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Encyclopedia > William M. Meredith
William Morris Meredith
William M. Meredith

In office
March 8, 1849 – July 22, 1850
Preceded by Robert J. Walker
Succeeded by Thomas Corwin

Born June 8, 1799(1799-06-08)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Died August 17, 1873 (aged 74)
U.S.
Political party Whig
Profession Politician, Lawyer

William Morris Meredith (June 8, 1799August 17, 1873) was an American lawyer and politician. William Morris Meredith, Jr. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 469 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (563 × 720 pixel, file size: 111 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Robert John Walker (July 23, 1801–November 11, 1869) was an American economist and statesman. ... Thomas Corwin, also known as Tom Corwin and The Wagon Boy (July 29, 1794 – December 18, 1865) was a politician from the state of Ohio who served as a prosecuting attorney, a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, United States House of Representatives, and United States Senate, and as... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday [1]of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday [1]of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1812. After he was admitted to the bar 1817, he began practicing law. Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ...


He served in the Pennsylvania General Assembly from 1824 to 1828, and was president of the Philadelphia City Council from 1834 until 1849. He was also United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania in 1841. Capitol Building The Pennsylvania General Assembly is the U.S. state of Pennsylvanias legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Harrisburg. ... City Hall from postcard, c. ... The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania is one of the original 13 federal judiciary districts created by the Judiciary Act of 1789, and originally sat in Independence Hall in Philadelphia as the U.S. District Court for the District of Pennsylvania. ...

The Zachary Taylor AdministrationFrom left to right: William B. Preston, Thomas Ewing, John M. Clayton, Zachary Taylor, William M. Meredith, George W. Crawford, Jacob Collamer and Reverdy Johnson, (1849).
The Zachary Taylor Administration
From left to right: William B. Preston, Thomas Ewing, John M. Clayton, Zachary Taylor, William M. Meredith, George W. Crawford, Jacob Collamer and Reverdy Johnson, (1849).

President Zachary Taylor, wanting a Pennsylvanian Whig for his cabinet, appointed William M. Meredith to be the 19th Secretary of the Treasury. He began his term in office in March 1849. Meredith strongly opposed the free trade legislation passed the year before under his predecessor Robert J. Walker. He felt that there was a need to protect the American workman, who was subject to competition from poorly paid European labor. Meredith's principal contribution in office was his Annual Report of 1849 in which he set forth an elaborate argument for a protective tariff. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (984x706, 168 KB) http://lcweb2. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (984x706, 168 KB) http://lcweb2. ... William Ballard Preston (November 25, 1805–16 November 1862) was a U.S. political figure. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... John Middleton Clayton (July 24, 1796–November 9, 1856) was an American statesman from Delaware who served as a U.S. Senator and as the U.S. Secretary of State from 1849 to 1850. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... George W. Crawford (December 22, 1798–July 27, 1872) was an American political figure from Georgia. ... Jacob Collamer (NSHC statue) Jacob Collamer (January 8, 1792 – November 9, 1865) was an American politician from Vermont. ... Reverdy Johnson (May 21, 1796–February 10, 1876) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... Robert John Walker (July 23, 1801–November 11, 1869) was an American economist and statesman. ... A protective tariff is a tariff or tax imposed on goods imported from other countries in an effort to protect goods made within the country. ...


The increase in the public debt due to the Mexican-American War and the acquisition of California gave Meredith additional argument for raising revenue through higher import duties, but no action was taken on the tariff during Meredith's term. He also recommended a revision of the Coast Survey Code, which had not been changed since its implementation in 1806, because the Coast Survey had seen great expansion and improvement with the introduction of steam powered ships. Meredith resigned with the rest of the Presidential Cabinet upon Taylor's death in 1850. Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... This article is about the U.S state. ... A steam engine is a heat engine that makes use of the potential energy that exists as pressure in steam, converting it to mechanical work. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ...


He was the state attorney general of Pennsylvania from 1861 from 1867. In 1870, Meredith served as a member of a commission working out the settlement of the Alabama claims. He died in 1873. During the American Civil War, Confederate States of America raiders (the most famous being the CSS Alabama) were built in Britain and did significant damage to Union naval forces. ...


