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Encyclopedia > William Gibson (novelist)
William Gibson

William Gibson reading at Georgia Tech
Born: March 17, 1948 (1948-03-17) (age 59)
Conway, South Carolina
Occupation: novelist, short story writer
Genres: Science fiction
Literary movement: Cyberpunk
Influences: Bester,[1] Delaney,[1] Hammett,[2] Stone,[2] Borges,[3] Burroughs,[4] Pynchon[3]
Influenced: Charles Stross, Neal Stephenson, Linda Nagata, Richard Morgan
Website: williamgibsonbooks.com

William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948(1948-03-17), Conway, South Carolina) is an American-born science fiction author who has been called the father of the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction, partly due to coining the term "cyberspace" in 1982,[5] and partly because of the success of his first novel, Neuromancer, which has sold more than 6.5 million copies worldwide since its publication in 1984.[6] Author: Karthik M Narayanaswami. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Location of Conway in South Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State South Carolina County Horry Mayor Gregory K. Martin Area    - City 34. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35°12N... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... Alfred Bester (December 18, 1913 - September 30, 1987) was a science fiction author and the winner of the first Hugo Award in 1953 for his novel The Demolished Man. ... Samuel Ray Delany, Jr. ... Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hard-boiled detective novels and short stories. ... Photo of Robert Stone by Robert Birnbaum Robert Stone (born August 21, 1937) is a critically well regarded American novelist, whose work is typically characterized by psychological complexity, political concerns, and dark humor. ... Jorge Luis Borges (August 24, 1899 – June 14, 1986) was an Argentine writer who is considered one of the foremost literary figures of the 20th century. ... William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) - August 2, 1997), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs (pronounced ), was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ... Charles David George Charlie Stross (born Leeds, October 18, 1964) is a writer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Neal Town Stephenson (born October 31, 1959) is an American writer, known primarily for his science fiction works in the postcyberpunk genre with a penchant for explorations of society, mathematics, currency, and the history of science. ... Linda Nagata (1960-) is an American science fiction author who won the Nebula award for best novella in 2000 (for Goddesses). She frequently writes about nanotechnology and the integration of advanced computing with the human brain. ... Richard Morgan (b. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Location of Conway in South Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State South Carolina County Horry Mayor Gregory K. Martin Area    - City 34. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... It has been suggested that Virtual world be merged into this article or section. ... For the 1988 video game, see Neuromancer (video game). ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ...


In the words of Tom Maddox, Gibson grew up in "an America as disturbing and surreal as anything J. G. Ballard ever dreamed."[7] In 1967, Gibson went to Canada "to avoid the Vietnam war draft"[8], appearing that year in a CBC newsreel item about hippie subculture in Yorkville, Toronto[9]. He settled in Vancouver, British Columbia five years later and began to write science fiction. Although he retains U.S. citizenship,[10] Gibson has spent most of his adult life in Canada, and still lives in the Vancouver area. Tom Maddox is an American science-fiction writer, known for his part in the early cyberpunk movement. ... James Graham Ballard (born November 15, 1930 in Shanghai) is a British writer. ... Singer at a modern Hippie movement in Russia Hippie, or hippy, refers to a member of a subgroup of the counterculture that began in the United States during the early 1960s, becoming an established social group by 1965, and expanding to other countries before declining in the mid-1970s. ... A subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... Bloor Street Bloor Street Yorkville is an affluent neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: By Sea, Land, and Air We Prosper Location of Vancouver within the Greater Vancouver Regional District in British Columbia, Canada Coordinates: , Country  Canada Province  British Columbia Region Lower Mainland Regional District Greater Vancouver Incorporated 1886 Government  - Mayor Sam Sullivan (NPA)  - City Council List of Councilors Suzanne Anton (NPA) Peter... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo - Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 36 - Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 4th - Total 944,735 km...

