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Encyclopedia > William Henry Harrison
William Henry Harrison


In office
March 4, 1841 – April 4, 1841
Vice President John Tyler
Preceded by Martin Van Buren
Succeeded by John Tyler

In office
March 4, 1825 – May 20, 1828
Preceded by Ethan Allen Brown
Succeeded by Jacob Burnet

Born February 9, 1773(1773-02-09)
Charles City County, Colony of Virginia
Died April 4, 1841 (aged 68)
Washington, D.C.
Nationality American
Political party Whig
Spouse Anna Symmes Harrison
Alma mater University of Pennsylvania
Occupation Soldier
Religion Episcopal
Signature William Henry Harrison's signature

William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. He served as the first Governor of the Indiana Territory and later as a U.S. Representative and Senator from Ohio. Harrison first gained national fame for leading U.S forces against American Indians at the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811 and earning the nickname "Tippecanoe" (or "Old Tippecanoe"). As a general in the subsequent War of 1812, his most notable contribution was a victory at the Battle of the Thames, which brought the war in his region to a successful conclusion. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Tyler, Jr. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Ethan Allen Brown (also known as Ethan A. Brown) (July 4, 1776 - February 24, 1852) was a Democratic-Republican politician. ... Jacob Burnet (1770-1853) was an American jurist and statesman from Ohio. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... A map of the Colony of Virginia. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison (1775 - 1864), wife of President William Henry Harrison and the grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison, was nominally First Lady of the United States during her husbands one-month term in 1841, but she never entered the White House. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... This article is about a military rank. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The military history of the United States spans a period of over two centuries. ... Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic, whereby the President of the United States is head of state, head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... Map of the Indiana Territory Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Belligerents Tecumsehs confederacy United States Commanders Tenskwatawa William Henry Harrison Strength 550-700 1,000 regulars and militia Casualties and losses 50+ killed 70+ wounded 62 killed 126 wounded The Battle of Tippecanoe was fought in 1811 between United States forces led by Governor William Henry Harrison of the... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Combatants British Empire Indian Confederation United States Commanders Henry Procter Tecumseh † William Henry Harrison Strength 800 regulars 500 natives1 2,380 militia 1,000 cavalry 120 regulars 260 natives1 Casualties 155 British dead or wounded 477 captured 33 natives dead 15 dead 30 wounded The Battle of the Thames, also...


When Harrison took office in 1841 at the age of 68, he was the oldest man to become President - a record that stood for 140 years, until Ronald Reagan was inaugurated in 1981 at the age of 69. Harrison died thirty-one days into his term — the briefest presidency in the history of the office. He was also the first U.S. President to die while in office. His death threw the country into a constitutional crisis.[1] The following list is based upon the persons age at the time of ascension to the office, not election to the Presidency. ... Reagan redirects here. ... This is a list of United States Presidents by time in office. ... A constitutional crisis is a severe breakdown in the smooth operation of government. ...

Contents

Early years

Harrison was born into a prominent political family at the Berkeley Plantation in Charles City County Virginia, the youngest of the seven children of Benjamin Harrison V and Elizabeth Bassett. His father was a Virginia planter who served as a delegate to the Continental Congress (1774–1777), signed the Declaration of Independence (1776), and was Governor of Virginia (1781-1784). William Henry Harrison's brother, Carter Bassett Harrison, later became a member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Virginia. Harrison's father-in-law was Congressman John Cleves Symmes. His stepmother-in-law was the daughter of New Jersey Governor William Livingston. He was the first cousin of Burwell Bassett on his mother's side. Harrison was the last president to be born a British subject. During its history the United States has seen many families who have repeatedly produced notable politicians from their ranks, and these historic U.S. political families have had a significant impact on politics in the United States. ... Berkeley Plantation, one of the first great estates in America, comprises about 100 acres (0. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Benjamin Harrison V Benjamin Harrison (V) (April 5, 1726 – April 24, 1791) was an American planter and revolutionary leader from Charles City County, Virginia. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... Carter Bassett Harrision (ca. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... John Cleves Symmes (1742-1814) was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and later a pioneer in the Northwest Territory. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... William Livingston William Livingston (November 30, 1723 – July 25, 1790) served as the Governor of New Jersey (1776–1790) during the American Revolution and was a signer of the United States Constitution. ... Burwell Bassett (March 18, 1764 – February 26, 1841) was an eighteenth and nineteenth century politician from Virginia. ...


At age 14 Harrison entered school. He first attended Hampden-Sydney College where he began to study medicine under Dr. Benjamin Rush.[2] He later attended the University of Pennsylvania.[3] Harrison attended the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming a physician, but did not receive a degree. He explained in his biography that he did not enjoy the profession of medicine, and when his father died in 1791, Harrison was left without money for further schooling. Harrison was 17 when his father died and he was left guardianship of Robert Morris, his mother having died years earlier.[4] Hampden-Sydney College is a liberal arts college for men located in Hampden-Sydney, Virginia. ... Dr. Benjamin Rush, painted by Charles Willson Peale, c. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Robert Morris is a very common name, and unsurprisingly there are many famous individuals named Robert Morris, including: Robert Morris (merchant), financier of the American Revolution and signatory of three important founding documents of the US Robert Morris, minimalist artist Robert H. Morris, American cryptographer and former chief scientist of...


Early Military Career

Gov. Lee of Virginia heard Harrison's situation and persuaded Harrison to join the army. Within 24 hours of meeting and discussing the his future with Lee, Harrison, at the age of 18, was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Army, 11th U.S Regt. of Infantry. He was first sent to Cincinnati in the Northwest Territory where the army had been fighting the Northwest Indian War since 1785. At the time Cincinnati consisted of 25-30 log cabins. Harrison once wrote' "I certainly saw more drunken men in those 48 hours...than I have in all of my previouse life." Harrison reported that this shocked him enough to stay wary of alcohol, the cause of death of nearly four fifths of the infantry. He would spent much of his life in the Northwest Territory. The army was demoralized from a defeat at the hands of Miami Tribe suffered just a few days before Harrison's arrival. Henry Lee III (January 29, 1756 - March 25, 1818), American general, called Light Horse Harry, was born near Dumfries, Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... Combatants United States Western Lakes Confederacy Commanders Josiah Harmar Arthur St. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... The Miami are a Native American tribe originally found in Indiana and Ohio, and now living also in Oklahoma. ...


