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Encyclopedia > William Kidd
For the 1945 film starring Charles Laughton, see Captain Kidd (1945 film)
William Kidd
c. 1645May 23, 1701
Image:William Kidd.jpg
William Kidd
Type: Privateer
Place of birth: Greenock, Scotland
Place of death: Wapping, England
Allegiance: Kingdom of England

William "Captain" Kidd (c. 1645May 23, 1701)[1] was a Scottish sailor remembered for his trial and execution for piracy after returning from a voyage to the Indian Ocean. Some modern historians deem his piratical reputation unjust, as there is evidence that Kidd acted only as a privateer. Kidd's fame springs largely from the sensational circumstances of his questioning before the English Parliament and the ensuing trial. His actual depredations on the high seas, whether piratical or not, were both less destructive and less lucrative than those of many other contemporary pirates and privateers. William Bill Kidd is a musician, conductor, composer, and orchestrator. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... Captain Kidd is a 1945 film, starring Charles Laughton, Randolph Scott, Barbara Britton, and John Carradine, directed by Rowland V. Lee, produced by Benedict Bogeaus and James Nasser, and released by United Artists. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... For other uses, see Greenock (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... This article is about the country. ... Look up trial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Execution is a synonym for the actioning of something, of putting something into effect. ... This article is about maritime piracy. ... For other uses, see Privateer (disambiguation). ... The English parliament in front of the King, c. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Preparing his expedition

On December 11, 1695, Coote, who was now governing New York, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire, asked the "trusty and well beloved Captain Kidd"[2] to attack Thomas Tew, John Ireland, Thomas Wake, William Maze, and all others who associated themselves with pirates, along with any enemy French ships. This request preceded the voyage which established Kidd's reputation as a pirate, and marked his image in history and folklore. is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... The flag of Thomas Tew Thomas Tew aka the Rhode Island Pirate. ... This article is about the English composer. ... Thomas Wake (1297 - May 31, 1349), English baron, belonged to a Lincolnshire family which had lands also in Cumberland, being the son of John Wake (d. ... The word Voyage may mean: The PC Game Voyage: Inspired by Jules Verne The Musical Group Voyage - Disco Group ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Four-fifths of the cost for the venture was paid for by noble lords, who were among the most powerful men in England: the Earl of Orford, The Baron of Romney, the Duke of Shrewsbury and Sir John Somers. Kidd was presented with a letter of marque, signed personally by King William III of England. This letter reserved 10% of the loot for the Crown, and Henry Gilbert's The Book of Pirates suggests that the King may have fronted some of the money for the voyage himself. Kidd and an acquaintance, Colonel Robert Livingston, orchestrated the whole plan and paid for the rest. Kidd had to sell his ship Antigua to raise funds. Admiral Edward Russell, 1st Earl of Orford, 1653–1727 by Thomas Gibson, painted c. ... Charles Talbot, 1st Duke of Shrewsbury ( 24 July 1660 – 1 February 1718), was the only son of Francis Talbot, 11th Earl of Shrewsbury and his second wife, Anne-Marie Brudenell, a daughter of Robert Brudenell, 2nd Earl of Cardigan; (she became the notorious mistress of the 2nd Duke of Buckingham... John Somers, 1st Baron Somers (4 March 1651–26 April 1716), was Lord Chancellor of England under King William III. He was born near Worcester, the eldest son of John Somers, an attorney in large practice in that town, who had formerly fought on the side of the Parliament, and... For the Patrick OBrian novel, see The Letter of Marque. ... William III (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702) was the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots (under the name William II) from... Robert Livingston the Elder (December 13, 1654 – October 1, 1728) was a New York colonial official, and first lord of Livingston Manor. ...


The new ship, the Adventure Galley,[3] was well suited to the task of catching pirates; weighing over 284 tons, it was equipped with 34 cannons, oars, and 150 men. The oars were a key advantage as they would enable the Adventure Galley to maneuver in a battle when the winds had calmed and other ships were dead in the water. Kidd took pride in personally selecting the crew, choosing only those he deemed to be the best and most loyal officers. Adventure Galley was a three-mast battleship used by Captain Kidd. ... Tonnage is a measure of the size or cargo capacity of a ship. ... Firing of a 18-pounder aboard of French ship During the Age of Sail, when large, sail-powered wooden naval warships dominated the high seas (roughly: 1571-1863), these warships mounted a bewildering variety of different types and sizes of cannons as their main armament. ...

