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Encyclopedia > William Harvey
William Harvey
William Harvey

William Harvey (April 1, 1578June 3, 1657) was an English medical doctor/physician, who is credited with being the first to correctly describe, in exact detail, the systemic circulation and properties of blood being pumped around the body by the heart. William Harvey (1796-1866) was an English engraver and designer. ... William King Bill Harvey (September 13, 1915 - June 1976) was a CIA officer, best known for his role in Operation Mongoose. ... Courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin. ... Courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 31 - Battle of Gemblours - Spanish forces under Don John of Austria and Alexander Farnese defeat the Dutch. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The word physician should not be confused with physicist, which means a scientist in the area of physics. ... For other uses, see Doctor. ... Systemic circulation is the portion of the cardiovascular system which carries oxygenated blood away from the heart, to the body, and returns deoxygenated blood back to the heart. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ...


Although Ibn al-Nafis and Michael Servetus had described pulmonary circulation before the time of Harvey, all but three copies of Servetus' manuscript Christianismi Restitutio were destroyed and as a result, the secrets of circulation were lost until Harvey rediscovered them nearly a century later. Harvey travelled widely in the course of his researches, especially to Italy, where he stayed at the Venerable English College in Rome. Ala-al-din abu Al-Hassan Ali ibn Abi-Hazm al-Qarshi al-Dimashqi (Arabic: علاء الدين أبو الحسن عليّ بن أبي حزم القرشي الدمشقي ) known as ibn Al-Nafis (Arabic: ابن النفيس ), was an Arab physician who is mostly famous for being the first to describe the pulmonary circulation of the blood. ... Michael Servetus. ... Pulmonary circulation is the portion of the cardiovascular system which carries oxygen-depleted blood away from the heart, to the lungs, and returns oxygenated blood back to the heart. ... The Venerable English College is a seminary based in Rome for the training of priests for the Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales. ...

Contents

Early life and education

Harvey was born in Folkestone, Kent, England (the nearest hospital to Folkestone (in Ashford) is named after him) to a prosperous yeoman, Thomas Harvey, of Folkestone, Kent (154912 June 1623), Turkey Company merchant, and wife Joan Halke, of Hastingleigh, Kent (1555-15568 November 1605), and educated at The King's School, Canterbury, at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, from which he received a B.A. in 1597, and at the University of Padua (also attended by Copernicus), where he studied under Hieronymus Fabricius, and the Aristotelian philosopher Cesare Cremonini graduating in 1602. He returned to England and married Elizabeth Browne, daughter of Lancelot Browne, a prominent London physician. The couple had no children. He became a doctor at St Bartholomew's Hospital in London (1609–43) and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians. After his time at St Bartholomew's he returned to Oxford and became Warden (head of house) of Merton College. In 1651 William Harvey donated money to the college for building and furnishing a library, which was dedicated in 1654. In 1656 he gave an endowment to pay a librarian and to present a yearly oration, which continues to happen in the present day in his honor. Harvey also left money in his will for the founding of a boys' school in his native town of Folkestone; opened in 1674, the Harvey Grammar School has had a continuous history to the present day. , Folkestone (IPA: ) is a coastal resort town in the Shepway district of Kent, England. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Yeoman is a word with several modern and historical meanings. ... , Folkestone (IPA: ) is a coastal resort town in the Shepway district of Kent, England. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Events July - Ketts Rebellion Francis Xavier arrives in Japan. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1623 (MDCXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... In English trading history, the Levant Company, or Turkey Company, was a chartered company formed in 1581,[1] after London merchants petitioned Queen Elizabeth I in 1580 for a charter to begin trading in the Levant, a trade that had fallen away to near nothing in the previous decades, [2... Merchants function as professionals who deal with trade, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves, in order to produce profit. ... The small civil parish of Hastingleigh lies on top of the North Downs in Kent three miles east of Wye and ten miles south of Canterbury, near the locally renowned beauty spot of the Devils Kneading Trough, on the North Downs Way with views towards Ashford, Romney Marsh and... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ... Events January 16 - Abdication of Emperor Charles V. His son, Philip II becomes King of Spain, while his brother Ferdinand becomes Holy Roman Emperor January 23 - The Shaanxi earthquake, the deadliest earthquake in history, occurs with its epicenter in Shaanxi province, China. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Kings School is a British independent school situated in Canterbury, Kent. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... Gymnasivm Patavinum: The Universitys main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut The University of Padua (Italian Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) located in Padua, Italy was founded in 1222. ... Copernicus redirects here. ... Girolamo Fabrizi d Acquapendente. ... Cesare Cremonini, sometimes Cesare Cremonino (22 December 1550[1] in Cento in the then Papal States - 19 July 1631 in Padua then under Republic of Venice rule) was an Italian professor of natural philosophy, working rationalism (against revelation) and Aristotelian materialism (against the dualist immortality of the soul) inside scholasticism. ... The King Henry VIII Gate at Barts, which was constructed in 1702. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... College building by Denys Lasdun The Royal College of Physicians of London is the oldest medical institution in England was founded in 1518 and is one of the most active of all medical professional organisations. ... and of the Merton College College name The House of Scholars of Merton Named after Walter de Merton Established 1264 Sister college Peterhouse, Cambridge Warden Prof. ... , Folkestone (IPA: ) is a coastal resort town in the Shepway district of Kent, England. ...


