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Encyclopedia > William Makepeace Thackeray
William Makepeace Thackeray
William Makepeace Thackeray
Born July 18, 1811
Calcutta, India
Died December 24, 1863
London, England
Occupation Novelist

William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811December 24, 1863) was a British novelist of the 19th century. He was famous for his satirical works, particularly Vanity Fair, a panoramic portrait of English society. Public domain image from http://www. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... ,   (IPA: [] Bengali: কলকাতা) (formerly, in English contexts,  ) is the capital of the Indian state of West Bengal. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2006 estimate... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... Young people interacting within an ethnically diverse society. ...

Contents

Life

Thackeray was born in Calcutta, India, where his father, Richmond Thackeray (1 September 1781 – 13 September 1815), held the high rank of secretary to the board of revenue in the British East India Company. His mother, Anne Becher (1792–1864; second daughter of John Harman Becher, a writer for the East India Company, and his wife Harriet), married Richmond Thackeray on 13 October 1810 after being sent to India in 1809. She was sent abroad after being told that the man she loved, Henry Carmichael-Smyth, had died. This was not true, but her family wanted a better marriage for her than with Carmichael-Smyth, a military man. The truth was unexpectedly revealed in 1812, when Richmond Thackeray unwittingly invited to dinner the supposedly dead Carmichael-Smyth. Richmond Thackeray, born at South Mimms, went to India at the age of sixteen to assume his duties as writer. By 1804 he had fathered a daughter by a native mistress, the mother and daughter being named in his will. Such liaisons being common among gentlemen of the East India Company, it formed no bar to his courting and marrying Anne Becher. After Richmond's death, Henry Carmichael-Smyth married Anne in 1818 and they returned to England the next year. This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... South Mimms is a location in Hertfordshire that was originally part of the traditional county of Middlesex Categories: UK geography stubs | Middlesex | Hertfordshire ...

Caricature of Thackeray by Thackeray
Caricature of Thackeray by Thackeray

William had been sent to England earlier, at the age of five, with a short stopover at St. Helena where the prisoner Napoleon was pointed out to him. He was educated at schools in Southampton and Chiswick and then at Charterhouse School, where he was a close friend of John Leech. He disliked Charterhouse, parodying it in his later fiction as "Slaughterhouse." Illness in his last year there (during which he reportedly grew to his full height of 6'3") postponed his matriculation at Trinity College, Cambridge, until February 1829. Never too keen on academic studies, he left the University in 1830. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 411 × 599 pixels Full resolution (480 × 700 pixel, file size: 121 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) William Makepeace Thackeray - self caricature - Project Gutenberg eText 19222 William Makepeace Thackeray—A Caricature Drawn by Himself From Project Gutenbergs Modern English Books of... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 411 × 599 pixels Full resolution (480 × 700 pixel, file size: 121 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) William Makepeace Thackeray - self caricature - Project Gutenberg eText 19222 William Makepeace Thackeray—A Caricature Drawn by Himself From Project Gutenbergs Modern English Books of... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Southampton is a city, unitary authority and major port situated on the south coast of England. ... Chiswick (IPA pronunciation: ) is an extensive district of West London, covering the eastern part of the London Borough of Hounslow and the south eastern corner of the London Borough of Ealing. ... Charterhouse School (Originally, Suttons Hospital in Charterhouse) is a famous boys English public school, located in Godalming in the county of Surrey. ... Portrait of John Leech. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street...


He travelled for some time on the continent, visiting Paris and Weimar, where he met Goethe. He returned to England and began to study law at the Middle Temple, but soon gave that up. On reaching twenty-one, he came into his inheritance, but he squandered much of it on gambling and by funding two unsuccessful newspapers, The National Standard and The Constitutional, which he had hoped to write for. He also lost a good part of his fortune in the collapse of two Indian banks. Forced to consider a profession to support himself, he turned first to art, which he studied in Paris, but he did not pursue it, except in later years as the illustrator of some of his own novels and other writings. City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... The city hall Goethe and Schiller in front of the Deutsche Nationaltheater Weimar is a city in Germany. ...  , IPA: , (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German poet, dramatist, novelist, theorist, humanist, scientist, and painter. ... Part of Middle Temple c. ...


Thackeray's years of semi-idleness ended after he met and, on 20 August 1836, married Isabella Gethin Shawe (1816-1893), second daughter of Matthew Shawe, a colonel, who had died after extraordinary service, primarily in India, and his wife, Isabella Creagh. The marriage appears to have been a very happy one, though beset by problems (an overbearing mother-in-law and sickness). Their three daughters were Anne Isabella (1837-1919), Jane (1837; died at 8 months) and Harriet Marian (1840-1875). He now began "writing for his life," as he put it, turning to journalism in an effort to support his young family.