Contents

Literary career

Early years: Short stories and Burning Chrome (1972–1984)

His early writings are generally futuristic stories about the influences of cybernetics and cyberspace (computer-simulated reality) technology on the human race. His themes of hi-tech shantytowns, recorded or broadcast stimulus (later to be developed into the "sim-stim" package featured so heavily in Neuromancer), and dystopic intermingling of technology and humanity, are already evident in his first published short story, "Fragments of a Hologram Rose" (1977). The latter thematic obsession was described by Gibson's friend and fellow author, Bruce Sterling, in Sterling's introduction to the Gibson short story collection, Burning Chrome, as "Gibson's classic one-two combination of lowlife and high tech."[11] For the meaning in finance, see futures contract. ... Cybernetics is the study of feedback and derived concepts such as communication and control in living organisms, machines and organisations. ... Shanty town near Cape Town, South Africa Shanty towns (sometimes called bidonvilles) or the academic term informal settlements, are units of irregular low-cost and — usually on lands belonging to third parties, most often located in the periphery of the cities. ... For the 1988 video game, see Neuromancer (video game). ... William Gibsons first published work, originally appearing in Unearth 3, in 1977, a short-lived science fiction collection magazine, retailing for $1. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... Burning Chrome. ...


Neuromancer and the Sprawl trilogy (1984–1988)

In the 1980s, his fiction developed a film noir, bleak feel; short stories appearing in Omni began to develop the themes he eventually expanded into his first novel, Neuromancer. Neuromancer was the first novel to win all three major science fiction awards: the Nebula, the Hugo, and Philip K. Dick Award. This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... The cover of the January 1991 issue of Omni. ... For the 1988 video game, see Neuromancer (video game). ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Philip K. Dick Memorial Award is a science fiction award sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society, and named after science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ...

"I'd buy him a drink, but I don't know if I'd loan him any money."--Gibson commenting in 1999's No Maps for These Territories on the author of Neuromancer.[8] No Maps for These Territories is a 1999 documentary film by Mark Neale focusing on the science fiction author William Gibson. ...

The subsequent novels which complete his first trilogy - commonly known as "The Sprawl trilogy" - are Count Zero (1986) and Mona Lisa Overdrive (1988). The Sprawl-trilogy, of which Neuromancer is the first part. ... The Sprawl trilogy, of which Count Zero is the second part Count Zero (ISBN 0441117732) is a science fiction novel written by William Gibson, originally published in 1986. ... NAKAYUBI (ナカユビ; Middle Finger) Buster Zangai -Shape2- (残骸 -Shape2-; Wreck -Shape2-) Limbo Mona Lisa Girl (Shape 2) Sid Vicious on the Beach Black Cherry Genzai (原罪; Original Sin) Monster Ai no uta (愛ノ歌; Love Song Continuous Information Mona Lisa OVERDRIVE was named after the 1989 novel Mona Lisa Overdrive, by William Gibson. ...


The Difference Engine and the Bridge trilogy (1990–1999)

Following the completion of the Sprawl trilogy, Gibson's next project was a departure from his cyberpunk roots, a steampunk collaboration with Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine, an alternate history novel set in a technologically advanced Victorian era Britain was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1991 and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award in 1992. Gibson's second trilogy, "The Bridge trilogy", centres on San Francisco in the near future and evinces Gibson's recurring themes of technological, physical, and spiritual transcendence in an arguably more grounded, matter-of-fact style than his first trilogy. The books in this trilogy are titled Virtual Light (1994), Idoru (1997), and All Tomorrow's Parties (1999). It has been suggested that Clockpunk be merged into this article or section. ... The Difference Engine is an alternate history novel by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. ... Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Winners of the Nebula Award for Best Novel. ... The John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel has been awarded every year since 1973, except in 1994. ... The Bridge trilogy is a series of novels by William Gibson, his second after the successful Sprawl trilogy. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... William Gibsons Bridge trilogy is his second trilogy, after the succesful Sprawl trilogy. ... William Gibsons Bridge trilogy is his second trilogy, after the successful Sprawl trilogy. ... All Tomorrows Parties is the third book in William Gibsons Bridge trilogy. Like its precessors, All Tomorrows Parties is a science-fiction novel set in a postmodern, dystopian, cyberpunk future. ...


Later novels (1999– )

After All Tomorrow's Parties, Gibson began to adopt a more realistic style of writing, with continuous narratives. His novel Pattern Recognition, set in the present day, broke into mainstream bestseller lists for the first time.[12] Realism in the visual arts and literature is the depiction of subjects as they appear in everyday life, without embellishment or interpretation. ... Book cover Pattern Recognition (G. P. Putnams Sons 2003, ISBN 0-425-19293-8) is William Gibsons eighth novel, the first to be set in the contemporary world. ...


