FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
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Encyclopedia > William J. Fields

William Jason Fields (December 29, 1874 - October 21, 1954) was the governor of Kentucky from 1923 to 1927. Fields was born in Willard, Carter County, Kentucky and worked as a lawyer and realtor when not engaged in politics. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

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Political career

Fields, a Democrat, served as one of Kentucky's congressmen from March 4, 1911, until December 11, 1923, when he resigned to take the office of governor. He beat Charles Dawson, his Republican opponent, 356,045 votes to 306,277 (53.3% to 45.8%). The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ...


His administration created the Kentucky State Parks Commission.


Fields later served as the commonwealth’s attorney for the thirty-seventh judicial district of Kentucky.

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See also

History of Kentucky The history of Kentucky spans hundreds of years, and has been influenced by the states diverse geography and central location. ...

Governors of Kentucky Kentucky State Flag
ShelbyGarrardGreenupScottShelbyMadisonSlaughterAdairDeshaMetcalfeJ. BreathittJ. MoreheadClarkWickliffeLetcherOwsleyCrittendenHelmPowellC. MoreheadMagoffinRobinsonBramletteHelmStevensonLeslieMcCrearyBlackburnKnottBuckner • Brown • BradleyTaylorGoebelBeckhamWillsonMcCrearyStanleyBlackMorrowFieldsSampsonLaffoonChandlerJohnsonWillisClementsWetherbyChandlerCombsE. BreathittNunnFordCarrollBrown Jr.CollinsWilkinsonJonesPattonFletcher