As the Adventure Galley sailed down the Thames, Kidd unaccountably failed to salute a Navy yacht at Greenwich as custom dictated. The Navy yacht then fired a shot to make him show respect, and Kidd’s crew… responded with an astounding display of impudence — by turning and slapping their backsides in [disdain].[4]

Because of his crew's refusal to salute, the Adventure Galley was stopped by the H.M.S. Duchess, whose captain was offended by Kidd's failure to fire the customary salute in response to his vessel's presence, and he retaliated by pressing much of Kidd's crew into naval service, this despite rampant protests. Thus short-handed, Kidd sailed for New York City, capturing a French vessel en route (which was legal under the terms of his commission). To make up for the lack of officers, Kidd picked up replacement crew in New York, the vast majority of whom were known and hardened criminals, some undoubtedly former pirates. Adventure Galley was a three-mast battleship used by Captain Kidd. ... Look up Impressment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Among Kidd's officers was his quartermaster, Hendrick van der Heul. The quartermaster was considered 'second in command' to the captain in pirate culture of this era. It is not clear, however, if van der Heul exercised this degree of responsibility because Kidd was nominally a privateer. Van der Heul is also noteworthy because he may have been African or of African-American descent. A contemporary source describes him as a "small black Man." However, the meaning of this term is not certain as, in late seventeenth-century usage, the phrase "black Man" could mean either black-skinned or black-haired. If van der Heul was indeed of African ancestry, this fact would make him the highest ranking black pirate so far identified. Van der Heul went on to become a master's mate on a merchant vessel, and was never convicted of piracy. Quartermaster is a term usually referring to a military unit which specializes in supplying and provisioning troops, or to an individual who does the same. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


Hunting for pirates

In September 1696, Kidd weighed anchor and set course for the Cape of Good Hope. However, more bad luck struck, and a third of his crew soon perished on the Comoros due to an outbreak of cholera. To make matters worse, the brand-new ship developed many leaks, and he failed to find the pirates he expected to encounter off Madagascar. Kidd then sailed to the Strait of Bab-el-Mandeb at the southern entrance of the Red Sea, one of the most popular haunts of rovers on the Pirate Round. Here he again failed to find any pirates. According to Edward Barlow, a captain employed by the British East India Company, Kidd attacked a Mughal convoy here under escort by Barlow's East Indiaman, and was beaten off. If the report is true, this marked Kidd's first foray into piracy. The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ... For other uses, see Cape of Good Hope (disambiguation). ... This article is about good and bad fortune. ... Cholera (or Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera) is an extreme diarrheal disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ... The Bab-el-Mandeb (Arabic for the gate of tears) is the strait separating the continents of Asia (Yemen on the Arabian Peninsula) and Africa (Somalia on the Horn of Africa), connecting the Red Sea to the Indian Ocean (Gulf of Aden). ... Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ... The Pirate Round was a sailing route followed by certain Anglo-American pirates, mainly during the late 17th century. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... An East Indiaman was a ship belonging to the British East India Company. ...


As it became obvious his ambitious enterprise was failing, he became understandably desperate to cover its costs. But, once again, Kidd failed to attack several ships when given a chance, including a Dutchman and New York privateer. Some of the crew deserted Kidd the next time the Adventure Galley anchored offshore, and those who decided to stay behind made constant open-threats of mutiny. For other uses, see Coercion (disambiguation). ... Mutiny AKA. Matt Daye Is A conspiracy among members of a group of similarly-situated individuals (typically members of the military; or the crew of any ship, even if they are civilians) to openly oppose, change or overthrow an existing authority. ...

Howard Pyle's fanciful painting of Kidd and his ship, the Adventure Galley, in New York Harbor.
Howard Pyle's fanciful painting of Kidd and his ship, the Adventure Galley, in New York Harbor.

Kidd killed one of his own crewmen on October 30, 1697. While Kidd's gunner, William Moore, was on deck sharpening a chisel, a Dutch ship hove in sight. Moore urged Kidd to attack the Dutchman, an act not only piratical but also certain to anger the Dutch-born King William. Kidd refused, calling Moore a lousy dog. Moore retorted, "If I am a lousy dog, you have made me so; you have brought me to ruin and many more." Kidd snatched up and heaved an ironbound bucket at Moore. Moore fell to the deck with a fractured skull and died the following day.[5] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 383 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1840 × 2880 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 383 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1840 × 2880 pixel, file size: 1. ... New York Harbor, a geographic term, refers collectively to the rivers, bays, and tidal estuaries near the mouth of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher... This article is about the tool. ... A skull fracture is a break in one or more of the bones in the skull caused by a head injury. ...