He primarily worked for Fraser's Magazine, a sharp-witted and sharp-tongued conservative publication, for which he produced art criticism, short fictional sketches, and two longer fictional works, Catherine and The Luck of Barry Lyndon. Later, through his connection to the illustrator John Leech, he began writing for the newly created Punch magazine, where he published The Snob Papers, later collected as The Book of Snobs. This work popularized the modern meaning of the word "snob." Frasers Magazine for Town and Country was a general and literary journal. ... Catherine: A Story was the first full-length work of fiction produced by William Makepeace Thackeray. ... The Luck of Barry Lyndon is a picaresque novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1844 about an Irish peasant who tries to become a gentleman. ... Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. ...

Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions.
Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions.

Meanwhile tragedy struck in his personal life as his wife succumbed to depression after the birth of their third child. Finding he could get no work done at home, he spent more and more time away, until September 1840, when he noticed how grave her condition was and, struck by guilt, he took his ailing wife to Ireland. During the crossing she threw herself from a water-closet into the sea (from which she was rescued). They fled back home after a four-week domestic battle with her mother. From November 1840 to February 1842 she was in and out of professional care, her condition waxing and waning. In the long run she deteriorated into a permanent state of detachment from reality, unaware of the world around her. Thackeray desperately sought cures for her, but nothing worked, and she ended up confined in a home near Paris, where she remained until 1893, outliving her husband by thirty years. After his wife's illness, Thackeray became a de facto widower, never establishing another permanent relationship. He did pursue other women, in particular Mrs. Jane Brookfield and Sally Baxter. In 1851 Mr. Brookfield barred Thackeray from further visits to or correspondence with Jane, while Baxter, an American twenty years his junior whom he met in New York City in 1852, married another man in 1855. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (472x700, 120 KB) William Makepeace Thackeray - Vanity Fair frontispiece - Project Gutenberg eText 19222 Title-page to Vanity Fair, Drawn by Thackeray, who Furnished the Illustrations for Many of his Earlier Editions From Project Gutenbergs Modern English Books of Power, by... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (472x700, 120 KB) William Makepeace Thackeray - Vanity Fair frontispiece - Project Gutenberg eText 19222 Title-page to Vanity Fair, Drawn by Thackeray, who Furnished the Illustrations for Many of his Earlier Editions From Project Gutenbergs Modern English Books of Power, by... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ...


In the early 1840s, Thackeray had some success with two travel books, The Paris Sketch Book and The Irish Sketch Book. Later in the decade, he achieved some notoriety with his Snob Papers, but the work that really established his fame was the novel Vanity Fair, which first appeared in serialized installments beginning in January 1847. Even before Vanity Fair completed its serial run, Thackeray had become a celebrity, sought after by the very lords and ladies he satirized and hailed as the equal of Dickens. Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... Charles Dickens Charles John Huffam Dickens (February 7, 1812 – June 9, 1870), pen-name “Boz”, was an English novelist of the Victorian era. ...


He remained "at the top of the tree," as he put it, for the remaining decade and a half of his life, producing several large novels, notably Pendennis, The Newcomes, and The History of Henry Esmond, despite various illnesses, including a near fatal one that struck him in 1849 in the middle of writing Pendennis. He twice visited the United States on lecture tours during this period, and there fell in love with a young American girl, Sally Baxter. Pendennis (1848–1850) is a novel by the English author William Makepeace Thackeray. ... The Newcomes is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1855. ... The History of Henry Esmond is a historical novel by William M. Thackeray that was published in 1852. ...


Thackeray also gave lectures in London, on the English humourists of the eighteenth century, and on the first four Hanoverian monarchs, the latter series being published in book form as The Four Georges. In Oxford, he stood unsuccessfully as an independent for Parliament. He was narrowly beaten by Cardwell (1070 votes, against 1005 for Thackeray).


In 1860, Thackeray became editor of the newly established Cornhill Magazine, but was never comfortable as an editor, preferring to contribute to the magazine as a columnist, producing his Roundabout Papers for it. The Cornhill Magazine was a Victorian magazine and literary journal named after Cornhill a street in London. ...