Kentucky also had two Confederate Governors: George W. Johnson and Richard Hawes. This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: | | ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kentucky. ... Isaac Shelby Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750-July 18, 1826) was an officer in the American Revolutionary War and the first Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1792 to 1796 and from 1812 to 1816. ... James Garrard was the Governor of Kentucky from 1796 to 1804. ... Christopher Greenup Christopher Greenup (1750–April 27, 1818) was an American lawyer and politician from Frankfort, Kentucky. ... For the Charles Scott who was British ambassador to Imperial Russia, 1898-1904 see Charles Scott (ambassador). ... Isaac Shelby Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750-July 18, 1826) was an officer in the American Revolutionary War and the first Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1792 to 1796 and from 1812 to 1816. ... George Madison was the Governor of Kentucky in 1816. ... Governor Gabriel Slaughter Gabriel Slaughter (1767 Culpepper County Virginia – 19 September 1830 Mercer County, Kentucky) Democratic-Republican party was the 7th governor of Kentucky (19 October 1817 – 7 September 1820). ... John Adair John Adair (January 9, 1757 – May 19, 1840) was an American pioneer, soldier and statesman of Mercer County, Kentucky. ... Joseph Desha (December 9, 1768 – October 12, 1842) was the ninth governor of Kentucky. ... Thomas Metcalfe (March 20, 1780 - August 18, 1855) was a United States politician, serving many different posts throughout his life, including U.S. Representative, Senator, and Governor of Kentucky. ... John Breathitt (1786–1834) was a 19th century politician who served as the Governor of Kentucky from 1832–1834, dying in office. ... James Turner Morehead (May 24, 1797 - December 28, 1854) was a United States Senator from Kentucky. ... James Clark (January 16, 1779 – August 27, 1839) was the thirteenth governor of Kentucky. ... Charles A. Wickliffe Charles Anderson Wickliffe, politician, born in Bardstown, Kentucky, 8 June 1788; died in Ilchester in Howard County, Maryland, 31 October 1869. ... Robert Perkins Letcher (February 10, 1788 – January 24, 1861) was the fifteenth governor of Kentucky. ... William Owsley (1782 – December 1862) was an American politician and jurist. ... John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. ... John LaRue Helm John LaRue Helm (July 4, 1802–September 8, 1867) was one of the most illustrious sons of Elizabethtown and Hardin County. ... Lazarus W. Powell was the Governor of Kentucky from 1851 to 1855, and later a United States Senator from Kentucky. ... Charles Slaughter Morehead (July 7, 1802 – December 21, 1868) was the twentieth governor of Kentucky. ... Beriah Magoffin (April 18, 1815 - February 28, 1885) was the Governor of Kentucky from 1859 to 1862. ... James Fisher Robinson (October 4, 1800 - October 31, 1882) was the twenty-second Governor of Kentucky. ... Thomas Elliott Bramlette (January 3, 1817 – January 12, 1875) was the twenty-third Governor of Kentucky. ... John LaRue Helm John LaRue Helm (July 4, 1802–September 8, 1867) was one of the most illustrious sons of Elizabethtown and Hardin County. ... John White Stevenson (2 May 1812 - 10 August 1886) succeeded Governor John Helm, who died while in office in 1867. ... Preston H. Leslie (8 March 1819 - 7 February 1907) was the governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky from 1871-1875. ... James B. McCreary McCreary ( July 8, 1838-Oct. ... Luke p. ... James Proctor Knott (1830 - June 18, 1911) was the Attorney General of Missouri at the outset of the American Civil War and Governor of Kentucky from 1883 to 1887. ... Simon Bolivar Buckner, Sr. ... John Young Brown (June 28, 1835-January 11, 1904) was a Representative from Kentucky. ... William OC. Bradley William OConnell Bradley (March 18, 1847 - May 23, 1914) was a U.S. senator from Kentucky. ... William Sylvester Taylor (1853-1928) was the Governor of Kentucky from December 1899 until January 1900. ... William Goebel William J. Goebel (January 4, 1856 – February 3, 1900) was a controversial American politician who served as Governor of Kentucky for a few days in 1900. ... John Crepps Wickliffe Beckham (August 5, 1869 - January 9, 1940) served as both Governor of Kentucky and in the United States Senate. ... Augustus Everett Willson (October 13, 1846 – August 24, 1931) was the thirty-sixth governor of Kentucky. ... James B. McCreary McCreary ( July 8, 1838-Oct. ... Augustus Owsley Stanley (May 21, 1867 - August 12, 1958) was governor of Kentucky from 1915 to 1918. ... James Dixon Black (September 24, 1849 – August 4, 1938) was governor of Kentucky for part of 1919. ... Edwin Porch Morrow (November 28, 1877 – June 15, 1835) was a Republican Governor of Kentucky from 1919 – 1923. ... Flemon Davis Sampson (1873 - 1967) was governor of Kentucky from 1927 through 1931. ... Ruby Laffoon (15th January, 1869 - 01 March 1941) was a Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1931 - 1935. ... Albert Chandler Albert Benjamin Chandler I (commonly known as A. B. Happy Chandler) (July 14, 1898–June 15, 1991) was a governor of Kentucky, a U.S. Senator and Baseball Commissioner. ... Keen Johnson (January 12, 1896 - February 7, 1970) served as Governor of Kentucky 1939-1943. ... Simeon Slavens Willis (1 December 1879 - 2 April 1965) was a US lawyer, judge and politician. ... Earle Chester Clements (October 22, 1896 - March 12, 1985) served as Governor of Kentucky and as a member of the United States Senate from Kentucky. ... Lawerence Winchester Wetherby (January 2, 1908 - March 27, 1994) served as Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky and as Governor of Kentucky upon the resignation of Governor Earle C. Clements as Clements went to the United States Senate. ... Albert Chandler Albert Benjamin Chandler I (commonly known as A. B. Happy Chandler) (July 14, 1898–June 15, 1991) was a governor of Kentucky, a U.S. Senator and Baseball Commissioner. ... Bert T. Combs (August 13, 1911-December 4, 1991),born in Clay County, Kentucky, was the Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1959 through 1963. ... Edward Thompson Ned Breathitt Jr. ... Louie Broady Nunn, (March 8, 1924-January 29, 2004) a native of Park in Barren County was Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. ... Wendell Hampton Ford (born September 8, 1924) is an American politician from Kentucky who belongs to the Democratic Party. ... Julian Morton Carroll (born April 16, 1931) was Governor of the U.S. state of Kentucky from 1974 to 1979 as a Democrat. ... John Y. Brown, Jr. ... Martha Layne Collins Martha Layne Collins (born December 7, 1936 in Bagdad, Kentucky) was Governor of the U.S. State of Kentucky from 1983 through 1987; she is a member of the Democratic Party. ... Wallace G. Wilkinson (May 23, 1928–July 5, 2002) was a Kentucky businessman who made a fortune with college bookstores. ... Brereton Jones Brereton Chandler Jones (born June 27, 1939) is an American political figure. ... Paul E. Patton Paul E. Patton (born May 26, 1937) served as Democratic governor of Kentucky from 1995 to 2003. ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since 2003. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (April 3–April 10, 1865) Largest city New Orleans... George W. Johnson (born May 27, 1811; died April 8, 1862) was the head of a shadow government of Kentucky formed by secessionists during the American Civil War. ... Kentuckys Provisinal Governor of the Confederates Richard Hawes (1797—1877) He was brother of Albert Gallatin Hawes, nephew of Aylett Hawes, and cousin of Aylett Hawes Buckner), a Representative from Kentucky. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Search Results for "William J. Fields" (249 words)
He joined Sir William D'Avenant's company at Lincoln's Inn Fields theater in 1661 and became the leading actor of the Restoration stage,...
John Reed and James T. Fields became Ticknor's partners in Boston, and their firm is best known as Ticknor and Fields....
Islington, in the north, is mostly residential, while Finsbury, in the south, is highly industrialized.
William J. Caps (665 words)
WILLIAM J. CAPS, a farmer and land owner of Cleburne whose prosperity has increased from year to year, making him one of the wealthy citizens and tax payers of the county, now owns about eight hundred acres of valuable farming land beside realty in the city.
William J. Caps was reared to farming and stock raising and for fifty years resided upon a farm, handling stock as well as the product of the fields.
In 1860 he removed from Davidson to Dickson county, Tennessee, forty miles west of Nashville, where he resided for three years and during the period of the Civil war he served as a constable and for a time was with Ross' regiment of cavalry.
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