Gibson finished writing a new novel entitled Spook Country in October 2006. According to Amazon.com, its scheduled market release is set for August 7, 2007. Gibson says: "It's set 'in the same universe,' as they say, as Pattern Recognition. Which is more or less the one we live in now. It takes place during the spring of 2006."[13] Spook Country is a forthcoming novel by William Gibson, set to be released on August 7, 2007 by publisher Penguin Putnam. ... Amazon. ... Book cover Pattern Recognition (G. P. Putnams Sons 2003, ISBN 0-425-19293-8) is William Gibsons eighth novel, the first to be set in the contemporary world. ...


Collaborations, adaptations and miscellanea

Literary collaborations

In 1990, Gibson co-wrote the Nebula Award-nominated alternate history novel The Difference Engine with friend and fellow founder of the cyberpunk movement Bruce Sterling. The novel is notable for being one of the founding texts of the steampunk sub-genre of speculative fiction. Image File history File links TheDifferenceEngine(1stEd). ... Image File history File links TheDifferenceEngine(1stEd). ... The Difference Engine is an alternate history novel by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Difference Engine is an alternate history novel by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. ... Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... It has been suggested that Clockpunk be merged into this article or section. ...


Gibson, together with his friend Tom Maddox, wrote the X-Files episodes "Kill Switch" and "First Person Shooter". In 1998, Gibson wrote the introduction to the Art of the X-Files. Gibson also made a cameo appearance in the miniseries Wild Palms. Gibson also wrote the foreword to the novel City come a-walkin' by fellow cyberpunk and occasional collaborator John Shirley.[14] In 1993, Gibson wrote and read the lyrics to the track "Floating Away" on Yellow Magic Orchestra's album, Technodon[15][16] and co-wrote lyrics to "Dog Star Girl" for Deborah Harry's Debravation.[17] Tom Maddox is an American science-fiction writer, known for his part in the early cyberpunk movement. ... X-Files intro from first 8 seasons The X-Files was a popular 1990s American science fiction television series created by Chris Carter. ... // WILLIAM GIBSONS X-FILES EPISODES William Gibson, together with science fiction novelist Tom Maddox, wrote two episodes for popular American television series The X-Files. Kill Switch (5x11) first aired on February 15th, 1998 and First Person Shooter (7x13) two years later on February 27th, 2000 on FOX. Both... Wild Palms is a six hour mini-series, which first aired in 1993 on the ABC Network in the United States. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Yellow Magic Orchestra is a Japanese electropop band, formed in 1978. ... Technodon was the eighth studio album by Yellow Magic Orchestra (1993). ... Debbie Harry on the cover of her collection Most of All: Best Of Deborah Harry (born July 1, 1945) is a Miami-born American rock and roll musician who originally gained fame as the frontwoman for New Wave band Blondie, which originated in the late 1970s and achieved commercial success... Debravation was Deborah Harrys fourth album, released in 1993. ...


Exhibitions and performance art

Gibson has contributed text to be integrated into a number of performance art pieces. In October 1989, Gibson wrote text for such a collaboration with future Johnny Mnemonic director Robert Longo entitled Dream Jumbo: Working the Absolutes, which was displayed in Royce Hall, University of California Los Angeles. Three years later, Gibson contributed original text to "Memory Palace", a performance show featuring the theatre group "La Fura dels Baus" at Art Futura, Barcelona, which featured images by Karl Sims, Rebecca Allen, Mark Pellington and music by Peter Gabriel and others.[15] Gibson's latest contribution was in 1997, a collaboration with critically acclaimed Vancouver-based contemporary dance company Holy Body Tattoo. Johnny Mnemonic is a 1995 cyberpunk-based movie, loosely based on a short story of the same name by William Ford Gibson, in which Keanu Reeves plays the title character, a man with a cybernetic implant in his head designed to store information. ... Robert Longo (b. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university situated in the neighborhood of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... La Fura dels Baus is a Spanish theatrical group founded in 1979 in Barcelona known for their violent urban theatre, making use of unusual settings and doing away with the boundaries seperating audience and actors. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (Catalan) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... Karl Sims is a researcher formerly with the MIT Media Lab who is most well known for using genetic programming to evolve virtual creatures that competed in various simulated environments as described in this paper. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mark Pellington (born March 17, 1962 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American film director. ... Peter Brian Gabriel (born February 13, 1950, in Chobham, Surrey, England) is an English musician. ... Contemporary dance is the name given to a group of 20th century concert dance forms. ... The Holy Body Tattoo is an award-winning Canadian contemporary dance troupe based in Vancouver, British Columbia. ...


