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Encyclopedia > William Hogarth
William Hogarth

William Hogarth, self-portrait, 1745
Born 10 November 1697(1697-11-10)
London
Died 26 October 1764 (aged 66)
London
Occupation English painter, engraver

William Hogarth (November 10, 1697October 26, 1764) was a major English painter, printmaker, pictorial satirist, and editorial cartoonist who has been credited as a pioneer in western sequential art. His work ranged from excellent realistic portraiture to comic strip-like series of pictures called “modern moral subjects.” Much of his work, though at times vicious, poked fun at contemporary politics and customs. Illustrations in such style are often referred to as Hogarthian. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2627, 361 KB) Description: Title: de: Der Maler und sein Mops, Selbstporträt Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 90 × 70 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Tate Gallery Other... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Printmaking is a process for producing a work of art in ink; the work (called a print) is created indirectly, through the transfer of ink from the surface upon which the work was originally drawn or otherwise composed. ... List of satirists below - writers, cartoonists and others known for their involvement in satire - humourous social criticism. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... ... Realism is a style of painting that depicts the actuality of what the eyes can see. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ...

Contents

Life

The son of a poor school teacher and textbook writer, William Hogarth was born at Bartholomew Close in London on November 10, 1697. In his youth he was apprenticed to the engraver Ellis Gamble in Leicester Fields, where he learned to engrave trade cards and the like. Young William also took a lively interest in the street life of the metropolis and the London fairs, and amused himself by sketching the characters he saw. At around the same time, his father, who had opened an unsuccessful Latin-speaking coffee house at St John's Gate, was imprisoned for debt in Fleet Prison for five years. Hogarth never talked about the fact. By April 1720 he was engraver on his own account, at first engraving coats of arms, shop bills, and designing plates for booksellers. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher... For details on the adjacent London Underground station, see Leicester Square tube station Leicester Square in 1750, looking north. ... Trade card describes small cards, similar to the visiting cards exchanged in social circles, that businesses would distribute to clients and potential customers. ... Roundabouts (or carousels) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairs. ... A Street Cafe, Jerusalem, Henry Fenn (1838- ): steel engraving in Picturesque Palestine, ca 1875 A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or caf shares some of the characteristics of a bar, and some of the characteristics of a restaurant. ... St Johns Gate is one of the few tangible remains from Clerkenwells monastic past, it was built in 1504 by Prior Thomas Docwra as the south entrance to the inner precinct of the Priory of the Knights of Saint John - the Knights Hospitallers. ... Pray remember ye poor debtors: inmates of the Fleet Prison beg passers by for alms. ... Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ...

Bust of Hogarth, Leicester Square, London.
Bust of Hogarth, Leicester Square, London.

In 1727, he was hired by Joshua Morris, a tapestry worker, to prepare a design for the Element of Earth. Morris, however, having heard that he was "an engraver, and no painter", declined the work when completed, and Hogarth accordingly sued him for the money in the Westminster Court, where, on the May 28, 1728, the case was decided in Hogarth's favour. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 653 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 653 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Leicester Square at night in 2005: a view towards the northeast corner. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Astronomical aberration discovered by the astronomer James Bradley Swedish academy of sciences founded at Uppsala The founding of the University of Havana (Universidad de la Habana), Cubas most well-established university. ...


On March 23, 1729 he was married to Jane Thornhill, daughter of artist Sir James Thornhill. is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... Sir James Thornhill (25 July 1675 or 1676 - May 4, 1734) was an English painter of historical subjects, in the Italian baroque tradition. ...


In 1757, he was appointed Serjeant Painter to the King. The Serjeant Painter was an honorable and lucrative position for the British monarchy. ...


Hogarth died in London on October 26, 1764 and was buried at St. Nicholas's Churchyard, Chiswick Mall, Chiswick, London. His friend the actor David Garrick wrote the inscription on his tombstone. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Chiswick (disambiguation). ... David Garrick by Thomas Gainsborough. ...


Works

Early works

An early print by William Hogarth entitled A Just View of the British Stage from 1724, depicting Robert Wilks, Colley Cibber, and Barton Booth rehearsing a pantomime play with puppets enacting a prison break down a privy, based on the escape of a felon from Newgate. The "play" is comprised of nothing but special effects, and the scripts for Hamlet, inter al., are toilet paper.
An early print by William Hogarth entitled A Just View of the British Stage from 1724, depicting Robert Wilks, Colley Cibber, and Barton Booth rehearsing a pantomime play with puppets enacting a prison break down a privy, based on the escape of a felon from Newgate. The "play" is comprised of nothing but special effects, and the scripts for Hamlet, inter al., are toilet paper.