General "Mad Anthony" Wayne took command of the western army in 1792. Harrison was promoted to lieutenant that summer because of his strict attention to discipline. The following year he was promited to serve as aide-de-camp.[5] It was Wayne from whom Harrison learned how to successfully command an army on the American frontier. Harrison participated in Wayne's decisive victory at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794, which brought the Northwest Indian War to a close. Lieutenant Harrison was one of the signers of the Treaty of Greenville in 1795, which opened much of present-day Ohio to settlement by Americans. This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Anthony Wayne (January 1, 1745 - December 15, 1796), was a United States Army general and statesman. ... An aide-de-camp (French: camp assistant) is a personal assistant, secretary, or adjutant to a person of high rank, usually a senior military officer or a head of state. ... In the United States and Canada the frontier was the term applied until the end of the 19th century to the zone of unsettled land outside the region of existing settlements of European immigrants and their descendants. ... For the American Civil War action on April 8, 1862, see Battle of Shiloh. ... Combatants United States Western Lakes Confederacy Commanders Josiah Harmar Arthur St. ... This depiction of the treaty negotiations may have been painted by one of Anthony Waynes officers. ...

This portrait of Harrison originally showed him in civilian clothes as the Congressional delegate from the Northwest Territory in 1800, but the uniform was added after he became famous in the War of 1812.
This portrait of Harrison originally showed him in civilian clothes as the Congressional delegate from the Northwest Territory in 1800, but the uniform was added after he became famous in the War of 1812.

Harrison resigned from the Army in the end of 1797 to become Secretary of the Northwest Territory, and acted as governor when Governor Arthur St. Clair was absent. Image File history File links William_H._Harrison. ... Image File history File links William_H._Harrison. ... For other uses, see Portrait (disambiguation). ... In times of armed conflict a civilian is any person who is not a combatant. ... // Sixth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... Portrait of St. ...

Congressman

In 1799 at age 26, Harrison was elected as the first delegate representing the Northwest Territory in the Sixth United States Congress, serving from March 4, 1799, to May 14, 1800. As delegate, he successfully promoted the passage of the Harrison Land Act, which made it easier for the average settler to purchase land in the Northwest Territory by allowing land to be sold in small tracts. This sudden availability of cheap land was an important factor in the rapid population growth of the Northwest Territory.[6] Harrison resigned from Congress to become governor of the newly formed Indiana Territory after being appointed by President John Adams. The Indiana Territory consisted of the future states of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and the eastern portion of Minnesota. For delegates in the . ... // Sixth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... The Land Act of 1804 was an act which made it easier to buy federal land in Ohio on credit. ... Map of the Indiana Territory Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ...


Governor

Harrison moved to Vincennes, the new capitol of the territory in 1800. While in Vincennes, Harrison built a plantation style home called Grouseland for it's many birds. It was the first brick structure in the territory. The home served as the center of social and political life in the territory. The home has been restored and is a popular tourist attraction. He had built a second home near Corydon, the second capitol, at Harrison Valley as well. This article is about the United States city, Vincennes. ... The Grouseland Mansion in Vincennes, Indiana. ... Corydon is a town in Harrison County, Indiana, United States. ... Harrison Spring 38°1440 N 86°1329 W Harrison Spring is the name of the largest spring in the state of Indiana. ...


As governor Harrison had wide ranging powers in the new territory including the authority to appoint all territory officials, the territorial legislature, and dividing the territory into districts. A primary responsibility as territorial governor was to obtain title to Native American lands so that white settlement could expand in the area and the region could attain statehood. Harrison, however, was also extremely eager to expand the territory for personal reasons, as his own political fortunes were tied to Indiana's rise to statehood. In 1803 President Thomas Jefferson granted Harrison authority to negotiate and conclude treaties with the Indians. Harrison oversaw the creation of thirteen treaties, purchasing more than 60 million acres of land including much of present day Indiana from Native American leaders.[7] The Treaty of Grouseland in 1805 was thought by Harrison to have appeased Native Americans however, tensions, always high on the frontier, became much greater after the 1809 Treaty of Fort Wayne, in which Harrison illegally purchased more than 2,500,000 acres (10,000 km²) of American Indian land. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... The Treaty of Fort Wayne is an 1809 treaty that obtained more than two million acres (8,000 km²) of American Indian land for the white settlers of Ohio and Indiana. ...


In 1803 Harrison lobbied Congress to repeal the 6th article of the Northwest Ordinance to permit slavery in the territory. He claimed it was necessary to make the region more appealing to settlers and ultimately make the territory economically viable. Congress suspended the article for ten years and granted the territory the right to decide for itself. Harrison then through the legislature he had appointed had indenturing legalized later in 1803. His attempt to legalize slavery in 1805 and 1807 caused a significant stir in the territory. In 1809 he found himself at odds with the legislature when the anti-slavery party came to power. They promply rebuffed many of his plans for slavery and repealed the indenturing laws he had passed in 1803. Northwest Territory (1787). ...

See also: History of slavery in Indiana

Grouseland, home of William Henry Harrison, made use of slave labor. ...