In 1990, Gibson wrote an article about a decaying San Francisco, its Bay Bridge closed and taken over by the homeless (a theme later to form the setting of the Bridge Trilogy) as part of a collaboration with the architects Ming Fung and Craig Hodgetts; this article became part of an exhibit at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art[18] featuring the author on a monitor discussing the future and reading from "Skinner's Room", a short story prequel to the trilogy.[15] This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2004). ... Skinners Room is a short story by influential cyberpunk author William Gibson. ...


A particularly well-received work by Gibson was Agrippa (A Book of the Dead) (1992), an electronic poem.[19] It focused on the ethereal nature of memories (the title refers to a photo album) in the artist's book collaboration with painter Dennis Ashbaugh and publisher Kevin Begos. "Ashbaugh's design eventually included a supposedly self-devouring floppy-disk intended to display the text only once, then eat itself."[20] The poem has since been reproduced online. Agrippa (a book of the dead) is an artists book. ...


Film adaptations and screenplays

Two of his short stories have been turned into movies: 1995's Johnny Mnemonic, starring Keanu Reeves (screenplay by Gibson), and 1998's New Rose Hotel, starring Christopher Walken, Willem Dafoe, and Asia Argento, both of which are set in the Sprawl trilogy universe. Gibson also wrote an early treatment of Alien³, few elements of which found their way into the film. A film adaptation of Pattern Recognition by director Peter Weir was in production, due for release in 2008[21], but according to Gibson, Weir is no longer attatched to the project.[22] In 2006, Alex Steyermark claimed to be developing an anime adaptation of Gibson's Idoru,[23] the status of which is currently unknown. Image File history File links Johnny_mnemonic_cover. ... Image File history File links Johnny_mnemonic_cover. ... Johnny Mnemonic is a 1995 cyberpunk-based movie, loosely based on a short story of the same name by William Ford Gibson, in which Keanu Reeves plays the title character, a man with a cybernetic implant in his head designed to store information. ... // March 28 - Actress Julia Roberts and singer Lyle Lovett announce their plans for separation November - After a six-year hiatus, the James Bond film series resumes with the successful GoldenEye. ... Johnny Mnemonic is a short story by William Gibson, and a movie loosely based on the short story. ... Keanu Charles Reeves (pronounced in IPA: ) is a Canadian actor, born September 2, 1964 in Beirut, Lebanon, and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... // February 14 - Sharon Stone marries Phil Bronstein. ... New Rose Hotel is a short story by William Gibson, later collected in his book Burning Chrome. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... William Dafoe, Jr. ... Asia Anna Maria Argento (born 20 September 1975, Rome) is an Italian television and film actress and director. ... This article is about the film, for the video games of the same name see Alien³ (video game), Alien³ (SNES) and Alien³ (Game Boy). ... Peter Lindsay Weir (born August 21, 1944) is an Australian film director. ... 2008 in film is expected to feature another battle of the sequels, as many properties release new installments, including: The Dark Knight, The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian, The Mummy 3, Indiana Jones 4, Bond 22, Madagascar 2, Hellboy 2, Harry Potter 6 and Star Trek 11. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... William Gibsons Bridge trilogy is his second trilogy, after the successful Sprawl trilogy. ...


Gibson was the focus of a 1999 documentary by Mark Neale called No Maps for These Territories, which followed Gibson across the North American continent discussing various aspects of his personal life, literary career and cultural interpretations. The documentary features interviews with Jack Womack and Bruce Sterling, as well as recitations from Neuromancer by Bono and The Edge.[8] The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... No Maps for These Territories is a 1999 documentary film by Mark Neale focusing on the science fiction author William Gibson. ... Jack Womack (b. ... Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... Paul David Hewson (born 10 May 1960), known as Bono (IPA pronunciation: ), is the lead singer and principal lyricist of the Irish rock band U2. ... Dave Howell Evans (born August 8, 1961 in Barking, East London), more widely known by his moniker The Edge, is the guitarist, keyboardist, primary songwriter, and backing vocalist for the Irish rock band U2. ...


