote uses words like "Christianize" that were never used by McKinley. The conclusion of historians such as Lewis Gould is that, although it is possible this quote is legitimate (certainly McKinley expressed most of these sentiments generally), it is unlikely that he spoke these specific words, or that he said the last part at all.[11]


See also

Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... // Era Overview At the end of the Civil War, the United States was still bitterly divided. ... This is a list of assasinated American politicians. ...

Notes

  1. ^ RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: McKinley Family.
  2. ^ William McKinley: 1892 – 1896. Ohio Governors, Ohio Historical Society. Retrieved on 2008-03-07.
  3. ^ Jensen (1971) ch 10
  4. ^ Beschloss, Michael (September 17, 2001). Bush Faces the Greatest Test. NYT. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
  5. ^ "Biography of William McKinley". Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  6. ^ William McKinley: Post-Shooting Medical Course at Medical History of American Presidents
  7. ^ 1920World Book, Volume VI, page 3575
  8. ^ “Mr. McKinley’s End”, McKinleydeath.com.
  9. ^ “The McKinley-Roosevelt Administration”, McKinleydeath.com.
  10. ^ Monuments erected to McKinley throughout country. CantonRep.com (January 24, 2005). Retrieved on 2008-03-07.
  11. ^ For a discussion of this question, see Gould (1980), pp. 140-142.

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References

Secondary sources

  • Andrews, E. Benjamin (1912). History of the United States. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 
  • Harold U. Faulkner, Politics, Reform, and Expansion, 1890-1900 (1959). general history of decade
  • Paul W. Glad, McKinley, Bryan, and the People (1964) brief history of 1896 election
  • Lewis L. Gould, The Presidency of William McKinley (Kansas UP, 1980), standard history of his term
  • Richard Jensen, The Winning of the Midwest: Social and Political Conflict, 1888-1896 (U Chicago Press, 1971) analysis of McKinley's campaigns in Ohio and 1896
  • Stanley L. Jones. The Presidential Election of 1896' (U Wisconsin Press., 1964).
  • Walter LaFeber, The New Empire: An Interpretation of American Expansion, 1860-1898 (Cornell University Press, 1963) an influential, though controversial, examination of the causes of the Spanish-American War and William McKinley's foreign policy
  • Margaret Leech, In the Days of McKinley (1959)
  • H. Wayne Morgan, William McKinley and His America (Syracuse UP, 1963), the standard biography
  • John L. Offner, An Unwanted War: The Diplomacy of the United States and Spain over Cuba, 1895-1898 (U of North Carolina Press, 1992).

Elisha Benjamin Andrews (1844 - 1917) was a U.S. economist and educator. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Primary sources

  • McKinley, William. Speeches and Addresses of William McKinley: from his election to Congress to the present time (1893)
  • McKinley, William. Abraham Lincoln. An Address by William McKinley of Ohio. Before the Marquette Club. Chicago. Feb. 12, 1896 (PDF) (1896)
  • McKinley, William. Speeches and Addresses of William McKinley: From March 1, 1897, to May 30, 1900 (1900)
  • McKinley, William. The Tariff; a Review of the Tariff Legislation of the United States from 1812 to 1896 (1904)

PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ...

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
William McKinley
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
William McKinley
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
William McKinley
  • William McKinley at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
  • Extensive essay on William McKinley and shorter essays on each member of his cabinet and First Lady from the Miller Center of Public Affairs
  • Works by William McKinley at Project Gutenberg
  • Audio clips of McKinley's speeches
  • First Inaugural Address
  • Second Inaugural Address
  • IPL POTUS -- William McKinley
  • Biography of William McKinley
  • Presidential Biography by Stanley L. Klos
  • Encyclopedia Americana: William McKinley
  • William McKinley Presidential Library and Memorial
  • First State of the Union Address
  • Second State of the Union Address
  • Third State of the Union Address
  • Fourth State of the Union Address
  • White House biography
  • The Assassination of President William McKinley, 1901 - an account of the killing.
  • Assassination Site
  • Library of Congress films of McKinley
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Laurin D. Woodworth
Member from Ohio's 17th congressional district
1877 – 1879
Succeeded by
James Monroe
Preceded by
Lorenzo Danford
Member from Ohio's 16th congressional district
1879 – 1881
Succeeded by
Jonathan T. Updegraff
Preceded by
James Monroe
Member from Ohio's 17th congressional district
1881 – 1883
Succeeded by
Joseph D. Taylor
Preceded by
Addison S. McClure
Member from Ohio's 18th congressional district
1883 – 1884
Succeeded by
Jonathan H. Wallace
Preceded by
David R. Page
Member from Ohio's 20th congressional district
1885 – 1887
Succeeded by
George W. Crouse
Preceded by
Isaac H. Taylor
Member from Ohio's 18th congressional district
1887 – 1891
Succeeded by
Joseph D. Taylor
Political offices
Preceded by
Roger Q. Mills
Chairman of the United States House
Committee on Ways and Means

1889 – 1891
Succeeded by
William M. Springer
Preceded by
James E. Campbell
Governor of Ohio
January 11, 1892 – January 13, 1896
Succeeded by
Asa S. Bushnell
Preceded by
Grover Cleveland
President of the United States
March 4, 1897 – September 14, 1901
Succeeded by
Theodore Roosevelt
Party political offices
Preceded by
Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party presidential candidate
1896, 1900
Succeeded by
Theodore Roosevelt
Honorary titles
Preceded by
John A. Logan
Persons who have lain in state or honor
in the United States Capitol rotunda

September 17, 1901
Succeeded by
Pierre Charles L'Enfant
Persondata
NAME McKinley, William
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American politician and President
DATE OF BIRTH January 29, 1843
PLACE OF BIRTH Niles, Ohio
DATE OF DEATH September 14, 1901
PLACE OF DEATH Buffalo, New York
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  Results from FactBites:
 
William McKinley (2593 words)
William McKinley, the twenty-fifth president of the United States, was born in Niles, Trumbull county, Ohio, on the 29th of January 1843.
McKinley reflected the strong sentiment of his manufacturing constituency in behalf of a high protective tariff, and he soon became known in Congress (where he particularly attracted the attention of James G. Blaine) as one of the most diligent students of industrial policy and questions affecting national taxation.
McKinley's message to the new Congress dwelt upon the necessity of an immediate reyision of the tariff and revenue system of the country, and the so-called Dingley Tariff Bill was accordingly passed through both houses, and was approved by the President on the 24th of July.
William McKinley - MSN Encarta (649 words)
McKinley was the seventh of nine children born to William and Nancy Allison McKinley, both of Scots-Irish descent.
William McKinley, Jr., was born in Niles on January 29, 1843.
In 1869 McKinley met Ida Saxton, daughter of a wealthy Canton businessman and banker.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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