He was a grandnephew of Gouverneur Morris. Gouverneur Morris Gouverneur Morris (January 31, 1752 – November 6, 1816) was an American statesman who represented Pennsylvania in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and was an author of large sections of the Constitution of the United States. ...


References

Parts of this article are based on information taken from the official web site of the US Treasury, which is a branch of the US Government, and thus presumed to be in the public domain. The U.S. Treasury building today. ...

Preceded by
Robert J. Walker
United States Secretary of the Treasury
18491850
Succeeded by
Thomas Corwin
Robert John Walker (July 23, 1801–November 11, 1869) was an American economist and statesman. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Corwin, also known as Tom Corwin and The Wagon Boy (July 29, 1794 – December 18, 1865) was a politician from the state of Ohio who served as a prosecuting attorney, a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, United States House of Representatives, and United States Senate, and as... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Alexander Hamilton (November 20, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was the first Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, political economist,] financier, and political theorist. ... Oliver Wolcott Jr. ... Samuel Dexter (May 14, 1761–May 4, 1816) was an early American statesman who served both in Congress and in the Presidential Cabinet. ... Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin (January 29, 1761 – August 12, 1849) was a Swiss-American ethnologist, linguist, politician, diplomat, Congressman, and the longest-serving United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... George W. Campbell George Washington Campbell (February 9, 1769–February 17, 1848) was an American statesman. ... Dallas, as portrayed in an 1881 copy of a Gilbert Stuart painting Alexander James Dallas (June 21, 1759 – January 16, 1817) was an American statesman who served as the U.S. Treasury Secretary under President James Madison. ... William Harris Crawfordlalalalalalala (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an important American politician, as well as a judge, during the early 19th century. ... Wikipedia also has an entry for Richard Rush (director) Richard Rush Richard Rush (August 29, 1780–July 30, 1859) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Samuel D. Ingham Samuel Delucenna Ingham (September 16, 1779 – June 5, 1860) was a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Andrew Jackson. ... Louis McLane Louis McLane (May 28, 1786–October 7, 1857) represented the state of Delaware in both the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate and served as the Secretary of the Treasury and later the Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson. ... William John Duane (May 9, 1780 - September 27, 1865) was a U.S. (Irish-born) lawyer. ... Roger Brooke Taney (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States, from 1836 until his death in 1864, and the first Roman Catholic to hold that office. ... Levi Woodbury (December 22, 1789–September 4, 1851) was the first justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to have attended law school. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... Walter Forward (January 24, 1786–November 24, 1852) was an American lawyer and politician. ... John Canfield Spencer (January 8, 1788–May 18, 1855) was an American politician who was Secretary of War from 1841 to 1843 and Secretary of the Treasury from 1843 to 1844 under President John Tyler. ... George Mortimer Bibb (October 30, 1776–April 14, 1859) was an American politician. ... Robert John Walker (July 23, 1801–November 11, 1869) was an American economist and statesman. ... Thomas Corwin, also known as Tom Corwin and The Wagon Boy (July 29, 1794 – December 18, 1865) was a politician from the state of Ohio who served as a prosecuting attorney, a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, United States House of Representatives, and United States Senate, and as... James Guthrie (December 5, 1792 – March 3, 1869) was an American businessman and politician. ... Howell Cobb (September 7, 1815–October 9, 1868) was an American political figure. ... Philip Francis Thomas (September 12, 1810 – October 2, 1890) was an American lawyer and politician. ... John Adams Dix (July 24, 1798 – April 21, 1879) was an American politician from New York. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806 – September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... George Sewall Boutwell (January 28, 1818–February 27, 1905) was an American statesman who served as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Ulysses S. Grant. ... William Adams Richardson (November 2, 1821–October 19, 1896) was an American judge and politician. ... Benjamin Helm Bristow (June 20, 1832–June 22, 1896) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the first Solicitor General of the United States and as a U.S. Treasury Secretary. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... William Windom (May 10, 1827–January 29, 1891) was an American politician. ... Charles James Folger (April 16, 1818–September 4, American politician, jurist and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. ... Walter Quintin Gresham (March 17, 1832–May 28, 1895) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... Daniel Manning (May 16, 1831–December 24, 1887) was an American businessman and politician. ... Charles Stebbins Fairchild (April 30, 1842–November 24, American businessman and politician. ... William Windom (May 10, 1827–January 29, 1891) was an American politician. ... Charles Foster Charles Foster (April 12, 1828–January 9, 1904) was a U.S. Republican politician from Ohio. ... John G. Carlisle (September 5, 1834 - July 31, 1910) was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party during the last quarter of the 19th century. ... Lyman Judson Gage Lyman Judson Gage (June 28, 1836–January 26, 1927) was an American financier and Presidential Cabinet officer. ... Leslie Mortimer Shaw (November 2, 1848–March 28, 1932) was an American businessman, lawyer and politician. ... G.B. Cortelyou Brian William Cortelyou (July 26, 1862–October 23, 1940) was an American Presidential Cabinet secretary of the early 20th century. ... Franklin MacVeagh (November 22, 1837–July 6, 1934) was an American banker and Treasury Secretary. ... William Gibbs McAdoo (October 31, 1863–February 1, 1941) was a U.S. Senator and United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... David Franklin Houston (February 17, 1866–September 2, 1940) was an American academic, businessman and politician. ... Andrew William Mellon (March 24, 1855 — August 27, 1937) was an American banker, industrialist, philanthropist, art collector and Secretary of the Treasury from March 4, 1921 until February 12, 1932. ... Ogden Livingston Mills (August 23, 1884–October 11, 1937) was an American businessman and politician. ... Woodin, 1933, Time Woodins signature, as used on American currency William Hartman Woodin (1868–1934) was a U.S. industrialist. ... Henry Morgenthau Jr. ... Frederick Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890 – September 8, 1953) served the United States in all three branches of government. ... Portrait of John W. Snyder U.S. Secretary of the Treasury painted by Greta Kempton. ... Humphreys signature, as used on American currency George Magoffin Humphrey (March 8, 1890–January 20, 1970) was an American lawyer, businessman and Cabinet secretary. ... Robert Bernard Anderson Andersons signature, as used on American currency Robert Bernard Anderson (June 4, 1910–August 14, 1989) was a U.S. administrator and businessman. ... Dillons signature, as used on American currency Clarence Douglas Dillon (August 21, 1909 – January 10, 2003) son of Clarence and Ann (Douglass) Dillon, was U.S. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to France (1953-1957) and 57th secretary of the United States Department of the Treasury (1961-1965). ... }} Henry Hammill Fowler (September 5, 1908–January 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Joseph Walker Barr (January 17, 1918–February 23, 1996) was an American businessman and politician. ... For the American historian, see David M. Kennedy (historian). ... John Bowden Connally, Jr. ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ... William Edward Simon (November 27, 1927–June 3, 2000) became the 63rd Secretary of the Treasury on May 8, 1974, during the Nixon administration. ... W. Michael Blumenthal Blumenthals signature, as used on American currency Werner Michael Blumenthal (born January 3, 1926) served as United States Secretary of the Treasury under President Jimmy Carter from 1977-1979. ... Chairman Miller, Time, 1978 Millers signature, as used on American currency George William Miller (March 9, 1925 – March 17, 2006) served as the 65th United States Secretary of the Treasury under President Carter from August 6, 1979 to January 20, 1981. ... Donald Thomas Regan (December 21, 1918 – June 10, 2003) was the 66th United States Secretary of the Treasury, from 1981 to 1985, and Chief of Staff from 1985 to 1987 in the Ronald Reagan Administration, where he advocated Reaganomics and tax cuts to create jobs and stimulate production. ... James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930) served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush. ... Nicholas F. Brady Bradys signature, as used on American currency Nicholas Frederick Brady (born April 11, 1930, in New York City) was United States Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, and is also known for articulating the Brady Plan in March 1989. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Robert Edward Rubin (born August 29, 1938) is the Chairman of Citigroup. ... Lawrence Henry Larry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist and academic. ... Paul Henry ONeill (born December 4, 1935) served as the 72nd United States Secretary of the Treasury for part of President George W. Bushs first Administration. ... John W. Snow John William Snow, Ph. ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

 
 

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