General

An Indian resistance movement against U.S. expansion had been growing around the Shawnee brothers Tecumseh and Tenskwatawa ("The Prophet"). Tecumseh called upon Harrison to nullify the Treaty of Fort Wayne, warned against any whites moving onto the land, and continued to widen his Indian confederation. In 1811 Tecumseh's War began and Harrison was authorized to march against the confederacy and engaged them in the Battle of Tippecanoe. In the ensuing battle it was claimed that Harrison had a bullet pierce his hat. He ultimately won his famous victory at Prophetstown next to the Wabash and Tippecanoe Rivers. Harrison was publicly hailed as a national hero, despite the fact that his troops had greatly outnumbered the Indian forces and yet suffered many more casualties. This article is about the Native American tribe. ... For other uses, see Tecumseh (disambiguation). ... Tenskwatawa Tenskwatawa, Tenskatawa,, Tensquatawa or Elskwatawa (1775 – November 1836) was a Native American religious and political leader known as the Shawnee Prophet (of the Shawnee tribe). ... A confederation is an association of sovereign states or communities, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution. ... At Vincennes in 1810, Tecumseh loses his temper when William Henry Harrison refuses to rescind the Treaty of Fort Wayne. ... Belligerents Tecumsehs confederacy United States Commanders Tenskwatawa William Henry Harrison Strength 550-700 1,000 regulars and militia Casualties and losses 50+ killed 70+ wounded 62 killed 126 wounded The Battle of Tippecanoe was fought in 1811 between United States forces led by Governor William Henry Harrison of the... Prophetstown may refer to Prophetstown, Illinois, USA Prophets Town or Prophetstown in Indiana, USA, site of the 1811 Battle of Tippecanoe and now the Prophetstown State Park Category: ... The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ... The Tippecanoe River is a gentle, 225 mile (362 km) long river in northern Indiana that flows from Lake Tippecanoe in Kosciusko County to the Wabash River near Battle Ground, about twelve miles northeast of Lafayette. ...


When Tecumseh's War merged with the War of 1812, Harrison remained in command army in Indiana. After the loss of Detroit General James Winchester became the commander of the Army of the Northwest and Harrison was offered the rank or Brigadier General which he refused and resigned from the army. After a brief time in command President James Madison removed Winchester and made Harrison the commander on Sept. 17, 1812. Harrison inherited a army made up of fresh recruits which he endeavored to drill. Initially he was greatly outnumbered and assumed a defensive posture. After receiving reinforcements in 1813 Harrison then advanced the army farther north to battle the Indian's and their new British allies. He won victories in Indiana and Ohio and retook Detroit before invading Canada and crushing the British at the Battle of the Thames, in which Tecumseh was killed. After the Battle of Thames the Secretary of War divided the command of Harrison's army assigning him to a backwater post and giving the front to one of his subordinates. Harrison was already having disagreement with the Secretary of War because of ongoing disagreements with Secretary of War John Armstrong over the lack of coordination and effectiveness of the invasion of Canada. When he was reassigned he promptly resigned from the army to prevent what he called an act of "subversive military order and discipline". His resignation was accepted in the summer of 1814.[8] This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Detroit redirects here. ... James Winchester (February 26, 1752-July 26, 1826) was a Brigadier General during the War of 1812 and commanding officer of American forces during the River Raisin massacre. ... This article is about the United States army active during the War of 1812. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Detroit redirects here. ... Combatants British Empire Indian Confederation United States Commanders Henry Procter Tecumseh † William Henry Harrison Strength 800 regulars 500 natives1 2,380 militia 1,000 cavalry 120 regulars 260 natives1 Casualties 155 British dead or wounded 477 captured 33 natives dead 15 dead 30 wounded The Battle of the Thames, also... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... John Armstrong, Jr. ...


After the war was concluded, Congress made an investigation into Harrison's resignation in which they decided that Harrison had been mistreated by the Secretary of War during his campaign and was justified in his resignation. They also awarded Harrison a gold medal for his service to the nation during the War of 1812.[9] This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ...


Tecumseh's Curse

According to a legend, Tecumseh had placed a curse on Harrison, claiming that every President to be elected in a year ending with the number zero (which happens every 20 years) would die in office. This Curse of Tecumseh is sometimes called the "zero-year curse". Remarkably, though there is no documentary evidence to prove the curse was made, it in fact "came true" for Harrison as well as for the next 6 eligible Presidents - Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley, Harding, Franklin Roosevelt and Kennedy. Ronald Reagan's survival of an assassination attempt seems to have "broken the curse", and, so far, George W Bush has evaded it. The term Tecumsehs curse or zero-year curse is sometimes used to describe a chain of events that began with the death of United States President William Henry Harrison from pneumonia. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was a major general in the United States Army, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and the twentieth President of the United States. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, from 1921 to 1923. ... FDR redirects here. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Reagan redirects here. ... The major events of the assassination attempt The Reagan assassination attempt occurred on March 30, 1981, just 69 days into the presidency of Ronald Reagan. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001 and re-elected in the 2004 U.S. presidential election. ...


The US has had three presidents in the same year two times. The first time was in 1841 when Martin van Buren ended his single term. William Henry Harrison was inaugurated and died a month later, with Vice President John Tyler stepping into the vacant office. The second time was in 1881, when Rutherford B. Hayes relinquished the office to James A. Garfield, who was assassinated. With the death of Garfield, Chester A. Arthur stepped into the Presidency. 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was the twentieth President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ...


Post-war Life

After the war Harrison was appointed by President James Madison to serve as a commissioner to negotiate two treaties with the Indians tribes in the northwest. Both treaties where advantageous to the United States and gained a large tract of land in the west for settlement.


Senator and Ambassador

Harrison was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Ohio, serving from October 8, 1816, to March 4, 1819. He was elected and served in the Ohio State Senate from 1819 to 1821. He ran for governor of Ohio but was defeated in 1820. In 1824, he was elected to the U.S. Senate, where he served until May 20, 1828. In the Senate he was became known for his impassioned debates. Harrison was referred to by fellow westerners in Congress as a Buckeye, a term of endearment in respect of the Buckeye chestnut tree. is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ... The Ohio Senate is the upper house in Ohios bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly; the lower house is the Ohio House of Representatives. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Buckeye may refer to: The name used for several species of trees of the genus Aesculus, or the related Mexican Buckeye (genus Ungnadia). ... Species Castanea alnifolia - Bush Chinkapin* Castanea crenata - Japanese Chestnut Castanea dentata - American Chestnut Castanea henryi - Henrys Chestnut Castanea mollissima - Chinese Chestnut Castanea ozarkensis - Ozark Chinkapin Castanea pumila - Allegheny Chinkapin Castanea sativa - Sweet Chestnut Castanea seguinii - Seguins Chestnut * treated as a synonym of by many authors Chestnut is a...