Early satirical works included an Emblematical Print on the South Sea Scheme (c.1721), about the disastrous stock market crash of 1720 known as the South Sea Bubble, in which many English people lost a great deal of money. In the bottom left corner, he shows Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish figures gambling, while in the middle there is a huge machine, like a merry-go-round, which people are boarding. At the top is a goat, written below which is "Who'l Ride" and this shows the stupidity of people in following the crowd in buying stock in The South Sea Company, which spent more time issuing stock than anything else. The people are scattered around the picture with a real sense of disorder, which represented the confusion. The progress of the well dressed people towards the ride in the middle shows how foolish some people could be, which is not entirely their own fault. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Robert Wilks ( 1665 - September 27, 1732) was a British actor and theatrical manager who was one of the leading managers of Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in its hey day of the 1710s. ... Colley Cibber, actor, playwright, Poet Laureate, first British actor-manager, and head Dunce of Alexander Popes Dunciad. ... Barton Booth (1681- May 10, 1733) was one of the most famous dramatic actors of the first part of the 18th century. ... The Christmas Pantomime colour lithograph bookcover, 1890 Pantomime (informally, panto) refers to a theatrical genre, traditionally found in Great Britain, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand and Ireland, which is usually performed around the Christmas and New Year holiday season. ... A puppet is a representational object, usually but not always depicting a human character, used in play or a presentation. ... Privies were a kind of toilet that you sat over but didnt have a flush, or sewer attached, during the middle ages. ... Newgate was a gate in the west of London Wall round the City of London. ... The American actor Edwin Booth as Hamlet, seated in a curule chair, c. ... Hogarthian image of the South Sea Bubble by Edward Matthew Ward, Tate Gallery More well known than The South Sea Company is perhaps the South Sea Bubble (1711 - September 1720) which is the name given to the economic bubble that occurred through overheated speculation in the company shares during 1720. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Hogarthian image of the South Sea Bubble, by Edward Matthew Ward, Tate Gallery The South Sea Company (1711 – c1850s) was an English company granted a monopoly to trade with South America under a treaty with Spain. ...


Other early works include The Lottery (1724); The Mystery of Masonry brought to Light by the Gormogons (1724); A Just View of the British Stage (1724); False Perspective; some book illustrations; and the small print, Masquerades and Operas (1724). The latter is a satire on contemporary follies, such as the masquerades of the Swiss impresario John James Heidegger, the popular Italian opera singers, John Rich's pantomimes at Lincoln's Inn Fields, and last not least, the exaggerated popularity of Lord Burlington's protégé, the architect and painter William Kent. He continued that theme in 1727, with the Large Masquerade Ticket. In 1726 Hogarth prepared twelve large engravings for Samuel Butler's Hudibras. These he himself valued highly, and are among his best book illustrations. False Perspective is the title of an engraving produced by William Hogarth in 1754. ... A masquerade ball (or masque) is an event which the participants attend in costume, usually including a mask. ... John James (Johann Jacob) Heidegger (1659–1749), Swiss count and leading impresario of masquerades in the early part of the 18th century. ... John Rich (1682 - 1761) was an important theater manager in 18th century London. ... Lincolns Inn Fields is the largest public square in London. ... Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork (April 25, 1694 – 1753) , born in Yorkshire, was a descendant of Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork. ... William Kent William Kent (born in Bridlington, Yorkshire, c. ... Samuel Butler Samuel Butler (4 December 1612–18 June 1680) was born in Strensham, Worcestershire and baptised 14 February 1613. ... Hudibras is a mock heroic poem from the 17th century written by Samuel Butler. ...


In the following years he turned his attention to the production of small "conversation pieces" (i.e., groups in oil of full-length portraits from 12 to 15 in. high). Among his efforts in oil between 1728 and 1732 were The Fountaine Family (c.1730), The Assembly at Wanstead House, The House of Commons examining Bambridge, and several pictures of the chief actors in John Gay's popular The Beggar's Opera. Conversation Piece is a song written by David Bowie. ... John Gay John Gay (30 June 1685 - 4 December 1732) was an English poet and dramatist. ... Painting based on The Beggars Opera, Scene V, William Hogarth, c. ...

The Beggar's Opera VI, 1731, Tate Britain's version (22.5 x 30 ins.)
The Beggar's Opera VI, 1731, Tate Britain's version (22.5 x 30 ins.)

