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Encyclopedia > William Henry Barlow

William Henry Barlow (1812-1902) was an English civil engineer of the 19th century, particularly associated with railway engineering projects. 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... The term civil engineer refers to an individual who practices civil engineering. ...


Born in Charlton in south-east London, the son of an engineer and mathematician (Professor Peter Barlow, who taught at the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich), William Barlow grew up close to Woolwich Dockyard and his formative years as an engineer were spent studying with his father and working in the Dockyard’s machinery department. Charlton is a place in south-east London, in the London Borough of Greenwich, sandwiched between east Greenwich and the Woolwich Dockyard area of west Woolwich. ... St. ... Peter Barlow Peter Barlow (1776 - March 1, 1862) was an English writer on pure and applied mathematics. ... The Royal Military Academy was founded in 1741 in Woolwich, south-east London. ... Woolwich (pronounced Woolitch) is a town in south-east London, England in the London Borough of Greenwich, on the south side of the River Thames, though the tiny exclave of North Woolwich (which is now part of the London Borough of Newham) is on the north side of the river. ... Woolwich Dockyard was an English naval dockyard founded by King Henry VIII in 1512 to build his flagship Henri Grace a Dieu (Great Harry), the largest ship of its day. ...


He then spent six years working as an engineer in Constantinople, Turkey, helping build an ordnance factory on behalf of Henry Maudslay’s machine tool company (and working on some lighthouses in the Bosphorus), before returning to take up a post as assistant engineer on the Manchester and Birmingham (London and North-Western) Railway (1838), after which he joined the Midland Railway (1842). Map of Constantinople. ... Henry Maudslay. ... The Peggys Point lighthouse in Nova Scotia, Canada An aid for navigation and pilotage at sea, a lighthouse is a tower building or framework sending out light from a system of lamps and lenses or, in older times, from a fire. ... Fatih Sultan Mehmed Bridge over the Bosporus seen from over Rumelihisarı This article is about the strait; Bosphorus is also a Turkish Boğaziçi or İstanbul Boğazı) is a strait that separates the European part (Rumeli) of Turkey from its Asian part (Anadolu), connecting the Sea of Marmara (Marmara Denizi) with... The Manchester and Birmingham Railway was built between Manchester and Crewe. ... The London and North Western Railway (LNWR) was formed in 1846 by the merger of three railway companies - the Grand Junction Railway, London and Birmingham and Manchester and Birmingham. ... The Midland Railway (MR) was a railway company in the United Kingdom which existed from 1844 to 1922. ...


He formed his own consulting practice in 1857, but remained a consultant for the Midland Railway.


An active member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Barlow became involved in several ICE initiatives, including the design of the building used for the Great Exhibition of 1851, and the realisation of the Clifton Suspension Bridge after the death of the celebrated Isambard Kingdom Brunel in 1859. The Institutions headquarters Founded on 2 January 1818, the Institution of Civil Engineers (the ICE) is an independent professional association, based in central London, representing civil engineers. ... The Great Exhibition was an international exhibition held in Hyde Park London, from 1 May to 15 October 1851 and the first in a series of Worlds Fair exhibitions of culture and industry that were to be a popular 19th century feature. ... The Clifton Suspension Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Avon Gorge and linking Clifton in Bristol to Leigh Woods in North Somerset. ... Brunel before the launching of the Great Eastern Isambard Kingdom Brunel (April 9, 1806 – September 15, 1859) was a British engineer. ...


As chief engineer for the Midland Railway, Barlow was responsible for sections of the main railway lines between London and the east Midlands. The route’s most famous landmark is the train shed at its London terminus: St Pancras Station (1864-68), which Barlow designed with Rowland Mason Ordish. This has an arched cast iron and steel canopy with a 74m (243ft) span – then the longest of its kind in the world. The canopy is 213m (700ft) long and about 30m (100ft) high. The Gothic Revival facade and clock tower of the disused Midland Hotel are the most visible part of St Pancras station. ... Rowland Mason Ordish (11 April 1824-1886) was an English engineer. ...


His brother Peter W. Barlow was also a noted engineer, whose major contributions included new developments in tunnelling shields in conjunction with James Henry Greathead – a pupil of William Barlow’s during the late 1860s. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A tunnelling shield is a protective structure used in the excavation of tunnels through soil that is too soft or fluid to remain stable during the time it takes to line the tunnel with a support structure of concrete or steel. ... James Henry Greathead (6 August 1844 - 21 October 1896) was an engineer renowned for his work on the underground railway networks of London. ...


Barlow was a Fellow of the Royal Society from 1850, and was elected as President of the Institution of Civil Engineers in 1879. His leading role in the profession led to his appointment as a member of the Board of Trade Enquiry that investigated the disastrous failure of the railway bridge across the River Tay near Dundee in 1879 (the Tay Rail Bridge Disaster). He then led the design of the replacement bridge (1882-87). During the same period, he also helped check the designs for the Forth Bridge, west of Edinburgh. A log bridge A bridge is a structure built to span a gorge, valley, road, railroad track, river, body of water, or any other physical obstacle. ... The River Tay, in terms of flow (193 km or 120 miles), is the largest river in Scotland, and drains much of the southern Highlands. ... Dundees location in Scotland Dundee (Dùn Dèagh in Gaelic) is Scotlands fourth largest city, population 154,674 (2001), situated on the North bank of the Firth of Tay. ... The Tay Bridge, properly named, is a railway bridge (approx. ... Forth Bridge, Edinburgh. ... It has been suggested that Areas of Edinburgh be merged into this article or section. ...


William Barlow lived in Charlton at Highcombe, 145 Charlton Road (blue plaque). A Greater London Council blue plaque at Alexandra Palace, commemorating the launch of BBC Television there in 1936. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
William Henry Barlow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (402 words)
William Henry Barlow (1812-1902) was an English civil engineer of the 19th century, particularly associated with railway engineering projects.
An active member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Barlow became involved in several ICE initiatives, including the design of the building used for the Great Exhibition of 1851, and the realisation of the Clifton Suspension Bridge after the death of the celebrated Isambard Kingdom Brunel in 1859.
Barlow was a Fellow of the Royal Society from 1850, and was elected as President of the Institution of Civil Engineers in 1879.
Peter W. Barlow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (213 words)
Peter William Barlow (1809-19 May 1885) was an English civil engineer particularly associated with bridges (he designed the first Lambeth Bridge, a crossing of the River Thames in London), the design of tunnels and the development of tunnelling techniques.
He was the son of an engineer and mathematician, professor Peter Barlow of the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich, south-east London.
It was this experience that prepared him to work with James Henry Greathead on the development of a tunnelling shield to dig the Tower Subway in 1870.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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