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Encyclopedia > William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
The Viscount Melbourne
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne
27th Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
30th Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
In office
July, 1834 – November, 1834
April, 1835 – August, 1841
Preceded by The Earl Grey
Sir Robert Peel, Bt
Succeeded by The Duke of Wellington
Sir Robert Peel, Bt
Born 15 March 1779
London
Died 24 November 1848
Political party Whig
Arms of Lord Melbourne
Enlarge
Arms of Lord Melbourne

William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, PC (15 March 177924 November 1848) was a British Whig statesman who served as Home Secretary (1830-1834) and Prime Minister (1834 and 1835-1841), and a mentor of Queen Victoria. William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne Image source: http://rurikovichi. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the head of Her Majestys Government and so exercises many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the head of Her Majestys Government and so exercises many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The Right Honourable Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC (13 March 1764–17 July 1845), known as Viscount Howick between 1806 and 1807, was a British Whig statesman and Prime Minister. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (75th in Leap years). ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... London is the capital city of England and of the United Kingdom, and is the most populous city in the European Union. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Image File history File links Arms of William Lamb This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Image File history File links Arms of William Lamb This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (75th in Leap years). ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The term statesman is a respectful term used to refer to diplomats, politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, known as the Home Secretary, is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order (except in Scotland). ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the head of Her Majestys Government and so exercises many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from January 1, 1877, until her death in 1901. ...


Born in London to an aristocratic Whig family and educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, he fell in with a group of Romantic Radicals that included Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron. In 1805 he succeeded his elder brother as heir to his father's title and, now known as Lord Melbourne, he married Lady Caroline Ponsonby. The next year he was elected to the British House of Commons as the Whig MP for Leominster. London is the capital city of England and of the United Kingdom, and is the most populous city in the European Union. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a prestigious and internationally known Public School for boys. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Percy Bysshe Shelley Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets who wrote in the English language. ... Lord Byron, Anglo-Scottish poet George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron (January 22, 1788–April 19, 1824) was an Anglo-Scottish poet and a leading figure in Romanticism. ... Lady Caroline Lamb (1785-1828) was an English aristocrat, the only daughter of the Frederick Ponsonby, 3rd Earl of Bessborough and Henrietta Ponsonby, the Countess. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Location within the British Isles For the town of Leominster, Massachusetts, see Leominster, Massachusetts. ...


He first came to general notice for reasons he would rather have avoided: his wife had a public affair with Lord Byron — she coined the famous characterisation of him as "mad, bad, and dangerous to know". The resulting scandal was the talk of Britain in 1812. Eventually the two reconciled and though they separated in 1825, her death (1828) affected him considerably.


Lamb's hallmark was finding the middle ground. Though a Whig, he accepted the post of Irish Secretary (1827) in the moderate Tory governments of George Canning and Lord Goderich. Upon the death of his father in 1828 and his becoming Viscount Melbourne, he moved to the House of Lords, but when the Whigs came to power under Lord Grey in November 1830 he became Home Secretary in the new government. George Canning (April 11, 1770 - August 8, 1827) was a British politician who served as Foreign Secretary and, briefly, Prime Minister. ... The Right Honourable Frederick John Robinson, 1st Earl of Ripon PC (November 1, 1782 – January 28, 1859), Frederick John Robinson until 1827, The Viscount Goderich 1827–1833, and The Earl of Ripon 1833 onwards, was a British statesman and Prime Minister (when he was known as Lord Goderich). ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Right Honourable Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC (13 March 1764–17 July 1845), known as Viscount Howick between 1806 and 1807, was a British Whig statesman and Prime Minister. ...


Again, compromise was the key to Melbourne's actions. He was opposed to the radical governmental reforms proposed by the Whigs, but rather than forcing a breach he worked from within the party to prevent passage of the Reform Act 1832. Although he was unsuccessful in this, when Lord Grey resigned (July 1834), Melbourne was widely seen as the most acceptable replacement among the Whig leaders, and became Prime Minister. The Reform Act of 1832 (known also as the Great Reform Act and The Parliamentary Reform Act 1832) introduced wide-ranging changes to electoral franchise legislation in the United Kingdom. ...


King William IV's opposition to the Whigs' reforming ways led him to dismiss Melbourne in November. He then gave the Tories under Robert Peel an opportunity to form a government. Peel's failure to win a House of Commons majority in the resulting general election (January 1835) made it impossible for him to govern, and the Whigs returned to power under Melbourne in April 1835. This was the last time a British monarch attempted to dismiss a prime minister. William IV (William Henry) (21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ...


The next year, Melbourne was once again involved in a sex scandal. This time he was the victim of attempted blackmail from the husband of a female friend. The husband demanded £1400, and when he was turned down he accused Melbourne of having an affair with his wife. In Victorian times even one sexual scandal (like the one two decades earlier involving Lord Byron) would be enough to finish off the career of most men, so it is a measure of the respect contemporaries had for his integrity that Melbourne's government did not fall. After Norton was unable to produce any evidence of an affair, the scandal died away.