One of his masterpieces of this period is the depiction of an amateur performance of John Dryden's The Indian Emperor, or The Conquest of Mexico (1732–1735) at the home of John Conduitt, master of the mint, in St George's Street, Hanover Square. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1542, 252 KB) Description: Title: de: Gemälde nach John Gays Â»Bettleroper«, Szene V Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 56 × 72,5 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Tate... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1542, 252 KB) Description: Title: de: Gemälde nach John Gays Â»Bettleroper«, Szene V Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 56 × 72,5 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Tate... John Dryden John Dryden (August 19 {August 9 O.S.}, 1631 - May 12 {May 1 O.S.}, 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright, who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles... Hanover Square, London, is a square in Mayfair, London,W1, England, just to the south west of the junction of Oxford Street and Regent Street. ...


Hogarth's other prints in the 1730s include A Midnight Modern Conversation (1733), Southwark Fair (1733), The Sleeping Congregation (1736), Before and After (1736), Scholars at a Lecture (1736), The Company of Undertakers (Consultation of Quacks) (1736), The Distrest Poet (1736), The Four Times of the Day (1738), and Strolling Actresses dressing in a Barn (1738). He may also have printed Burlington Gate (1731), evoked by Alexander Pope's Epistle to Lord Burlington, and defending Lord Chandos, who is therein satirized. This print gave great offence, and was suppressed (some modern authorities, however, no longer attribute this to Hogarth). For other uses, see Alexander Pope (disambiguation). ... Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork (April 25, 1694 – 1753) , born in Yorkshire, was a descendant of Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork. ...


Moralizing art

Harlot's and Rake's Progresses

A Rake's Progress, Plate 8, 1735
A Rake's Progress, Plate 8, 1735

In 1731, he completed the earliest of the series of moral works which first gave him recognition as a great and original genius. This was A Harlot's Progress, first as paintings, (now lost), and then published as engravings. In its six scenes, the miserable fate of a country girl who began a prostitution career in town is traced out remorselessly from its starting point, the meeting of a bawd, to its shameful and degraded end, the whore's death of venereal disease and the following merciless funeral ceremonial. The series was an immediate success, and was followed in 1735 by the sequel A Rake's Progress showing in eight pictures the reckless life of Tom Rakewell, the son of a rich merchant, who wastes all his money on luxurious living, whoring, and gambling, and ultimately finishes his life in Bedlam. The original paintings of A Harlot's Progress were destroyed in the fire at Fonthill Abbey in 1755; A Rake's Progress is displayed in the gallery room at Sir John Soane's Museum, London. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2042x1782, 722 KB) Summary The Interior of Bedlam, from A Rakes Progress by William Hogarth, 1763. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2042x1782, 722 KB) Summary The Interior of Bedlam, from A Rakes Progress by William Hogarth, 1763. ... Plate 3 - Tom succumbs to the pleasures of the flesh at The Rose Tavern, Drury Lane. ... A Harlots Progress (also known as The Harlots Progress) is a series of six paintings (1731, now lost) and engravings (1732) by William Hogarth. ... Plate 3 - Tom succumbs to the pleasures of the flesh at The Rose Tavern, Drury Lane. ... The Bethlem Royal Hospital of London, which has been variously known as St Mary Bethlehem, Bethlem Hospital, Bethlehem Hospital and Bedlam, is the worlds oldest psychiatric hospital. ... Fonthill Abbey Fonthill Abbey — also known as Beckfords Folly — was a large Gothic-style building built in the turn of the 19th century in Wiltshire, England. ... The Soane Museum is a museum of architecture, and was formerly the house and studio of Sir John Soane. ...


Marriage à-la-mode

Marriage à-la-mode, Shortly After the Marriage (scene two of six).

In 1743–1745 Hogarth painted the six pictures of Marriage à-la-mode (National Gallery, London), a pointed skewering of upper class 18th century society. This moralistic warning shows the miserable tragedy of an ill-considered marriage for money. This is regarded by many as his finest project, certainly the best example of his serially-planned story cycles. Download high resolution version (1117x860, 180 KB)Hogarth, Marriage a la Mode, series, National Gallery London Source: gallery. ... Download high resolution version (1117x860, 180 KB)Hogarth, Marriage a la Mode, series, National Gallery London Source: gallery. ... Marriage à-la-mode, scene two of six. ... This is the second canvas in the series of six satirical paintings known as Marriage à-la-mode painted by William Hogarth. ... Marriage à-la-mode, scene two of six. ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ...