Family

He had at least one brother, Daniel Harvey (31 May 158710 September 1649), Turkey Company merchant, who married Elizabeth Kynnersley (baptized 1601buried 7 May 1655), daughter of Henry Kynnersley and wife, and they had at least one daughter Mary Harvey (baptized St. Laurence Pountney, London, 3 September 1629 – Surrenden Dering, Kent, 7 February 1703/1704, buried Pluckley, Kent, 12 February 1703/1704), married at St. Bartholomew the Less, London, 5 April 1648 to Sir Edward Dering, 2nd Baronet (Surrenden Dering, Kent, 12 November 1625, baptized Pluckley, Kent, 8 December 1625 – Gerard Street, London, 24 June 1684, buried Pluckley, Kent, 28 June 1684), son of Sir Edward Dering, 1st Baronet (Tower of London, 28 January 1598, baptized 9 February 159822 June 1644, buried St. Nicholas's Church, Pluckley) and wife (married at Whitehall, 1 January 1625) Anne Ashburnham (1604/16051628), paternal grandson of Sir Anthony Dering, of Surrenden Dering, Pluckley, Kent (1557/15581636) and wife Frances Bell (15771657), and maternal grandson of Sir John Ashburnham, of Ashburnham, Sussex (157229 June 1620, buried St. Andrew's, Holborn), and wife Elizabeth Beaumont, 1st Baroness Cramond (d. Covent Garden, Middlesex, 3 April 1651, buried St. Andrew's, Holborn). They had issue, being the ancestors of Camilla Parker-Bowles.[1] is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1587 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ... In English trading history, the Levant Company, or Turkey Company, was a chartered company formed in 1581,[1] after London merchants petitioned Queen Elizabeth I in 1580 for a charter to begin trading in the Levant, a trade that had fallen away to near nothing in the previous decades, [2... Merchants function as professionals who deal with trade, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves, in order to produce profit. ... Baptism is a water purification ritual practiced in certain religions such as Christianity, Mandaeanism, Sikhism, and some historic sects of Judaism. ... Events February 8 - Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, rebels against Elizabeth I of England - revolt is quickly crushed February 25 - Robert Devereux beheaded Jesuit Matteo Ricci arrives in China Bad harvest in Russia due to rainy summer Dutch troops drive Portuguese from Málaga Battle of Kinsale, Ireland Births... By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 25 - Saturns largest moon, Titan, is discovered by Christian Huygens. ... Lady Mary Dering (née Harvey) ( September 3, 1629–1704) was an English composer. ... Baptism is a water purification ritual practiced in certain religions such as Christianity, Mandaeanism, Sikhism, and some historic sects of Judaism. ... 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Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1648 (MDCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir Edward Dering, 2nd Baronet (8 or 12 November 1625 – 24 June 1684) was an English politician. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Baptism is a water purification ritual practiced in certain religions such as Christianity, Mandaeanism, Sikhism, and some historic sects of Judaism. ... Pluckley is a village and civil parish in the Ashford District of Kent, United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ... Pluckley is a village and civil parish in the Ashford District of Kent, United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... Sir Edward Dering (1598 - 1644), antiquary and politician, was the eldest son of Sir Anthony Dering of Surrenden Dering in Pluckley, Kent (d. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... Baptism is a water purification ritual practiced in certain religions such as Christianity, Mandaeanism, Sikhism, and some historic sects of Judaism. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events February to August - Explorer Abel Tasmans second expedition for the Dutch East India Company maps the north coast of Australia. ... By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ... Pluckley is a village and civil parish in the Ashford District of Kent, United Kingdom. ... Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 – Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ... 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1628 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pluckley is a village and civil parish in the Ashford District of Kent, United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Events Spain is effectively bankrupt. ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events March 17 - formation of the Cathay Company to send Martin Frobisher back to the New World for more gold May 28 - Publication of the Bergen Book, better known as the Solid Declaration of the Formula of Concord, one of the Lutheran confessional writings. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... The title of Baron Ashburnham was created in the Peerage of England in 1689. ... This article refers to the historic county in England. ... January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1620 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ... Holborn (pronounced ho-bun or ho-burn) is a place in London, named after a tributary to the river Fleet that flowed through the area, the Hole-bourne (the stream in the hollow). ... Covent Garden is a district in London, located on the easternmost parts of the City of Westminster and the southwest corner of the London Borough of Camden. ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 1 - Charles II crowned King of Scotland in Scone. ... By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ... Holborn (pronounced ho-bun or ho-burn) is a place in London, named after a tributary to the river Fleet that flowed through the area, the Hole-bourne (the stream in the hollow). ... Camilla Parker Bowles (born July 17 1947) was mistress, now girlfriend, of Charles, Prince of Wales. ...