Journalism

Gibson is a sporadic contributor to Wired magazine, and has written for The Observer, Addicted to Noise, New York Times Magazine and Rolling Stone.[24] He commenced writing a blog in early 2003, which remains active, with one major hiatus, into 2007. During the process of writing Spook Country, Gibson frequently posted short nonsequential excerpts from the novel to the blog.[citation needed] This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... This article is about the magazine. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Spook Country is a forthcoming novel by William Gibson, set to be released on August 7, 2007 by publisher Penguin Putnam. ...


Influence

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Please help Wikipedia by adding references. See the talk page for details.

Gibson's work has influenced several popular musicians; references to his stories appear in the music of Stuart Hamm, Billy Idol, Warren Zevon, Deltron 3030, Straylight Run and Sonic Youth. U2 at one point planned to scroll the text of "Neuromancer" above them on a concert tour, but ended up not doing it. Members of the band did, however, provide background music for the audiobook version of "Neuromancer"[25] as well as appearing in Gibson's biographical documentary, No Maps for These Territories. Gibson returned the favour, writing an article about U2 on tour titled 'U2's City of the blinding light' for Wired Magazine. Image File history File links Circle-question. ... Stuart Hamm (born February 8, 1960) is a highly respected bass player, known for his session and live work with numerous artists as well for his virtuosic style of playing. ... Billy Idol (born William Michael Albert Broad, 30 November 1955 in Middlesex) is an English rock musician. ... Warren William Zevon (January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was an American rock and roll musician and songwriter. ... // Deltron 3030 is a super-group of hip hop artists, composed primarily of producer Dan the Automator, rapper Del Tha Funkee Homosapien and DJ Kid Koala, though their work features many other artists as well, all taking on various futuristic pseudonyms. ... Straylight Run is an indie band based in Baldwin, Nassau County, Long Island, New York. ... Sonic Youth is a seminal American alternative rock group formed in New York City in 1981. ... U2 are a rock band from Dublin, Ireland. ... Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ...


In the landmark cyberpunk film The Matrix (1999), the title itself and some of the characters were inspired by the novel. Neo and Trinity in The Matrix show remarkable similarities to Case and Molly in Neuromancer. In an interview Gibson, when questioned about copyright issues, laughed it away and called it 'the unpaid invoice'.[citation needed] The Matrix is a 1999 science fiction action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski and starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano and Hugo Weaving. ...


Hackers is another film, which although not drawing influence from Gibson directly, pays homage to him. The computer which the hackers break into toward the end of the film is called the Gibson.[26]


Visionary influence

Gibson coined the term 'cyberspace' and in Neuromancer first used the term 'matrix' to refer to the visualised internet.[27][28][29] He predicted the rise of the internet and many of the subcultural aspects of it, e.g. the hacker's subculture in Neuromancer. In Pattern Recognition, an important plotline revolves around snippets of film footage posted anonymously at various locations on the Internet. Characters in the novel speculate about the filmmaker's identity, motives, methods and inspirations on several websites, anticipating the 2006 Lonelygirl15 internet phenomenon. Again, Gibson predicted an internet application, of which YouTube is perhaps the best known example.[citation needed] Pattern recognition is a field within the area of machine learning. ... lonelygirl15 is an interactive web-based video series centering around the life of a fictional teenage girl named Bree, whose YouTube username is the eponymous lonelygirl15. The series is presented through short, regularly-updated video blogs posted by the fictional characters, as well as through an optional alternate reality game. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... YouTube is a popular free video sharing website which lets users upload, view, and share video clips. ...