While seventeenth century English admiralty law allowed captains great leeway in using violence against their crew, outright murder was not permitted. But Kidd seemed unconcerned, later explaining to his surgeon that he had "good friends in England, that will bring me off for that." Admiralty law (also referred to as maritime law) is a distinct body of law which governs maritime questions and offenses. ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ...


Accusations of piracy

Acts of savagery on Kidd’s part were reported by escaped prisoners, who told stories of being hoisted up by the arms and drubbed with a naked cutlass. In truth, many of these acts were committed by his disobedient and mutinous crew. On one occasion, crewmembers ransacked the trading ship, Mary and tortured several of its crewmembers while Kidd and the other captain, Thomas Parker conversed privately in Kidd's cabin. When Kidd found out what had happened, he was outraged and forced his men to return most of the stolen property. Beating up is systematic punching, or hitting with a blunt instrument, many times, with the design or effect of causing much pain. ... French naval cutlass of the 19th Century A cutlass is a short, thick saber or slashing sword, with a straight or slightly curved blade sharpened on the cutting edge, and a hilt often featuring a solid cupped or basket-shaped guard. ...


Kidd was declared a pirate very early in his voyage by a Royal Navy officer to whom he had promised "thirty men or so".[6] Kidd sailed away during the night to preserve his crew, rather than subject them to Royal Navy impressment. Look up Impressment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


On January 30, 1698, he raised French colors and took his greatest prize, an Armenian ship, the 400 ton Quedah Merchant,[7][8] which was loaded with satins, muslins, gold, silver, an incredible variety of East Indian merchandise, as well as extremely valuable silks. The captain of the Quedah Merchant was an Englishman named Wright, who had purchased passes from the French East India Company promising him the protection of the French Crown. After realizing the captain of the taken vessel was an Englishman, Kidd tried to persuade his crew to return the ship to its owners, but they refused, claiming that their prey was perfectly legal as Kidd was commissioned to take French ships, and that an Armenian ship counted as French if it had French passes. In an attempt to maintain his tenuous control over his crew, Kidd relented and kept the prize. When this news reached England, it confirmed Kidd's reputation as a pirate, and various naval commanders were ordered to "pursue and seize the said Kidd and his accomplices" for the "notorious piracies"[9] they had committed. is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... Satin used in bedding Structure of silk satin Look up Satin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Muslin is a type of finely-woven cotton fabric, introduced to Europe from the Middle East in the 17th century. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and South-East Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Maldives, and... In marketing, a product is anything that can be offered to a market that might satisfy a want or need. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ...


Kidd kept the French passes of the Quedah Merchant, as well as the vessel itself. While the passes were at best a dubious defense of his capture, British admiralty and vice-admiralty courts (especially in North America) heretofore had often winked at privateers' excesses into piracy, and Kidd may have been hoping that the passes would provide the legal fig leaf that would allow him to keep the Quedah Merchant and her cargo. Renaming the seized merchantman the Adventure Prize, he set sail for Madagascar.


On April 1, 1698, Kidd reached Madagascar. Here he found the first pirate of his voyage, Robert Culliford, (the same man who had stolen Kidd’s ship years before) and his crew aboard the Mocha Frigate. Probably realizing that his men would not attack Culliford's powerful vessel if ordered, Kidd anchored near the Mocha Frigate and made peaceful overtures to Culliford, promising him that he meant his fellow pirate no harm. Most of Kidd's men now abandoned him for Culliford. Only 13 remained with the Adventure Galley. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... Robert Culliford was an English pirate who was the former first mate of Captain William Kidd before spearheading a mutiny to steal Kidds first ship and crew. ...


Deciding to return home, Kidd left the Adventure Galley behind, ordering her to be burnt because she had become worm-eaten and leaky. By burning the ship, he was able to salvage every last scrap of metal, for example hinges. With the loyal remnant of his crew, he returned home aboard the Adventure Prize. Adventure Galley was a three-mast battleship used by Captain Kidd. ...


Trial

Prior to Kidd returning to New York City, he learned that he was a wanted pirate, and that several English men-of-war were searching for him. Realizing that the Adventure Prize was a marked vessel, he cached it in the Caribbean Sea and continued toward New York aboard a sloop. He deposited some of his treasure on Gardiners Island, hoping to use his knowledge of its location as a bargaining tool with Bellomont. A man of war (also man-of-war, man-o-war or simply man) is an armed naval vessel. ... Map of Central America and the Caribbean The Caribbean Sea (pronounced or ) is a tropical sea in the Western Hemisphere, part of the Atlantic Ocean, southeast of the Gulf of Mexico. ... Gardiners Island Gardiners Island is a small island, approximately 5 sq mi (13 km²) in eastern Suffolk County in the U.S. state of New York. ...