New circulatory model

Many believe that Servetus merely re-discovered and extended early Muslim medicine, especially the work of Ibn al-Nafis, who discovered the pulmonary circulation and had laid out the principles of major veins and arteries in the 13th century. In the history of medicine, Islamic medicine or Arabic medicine refers to medicine developed in the medieval Islamic civilisation and written in Arabic, the lingua franca of the Islamic civilization. ... Ala-al-din abu Al-Hassan Ali ibn Abi-Hazm al-Qarshi al-Dimashqi (Arabic: علاء الدين أبو الحسن عليّ بن أبي حزم القرشي الدمشقي ) known as ibn Al-Nafis (Arabic: ابن النفيس ), was an Arab physician who is mostly famous for being the first to describe the pulmonary circulation of the blood. ... Pulmonary circulation is the portion of the cardiovascular system which carries oxygen-depleted blood away from the heart, to the lungs, and returns oxygenated blood back to the heart. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


Fabricius, Harvey's teacher at Padua, had claimed discovery of "valves" in veins, but had not discovered the true use of them. The explanation that he had put forward did not satisfy Harvey, and thus it became Harvey's endeavour to explain the true use of these valves, and eventually, the search suggested to him the larger question of the explanation of the motion of blood. Harvey announced his discovery of the circulatory system in 1616 and in 1628 published his work Exercitatio Anatomica de Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus (An Anatomical Exercise on the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals), where, based on scientific methodology, he argued for the idea that blood was pumped around the body by the heart before returning to the heart and being re-circulated in a closed system. Exercitatio Anatomica de Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus, (An Anatomical Exercise on the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals) is the best-known work of the physician William Harvey. ...


This clashed with the accepted model going back to Galen, who identified venous (dark red) and arterial (brighter and thinner) blood, each with distinct and separate functions. Venous blood was thought to originate in the liver and arterial blood in the lung; the blood flowed from those organs to all parts of the body where it was consumed. It was for exactly these reasons that the work of Ibn al-Nafis had been ignored in Europe. For other uses, see Galen (disambiguation). ... For the bird, see Liver bird. ... Ala-al-din abu Al-Hassan Ali ibn Abi-Hazm al-Qarshi al-Dimashqi (Arabic: علاء الدين أبو الحسن عليّ بن أبي حزم القرشي الدمشقي ) known as ibn Al-Nafis (Arabic: ابن النفيس ), was an Arab physician who is mostly famous for being the first to describe the pulmonary circulation of the blood. ...