He resigned from the Senate in 1828 to become Minister Plenipotentiary to Colombia serving in 1828 and 1829. He left for Columbia and resided in Bogota arriving Decmeber 22. He found the condition of the citizens saddening and reported to the Secretary of State that the country was on the edge of anarchy and that he thought Simon Bolivar was about to become a despotic military dictator. While the minister there he wrote a letter of rebuke to Bolivar stating "...the strongest of all governments is that which is most free." He went on to call for Bolivar to refrain from terrorizing his enemies and encourage the development of a democracy.[10] He was soon recalled from his position when the administration of President Andrew Jackson came to power. He arrived back in the United States in June. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Simón José Antonio de la Santísima Trinidad Bolívar y Palacios (July 24, 1783 – December 17, 1830) was a South American revolutionary leader. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ...


Private Citizen

Harrison returned to the United States in 1829 and settled on his farm in North Bend, Ohio, by then his adopted home state. There he entered a relative state of retirement having been continually in government service for nearly 40 years. Having accumulated no substantial wealth during his life he subsisted on his savings and a small income from pensions, but mostly from the income produced by his farm. He also gained some money from a biography he contributed to that was written by his biographer John Dawson and a second book written by James Hall entitled A Memoir of the Public Services of William Henry Harrison that was published in 1836. By the time he began to run for President the second time there were already more than a dozen books on the life of Harrison. North Bend is a village in Hamilton County, Ohio, along the Ohio River. ...


On his farm he grew many acres of corn and established a distillery to produce whiskey. After a brief time of brewing he became disturbed by the effects his product made on it's consumers and closed down the distillery. He even went so far as to address the Hamilton County Agricultural Board in 1831 claiming that he had sinned in creating the whiskey and hoped that others would learn from his mistake and also stop producing liquors.[11] Distillation is a means of separating liquids through differences in their boiling points. ... Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ... Hamilton County is a county in the located in the southwest corner of the state of Ohio, United States. ...


His private life would only last a few years though and he would return to public life and the national stage in 1836.

Chromolithograph campaign poster for William Henry Harrison
Chromolithograph campaign poster for William Henry Harrison

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 429 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (442 × 618 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 429 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (442 × 618 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Folding Card, The Old Woman Who Lived in A Shoe, 6 April 1883. ...

1840 Presidential Campaign

Harrison was the Northern Whig candidate for President in 1836, but lost the election to Martin Van Buren. He was the candidate again (and again faced Van Buren, now the incumbent President) in the 1840 election, basing his campaign heavily on his heroic military record and the weak U.S. economy brought on by the Panic of 1837. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Whig campaign poster blames Van Buren for hard times (1840). ...


The Democrats attempted to ridicule Harrison by calling him "Granny Harrison, the petticoat general," because he resigned from the army before the War of 1812 ended. When asking voters whether Harrison should be elected, they asked them what his name backwards was, which happens to be "No Sirrah." This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ...


Democrats also cast Harrison as a provincial and out-of-touch old man who would rather "sit in his log cabin drinking hard cider" than attend to the administration of the country. This strategy backfired, however, when Harrison and his vice presidential running-mate, John Tyler, immediately adopted both symbols, using the images in banners, posters, and even bottles of hard cider that were shaped like log cabins. John Tyler, Jr. ...


Their campaign was from then on marked by exaggeration of Harrison's connections to the common man. (Harrison came from an aristocratic Virginia family, but his supporters promoted him as a humble frontiersman in the style of the popular Andrew Jackson.) A memorable example of these efforts was the Gold Spoon Oration delivered by a Whig congressman. Van Buren, by contrast, was presented as a wealthy elitist who spent taxpayers' money on champagne and crystal goblets from which to sip it. For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Gold Spoon Oration, also called The Regal Splendor of the President’s Palace, is a political speech given in the US House of Representatives by Charles Ogle (Whig-PA) on April 14-16, 1840. ...


The Whigs also played up Harrison's military record and reputation as the hero of the Battle of Tippecanoe. Their campaign slogan, "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too," became one of the most famous in American politics.


On election day, Harrison won a landslide electoral victory In politics, a landslide victory (or just a landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election. ...


Presidency 1841

Shortest presidency

When Harrison arrived in Washington, he focused on showing that he was still the steadfast hero of Tippecanoe. He took the oath of office on March 4, 1841, an extremely cold and wet day.[12] Nevertheless, he faced the weather without his overcoat and delivered the longest inaugural address in American history. At 8,444 words, it took nearly two hours to read (even after his friend and fellow Whig, Daniel Webster, had edited it for length). He then rode through the streets in the inaugural parade. Belligerents Tecumsehs confederacy United States Commanders Tenskwatawa William Henry Harrison Strength 550-700 1,000 regulars and militia Casualties and losses 50+ killed 70+ wounded 62 killed 126 wounded The Battle of Tippecanoe was fought in 1811 between United States forces led by Governor William Henry Harrison of the... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ...


Most of his business during Harrison's month-long presidency involved heavy social obligations — an inevitable part of his high position and arrival in Washington — and receiving visitors who were seeking his favor in the hope that he would appoint them to the numerous offices the president then had at his disposal. Harrison and Clay had also disagreed about government patronage, which was entirely given at the discretion of the President. Harrison had tried to end the dispute by promising in his inaugural address not to use the power to enhance his own standing in the government; however, the very fact of his appointment power sent scores of people to line up at the doors of the White House. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


Harrison's only act of consequence was to call Congress into a special session, which he set to begin on May 31, 1841. He and Whig leader Henry Clay had disagreed over the necessity of the special session (which Harrison opposed, but Clay desired in order to immediately get his economic agenda underway), but Clay's powerful position in both the legislature and the Whig Party quickly forced Harrison to give in. He thus proclaimed the special session in the interests of "the condition of the revenue and finance of the country."[13] is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Henry Clay, Sr. ...