Bellomont (an investor) was away in Boston, Massachusetts. Aware of the accusations against Kidd, Bellomont was justifiably afraid of being implicated in piracy himself, and knew that presenting Kidd to England in chains was his best chance to save his own neck. He lured Kidd into Boston with false promises of clemency[10], then ordered him arrested on July 6, 1699. Kidd was placed in Stone Prison, spending most of the time in solitary confinement. His wife, Sarah, was also imprisoned. The conditions of Kidd's imprisonment were extremely harsh, and appear to have driven him at least temporarily insane. Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... Solitary confinement, colloquially referred to as the hole (or in British English the block), is a punishment in which a prisoner is denied contact with any other persons, excluding guards, chaplains and doctors. ...


He was eventually (after over a year) sent to England for questioning by Parliament. The new Tory ministry hoped to use Kidd as a tool to discredit the Whigs who had backed him, but Kidd refused to name names, naively confident his patrons would reward his loyalty by interceding on his behalf. Finding Kidd politically useless, the Tory leaders sent him to stand trial before the High Court of Admiralty in London for the charges of piracy on high seas and the murder of William Moore. Whilst awaiting trial, Kidd was confined in the infamous Newgate Prison and wrote several letters to King William requesting clemency. The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Admiralty courts, also known as maritime courts, are courts exercising jurisdiction over all maritime contracts, torts, injuries and offences. ... Newgate, the old city gate and prison. ...


Kidd was tried without representation, and was shocked to learn at his trial that he was charged with murder. He was found guilty on all charges (murder and five counts of piracy). He was hanged on May 23, 1701, at 'Execution Dock', Wapping, in London. During the execution, the hangman's rope broke and Kidd was hanged on the second attempt. His body was gibbeted — left to hang in an iron cage over the River Thames, London, as a warning to future would-be pirates for two years. Hanging is the suspension of a person by a ligature, usually a cord wrapped around the neck, causing death. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... The Execution Dock was located on the Thames in the Wapping area of London, England. ... Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Gibbet is a term applied to several different devices used in the capital punishment of criminals and/or the deterrence of potential criminals. ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ...


His associates Richard Barleycorn, Robert Lamley, William Jenkins, Gabriel Loffe, Able Owens, and Hugh Parrot were convicted, but pardoned just prior to hanging at Execution Dock.


Kidd's Whig backers were embarrassed by his trial. Far from rewarding his loyalty, they participated in the effort to convict him by depriving him of the money and information which might have provided him with some legal defense. In particular, the two sets of French passes he had kept were missing at his trial. These passes (and others dated 1700) resurfaced in the early twentieth century, misfiled with other government papers in a London building. These passes call the extent of Kidd's guilt into question. Along with the papers, many goods were brought from the ships and soon auctioned off as "pirate plunder." They were never mentioned in the trial. Nevertheless, none of these items would have prevented his conviction for murdering Moore. The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Mythology and legend

The belief that Kidd had left a buried treasure somewhere, contributed considerably to the growth of his legend. This belief had made its contributions to literature in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Gold-Bug", Washington Irving's The Devil and Tom Walker , Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island and Nelson DeMille's Plum Island. It also gave impetus to the never-ending treasure hunts conducted on Oak Island in Nova Scotia, in Suffolk County, Long Island in New York where Gardiner's Island is located, Charles Island in Milford, Connecticut, and in the Thimble Islands in Connecticut. For other uses, see Treasure (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The Gold-Bug is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, set on Sullivans Island, South Carolina. ... Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American author of the early 19th century. ... The Devil and Tom Walker is a short story by Washington Irving that first appeared in his 1824 collection of stories and sketches It was part of the Money-Diggers portion. ... Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet and travel writer, and a representative of neo-romanticism in English literature. ... For other uses, see Treasure Island (disambiguation). ... Nelson Richard DeMille (born August 23, 1943) is an American author. ... Plum Island is the name given to at least two of the islands located off the northeastern Atlantic Ocean coast of the United States: Plum Island, Massachusetts Plum Island, New York Plum Island is also the title of a novel by Long Island author Nelson DeMille, who uses the island... This article is about the Oak Island in Nova Scotia. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... Suffolk County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... This article is about the state. ... Gardiners Island Gardiners Island is a small island, approximately 5 sq mi (13 km²) in eastern Suffolk County in the U.S. state of New York. ... Charles Island is a 14 acre (57,000 m²) island located roughly 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Map of Thimble Islands The Thimble Islands are an archipelago of small islands in Long Island Sound, in and near the harbor of Stony Creek, Connecticut in the southeast corner of Branford, Connecticut, . Known to the Mattabesec Indians as the beautiful sea rocks, they consist of a jumble of granite... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...