Despite all this, Gibson never had a special relationship with computers. His watershed Neuromancer was in fact written on a manual typewriter (he eventually moved up to a Macintosh SE/30). In 2007 he reports:

I have a 2005 PowerBook G4, a gig of memory, wireless router. That's it. I'm anything but an early adopter, generally. In fact, I've never really been very interested in computers themselves. I don't watch them; I watch how people behave around them. That's becoming more difficult to do because everything is "around them."[13]

Selected quotations

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • I suspect I have spent just about exactly as much time actually writing as the average person my age has spent watching television, and that, as much as anything, may be the real secret here. -- excerpt from short autobiography on Gibson's website, williamgibsonbooks.com
  • Emergent technology is, by its very nature, out of control, and leads to unpredictable outcomes. -- from a talk given at the Directors Guild of America's Digital Day, Los Angeles, May 17, 2003.
  • ...I felt that I was trying to describe an unthinkable present and I actually feel that science fiction's best use today is the exploration of contemporary reality rather than any attempt to predict where we are going... The best thing you can do with science today is use it to explore the present. Earth is the alien planet now. --from an interview on CNN, August 26, 1997.
  • ...the street finds its own uses for things. -- from "Burning Chrome"
  • Writing a novel for me...the part of the text where you're moving forward into nothingness, it feels like being one of those transatlantic tunneling machines...grinding away at a dank dark rock face. -- from a radio interview with This Week in Science originally recorded on February 03, 2004.
  • "The future is already here. It’s just not very evenly distributed."

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Director Guild of America building on Sunset Boulevard. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... This Week in Science (TWIS) is a weekly science radio talk show broadcasting from KDVS 90. ... The Matrix is a 1999 science fiction action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski and starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano and Hugo Weaving. ...

Bibliography

The Sprawl trilogy: Neuromancer, Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive.
The Sprawl trilogy: Neuromancer, Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive.

Download high resolution version (1228x772, 138 KB)public domain / picture taken by Fortinbras File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1228x772, 138 KB)public domain / picture taken by Fortinbras File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Novels

For the 1988 video game, see Neuromancer (video game). ... See also: 1983 in literature, other events of 1984, 1985 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Sprawl-trilogy, of which Neuromancer is the first part. ... The Sprawl trilogy, of which Count Zero is the second part Count Zero (ISBN 0441117732) is a science fiction novel written by William Gibson, originally published in 1986. ... See also: 1985 in literature, other events of 1986, 1987 in literature, list of years in literature. ... NAKAYUBI (ナカユビ; Middle Finger) Buster Zangai -Shape2- (残骸 -Shape2-; Wreck -Shape2-) Limbo Mona Lisa Girl (Shape 2) Sid Vicious on the Beach Black Cherry Genzai (原罪; Original Sin) Monster Ai no uta (愛ノ歌; Love Song Continuous Information Mona Lisa OVERDRIVE was named after the 1989 novel Mona Lisa Overdrive, by William Gibson. ... See also: 1987 in literature, other events of 1988, 1989 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Difference Engine is an alternate history novel by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. ... See also: 1989 in literature, other events of 1990, 1991 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... William Gibsons Bridge trilogy is his second trilogy, after the succesful Sprawl trilogy. ... See also: 1992 in literature, other events of 1993, 1994 in literature, list of years in literature. ... William Ford Gibsons Bridge trilogy, sometimes called the San Francisco trilogy, is his second trilogy, after the successful Sprawl trilogy. ... William Gibsons Bridge trilogy is his second trilogy, after the successful Sprawl trilogy. ... See also: 1995 in literature, other events of 1996, 1997 in literature, list of years in literature. ... All Tomorrows Parties is the third book in William Gibsons Bridge trilogy. Like its precessors, All Tomorrows Parties is a science-fiction novel set in a postmodern, dystopian, cyberpunk future. ... See also: 1998 in literature, other events of 1999, 2000 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Book cover Pattern Recognition (G. P. Putnams Sons 2003, ISBN 0-425-19293-8) is William Gibsons eighth novel, the first to be set in the contemporary world. ... See also: 2002 in literature, other events of 2003, 2004 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Spook Country is a forthcoming novel by William Gibson, set to be released on August 7, 2007 by publisher Penguin Putnam. ... The year 2007 in literature involves some significant new books. ...