Harvey based most of his conclusions on careful observations recorded during vivisections made of various animals during controlled experiments, being the first person to study biology quantitatively. He did an experiment to see how much blood would pass through the heart each day. In this experiment he used estimates of the capacity of the heart, how much blood is expelled each pump of the heart, and the amount of times the heart beats in a half an hour. All of these estimates were purposefully low, so that people could see the vast amount of blood Galen's theory required the liver to produce. He estimated that the capacity of the heart was 1.5 ounces, and that every time the heart pumps, 1/8 of that blood is expelled. This led to Harvey's estimate that about 1/6 of an ounce of blood went through the heart every time it pumped. The next estimate he used was that the heart beats 1000 times every half an hour, which gave 10 pounds 6 ounces of blood in a half an hour, and when this number was multiplied by 48 half hours in a day he realized that the liver would have to produce 540 pounds of blood in a day. At this time, common thought was that the blood was recycled and not constantly produced.


He proposed that blood flowed through the heart in two separate closed loops. One loop, pulmonary circulation, connected the circulatory system to the lungs. The second loop, systemic circulation, causes blood to flow to the vital organs and body tissue. He also observed that blood in veins would move readily towards the heart, but veins would not allow flow in the opposite direction. This was observed by another simple experiment. Harvey tied a tight ligature onto the upper arm of a person. This would cut off bloodflow from the arteries and the veins. When this was done, the arm below the ligature was cool and pale, while above the ligature it was warm and swollen. The ligature was loosened slightly, which allowed blood from the arteries to come into the arm, since arteries are deeper in the flesh than the veins. When this was done, the opposite effect was seen in the lower arm. It was now warm and swollen. The veins were also more visible, since now they were full of blood. Harvey then noticed little bumps in the veins, which he realized were the valves of the veins, discovered by an earlier biologist, Hieronymus Fabricius. Harvey tried to push blood in the vein down the arm, but to no avail. When he tried to push it up the arm, it moved quite easily. The same effect was seen in other veins of the body, except the veins in the neck. Those veins were different from the others - they did not allow blood to flow up, but only down. This led Harvey to believe that the veins allowed blood to flow to the heart, and the valves maintained the one way flow. Harvey further concluded that the heart acted like a pump that forced blood to move throughout the body instead of the prevailing theory of his day that blood flow was caused by a sucking action of the heart and liver. These important theories of Harvey represent two significant contributions to the understanding of the mechanisms of circulation. Pulmonary circulation is the portion of the cardiovascular system which carries oxygen-depleted blood away from the heart, to the lungs, and returns oxygenated blood back to the heart. ... Systemic circulation is the portion of the cardiovascular system which carries oxygenated blood away from the heart, to the body, and returns deoxygenated blood back to the heart. ... Girolamo Fabrizi d Acquapendente. ...


Embryology

Harvey also conducted research in embryology in his later career, writing On the Generation of Animals (De Generatione) in 1651. He supported the Aristotelian theory of epigenesis that embryos formed gradually and did not possess the characteristics of an Adult in early stages. He also hypothesized the existence of a mammalian egg, and dissected dozens of deer in the hunting park in hopes of finding one, although he failed to do so. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... William Harvey William Harvey (April 1, 1578 - June 3, 1657) was a medical doctor who first correctly described in exact detail the circulatory system of blood being pumped around the body by the heart. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... In geology, epigenesis means changes in the mineral composition of a rock because of outside influences, e. ... For the adult insect stage, see Imago. ... A human ovum Sperm cells attempting to fertilize an ovum An ovum (plural ova) is a haploid female reproductive cell or gamete. ...


Criticism of Harvey's work

Harveys ideas were eventually accepted during his lifetime. His work was attacked, notably by Jean Riolan in Opuscula anatomica (1649) which forced Harvey to defend himself in Exercitatio anatomica de circulatione sanguinis (also 1649) where he argued that Riolan's position was contrary to all observational evidence. Harvey was still regarded as an excellent doctor. He was personal physician to James I (1618-25). After his and others' attempts to cure James of his fatal illness failed, he became a scapegoat for that failure amidst rumours of a Catholic plot to kill James, but was saved by the personal protection of Charles I (to whom he was also personal physician, from 1625 to 1647). He took advantage of these royal positions by dissecting deer from the royal parks and demonstrating the pumping of the heart on Viscount Montgomery's son, who had fallen from a horse when he was a boy, leaving a gap in his ribs, subsequently covered by a metal plate, which he was able to remove for Harvey. "I immediately saw a vast hole," Harvey wrote, and it was possible to feel and see the heart's beating through the scar tissue at the base of the hole.[1] Jean Riolan (the Younger) (1577-1657) was a French anatomist who was an influentual member of the Medical Faculty of Paris. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ...