In 1983, American combat photojournalist Cork Graham, and British comedy actor-turned treasure hunter Richard Knight, illegally entered Vietnamese waters in search of treasure supposedly belonging to Captain Kidd. Knight's research began after a disagreement about a map included in The Money Pit Mystery by Rupert Fourneaux. The map, verified as part of Kidd's cache, is labelled "China Sea", yet theorized by Fourneaux to be Oak Island, eventhough the map and Oak Island topography are completely different. Graham and Knight were held for more than a year on trumped up charges of spying for the CIA. [11] A war correspondent is a journalist who covers stories firsthand from a war zone. ... This article is about the Oak Island in Nova Scotia. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ...


Captain Kidd did bury a small cache of treasure on Gardiner's Island in a spot known as Cherry Tree Field; however, it was removed by Governor Bellomont and sent to England to be used as evidence against him.[12] Gardiners Island Gardiners Island is a small island, approximately 5 sq mi (13 km²) in eastern Suffolk County in the U.S. state of New York. ...


Kidd also visited Block Island around 1699, where he was supplied by Mrs. Mercy (Sands) Raymond, daughter of the mariner James Sands. The story has it that, for her hospitality, Mrs. Raymond was bid to hold out her apron, into which Kidd threw gold and jewels until it was full. After her husband Joshua Raymond died, Mercy removed with her family to northern New London, Connecticut (later Montville), where she bought much land. The Raymond family was thus said to have been "enriched by the apron".[13] Southeast Light, a famous Block Island landmark Block Island, shown in red, off the coast of the State of Rhode Island. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ...


There is also a mention of Kidd attacking one of the Japanese islands of the Tokara archipelago, south of Kagoshima. It is the most southern island named Takarajima. The legend says that all the pirates requested food and cattle from the inhabitants of the island. Their offer was refused and thus 23 of the pirates landed and burned alive the inhabitants in a lime cave, while after, Kidd has hidden his treasure in one of the caves, for which he has never come back due to his execution in England. The Tokara Islands (吐噶喇列島 or トカラ列島, tokara rettō) is a group of islands in the northern part of the Nansei Islands (encompassing the Ryukyu islands), belonging to Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. ... Kagoshima Prefecture ) is located on Kyūshū island, Japan. ... Takarajima (宝島), literally treasure island, is one of the Tokara Islands, belonging to Kagoshima Prefecture. ...


The Dominican Republic's small Catalina Island, in the Caribbean, is being studied since December 13, 2007, by a team of underwater archeologists from Indiana University, after an Italian tourist notified the existence of an old wreckage at just 10 feet of clear-blue waters, at a distance of no more than 70 feet off shore. There was no evidence of looting at the site, despite its remains believed to have been buried since the 17th century in what has proved to be the Quedah Merchant.