Harrison was the first sitting president to have his picture taken. The original daguerreotype has been lost, although copies of it exist.[14] An 1837 daguerreotype by Daguerre. ...


On March 26, Harrison became ill with a cold. The presumptive story, which has become common knowledge despite its falsity, is that the inauguration day exposure was the cause of his illness. In fact, it was more than three weeks after the inauguration when Harrison began showing any sign at all of ill health, although the cold did worsen after Harrison was caught in a rain shower that day and rapidly turned to pneumonia and pleurisy.[15] (According to the prevailing medical misconception of the times, microorganisms being still unknown, it was believed that his illness was directly caused by the bad weather, when, in fact, he was likely a victim of the virus that causes the common cold, exacerbated by the drastic pressures of his changing circumstances and the unceasing crush of office seekers.) He sought to rest in the White House, but could not find a quiet room because of the steady crowd of office seekers; in addition, his extremely busy social schedule made any rest time scarce. Acute viral nasopharyngitis, or acute coryza, usually known as the common cold, is a highly contagious, viral infectious disease of the upper respiratory system, primarily caused by picornaviruses or coronaviruses. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... Pleurisy, also known as pleuritis, is an inflammation of the pleura, the lining of the pleural cavity surrounding the lungs, which can cause painful respiration (also called pleuritic chest pain) and other symptoms. ... This article is about biological infectious particles. ... Acute viral nasopharyngitis, or acute coryza, usually known as the common cold, is a highly contagious, viral infectious disease of the upper respiratory system, primarily caused by picornaviruses or coronaviruses. ...

Poster of Harrison's accomplishments.
Poster of Harrison's accomplishments.

Harrison's doctors tried various methods to cure him, applying opium, castor oil, Virginia snakeweed, and even actual snakes. But the treatments only made Harrison worse and he went into delirium. He died nine days after becoming ill,[16] at 12:30 a.m., on April 4, 1841, of right lower lobe pneumonia, jaundice, and overwhelming septicemia, becoming the first American president to die in office. His last words were to his doctor, but assumed to be to John Tyler, "Sir, I wish you to understand the true principles of the government. I wish them carried out. I ask nothing more." Harrison served the shortest term of any American president: only 30 days, 12 hours and 30 minutes. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 475 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (898 × 1134 pixel, file size: 266 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 475 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (898 × 1134 pixel, file size: 266 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... This article is about the drug. ... Castor oil is a vegetable oil obtained from the castor bean (technically castor seed as the castor plant, Ricinus communis, is not a member of the bean family). ... Families Acrochordidae Aniliidae Anomalepididae Anomochilidae Atractaspididae Boidae Bolyeriidae Colubridae Cylindrophiidae Elapidae Hydrophiidae Leptotyphlopidae Loxocemidae Pythonidae Tropidophiidae Typhlopidae Uropeltidae Viperidae Xenopeltidae Snakes are cold blooded legless reptiles closely related to lizards, which share the order Squamata. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... Look up jaundice in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sepsis (in Greek Σήψις) is a serious medical condition caused by a severe systemic infection leading to a systemic inflammatory response. ...


Harrison's funeral took place in the Wesley Chapel in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1841. It was said no man was mourned this much since George Washington.[citation needed] He was a founding member of Christ Church, Cincinnati. He was buried in North Bend, Ohio at the William Henry Harrison Tomb State Memorial. Wesley Chapel (Cincinnati) was built in 1831 on the north side of Fifth Street between Broadway and Sycamore, was a simple red brick Georgian structure, a copy of John Wesleys original Methodist church in London. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ... The Parish House (centre) and Christ Church Cathedral (to the left) in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... North Bend is a village in Hamilton County, Ohio, along the Ohio River. ... William Henry Harrison Tomb State Memorial is a registered historic structure in North Bend, Ohio, listed in the National Register on November 10, 1970. ...


Legacy

The untimely death of Harrison was a disappointment to Whigs, who hoped to pass a revenue tariff and enact measures to support Henry Clay's American System. John Tyler, Harrison's successor and a long-time Democrat, abandoned the Whig agenda, leaving himself without a party. The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... The Monkey System or Every One For Himself Henry Clay says Walk in and see the new improved original grand American System! The cages are labeled: Home, Consumption, Internal, Improv. This 1831 cartoon ridiculing Clays American System depicts monkeys, labeled as being different parts of a nations economy... John Tyler, Jr. ...


Harrison's son, John Scott Harrison, was also elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Ohio from 1853 to 1857. Harrison's grandson, Benjamin Harrison of Ohio, became the 23rd president in 1889, making them the only grandparent-grandchild pair of presidents to date. In 1889, President Benjamin Harrison gave his inaugural address in the rain. Understanding his grandfather's mistakes, he asked his outgoing predecessor (and later his successor), Grover Cleveland, to hold an umbrella above his head, since he also delivered a long inaugural address. John Scott Harrison (1804-1878) was an American Congressman who represented the second district of Ohio from 1853 to 1857. ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ...

Statue of Harrison on horseback in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Statue of Harrison on horseback in Cincinnati, Ohio.

He was the first, but not only, U.S. president to have no military vessel named after him. However, during the American Civil War, the Union Army named a post near Cincinnati "Camp Harrison." ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1356 KB) Statue of William Henry Harrison in Cincinnati. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1356 KB) Statue of William Henry Harrison in Cincinnati. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Camp Harrison was one of several Union Army training posts in Hamilton County, Ohio, established during the American Civil War. ...


Harrison County, Indiana, Harrison County, Mississippi, Harrison County, Iowa, Harrison County, Ohio, and William Henry Harrison High School are all named in honor of Harrison. Harrison County is a county located in the south-central part of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Harrison County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Harrison County is a county located in the state of Iowa. ... Harrison County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... William Henry Harrison High School (HHS) is a 4-year high school in Tippecanoe County, West Lafayette, Indiana. ...