His research notes were destroyed in riots in London at start of the English Civil War. He himself went with the king on campaign, and was in charge of the royal children's safety at the Battle of Edgehill, hiding them in a hedge with them reading a book, then forced by enemy fire to shelter behind the Royalist lines, and at the end of the battle tending to the dying and wounded. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Edgehill (or Edge Hill) was the first pitched battle of the First English Civil War. ...


Harvey also became the Lumleian lecturer to the Royal College of Physicians (1615-56). College building by Denys Lasdun The Royal College of Physicians of London is the oldest medical institution in England was founded in 1518 and is one of the most active of all medical professional organisations. ...


Marcello Malpighi later proved that Harvey's ideas on anatomical structure were correct; Harvey had been unable to distinguish the capillary network and so could only theorize on how the transfer of blood from artery to vein occurred. Marcello Malpighi (March 10, 1628 - September 30, 1694) was an Italian doctor, who gave his name to several physiological features. ... Blood flows from digestive system heart to arteries, which narrow into arterioles, and then narrow further still into capillaries. ... Section of an artery For other uses, see Artery (disambiguation). ... In the circulatory system, a vein is a blood vessel that carries blood toward the heart. ...


Even so, Harvey's work had little effect on general medical practice at the time — blood letting, based on the prevailing Galenic tradition, was a popular practice, and continued to be so even after Harvey's ideas were accepted. Harvey's work did much to encourage others to investigate the questions raised by his research, and to revive the Muslim tradition of scientific medicine expressed by Nafis, Ibn Sina, and Rhazes. (See also: François Bernier) Bloodletting (or blood-letting, in modern medicine referred to as phlebotomy) was a popular medical practice from antiquity up to the late 19th century, involving the withdrawal of often considerable quantities of blood from a patient in the belief that this would cure or prevent illness and disease. ... Ibn Nafis (1210-1288) was the first person to accurately describe the process of blood circulation in the human body (in 1242). ... This article needs cleanup. ... Rhazes-Treating a Patient (artist unknown) Abu Bakr Mohammad Ibn Zakariya al-Razi (born in Rayy, Iran, 864; died in Baghdad, Iraq, 930 AD) was a versatile Persian philosopher (hakim), who made fundamental and lasting contributions to the fields of medicine, chemistry (alchemy) and philosophy. ... François Bernier (1625 – 1688) was a French physician and traveler, born at Joué-Etiau /Anjou. ...


Posthumous Honors

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr. also included him in his list of "The Ten Most Influential People of the Second Millennium" in the World Almanac & Book of Facts. The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. ... The World Almanac and Book of Facts is a book considered to be a top reference work. ...


Later Years

He later died of a stroke in 1657. He was seventy-nine.


See also

  • Amato Lusitano - 16th century physician, also credited with the discovery of the circulation of the blood

João Rodrigues de Castelo Branco better known as Amato Lusitano was a notable portuguese jewish physician of the 16th Century. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia4U - William Harvey - Encyclopedia Article (468 words)
Born in Folkestone, Harvey studied at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, receiving a BA in 1597, and then he studied medicine at the prestigious University of Padua under Fabricius, graduating in 1602.
Harvey was still regarded as an excellent doctor, he was personal physician to James I (1618-25) and Charles I (1625-47) and the Lumleian lecturer to the Royal College of Physicians (1615-56).
Harvey's work did much to encourage others to investigate the questions raised by his research, and to revive the Muslim tradition of scientific medicine expressed by Nafis, Ibn Sina and of course Rhazes.
William Harvey Carney - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (434 words)
William Harvey Carney (March 28, 1842 – March 20, 1908) was an American Civil War hero.
William H. Carney is credited as being the first African American to be awarded the Medal of Honor.
William Harvey Carney once featured in an episode of the popular TV program Sabrina the Teenage Witch.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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