Marital ethics were the topic of much debate in 18th century Britain. Frequent marriages of convenience and their attendant unhappiness came in for particular criticism, with a variety of authors taking the view that love was a much sounder basis for marriage. Hogarth here painted a satire Рa genre that by definition has a moral point to convey Рof a conventional marriage within the English upper class. All the paintings were engraved and the series achieved wide circulation in print form. The series, which are set in a Classical interior, shows the story of the fashionable marriage of the son of bankrupt Earl Squanderfield to the daughter of a wealthy but miserly city merchant, starting with the signing of a marriage contract at the Earl's mansion and ending with the murder of the son by his wife's lover and the suicide of the daughter after her lover is hanged at Tyburn for murdering her husband. For Moli̬res play, see The Miser. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... Tyburn may refer to: Tyburn, London, a former village in London, United Kingdom Tyburn (stream), London, UK Tyburn, West Midlands, a ward in Birmingham, UK Category: ...


Industry and Idleness

Industry and Idleness, plate 11, The Idle 'Prentice executed at Tyburn
Industry and Idleness, plate 11, The Idle 'Prentice executed at Tyburn

In the twelve prints of Industry and Idleness (1747) Hogarth shows the progression in the lives of two apprentices, one who is dedicated and hard working, the other idle which leads to crime and his execution. This shows the work ethic of Protestant England, where those who work hard get rewarded, such as the industrious apprentice who becomes Sheriff (plate 8), Alderman (plate 10), and finally the Lord Mayor of London in the last plate in the series. The idle apprentice, who begins with being "at play in the church yard" (plate 3), holes up "in a Garrett with a Common Prostitute" after turning highwayman (plate 7) and "executed at Tyburn" (plate 11). The idle apprentice is sent to the gallows by the industrious apprentice himself. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 546 pixelsFull resolution (2922 × 1995 pixel, file size: 12. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 546 pixelsFull resolution (2922 × 1995 pixel, file size: 12. ... The Idle Prentice Executed at Tyburn — Plate 11 of 12 of the series, showing the final reward of idleness Industry and Idleness is the title of a series of 12 plot-linked engravings created by William Hogarth in 1747, intending to illustrate to working children the possible rewards of hard... Tyburn may refer to: Tyburn, London, a former village in London, United Kingdom Tyburn (stream), London, UK Tyburn, West Midlands, a ward in Birmingham, UK Category: ... The Idle Prentice Executed at Tyburn — Plate 11 of 12 of the series, showing the final reward of idleness Industry and Idleness is the title of a series of 12 plot-linked engravings created by William Hogarth in 1747, intending to illustrate to working children the possible rewards of hard... For other meanings, including people named Idle, see Idle (disambiguation). ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... There are two Sheriffs of the City of London. ... An alderman is a member of a municipal assembly or council in many jurisdictions. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people traveling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... Tyburn may refer to: Tyburn, London, a former village in London, United Kingdom Tyburn (stream), London, UK Tyburn, West Midlands, a ward in Birmingham, UK Category: ... These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ...


Beer Street and Gin Lane

Later important prints include his pictorial warning of the unpleasant consequences of alcoholism in Beer Street and Gin Lane (1751) Hogarth engraved Beer Street to show a happy city drinking the 'good' beverage of English beer, versus Gin Lane which showed what would happen if people started drinking gin which, as a harder liquor, would cause more problems for society. People are shown as healthy, happy and hard working in Beer Street, while in Gin Lane they are scrawny, lazy and acting carelessly. The woman at the front echoes the tale of a woman released from prison who, crazed for gin, rips off her baby's clothes to sell for gin money and then abandons the child to die. The prints were published partly to support the 1751 Gin Act. Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... William Hogarth produced the twin engravings Beer Street and Gin Lane at the height of what became known as the London Gin Craze in 1751. ... Gin Lane William Hogarth produced the twin engravings Beer Street and Gin Lane at the height of what became known as the London Gin Craze in 1751. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Gin and tonic. ...


The magistrate, Henry Fielding, supposedly informed Hogarth of these proceedings, to help with propaganda for a Gin Act, which his work An Enquiry into the Causes of the Late Increase of Robbers, and Related Writings hoped to achieve.


The Four Stages of Cruelty

Other prints were his outcry against inhumanity in The Four Stages of Cruelty (1751); a series which Hogarth intended to show some of the terrible habits of criminals. In the first picture there are scenes of torture of dogs, cats and other animals. In the second it shows one of the characters from the first painting, Tom Nero, has now become a coach driver, and his cruelty to his horse caused it to break its leg. In the third painting Tom is shown as a murderer, with the woman he killed lying on the ground, while in the fourth, titled Reward of Cruelty, the murderer is shown being dissected by scientists after his execution. Hogarth is thus using the series to say what will happen to people who carry on in this manner. This shows what crimes people were concerned with in this time, the method of execution, and the dissection reflects upon the 1752 Act of Parliament which had just being passed allowing for the dissection of executed criminals who had been convicted for murder. It shows his reaction against the cruel treatment of animals which he saw around him, that he wished could be stopped. William Hogarth (1697–1764) The Four Stages of Cruelty is a series of four printed engravings published by William Hogarth in 1751. ... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ...