Harrison died nearly penniless. Congress voted to give his wife a pension payment of $25,000,[17] equivalent to one year's worth of Harrison's salary.[18]


Administration and Cabinet

Harrison's tomb and memorial in North Bend, Ohio.
Harrison's tomb and memorial in North Bend, Ohio.
The Harrison Cabinet
OFFICE NAME TERM
President William Henry Harrison 1841
Vice President John Tyler 1841
Secretary of State Daniel Webster 1841
Secretary of Treasury Thomas Ewing, Sr. 1841
Secretary of War John Bell 1841
Attorney General John J. Crittenden 1841
Postmaster General Francis Granger 1841
Secretary of the Navy George E. Badger 1841


ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1728x2304, 1259 KB) Memorial at William Henry Harrisons tomb. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1728x2304, 1259 KB) Memorial at William Henry Harrisons tomb. ... North Bend is a village in Hamilton County, Ohio, along the Ohio River. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... John Bell (also known as The Great Apostate) (February 15, 1797–September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician, attorney, and plantation owner. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... Francis Granger (December 1, 1792 - August 31, 1868) was a Representative from New York. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... George Edmund Badger (1795 - 1866) was a Whig U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina. ...

Supreme Court appointments

none


States admitted to the Union

none


Notes and references

  1. ^ "The Constitution of that time contained no Twenty-fifth Amendment to lay out procedures governing the vice president's actions when the chief executive became disabled or when there was a vacancy before the end of the incumbent's term. The document provided only that the 'Powers and Duties of the said Office . . . shall devolve on the Vice President . . . [who] shall act accordingly, until the Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.' In another section, the Constitution referred to the vice president 'when he shall exercise the Office of President of the United States.'" John Tyler, Tenth Vice President (1841). Secretary of the Senate, United States Government. Last accessed 2007-04-01.
  2. ^ A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of William Henry Harrison, J. N. Whitting, 1840, Pg 2
  3. ^ whitehouse.gov
  4. ^ A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of William Henry Harrison, J. N. Whitting, 1840, Pg 2
  5. ^ A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of William Henry Harrison, J. N. Whitting, 1840, Pg 3
  6. ^ A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of William Henry Harrison, J. N. Whitting, 1840, Pg 5
  7. ^ A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of William Henry Harrison, J. N. Whitting, 1840, Pg 7
  8. ^ A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of William Henry Harrison, J. N. Whitting, 1840, Pg 24-25
  9. ^ A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of William Henry Harrison, J. N. Whitting, 1840, Pg 25
  10. ^ A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of William Henry Harrison, J. N. Whitting, 1840, Pg 26-27
  11. ^ The Life and Times of William Henry Harrison, By Samuel Jones Burr, Pg 258
  12. ^ Harrison's Inauguration (Reason): American Treasures of the Library of Congress
  13. ^ William Henry Harrison and John Tyler - Harrison's presidency, The accession of tyler
  14. ^ The White House Historical Association, retrieved January 23, 2007
  15. ^ Cleaves, Freeman. Old Tippecanoe: William Henry Harrison and His Time. New York: Scribner's, 1939
  16. ^ Cleaves, Freeman. Old Tippecanoe: William Henry Harrison and His Time. New York: Scribner's, 1939
  17. ^ Damon, Allan L. (June 1974), "Presidential Expenses", American Heritage 25 (4), <http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/ah/1974/4/1974_4_64.shtml>
  18. ^ Summers, Robert S. (2007), POTUS: William Henry Harrison, <http://www.ipl.org/div/potus/whharrison.html>. Retrieved on 12 November 2007

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Books

  • Cleaves, Freeman. Old Tippecanoe: William Henry Harrison and His Time. New York: Scribner's, 1939.
  • The Life and Time of William Henry Harrison, By Samuel Jones Burr, 1840
  • A Memoir of the Public Services of William Henry Harrison, of Ohio, By James Hall, 1836
  • A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of William Henry Harrison, By Isaac Rand, 1840

Related Links

  • List of United States Presidents who died in office

This is a list of us presidents who died during their term as president, by date and by cause of death. ...

External links

Ohio Portal
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Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
William Henry Harrison
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
William Henry Harrison
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
William Henry Harrison