His health worsened during the 1850s and he was plagued by the recurring stricture of the urethra that laid him up for days at a time. He also felt he had lost much of his creative impetus. He worsened matters by over-eating and drinking and avoiding exercise, though he enjoyed horseback riding and kept a horse. On 23 December 1863, after returning from dining out and before dressing for bed, Thackeray suffered a stroke and was found dead on his bed in the morning. His death at the age of fifty-three was entirely unexpected by his family, friends, and reading public. An estimated 7000 people attended his funeral at Kensington Gardens. He was buried on 29 December at Kensal Green Cemetery, and a memorial bust sculpted by Marochetti can be found in Westminster Abbey. In anatomy, the urethra is a tube which connects the urinary bladder to the outside of the body. ... This article is about the park in London. ... Kensal Green Cemetery Kensal Green Cemetery, located in Kensal Green, London, England, was incorporated in 1832, and is the oldest of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries still in operation. ... Baron Carlo (Charles) Marochetti (1805-1867) was a sculptor, born in Turin, but raised in Paris as a French citizen. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


Works

Thackeray began as a satirist and parodist, with a sneaking fondness for roguish upstarts like Becky Sharp in Vanity Fair, Barry Lyndon in The Luck of Barry Lyndon, and Catherine in Catherine. In his earliest works, writing under such pseudonyms as Charles James Yellowplush, Michael Angelo Titmarsh, and George Savage Fitz-Boodle, he tended towards the savage in his attacks on high society, military prowess, the institution of marriage, and hypocrisy. Becky Sharp is the main character in the novel Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1847. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... The Luck of Barry Lyndon is a picaresque novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1844 about an Irish peasant who tries to become a gentleman. ... Catherine: A Story was the first full-length work of fiction produced by William Makepeace Thackeray. ...

Thackeray's grave (marble slab with railings) at Kensal Green Cemetery.

One of his very earliest works was "Timbuctoo," a satirical poem written for a Cambridge poetry contest won by Tennyson in 1829, but his writing career really began with a series of satirical sketches usually known now as The Yellowplush Papers, which appeared in Fraser's Magazine beginning in 1837. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Kensal Green Cemetery Kensal Green Cemetery, located in Kensal Green, London, England, was incorporated in 1832, and is the oldest of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries still in operation. ... Tennyson may refer to: A placename: In Australia: Tennyson, Queensland Tennyson railway station, Brisbane Tennyson, New South Wales, a suburb of Sydney Tennyson Point, New South Wales a suburb of Sydney Tennyson, South Australia, a suburb of Adelaide Tennyson, Victoria In the United States of America: Tennyson, Wisconsin Tennyson, Indiana...


Between May 1839 and February 1840, Fraser's published the work sometimes considered Thackeray's first novel, Catherine, originally intended as a satire of the Newgate school of crime fiction, but ending up more as a rollicking picaresque tale in its own right. Catherine: A Story was the first full-length work of fiction produced by William Makepeace Thackeray. ... The Newgate novels (or Old Bailey novels) were novels published in England from the late 1820s until the 1840s that were thought to glamorise the lives of the criminals they portrayed. ...


In The Luck of Barry Lyndon, a novel serialized in Fraser's in 1844, Thackeray explored the situation of an outsider trying to achieve status in high society, a theme he developed much more successfully in Vanity Fair in the character of Becky Sharp, the artist's daughter who rises nearly to the heights by manipulating the other characters. The Luck of Barry Lyndon is a picaresque novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1844 about an Irish peasant who tries to become a gentleman. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... Becky Sharp is the main character in the novel Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1847. ...


He is best known now for Vanity Fair, with its deft skewerings of human foibles and its roguishly attractive heroine. His large novels from the period after Vanity Fair, once described unflatteringly by Henry James as examples of "loose baggy monsters," have faded from view, perhaps because they reflect a mellowing in the author, who became so successful with his satires on society that he seemed to lose his zest for attacking it. Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ...


The later works include Pendennis, a sort of bildungsroman depicting the coming of age of Arthur Pendennis, a sort of alter ego of Thackeray's who also features as the narrator of two later novels: The Newcomes and The Adventures of Philip. The Newcomes is noteworthy for its critical portrayal of the "marriage market," while Philip is noteworthy for its semi-autobiographical look back at Thackeray's early life, in which the author partially regains some of his early satirical zest. Pendennis (1848–1850) is a novel by the English author William Makepeace Thackeray. ... A bildungsroman (IPA: /, German: novel of education or novel of formation) is a novel which traces the spiritual, moral, psychological, or social development and growth of the main character from (usually) childhood to maturity. ... The Newcomes is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1855. ... The Newcomes is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1855. ...


Also notable among the later novels is The History of Henry Esmond, in which Thackeray attempted to write a novel in the style of the eighteenth century. In fact, the eighteenth century held a great appeal for Thackeray. Besides Esmond, Barry Lyndon and Catherine are set then, as is the sequel to Esmond, The Virginians, which takes place in America and includes George Washington as a character who nearly kills one of the protagonists in a duel. The History of Henry Esmond is a historical novel by William M. Thackeray that was published in 1852. ...