Portraits

Hogarth's portrait of Captain Thomas Coram, 1740
Hogarth's portrait of Captain Thomas Coram, 1740

Hogarth was also a popular portrait painter. In 1746 he painted actor David Garrick as Richard III, for which he was paid £200, “which was more,” he wrote, “than any English artist ever received for a single portrait.” In the same year a sketch of Simon Fraser, 11th Lord Lovat, afterwards beheaded on Tower Hill, had an exceptional success. Hogarth's truthful, vivid full-length portrait of his friend, the philanthropic Captain Coram (1740; formerly Thomas Coram Foundation for Children, now Foundling Museum), and his unfinished oil sketch of The Shrimp Girl (National Gallery, London) may be called masterpieces of British painting. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1576x2629, 206 KB) Description: Title: de: Porträt des Captain Thomas Coram Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 239 × 147,5 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Foundling Hospital Other... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1576x2629, 206 KB) Description: Title: de: Porträt des Captain Thomas Coram Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 239 × 147,5 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Foundling Hospital Other... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Thomas Coram, painted by William Hogarth, 1740 Captain Thomas Coram (c. ... Self-portrait by Vincent Van Gogh A portrait is a painting, photograph, or other artistic representation of a person. ... David Garrick by Thomas Gainsborough. ... Frontispage of the First Quarto Richard The Third. ... Simon the Fox Fraser Simon Fraser, Lord Lovat (c. ... The Thomas Coram Foundation for Children, London, formerly known as the Foundling Hospital, currently named the Coram Family, was founded in 1739 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram who was appalled to see abandoned babies and children starving and dying in the streets of London. ... The Foundling Museums Court Room The Foundling Museum was set up in 1998 and houses the nationally important art collection of the Foundling Hospital. ... The Shrimp Girl is a painting by the English artist William Hogarth (1697–1764) in the National Gallery, London. ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ... The English school of painting is an expression for English (or British) painters who produced characteristically English paintings. ...


Historical subjects

During a long period of his life, Hogarth tried to achieve the status of history painter, but had no great success in this field. Categories: Stub | Painting ...


Biblical scenes

Examples of his history pictures are The Pool of Bethesda and The Good Samaritan, executed in 1736–1737 for St Bartholomew's Hospital; Moses brought before Pharaoh's Daughter, painted for the Foundling Hospital (1747, formerly at the Thomas Coram Foundation for Children, now in the Foundling Museum); Paul before Felix (1748) at Lincoln's Inn; and his altarpiece for St. Mary Redcliffe, Bristol (1756). The King Henry VIII Gate at Barts, which was constructed in 1702. ... The Foundling Hospital, London, was founded in 1739 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram. ... The Thomas Coram Foundation for Children, London, formerly known as the Foundling Hospital, currently named the Coram Family, was founded in 1739 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram who was appalled to see abandoned babies and children starving and dying in the streets of London. ... The Foundling Museums Court Room The Foundling Museum was set up in 1998 and houses the nationally important art collection of the Foundling Hospital. ... Part of Lincolns Inn drawn by Thomas Shepherd c. ... St Mary Redcliffe is a great Anglican parish church in the City of Bristol, England. ... This article is about the English city. ...


The Gate of Calais

The Gate of Calais (also known as, O the Roast Beef of Old England), 1749
The Gate of Calais (also known as, O the Roast Beef of Old England), 1749

The Gate of Calais (1748; now in Tate Britain) was produced soon after his return from a visit to France. Horace Walpole wrote that Hogarth had run a great risk to go there since the peace of Aix-la-Chapelle, Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1695, 237 KB) Description: Title: de: Vor dem Tor von Calais (Das Roastbeef von Alt-England) Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 78,5 × 94,5 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1695, 237 KB) Description: Title: de: Vor dem Tor von Calais (Das Roastbeef von Alt-England) Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 78,5 × 94,5 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location... Sunday roast consisting of roast beef, roast potatoes, vegetables and Yorkshire pudding A dinner of roast beef, potatoes, and green beans Roast beef (is a cut of beef which is roasted in an oven. ... The term Merry England, or in more jocular, half-timbered spelling Merrie England, refers to a semi-mythological, idyllic, and pastoral way of life that the inhabitants of England allegedly enjoyed at some poorly-defined point between the Middle Ages and the onset of the Industrial Revolution. ... The Gate of Calais or O, the Roast Beef of Old England is a 1748 painting by William Hogarth, reproduced as a print from an engraving the next year. ... Tate Britain is a part of the Tate Gallery in Britain, along with Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives. ... Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... The second Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (Aachen) of 1748 ended the War of the Austrian Succession. ...