In popular culture

  • The MMORPG Pirates of the Burning Sea (set in the year 1720) uses a fictional storyline where William Kidd escaped from his hanging in Wapping to Tortuga, where he founded a new Brethren of the Coast organization, and acts as a primary organizer behind the piracy in the Spanish Main in that game. He is still there 19 years later, having fully embraced his role as a pirate.
  • Anthony Dexter and Eva Gabor starred in the 1954 film Captain Kidd and the Slave Girl.
  • Captain Kidd's legend is also the subject of a traditional English song, "Captain Kidd", which takes the form of Kidd reminiscing about a rather inaccurate version of his life. One recording of it may be found on the Waterson:Carthy album Fishes and Fine Yellow Sand. Another may be found on the Great Big Sea album The Hard and the Easy.
  • Children's author Robert Lawson wrote Captain Kidd's Cat (Little, Brown 1956), in which Kidd's cat McDermot tells the tale of Kidd's adventures on the high seas, arguing that Kidd was no pirate but was rather a victim of circumstances - and politics - beyond his control.
  • There are three heavy metal songs based on Kidd's adventures; two by Running Wild called "The Ballad of William Kidd" and "Adventure Galley", released on The Rivalry album (1998); and also by Scissorfight called "The Gibbetted Captain Kidd" on the album Balls Deep.
  • The time-travel card game Early American Chrononauts includes a card called Captain Kidd's Treasure Chest which players can symbolically acquire from the year 1699.
  • The 1980s British band Bucks Fizz recorded "The Land of Make Believe", a 1981 chart-topping song called which contains the line, "Captain Kidd's on the sand, with treasure close at hand".
  • The first single of the 2005 album The Hard and the Easy by Great Big Sea is "Captain Kidd" which chronicles the story of Captain William Kidd. The lyrics are derived from a traditional Newfoundland folk song supposedly sung during Kidd's time.
  • In the video game "Sid Meier's Pirates!", Captain Kidd is one of the nine other notorious pirates with whom the player competes.
  • In Wildwood, New Jersey, the third weekend in May is known as "Captain Kidd's Weekend". During this weekend, children dig up small candy-filled plastic treasure chests buried on the beach. Here, the name 'Kidd' is a pun to the word 'kid', a slang term that has come to mean 'child'.
  • In Corunna, Ontario, Canada, the first weekend in August is know as "Captain Kidd Days".
  • Kidd is mentioned in Bob Dylan's 1965 song "Bob Dylan's 115th Dream". In the fictional song, the Coast Guard asks Dylan/narrator his name, to which he replies: "And I said, 'Captain Kidd'/They believed me but they wanted to know what exactly that I did/I said for the Pope of Eruke I was employed/They let me go right away/They were very paranoid."
  • German pop band Dschinghis Khan recorded a song called "Käpt'n Kid (Wir sind Piraten)" in 1982, but released it on 2004's "Jubilee" album.
  • In 2006 the celtic folk rock band Tempest released an album called The Double Cross. The first song tells Captain Kidd's story from his point of view, with emphasis on how he was double-crossed by the English.
  • Kidd's buried treasure was uncovered in Edgar Allan Poe's short story "The Gold Bug"
  • There is the Captain Kidd Bar that has been located in Woods Hole, Massachusetts for over 100 years.

Pirates of the Burning Sea (abbreviated PotBS) is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) currently under development by Flying Lab Software (FLS). ... The Brethren of the Coast is a meeting that takes place in Pirates of the Caribbean: At Worlds End. ... The Spanish Man was a name given to the Caribbean coast of the Spanish Empire in mainland Central and South America. ... // Paramount Studios releases theatrical short cartoon titled The Friendly Ghost, featuring ghost named Casper With Rossellinis Roma Città aperta, Italian neorealist cinema begins. ... Captain Kidd is a 1945 film, starring Charles Laughton, Randolph Scott, Barbara Britton, and John Carradine, directed by Rowland V. Lee, produced by Benedict Bogeaus and James Nasser, and released by United Artists. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... Randolph Scott (January 23, 1898 – March 2, 1987) was an American motion picture actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. ... Britton in They Made Me a Killer (1946) Barbara Britton (September 26, 1919 - January 17, 1980) was a film and television actress. ... John Carradine (February 5, 1906 – November 27, 1988) was a Daytime Emmy Award-winning American actor, perhaps best known for his roles in horror films and Westerns. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Gabor, see Gabor (disambiguation). ... Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ... This article is about the play by J.M. Barrie. ... For other uses, see Neverland (disambiguation). ... Gerald du Maurier as Captain Hook Captain James Hook is the villain of J. M. Barries play and novel Peter Pan. ... Waterson:Carthy are Norma Waterson, Martin Carthy and their daughter Eliza Carthy Their eponymous CD was released in 1994 followed by Common Tongue in 1996, Broken Ground 1999, A Dark Light 2002 and Fishes And Fine Yellow Sand 2004 Categories: Stub ... Great Big Sea (often shortened to GBS) is a Canadian folk-rock band from Newfoundland and Labrador, best known for performing energetic rock interpretations of traditional Newfoundland folk songs including sea shanties, which draw from the islands 500-year-old Irish, English, and French heritage. ... Robert Lawson (born October 4, 1892 in New York City - died 1957) was an author and commercial artist. ... Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Running Wild is one of a few German heavy metal bands to emerge in the early/mid 1980s (along with Helloween, Gamma Ray, Rage, Blind Guardian, Grave Digger, etc). ... The Rivalry formed in the suburbs of Long Island, NY in the summer of 2005. ... Scissorfight is an American hardcore / stoner metal band from New Hampshire. ... Chrononauts is a card game played with a specially designed set of 136 cards. ... Bucks Fizz is an English pop group, formed in 1981 to compete in the Eurovision Song Contest that year. ... The Hard and The Easy is an album by Great Big Sea. ... Great Big Sea (often shortened to GBS) is a Canadian folk-rock band from Newfoundland and Labrador, best known for performing energetic rock interpretations of traditional Newfoundland folk songs including sea shanties, which draw from the islands 500-year-old Irish, English, and French heritage. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... The 2004 version of the game features a high-end 3D engine, a feature impossible to deliver with the original 1987 release. ... This article is about the Christian rock band. ... Veggie Tales is a series of childrens books and computer animated videos conveying Christian ideals to children via humorous, anthropomorphic vegetable-shaped characters. ... An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ... The Execution Dock was located on the Thames in the Wapping area of London, England. ... Jon Bon Jovi (born John Francis Bongiovi, Jr. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from Sayreville, New Jersey. ... Singles from New Jersey Released: 1988 Released: 1988 Released: 1989 Released: 1989 Released: 1989 Bon Jovis fourth album, New Jersey was released on September 13, 1988. ...