Reputation

Thackeray is most often compared to one other great novelist of Victorian literature, Charles Dickens. During the Victorian era, he was ranked second only to Dickens, but he is now much less read and is known almost exclusively as the author of Vanity Fair. In that novel he was able to satirize whole swaths of humanity while retaining a light touch. It also features his most memorable character, the engagingly roguish Becky Sharp. As a result, unlike Thackeray's other novels, it remains popular with the general reading public, is a standard fixture in university courses, and has been repeatedly adapted for movies and television. Charles Dickens is still one of the best known English writers of any era. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... Becky Sharp is the main character in the novel Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1847. ...


In Thackeray's own day, some commentators, such as Anthony Trollope ranked his History of Henry Esmond as his greatest work, perhaps because it expressed Victorian values of duty and earnestness, as did some of his other later novels. It is perhaps for this reason that they have not survived as well as Vanity Fair, which satirizes those values. Anthony Trollope (April 24, 1815 – December 6, 1882) became one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. ... The History of Henry Esmond is a historical novel by William M. Thackeray that was published in 1852. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ...


Thackeray saw himself as writing in the realistic tradition and distinguished himself from the exaggerations and sentimentality of Dickens. Some later commentators have accepted this self-evaluation and seen him as a realist, but others note his inclination to use eighteenth-century narrative techniques, such as digressions and talking to the reader, and argue that through them he frequently disrupts the illusion of reality. The school of Henry James, with its emphasis on maintaining that illusion, marked a break with Thackeray's techniques. Charles Dickens Charles John Huffam Dickens (February 7, 1812 – June 9, 1870), pen-name “Boz”, was an English novelist of the Victorian era. ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ...


Trivia

  • One of Thackeray's daughters (Harriet, also known as Minnie) was the first wife of Sir Leslie Stephen, founding editor of the Dictionary of National Biography. With his second wife, Stephen was the father of Virginia Woolf, making Thackeray "almost" her grandfather. Thackeray's other daughter, Anne, remained close to the Stephen family after her sister's death; young Virginia referred to her as Aunt Anny and created a character based on her in her novel Night and Day. Al Murray ("the Pub Landlord") is a direct descendant.
  • Thackeray provided such a positive review of Jane Eyre that Charlotte Bronte dedicated the second edition to him. This caused her some great embarrassment when she found out about the parallels between the book's plot and Thackeray's domestic situation.
  • The quote "Mother is the name for God in the lips and hearts of little children" from Vanity Fair was used in James O'Barr's graphic novel "The Crow", as well as the subsequent film, though the line was slightly altered ("... of all children."). The line is often misattributed to O'Barr.

Sir Leslie Stephen (November 28, 1832 – February 22, 1904) was an English author and critic, the father of two famous daughters, Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell. ... The Dictionary of National Biography (or DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history. ... For the American childrens writer, see Virginia Euwer Wolff Virginia Woolf (née Stephen) (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) was an English novelist and essayist regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. ... Night and Day (1919) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ... Al Murray (born May 10, 1968) is an English comedian best known for his stand-up persona, the Pub Landlord, a stereotypical xenophobic public house licensee, and indeed earlier in his career he performed in pubs as though it were genuinely his gaff. Murray has toured with other comedians (including... Al Murray (born May 10, 1968) is an English comedian best known for his stand-up persona, the Pub Landlord, a stereotypical xenophobic public house licensee, and indeed earlier in his career he performed in pubs as though it were genuinely his gaff. Murray has toured with other comedians (including... Jane Eyre is a classic novel by Charlotte Brontë which was published in 1847 by Smith, Elder & Company, London, and is one of the most famous British novels. ... Charlotte Bront - idealized portrait, 1873 (based on a drawing by George Richmond, 1850) Charlotte Bront (April 21, 1816 - March 31, 1855) was an English writer. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... James OBarr (born 1960, Detroit, Michigan) is creator of the comic book series, The Crow. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... The Crow is a comic book series created by James OBarr. ... The Crow is a 1994 American film adaptation of the comic book of the same name by James OBarr (who himself makes a cameo in the film). ...

See also

Anne Isabella Thackeray Ritchie (born 9 July 1837 in London; died 1919) was an English writer. ... Barry Lyndon (1975) is a film by Stanley Kubrick based on the novel The Luck of Barry Lyndon (1844) by William Makepeace Thackeray. ...