he went to France, and was so imprudent as to be taking a sketch of the drawbridge at Calais. He was seized and carried to the governor, where he was forced to prove his vocation by producing several caricatures of the French; particularly a scene of the shore, with an immense piece of beef landing for the lion d'argent, the English inn at Calais, and several hungry friars following it. They were much diverted with his drawings, and dismissed him. Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Caricature of Alan Greenspan by Jan Op De Beeck. ...

Back home, he immediately executed a painting of the subject in which he unkindly represented his enemies, the Frenchmen, as cringing, emaciated and superstitious people, while an enormous sirloin of beef arrives, destined for the English inn as a symbol of British prosperity and superiority. He claimed to have painted himself into the picture in the corner, with the solder running him in.[1] For a specific analysis of the population of France, see Demographics of France. ...


Other later works

March of the Guards to Finchley (1750), a satirical depiction of troops mustered to defend London from the 1745 Jacobite rebellion.
March of the Guards to Finchley (1750), a satirical depiction of troops mustered to defend London from the 1745 Jacobite rebellion.
A late painting by Hogarth entitled Hogarth's Servants, mid-1750s.
A late painting by Hogarth entitled Hogarth's Servants, mid-1750s.

Notable Hogarth engravings in the 1740s included The Enraged Musician (1741), the six prints of Marriage à-la-mode (1745; executed by French artists under Hogarth's inspection), The Stage Coach or The Country Inn Yard (1747), Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2024x1570, 253 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): William Hogarth ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2024x1570, 253 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): William Hogarth ... This article is not about the Jacobite Orthodox Church, nor is it about Jacobinism or the earlier Jacobean period. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1102x945, 243 KB) Summary William Hogarths painting, Hogarths Servants. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1102x945, 243 KB) Summary William Hogarths painting, Hogarths Servants. ...

Self-portrait, painting Thalia, the muse of comedy and pastoral poetry, 1757–1758
William Hogarth: The Bench, 1758
William Hogarth: The Bench, 1758

In 1745 Hogarth painted a self-portrait with his dog (now also in Tate Britain), which shows him as a learned artist supported by volumes of Shakespeare, Milton and Swift. In 1749, he represented the somewhat disorderly English troops on their March of the Guards to Finchley (formerly Thomas Coram Foundation for Children, now Foundling Museum). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2128, 367 KB) Description: Title: de: Selbstporträt vor Staffelei beim Malen der komischen Muse Thalia Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 45 × 42,6 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2128, 367 KB) Description: Title: de: Selbstporträt vor Staffelei beim Malen der komischen Muse Thalia Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 45 × 42,6 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery... For other uses, see Thalia (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1673, 257 KB) Description: Title: de: Der Gerichtshof Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 14,5 × 18 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: Cambridge (Großbritanien) Current location (gallery): de: Fitzwilliam Museum Other notes: de... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1673, 257 KB) Description: Title: de: Der Gerichtshof Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 14,5 × 18 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: Cambridge (Großbritanien) Current location (gallery): de: Fitzwilliam Museum Other notes: de... Tate Britain is a part of the Tate Gallery in Britain, along with Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... The Thomas Coram Foundation for Children, London, formerly known as the Foundling Hospital, currently named the Coram Family, was founded in 1739 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram who was appalled to see abandoned babies and children starving and dying in the streets of London. ... The Foundling Museums Court Room The Foundling Museum was set up in 1998 and houses the nationally important art collection of the Foundling Hospital. ...


Others were his satire on canvassing in his Election series (1755–1758; now in Sir John Soane's Museum); his ridicule of the English passion for cockfighting in The Cockpit (1759); his attack on Methodism in Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism (1762); his political anti-war satire in The Times, plate I (1762); and his pessimistic view of all things in Tailpiece, or The Bathos (1764). The Humours of an Election is a series of four oil painting and later engravings by William Hogarth that illustrate the election of a member of parliament in Oxfordshire in 1754. ... The Soane Museum is a museum of architecture, and was formerly the house and studio of Sir John Soane. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For school of ancient Greek medicine...