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Political offices
Preceded by
Winthrop Sargent
Secretary of Northwest Territory
June 28, 1798October 1, 1799
Succeeded by
Charles Willing Byrd
New title
Indiana Territory established
Governor of Indiana Territory
1800 – 1812
Succeeded by
John Gibson (acting)
Preceded by
Amos Stoddard
as Commandant of the District of Louisiana
Governor of Indiana Territory (Upper Louisiana)
1804 – 1805
Succeeded by
James Wilkinson
as Governor of Louisiana Territory
Preceded by
Andrew Jackson
Chairman of the Senate Military Affairs Committee
1825 – 1828
Succeeded by
Thomas Hart Benton
Preceded by
Martin Van Buren
President of the United States
March 4, 1841April 4, 1841
Succeeded by
John Tyler
United States House of Representatives
New title Delegate from the Northwest Territory
March 4, 1799May 14, 1800
Succeeded by
William McMillan
Preceded by
John McLean
Member from Ohio's 1st congressional district
1816–1819
Succeeded by
Thomas Randolph Ross
Ohio Senate
Preceded by
Ephraim Brown
George P. Torrence
Senator from Hamilton County
1819–1821
Served alongside: Ephraim Brown
Succeeded by
Ephraim Brown
Benjamin M. Piatt
United States Senate
Preceded by
Ethan Allen Brown
Senator from Ohio (Class 3)
1825 – 1828
Served alongside: Benjamin Ruggles
Succeeded by
Jacob Burnet
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Beaufort T. Watts
United States Minister to Colombia
May 24, 1828September 26, 1829
Succeeded by
Thomas P. Moore
Party political offices
New political party Whig Party presidential candidate
1836¹, 1840
Succeeded by
Henry Clay
Notes and references
1. The Whig Party ran regional candidates in 1836. Harrison ran in the Northern states, Hugh Lawson White ran in the Southern states, and Daniel Webster ran in Massachusetts.
Persondata
NAME Harrison, William Henry
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American politician, military leader
DATE OF BIRTH February 9, 1773
PLACE OF BIRTH Charles City County, Virginia
DATE OF DEATH April 4, 1841
PLACE OF DEATH Washington, D.C.
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The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... Thomas Hart Benton nicknamed Old Bullion (March 14, 1782 – April 10, 1858), was an U.S. Senator from Missouri and a staunch advocate of westward expansion of the United States. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Tyler, Jr. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... 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Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825). ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was the twentieth President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, from 1921 to 1923. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Nixon redirects here. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Reagan redirects here. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Image File history File links Seal_Of_The_President_Of_The_Unites_States_Of_America. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... This is about the 19th century Tennessee politician; for the 20th century Mississippi politician, see Hugh L. White. ... Willie Person Mangum (May 10, 1792–September 7, 1861) was a U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1831 and 1836 and between 1840 and 1853. ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... John Bell (also known as The Great Apostate) (February 15, 1797–September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician, attorney, and plantation owner. ... Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... John Smith (1735 - July 30, 1824) was one of the first two U.S. Senators from the state of Ohio. ... Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr. ... Thomas Worthington (July 16, 1773 - June 20, 1827) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... Joseph Kerr (1765 - August 22, 1837) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... Benjamin Ruggles (February 21, 1783 _ September 2, 1857 was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... Thomas Morris (January 3, 1776 - December 7, 1844) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Benjamin Tappan (May 25, 1773 - April 20, 1857) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Thomas Corwin, also known as Tom Corwin and The Wagon Boy (July 29, 1794 – December 18, 1865) was a politician from the state of Ohio who served as a prosecuting attorney, a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, United States House of Representatives, and United States Senate, and as... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... Benjamin Franklin Bluff Wade (October 27, 1800 – March 2, 1878) was a U.S. lawyer and United States Senator. ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... Mark Hanna Mark A. Hanna (September 24, 1837–February 15, 1904), born Marcus Alonzo Hanna, was an industrialist and Republican politician from Ohio. ... Charles William Frederick Dick (November 3, 1858 - March 13, 1945) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Atlee Pomerene (December 6, 1863 _ November 12, 1937) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Simeon Davison Fess (December 11, 1861 - December 23, 1936) was a Republican politician and educator from Ohio. ... Alvin Victor Donahey (also known as A. Victor Donahey, A. Vic Donahey, Vic Donahey, or A. V. Donahey) (July 7, 1873 - April 8, 1946) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Harold Hitz Burton (June 22, 1888 - October 28, 1964) was an American Senator and Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... James Wylie Huffman (September 13, 1894 - May 20, 1980) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Kingsley Arter Taft (July 19, 1903 – March 28, 1970) was an American politician of Ohios Republican Taft family who served as chief justice of the Ohio Supreme Court and also served briefly as a United States Senator. ... John William Bricker (September 6, 1893 – March 22, 1986) was a United States politician from Ohio. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Stephen Marvin Young (May 4, 1889 - December 1, 1984) was an American politician of the Democratic Party from Ohio. ... Robert Taft (generally known as Robert Taft Jr. ... Howard Metzenbaum Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate (1974, 1976-1995). ... Richard Michael Mike DeWine (born January 5, 1947) is an American politician from Ohio. ... Sherrod Campbell Brown (born November 9, 1952) is the Democratic Junior United States Senator from the state of Ohio. ... Thomas Worthington (July 16, 1773 - June 20, 1827) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... Edward Tiffin (June 19, 1766 – August 9, 1829) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio, and the first Governor of that state. ... Stanley Griswold (November 14, 1763 - August 21, 1815) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... Insert non-formatted text here</nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereAlexander Campbell ([[1779]] – [[November 5]], [[1857]]) was a [[United States National Republican Party|National Republican]] politician from [[Ohio]]. He served in the [[United States Senate|U.S. Senate]]. Born in [[Frederick County, Virginia]], Campbell moved to eastern [[Tennessee]] and... Jeremiah Morrow (October 6, 1771 - March 22, 1852) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... William Allen Trimble (April 4, 1786 - December 13, 1821) was a National Republican politician from Ohio. ... Ethan Allen Brown (also known as Ethan A. Brown) (July 4, 1776 - February 24, 1852) was a Democratic-Republican politician. ... Jacob Burnet (1770-1853) was an American jurist and statesman from Ohio. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... William Allen ( December 27, 1803 - July 11, 1879) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio and Governor of Ohio. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... George Ellis Pugh (November 28, 1822 - July 19, 1876) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | United States Senators | Ohio State Senators | American lawyers | U.S. Army officers | 1824 births | 1889 deaths ... George Pendleton George Hunt Pendleton (July 19, 1825 – November 24, 1889) was a Representative and a Senator from Ohio. ... Henry B. Payne (November 30, 1810 - September 9, 1896) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Calvin Stewart Brice (September 17, 1845 - December 15, 1898) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Joseph Benson Foraker (July 5, 1846 – May 10, 1917) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Theodore Elijah Burton (December 20, 1851 - October 28, 1929) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, from 1921 to 1923. ... Frank Bartlett Willis (December 28, 1871 - March 30, 1928) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Cyrus Locher (March 8, 1878 - August 17, 1929) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Theodore Elijah Burton (December 20, 1851 - October 28, 1929) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Roscoe Conkling McCulloch (November 27, 1880 - March 17, 1958) was a Republican politician from Ohio who served in the United States House of Representatives and U.S. Senate. ... Robert Johns Bulkley (October 8, 1880 - July 21, 1965) was a United States Democratic Party politician from Ohio. ... For the former Governor of Ohio and Robert Tafts grandson, see Bob Taft. ... Thomas A. Burke (October 30, 1898 - December 5, 1971) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... George Harrison Bender (September 29, 1896, Cleveland, Ohio - June 18, 1961, Chagrin Falls, Ohio) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Frank John Lausche (November 14, 1895 - April 21, 1990) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... William Bart Saxbe (born June 24, 1916) was an American politician of the Republican Party, who served as a U.S. Senator from Ohio and as U.S. Attorney General under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. ... Howard Metzenbaum Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate (1974, 1976-1995). ... For other persons named John Glenn, see John Glenn (disambiguation). ... George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) is the senior United States Senator from the state of Ohio, and a member of the Republican Party. ... List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ... Map of the Indiana Territory Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... Portrait of Thomas Posey by John Bayless Hill. ... State seal of Indiana. ... Jonathan Jennings (1784–1834) was a U.S. political figure. ... Ratliff Boon (January 18, 1781–November 20, 1844) was the governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from September 12 to December 5, 1822, after Governor Jonathan Jennings was elected to Congress. ... William Hendricks (born November 12, 1782; died May 16, 1850) was Governor of Indiana from 1822 to 1825, and a U.S. Senator from 1825 to 1837. ... James Brown Ray (February 19, 1794–August 4, 1848) was governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1825 to 1831. ... Noah Noble ( January 14, 1794– February 8, 1844) was a Whig governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1831 to 1837. ... Governor David Wallace David Wallace (September 12, 1799–September 4, 1859) was a Whig governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from December 6, 1837 to December 9, 1840. ... Governor Samuel Bigger Samuel Bigger (March 20, 1802–September 9, 1845) was a Whig governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from December 9, 1840 to December 6, 1843. ... James Whitcomb (December 1, 1795–October 4, 1852) was a Democrat governor of Indiana from December 6, 1843 to December 26, 1848. ... Paris C. Dunning (March 15, 1806–May 9, 1884) was a Democrat governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from December 26, 1848 to December 5, 1849. ... Joseph A. Wright (April 17, 1810–May 11, 1867) was a Democrat governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from December 5, 1849 to January 12, 1857. ... Ashbel P. Willard was a former Indiana Governor Category: ... Abram A. Hammond (March 21, 1814-August 27, 1874) was twelfth Governor of Indiana. ... Henry Smith Lane (February 24, 1811 - June 18, 1881) was an anti-slavery American politician who had the distinction of serving the shortest term (two days) of any Indiana Governor. ... Oliver Hazard Perry Morton (NSHC statue) Oliver Hazard Perry Throck Morton (August 4, 1823–November 1, 1877) was an American politician from Indiana. ... Conrad Baker (1817 1885) was the governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1867 to 1873. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... James Douglas Williams (January 16, 1808 November 20, 1880) was an American politician, most notable as the governor of Indiana from 1877 to 1880. ... Isaac P. Gray (1828 1895) was the governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1880 to 1881 and from 1885 to 1889. ... Albert Gallatin Porter (1824-1897), was an Indiana governor, and United States Congressman. ... Isaac P. Gray (1828 1895) was the governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1880 to 1881 and from 1885 to 1889. ... Alvin P. Hovey as a brigadier general. ... Ira Joy Chase (1834 – 1895) was the Governor of Indiana between November 23, 1891 – January 9, 1893. ... List of Indiana Territory Governors William Henry Harrison 1800-1812 John Gibson 1801-1813 Thomas Posey 1813-1816 List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ... James A. Mount is a former Indiana governor. ... Winfield Taylor Durbin (1847 - 1928) was governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1901 to 1905. ... James Franklin Hanly (April 4, 1863 – August 1, 1920) was an United States politician who served as the 26th Governor of Indiana from 1905 to 1909. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... Samuel M. Ralston is a former Indiana governor. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: no content and looks like vanity page. ... Warren T. McCray is a former Indiana governon. ... Governor Harry G. Leslie Harry Guyer Leslie (April 6, 1878 - December 10, 1937) was born of pioneer parents in West Lafayette, Indiana. ... Paul V. McNutt in his Washington office, 1941. ... M. Clifford Townsend is a former Indiana Governor. ... Henry Frederick Schricker (August 30, 1883 - December 28, 1966) was governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1941 to 1945 and from 1949 to 1953. ... Ralph F. Gates (1893 - 1978) was governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1945 to 1949. ... Henry Frederick Schricker (August 30, 1883 - December 28, 1966) was governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1941 to 1945 and from 1949 to 1953. ... George N. Craig on the cover of Time Magazine George N. Craig (1909-1992), was governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from 1953 until 1957. ... Harold W. Handley is a former Indiana governor. ... Image:Welsh. ... Roger Douglas Branigin (July 26, 1902–November 19, 1975) was a Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from January 11, 1965 to January 13, 1969. ... Edgar Doud Whitcomb (b. ... Otis Ray Bowen (born 26 February 1918) is a retired U.S. politician and physician. ... Robert D. Orr Robert Dunkerson Orr (November 17, 1917 - March 10, 2004) was an American political leader and Governor of Indiana from 1981 to 1989. ... Birch Evans Bayh III (commonly known as Evan Bayh) (pronounced like bye; IPA pronunciation: ) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Frank Lewis OBannon (1930-2003) was an American politician who was Governor of Indiana from 1997 until his death, on September 13, 2003. ... Joseph Eugene Kernan (born April 8, 1946), widely known as Joe Kernan, is an American politician who became the Governor of Indiana on September 13, 2003 upon the death of Frank OBannon. ... Mitchell Elias Mitch Daniels, Jr. ... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... John Bell (also known as The Great Apostate) (February 15, 1797–September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician, attorney, and plantation owner. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... Francis Granger (December 1, 1792 - August 31, 1868) was a Representative from New York. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... George Edmund Badger (1795 - 1866) was a Whig U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

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William Henry Harrison - MSN Encarta (581 words)
William Henry Harrison was born on February 9, 1773, and grew up on his family's plantation, Berkeley, in Charles City County, Virginia.
He was the son of Elizabeth Basset Harrison and Benjamin Harrison, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and governor of Virginia.
Because Harrison's father wanted his son to become a doctor, he was sent to the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia to study under the great physician Benjamin Rush.
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