List of works

Thackeray
Thackeray
  • The Yellowplush Papers (1837) - ISBN 0-8095-9676-8
  • Catherine (1839) - ISBN 1-4065-0055-0
  • A Shabby Genteel Story (1840) - ISBN 1-4101-0509-1
  • The Adventures of Philip (1862) - ISBN 1-4101-0510-5
  • Denis Duval (1864) - ISBN 1-4191-1561-8

Image File history File links William_Makepeace_Thackeray_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_13103. ... Image File history File links William_Makepeace_Thackeray_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_13103. ... Catherine: A Story was the first full-length work of fiction produced by William Makepeace Thackeray. ... See also: 1839 in literature, other events of 1840, 1841 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Luck of Barry Lyndon is a picaresque novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1844 about an Irish peasant who tries to become a gentleman. ... See also: 1843 in literature, other events of 1844, 1845 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Barry Lyndon (1975) is a film by Stanley Kubrick based on the novel The Luck of Barry Lyndon (1844) by William Makepeace Thackeray. ... Stanley Kubrick (July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999) was an influential and acclaimed American film director and producer. ... See also: 1847 in literature, other events of 1848, 1849 in literature, list of years in literature. ... A snob, guilty of snobbery, is a person that adopts the world-view that other people are inherently inferior for any one of a variety of reasons including supposed intellect, wealth, education, ancestry, etc. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... See also: 1847 in literature, other events of 1848, 1849 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Becky Sharp is the main character in the novel Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1847. ... Pendennis (1848–1850) is a novel by the English author William Makepeace Thackeray. ... See also: 1847 in literature, other events of 1848, 1849 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1849 in literature, other events of 1850, 1851 in literature, list of years in literature. ... For other uses, see Ivanhoe (disambiguation). ... Mens Wives is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray. ... See also: 1851 in literature, other events of 1852, 1853 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The History of Henry Esmond is a historical novel by William M. Thackeray that was published in 1852. ... See also: 1851 in literature, other events of 1852, 1853 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Newcomes is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1855. ... See also: 1854 in literature, other events of 1855, 1856 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Rose and The Ring is a satirical work of fiction written by William Makepeace Thackeray and originally published at Chirstmas 1854 (though dated 1855). ... See also: 1854 in literature, other events of 1855, 1856 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1856 in literature, other events of 1857, 1858 in literature, list of years in literature. ...

References

  • Ferris, Ina. William Makepeace Thackeray. Boston: Twayne, 1983.
  • Monsarrat, Ann. An Uneasy Victorian: Thackeray the Man, 1811-1863. London: Cassell, 1980.
  • Peters, Catherine. Thackeray’s Universe: Shifting Worlds of Imagination and Reality. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987.
  • Prawer, Siegbert S.: Breeches and Metaphysics: Thackeray's German Discourse. Oxford : Legenda, 1997.
  • Prawer, Siegbert S.: Israel at Vanity Fair: Jews and Judaism in the Writings of W. M. Thackeray. Leiden : Brill, 1992.
  • Prawer, Siegbert S.: W. M. Thackeray's European sketch books : a study of literary and graphic portraiture. Oxford ; New York : P. Lang, 2000.
  • Ray, Gordon N. Thackeray: The Uses of Adversity, 1811-1846. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1955.
  • Ray, Gordon N. Thackeray: The Age of Wisdom, 1847-1863. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1957.

Ritchie, H.T. "Thackeray and his daughter". Harper and Brothers, 1924.

  • Shillingsburg, Peter. William Makepeace Thackeray: A Literary Life. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2001.
  • Williams, Ioan M. Thackeray. London: Evans, 1968.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
William Makepeace Thackeray
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NAME Thackeray, William Makepeace
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Novelist
DATE OF BIRTH July 18, 1811
PLACE OF BIRTH Calcutta, India
DATE OF DEATH December 24, 1863
PLACE OF DEATH London, England

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Makepeace Thackeray (354 words)
Although William Makepeace Thackeray was born to a British family, educated in England, and is most well-known for his novels, he contributed to the bohemian ideal by
William Thackeray was born in 1811 to a British family.
Thackeray lived the life of a bohemian, scraping by on his small income from selling his novels and sketches.
William Makepeace Thackeray - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1880 words)
William Makepeace Thackeray (18 July 1811 24 December 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century.
Thackeray was born in Calcutta, India, where his father, Richmond Thackeray, worked as secretary to the board of revenue for the British East India Company.
Thackeray's connection with Royal Tunbridge Wells is of special interest and value from the fact that The Wells figures largely in his novel The Virginians; and in the "Roundabout Papers", one of his sketches, entitled "Tonbridge Toys", describes his visits here and his early and later impressions of the place.
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