Writing

Hogarth also wrote and published his ideas of artistic design in his book The Analysis of Beauty (1753). In it, he professes to define the principles of beauty and grace which he, a real child of Rococo, saw realized in serpentine lines (the Line of Beauty). The Analysis of Beauty, a book written by William Hogarth (18th century English painter, satyrist, and writer) and published in 1753 describes Hogarths attempt at formulating theories of visual beauty and grace in a manner accessible to the common man of his day. ... North side of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo - carriage courtyard: all the stucco details sparkled with gold until 1773, when Catherine II had gilding replaced with olive drab paint. ... The Line of Beauty is a term and a theory in Art or Aesthetics used to describe an S-shaped curved line (a serpentine line) appearing within an object, as the boundary line of an object, or as a virtual boundary line formed by the composition of several objects. ...


Analysis

Painter and engraver of modern moral subjects

Hogarth lived in an age when artwork became increasingly commercialized and viewed in shop windows, taverns and public buildings and sold in printshops. Old hierarchies broke down, and new forms began to flourish: the ballad opera, the bourgeois tragedy, and especially, a new form of fiction called the novel with which authors such as Henry Fielding had great success. Therefore, by that time, Hogarth hit on a new idea: "painting and engraving modern moral subjects ... to treat my subjects as a dramatic writer; my picture was my stage", as he himself remarked in his manuscript notes. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The term Old Master Print is used to describe works of art produced by a printing process within the Western tradition (European or New World). ... Ballad opera is a genre of 18th century English stage entertainment. ... Bourgeois Tragedy (Bürgerliches Trauerspiel) is a form of tragedy, which developed in 18th century Europe. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... This article is about the literary concept. ... Henry Fielding (April 22, 1707 – October 8, 1754) was an English novelist and dramatist known for his rich earthy humor and satirical prowess and as the author of the novel Tom Jones. ...


He drew from the highly moralizing Protestant tradition of Dutch genre painting, and the very vigorous satirical traditions of the English broadsheet and other types of popular print. In England the fine arts had little comedy in them before Hogarth. His prints were expensive, and remained so until early nineteenth-century reprints brought them to a wider audience. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Genre painting, also called genre scene or petit genre, attempts to depict aspects of everyday life, via portraits of ordinary people engaged in common activities. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ...


Parodic borrowings from the Old Masters

Hogarth's satirical engraving of the radical politician John Wilkes.
Hogarth's satirical engraving of the radical politician John Wilkes.

When analyzing the work of the artist as a whole, Ronald Paulson, the modern authority on Hogarth, sees an accomplished parodist at work, and a subversive. He says, "In A Harlot's Progress, every single plate but one is based on Dürer's images of the story of the Virgin and the story of the Passion." In other works, he parodies Leonardo da Vinci's Last Supper. According to Paulson, Hogarth is subverting the religious establishment and the orthodox belief in an immanent God who intervenes in the lives of people and produces miracles. Indeed, Hogarth was a Deist, a believer in a God who created the universe but takes no direct hand in the lives of his creations. Thus, as a "comic history painter", he often poked fun at the old-fashioned, "beaten" subjects of religious art in his paintings and prints. Hogarth also rejected Lord Shaftesbury's then current ideal of the classical Greek male in favor of the living, breathing female. He said, "Who but a bigot, even to the antiques, will say that he has not seen faces and necks, hands and arms in living women, that even the Grecian Venus doth but coarsely imitate." Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1589x2167, 937 KB) Engraving of John Wilkes (1727-1797), British radical, by the noted painter and engraver William Hogarth. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1589x2167, 937 KB) Engraving of John Wilkes (1727-1797), British radical, by the noted painter and engraver William Hogarth. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ronald Paulson (Born May 27, 1930 in Bottineau, North Dakota), is an American professor of English, a specialist in English 18th-century art and culture, and the leading modern expert on William Hogarth. ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced /al. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... The Last Supper (Italian: or LUltima Cena) is a 15th century mural painting in Milan created by Leonardo da Vinci for his patron Duke Ludovico Sforza and his duchess, Beatrice dEste. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... Deism is belief in a God or first cause based on reason, rather than on faith or revelation, and thus a form of theism in opposition to fideism. ... For other uses, see Shaftesbury (disambiguation) Shaftesbury is a town in North Dorset, England, situated on the A30 road near the Wiltshire border 20 miles west of Salisbury. ... The art of ancient Greece has exercised an enormous influence on the culture of many countries from ancient times until the present, particularly in the areas of sculpture and architecture. ... For the province in the Philippines, see Antique (province) and for the band, see Antique (duo). ... Venus is the Roman goddess of love, equivalent to Greek Aphrodite and Etruscan Turan. ...