Quedah Merchant Ship Found

For years, people and treasure hunters have tried to locate the Quedah Merchant ship.[14] It was reported on December 13, 2007, that "wreckage of a pirate ship abandoned by Captain Kidd in the 17th century has been found by divers in shallow waters off the Dominican Republic." The waters in which the ship was found were less than ten feet deep and were only 70 feet off of Catalina Island, just to the south of La Romana on the Dominican coast. The ship is believed to be "the remains of Quedah Merchant".[15][16] Charles Beeker, the director of Academic Diving and Underwater Science Programs in IU Bloomington's School of Health, was one of the experts leading the Indiana University diving team. He said that it was "remarkable that the wreck has remained undiscovered all these years given its location", and given that the ship has been the subject of so many prior failed searches.[17] Indiana University, founded in 1820, is a nine-campus university system in the state of Indiana. ...


See also

Gardiners Island Gardiners Island is a small island, approximately 5 sq mi (13 km²) in eastern Suffolk County in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the Oak Island in Nova Scotia. ...

References

  • Botting, Douglas (1978). The Pirates. Time Life Books (ISBN 0-8094-2650-1).
  • Cordingly, David (1995). Under The Black Flag : The Romance and the Reality of Life Among the Pirates. Harcourt Brace & Company.
  • Hamilton, Cochran. et al. (1961) Pirates of the Spanish Main, 1st Edition, American Heritage Publishing Co., Inc., New York.

Footnotes

  1. ^ William Kidd. UXL Encyclopedia of World Biography (2003). Retrieved on 2007-12-13.
  2. ^ Hamilton, (1961) p.?
  3. ^ Frank R. Stockton. "Buccaneers and Pirates of Our Coasts" "The Real Captain Kidd". The Baldwin Online Children's Literature Project. Retrieved on 2007-12-13.
  4. ^ Botting (1978) p.106
  5. ^ Cordingly (1995), p.?
  6. ^ Hamilton, (1961) p.?
  7. ^ Pirates of the High Seas - Capt. William Kidd. Retrieved on 2007-12-13.
  8. ^ “Quedagh Merchant” (ship). Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved on 2007-12-13.
  9. ^ Hamilton, (1961)
  10. ^ "The Quest for the Armenian Vessel, Quedagh Merchant". AYAS Nautical Research Club. Retrieved on 2007-12-13.
  11. ^ Graham, Frederick "Cork". The Bamboo Chest: An Adventure in Healing the Trauma of War; Dragon Press Publishing, Inc. (2004)
  12. ^ Richard Zacks. [1]"The Pirate Hunter: The True Story of Captain Kidd". Hyperion. Retrieved on 2007-12-14. 
  13. ^ Caulkins, Frances Manwaring (1895). "History of New London, Connecticut", 293. 
  14. ^ Captain Kidd (1645-1701). PortCities London. Retrieved on 2007-12-13.
  15. ^ Captain Kidd Ship Found. Yahoo News (December 13, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-12-13.
  16. ^ Captain Kidd's Shipwreck Of 1699 Discovered. Science Daily (December 13, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-12-13.
  17. ^ IU team finds fabled pirate ship. INDYSTAR.COM (December 13, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-12-13.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