Melbourne was Prime Minister when Queen Victoria came to the throne (June 1837). Barely eighteen, she was only just breaking free from the somewhat malevolent influence of her mother, the Duchess of Kent, and her mother's advisor, John Conroy. Over the next four years Melbourne trained her in the art of politics and the two became friends: Victoria was quoted as saying she considered him like a father (her own had died when she was only eight months old), and Melbourne's grown son had died recently. Melbourne was given a private apartment at Windsor Castle, and unfounded rumours circulated for a time that Victoria would marry Melbourne, forty years her senior. Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from January 1, 1877, until her death in 1901. ... Sir John Conroy, 1st Baronet (21 October 1786 – 2 March 1854) was an Irish soldier and adventurer who served as Comptroller of the Household of Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, the Duchess of Kent, the mother of the future Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and widow of Prince Edward... Windsor Castle: The Round Tower or keep dominating the castle, as seen from the River Thames. ...


In May 1839 the Bedchamber Crisis occurred when Melbourne tried to resign and Victoria rejected the request of prospective Tory prime minister Robert Peel that she dismiss some of the wives and daughters of Whig MPs who made up her personal entourage. As monarch she was expected to avoid any hint of favouritism to a party out of power, so her action (which was supported by the Whigs) led to Peel's refusal to form a new government. Melbourne was eventually persuaded to stay on as Prime Minister. The Bedchamber crisis (May 1839) is the unofficial name for the crisis that took place under Queen Victoria during a change of Her Majestys government. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ...


Even after Melbourne resigned permanently in August 1841, Victoria continued writing to him. This too was forbidden, however, for the same reasons as before, and eventually the correspondence was forced to an end. Melbourne's role faded away as Victoria came to rely on her new husband Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg as well as on herself. Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ...


Melbourne left a considerable list of reforming legislation - not as long as that of Lord Grey, but worthy in its own right. Among his administration's acts were a reduction in the number of capital offences, reform of the Poor laws, and reforms of local government. The Poor Law was the system for the provision of social security in operation in England and the rest of the United Kingdom from the 16th century until the establishment of the Welfare State in the 20th century. ...


Melbourne's most lasting memorial is the city of Melbourne, Australia, which was named after him in 1837. Melbourne is the state capital and largest city in the Australian state of Victoria, and the second-largest city in Australia, with a population of approximately 3. ...


Melbourne's Governments

Political Offices
Preceded by:
Henry Goulburn
Chief Secretary for Ireland
1827–1828
Succeeded by:
The Lord Francis Leveson-Gower
Preceded by:
Sir Robert Peel, Bt
Home Secretary
1830–1834
Succeeded by:
Viscount Duncannon
Preceded by:
The Earl Grey
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1834
Succeeded by:
The Duke of Wellington (caretaker, followed by)
Sir Robert Peel, Bt
Leader of the House of Lords
1834
Succeeded by:
The Duke of Wellington
Preceded by:
Sir Robert Peel, Bt
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1835–1841
Succeeded by:
Sir Robert Peel, Bt
Preceded by:
The Duke of Wellington
Leader of the House of Lords
1835–1841
Succeeded by:
The Duke of Wellington
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by:
Peniston Lamb
Viscount Melbourne Succeeded by:
Frederick Lamb
Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom Flag of the United Kingdom
Walpole, Wilmington, Pelham, Newcastle, Devonshire, Newcastle, Bute, G Grenville, Rockingham, Chatham, Grafton, North, Rockingham, Shelburne, Portland, Pitt the Younger, Addington, Pitt the Younger, W Grenville, Portland, Perceval, Liverpool, Canning, Goderich, Wellington, Grey, Melbourne, Peel, Melbourne, Peel, Russell, Derby, Aberdeen, Palmerston, Derby, Palmerston, Russell, Derby, Disraeli, Gladstone, Disraeli, Gladstone, Salisbury, Gladstone, Salisbury, Gladstone, Rosebery, Salisbury, Balfour, Campbell-Bannerman, Asquith, Lloyd George, Bonar Law, Baldwin, MacDonald, Baldwin, MacDonald, Baldwin, Chamberlain, Churchill, Attlee, Churchill, Eden, Macmillan, Douglas-Home, Wilson, Heath, Wilson, Callaghan, Thatcher, Major, Blair

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (944 words)
William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, PC (15 March 1779–24 November 1848) was a British Whig statesman who served as Home Secretary (1830-1834) and Prime Minister (1834 and 1835-1841), and a mentor of Queen Victoria.
Melbourne was given a private apartment at Windsor Castle, and unfounded rumours circulated for a time that Victoria would marry Melbourne, forty years her senior.
Melbourne's role faded away as Victoria came to rely on her new husband Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg as well as on herself.
William Lamb, the 2nd Viscount Melbourne, 1779-1848 (2094 words)
However Lamb also had a conservative streak and never adapted to the radical wing of the Whig party which was evolving in the early nineteenth century and which stood for Church, educational, social, and parliamentary reform.
Melbourne was a reluctant supporter of the 1832 parliamentary Reform Bill that increased the franchise and removed some "rotten boroughs" -- parliamentary districts with small malleable electorates under the control of a special interest.
Melbourne was not forceful enough in suggesting the Queen comply with Peel and overly associated her with the Whig Party.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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