Influence and Reputation

His satirical engravings are often considered an important ancestor of the comic strip.[citation needed] This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ...


Hogarth's paintings and prints have provided the subject matter for several other works. For example, Igor Stravinsky's opera The Rake's Progress, with libretto by W. H. Auden, was inspired by Hogarth's series of paintings of that title. Russell Banks's short story, "Indisposed," is a fictional account of Hogarth's infidelity as told from the viewpoint of his long-suffering wife, Jane. Igor Stravinsky. ... This article is about Opera, the art form. ... The Rakes Progress is an English opera in three acts and an epilogue by Igor Stravinsky. ... Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) (IPA: ; first syllable of Auden rhymes with law), who signed his works W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. ... Russell Banks (born March 28, 1940) is an American writer of fiction and poetry. ...


Hogarth's House in Chiswick, West London, is now a museum (free entry); it abuts one of London's best known road junctions – the Hogarth Roundabout. Hogarths House is the former home of the 18th century English artist William Hogarth in Chiswick. ... In the field of road transport, a road junction is a place where two or more roads either meet or cross. ... The Hogarth Roundabout is one of Londons best known road junctions. ...


References

  1. ^ [http://books.google.com/books?id=nwgIAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA1&dq=%22William+Hogarth%22&as_brr=1&ie=ISO-8859-1#PPA63,M1 Anecdotes of William Hogarth, Written by Himself. Page 63

Bibliography

  • Fort, Bernadette, and Angela Rosenthal, The Other Hogarth: Aesthetics of Difference. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2003.
  • Peter Quennell, Hogarth's Progress (London, New York 1955)
  • Frederick Antal, Hogarth and His Place in European Art (London 1962)
  • David Bindman, Hogarth (London 1981)
  • Ronald Paulson, Hogarth's Graphic Works (3rd edn, London 1989)
  • Ronald Paulson, Hogarth, 3 vols. (New Brunswick 1991-93)
  • Jenny Uglow, Hogarth: A Life and a World (London 1997)
  • Frédéric Ogée and Peter Wagner, eds., William Hogarth: Theater and the Theater of Life (Los Angeles, 1997)

Shesgreen, Sean. Hogarth 101 Prints. New York: Dover, 1973. Shesgreen, Sean. Hogarth and the Times of the Day Tradition. Ithca: Cornell UP. Peter Quennell (March 9, 1905, Bickley, Kent (now in Greater London), England - October 27, 1993, London) was an English biographer, literary historian, editor, essayist, poet, and critic. ... Ronald Paulson (Born May 27, 1930 in Bottineau, North Dakota), is an American professor of English, a specialist in English 18th-century art and culture, and the leading modern expert on William Hogarth. ... The name Peter Wagner can refer to several persons: Peter Wagner, a German social theorist. ...

  • Hans-Peter Wagner, William Hogarth: Das graphische Werk (Saarbrücken, 1998)
  • David Bindman, Frédéric Ogée and Peter Wagner, eds. Hogarth: Representing Nature's Machines (Manchester, 2001)
  • Christine Riding and Mark Hallet, "Hogarth" (Tate Publishing, London, 2006)

The name Peter Wagner can refer to several persons: Peter Wagner, a German social theorist. ...

See also

The English school of painting is an expression for English (or British) painters who produced characteristically English paintings. ... The following is a partial list of British painters (in chronological order): George Gower (1540-1596) Nicolas Hilliard (1547-1619) Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599-1641) (born Flemish) William Dobson (1610-1646) John Michael Wright (1617-1694) Sir James Thornhill (1675-1734) John Wootton (1682-1764) John Vanderbank (1694-1739... British Art is the art of the island of Britain. ... Hogarths House is the former home of the 18th century English artist William Hogarth in Chiswick. ... False Perspective is the title of an engraving produced by William Hogarth in 1754. ...

External links

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William Hogarth

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William Hogarth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3059 words)
The son of a poor schoolteacher and textbook writer, William Hogarth was born at Bartholomew Close in London on November 10, 1697.
Hogarth lived in an age, when artwork became immensely commercialized, something no longer just exhibited in churches and the homes of connoisseurs, but viewed in shopwindows, taverns and public buildings and sold in printshops.
Hogarth thus gives a gloomy view of what he perceives to be the life of the upper classes, as well as the ultimate costs of a loveless arranged marriage.
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