Books
  • Campbell, An Historical Sketch of Robin Hood and Captain Kid (New York, 1853)
  • Dalton, The Real Captain Kidd: A Vindication (New York, 1911)
  • Gilbert, H. (1986). The Book of Pirates. London: Bracken Books.
  • Zacks, Richard (2002). The Pirate Hunter : The True Story of Captain Kidd. Hyperion Books (ISBN 0-7868-8451-7).
Articles
This article is about maritime piracy. ... This article is about maritime piracy. ... For other uses, see Privateer (disambiguation). ... This article refers to the type of pirate. ... Look up corsair in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Moorish ambassador of the Barbary States to the Court of Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... Sixteenth century Japanese pirate raids. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Edward_England. ... Central America and the Caribbean (detailed pdf map) An 18th-century pirate flag. ... Piracy in the Strait of Malacca was common in the past, and is currently on the rise again in recent years possibly for terrorism-related reasons. ... Port-Royal was a Cistercian convent in Magny-les-Hameaux, in the Vallée de Chevreuse southwest of Paris that launched a number of culturally important institutions. ... Tortuga (Île de la Tortue in French) is a Caribbean island that forms part of Haiti, off the northwest coast of Hispaniola. ... Categories: France geography stubs | Communes of Ille-et-Vilaine ... Libertatia (also known as Libertalia) was a legendary country, or free colony, forged by pirates, under the leadership of Captain Misson in the late 1600s. ... The Barbary Coast, or Barbary, was the term used by Europeans from the 16th until the 19th century to refer to the coastal regions of what is now Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya. ... Jean Bart (October 21, 1651 - April 27, 1702) was a French naval commander of the 17th century. ... For other uses, see Blackbeard (disambiguation). ... Stede Bonnet (1688?-December 10, 1718)[1] was a pirate captain from the English colony of Barbados. ... Anne Bonny (c. ... Roche Braziliano (born c. ... Roberto Cofresí (June 17, 1791-March 29, 1825) born Roberto Cofresí y Ramírez de Arellano in Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico, is Puerto Ricos most famous pirate and is better known as El Pirata Cofresí. Monument of Roberto Cofresí // The origin of Cofresís father is unknown and has... This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ... Henry Every or Avery (born c. ... A portrait of Edward Lowe hanging in the National Maritime Museum in London Edward Ned Lowe (or Low, or Loe), often known as Ned Low was a notorious pirate during the Golden Age of Piracy. ... Sir Henry Morgan (Hari Morgan in Welsh), (ca. ... The meeting of Grace OMalley and Queen Elizabeth I Gráinne Ní Mháille (c. ... John Rackham (died November 17, 1720), also known as Calico Jack Rackham or Calico Jack, was an English pirate captain during the early 18th century. ... For Mary Karen Read, see List of victims of the Virginia Tech massacre Mary Read (c. ... Oruç Reis captures a galley Aruj or Oruc Reis (Turkish: Oruç Reis) (c. ... Born John Roberts (May 17, 1682 - February 10, 1722), Bartholomew Roberts, also known as Bart Roberts, was a Welsh pirate who raided shipping off the Americas and West Africa between 1719 and 1722. ... Statue of Robert Surcouf in Saint-Malo. ... Statue in St Malo René Trouin, Sieur du Gué, usually called Réné Duguay-Trouin, (Saint Malo, 10 June 1673 -- 1736) was a famous French privateer, Lieutenant-Général des armées navales du roi (admiral) and Commander in the Order of Saint-Louis. ... Blackbeards severed head hanging from Maynards bow Robert Maynard was a lieutenant in the British Royal Navy, captain of HMS Pearl, and is most famous for defeating the infamous pirate Blackbeard in battle. ... Sir Chalonor Ogle (1681-1750) was an Admiral of the Fleet in the British navy. ... Wingdings version of the Jolly Roger (character N). Many pirates created their own individualized versions. ... A painting depicting the era. ... This is a timeline of the history of piracy. ... List of pirate films is is an alphabetical list of films dealing with piracy, primarily during the Golden Age of Piracy in the Caribbean Sea in the 16th century to 18th century. ... This is a list of known pirates, buccaneers, corsairs, privateers, and others involved in piracy. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Kidd - LoveToKnow 1911 (579 words)
Accordingly the "Adventure Galley," a vessel of 30 guns and 275 tons, was privately fitted out, and the command given to Captain Kidd, who received the king's commission to arrest and bring to trial all pirates, and a commission of reprisals against the French.
Kidd sailed from Plymouth in May 1696 for New York, where he filled up his crew, and in 1697 reached Madagascar, the pirates' principal rendezvous.
Much has been written about Kidd, less because of the intrinsic interest of his career than because the agreement made with him by Bellomont was the subject of violent political controversy.
William Kidd - Academic Kids (748 words)
William "Captain" Kidd (1645–May 23, 1701) is often remembered as a notorious pirate, but the historical record calls this characterization into question.
The marriage brought to Kidd a considerable amount of property and before the voyage which established his reputation as a pirate he lived as a respectable merchant.
The belief that Kidd left a buried treasure somewhere contributed considerably to the growth of his legend.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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