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Encyclopedia > William Livingston
William Livingston
William Livingston

William Livingston (November 30, 1723July 25, 1790) served as the Governor of New Jersey (1776–1790) during the American Revolution and was a signer of the United States Constitution. His grandfather, Robert Livingston the Elder, was a son of the Rev John Livingston a lineal descendant of the fifth Lord Livingston. He was the Brother of Philip Livingston and cousin of Robert R. Livingston, the Chancellor, as well as the grandson of Albany, New York mayor, Pieter Van Brugh. Image File history File links William_Livingston. ... Image File history File links William_Livingston. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... The American Revolution was a political movement that in 1776 created a new nation, the United States of America, ending British control. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Robert Livingston the Elder (1654 - 1728), was a New York colonial official, and first lord of Livingston Manor. ... The titles of Earl of Linlithgow and Lord Livingston and Calendar were created in the Peerage of Scotland in 1600 for the Lord Livingston (a title dating to 1458). ... Philip Livingston Philip Livingston (January 15, 1716 – June 12, 1778), was an American merchant and statesman from New York City. ... Robert R. Livingston (November 27, 1746 - February 26, 1813), of New York, was a delegate to the New York state constitutional convention and a member of the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence, although he was recalled by his state before he could sign it. ... Flag Seal Location Location in Albany County and the State of New York Coordinates , Government Country   State     County United States   New York     Albany Founded Incorporated 1614 1686 Mayor Gerald D. Jennings Geographical characteristics Area     City 56. ... Pieter Van Brugh (1666–July 1740) was the Mayor of Albany, New York from 1699 to 1700 and from 1721 to 1723. ...


Livingston was born in Albany, of Scottish descent, and was raised by his grandmother until the age of 14. He graduated from Yale University in 1741 and then studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1748 and began his practice in New York. He moved to Elizabethtown, New Jersey in 1772, where he built a large country home to house his growing family. The house, known as Liberty Hall, still stands today. Yale redirects here. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... Map of Elizabeth in Union County Union County Court House Elizabeth is a City in Union County, New Jersey, in the United States. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ...


The home became a center of activity, in part due to its proximity to Francis Barber's academy and visits from young men. (Alexander Hamilton, a boarder at the academy, was a frequent early visitor.) Three of Livingston's daughters — Sarah, Susan, and Catherine — came to be known as 'the three graces'. The height of social activity during this era was the wedding, at Liberty Hall, in April 1774 of Sarah to a young New York lawyer, John Jay. Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 — July 12, 1804) was an American politician, leading statesman, financier, intellectual, military officer, and founder of the Federalist party. ... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, writer, and a jurist. ...


Livingston was a member of the Continental Congress from July 1774 to June 1776. In October 1775, he was commissioned a brigadier general of the New Jersey Militia and served until August 1776 when he was elected Governor of New Jersey — holding the office until his death in 1790. For much of the time between 1776 and 1779, the family was located in Parsippany for safety. Liberty Hall was frequently visited by British troops or naval forces since there was a substantial reward for Livingston's capture. The family returned in 1779 to begin restoring their looted home. Livingston's daughter, Susannah, married John Cleves Symmes in 1780 and became the stepmother-in-law of President William Henry Harrison. A descendant of William Livingston was Julia Kean, mother of New York Governor / Congressman Hamilton Fish. William Livingston's sister Sarah was married to Continental General William Alexander (aka Lord Stirling); their daughter was married to William Duer (1747-1799) and became the parents of William Alexander Duer and the grandparents of William Duer (1805-1879). The Continental Congress is the label given to three successive bodies of representatives: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774 to October 26, 1774. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Parsippany-Troy Hills Township is a township located in Morris County, New Jersey. ... John Cleves Symmes (1742-1814) was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and later a pioneer in the Northwest Territory. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States, (1841). ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Hamilton Fish Hamilton Fish, (3 August 1808–7 September 1893), born in New York City, was an American statesman who served as Governor of New York, United States Senator and United States Secretary of State. ... William Alexander (born 1726 in New York, died 1783 in Albany, New York) was an American major general during the American Revolutionary War. ... For other men with this name, see the disambiguation page: William Duer. ... For other men with similar names, see the disambiguation page: William Duer. ... For other men with this name, see the disambiguation page: William Duer. ...


Livingson was a delegate to the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and one of the signers of the Constitution. Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


Livingston was originally buried in Trinity Church, New York, but was reinterred at Green-Wood Cemetery, in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, in 1846. Trinity Church Close-up of Trinity Church Trinity Church, at the corner of Broadway and Wall Street in New York City, viewed from the World Trade Center A glimpse of New York from Trinity Church steeple. ... The Chapel at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn NY Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Brooklyn, New York, several blocks west of Prospect Park. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps image_skyline = Top_of_Rock_Cropped. ... Brooklyn (named for the Dutch city Breukelen) is one of the five boroughs of New York City. ...


Because he was the first Revolutionary governor, he is often cited as the first governor of New Jersey. The current numbering of New Jersey governors reflects this.


External links

  • Biographic sketch at U.S. Congress website
  • New Jersey State Library biography of William Livingston
Preceded by:
William Franklin
(the last Royal Governor of New Jersey)
New Jersey Governor
1776–1790
Succeeded by:
Elisha Lawrence

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Livingston - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (540 words)
William Livingston (November 30, 1723 – July 25, 1790) served as the Governor of New Jersey (1776–1790) during the American Revolution and was a signer of the United States Constitution.
William Livingston's sister Sarah was married to Continental General William Alexander (aka Lord Stirling); their daughter was married to William Duer (1747-1799) and became the parents of William Alexander Duer and the grandparents of William Duer (1805-1879).
Livingson was a delegate to the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and one of the signers of the Constitution.
WILLIAM LIVINGSTON (1725 words)
William Livingston, who represented New Jersey at the Constitutional Convention, was one of the new nation's authentic renaissance figures.
William Livingston received his primary education in local schools and from private tutors, but his horizons were considerably expanded at the age of fourteen when his family sent him to live for a year with a missionary among the Iroquois Indians in the wilds of the Mohawk Valley.
In 1748 Livingston was admitted to the bar and opened a practice in the city, a year after marrying the daughter of a wealthy New Jersey landowner.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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