Collections

Cover of the Burning Chrome short story collection
Cover of the Burning Chrome short story collection

Image File history File links A book cover of Burning Chrome by William Gibson. ... Image File history File links A book cover of Burning Chrome by William Gibson. ... Burning Chrome. ... Burning Chrome. ... William Gibsons first published work, originally appearing in Unearth 3, in 1977, a short-lived science fiction collection magazine, retailing for $1. ... Johnny Mnemonic is a short story by William Gibson. ... The cover of the January 1991 issue of Omni. ... The Gernsback Continuum is a short story by William Gibson, collected as part of his Burning Chrome anthology, about a photographer who has been given the assignment of photographing old, futuristic architecture. ... Hinterlands is a William Gibson short story written in 1981 and featured in his collection Burning Chrome in 1986. ... New Rose Hotel is a short story by William Gibson, later collected in his book Burning Chrome. ... ). The Belonging Kind is a collaboration between William Gibson, noted cyberpunk author, and John Shirley. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Hackers (ISBN 0-441-00375-3) is an anthology of short stories edited by Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois. ... This story from William Gibsons Burning Chrome collection of short fiction is set in an alternate future where the Soviet Union controls most of the Earths resources, especially oil. ... Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... The Winter Market is a science fiction short story written by William Gibson, and published as part of his Burning Chrome short story collection. ... Hackers (ISBN 0-441-00375-3) is an anthology of short stories edited by Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Michael Swanwick (born November 18, 1950) is an American science fiction author. ...

Uncollected short fiction

  • "Tokyo Collage" in SF Eye, August 1988.[17]
  • "Hippy Hat Brain Parasite" in Rucker, Rudy (1989). Semiotext[E] Sf. Brooklyn: Autonomedia, 109-122. ISBN 0936756438. 
  • "The Nazi Lawn Dwarf Murders" (unpublished)[30]
  • "Doing Television" in Dorsey, Candas (1989). Tesseracts 3. Victoria: Porcépic, 392-394. ISBN 9780888782908. 
  • "Darwin" in Spin, April 1990, 21-23.[17][15]
  • "Skinner's Room" in Polledri, Paolo (1990). Visionary San Francisco. Munich: Prestal, 153-65. ISBN 3791310607. 
  • "Academy Leader" in Benedikt, Michael (1991). Cyberspace. Cambridge: MIT Press, 27-29. ISBN 0262521776. 
  • "Cyber-Claus" in Hartwell, David (1992). Christmas Stars. New York: Tor Books. ISBN 0812522869. 
  • "Where the Holograms Go" in Trilling, Roger (1993). Wild Palms Reader. City: St Martins Pr, 122-23. ISBN 0312090838. 
  • "Thirteen Views of a Cardboard City" in Aldiss, Brian (1997). New Worlds. Clarkston: White Wolf Pub, 338-349. ISBN 1565041909. 
Cover of Agrippa (A Book of the Dead), released in 1992
Cover of Agrippa (A Book of the Dead), released in 1992

Spin is a music magazine that reports on all the music that rocks. Founded in 1985 by publisher Bob Guccione, Jr. ... Skinners Room is a short story by influential cyberpunk author William Gibson. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Agrippa (a book of the dead) is an artists book. ...

Articles

The Sprawl trilogy, of which Count Zero is the second part Count Zero (ISBN 0441117732) is a science fiction novel written by William Gibson, originally published in 1986. ... Cover for an issue of Asimovs Science Fiction. ... This article is about the magazine. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Post is a major Canadian English-language national newspaper based in Don Mills, Ontario, a district of Toronto. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Miscellaneous other work

Agrippa (a book of the dead) is an artists book. ... See also: 1991 in literature, other events of 1992, 1993 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1997 in literature, other events of 1998, 1999 in literature, list of years in literature. ... // WILLIAM GIBSONS X-FILES EPISODES William Gibson, together with science fiction novelist Tom Maddox, wrote two episodes for popular American television series The X-Files. Kill Switch (5x11) first aired on February 15th, 1998 and First Person Shooter (7x13) two years later on February 27th, 2000 on FOX. Both... The X-Files is a Peabody- and Emmy Award-winning science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on September 10, 1993, and ended on May 19, 2002. ...

Further reading

  • Olsen, Lance (1992). William Gibson. San Bernardino: Borgo Press. ISBN 1557421986. 
  • Cavallaro, Dani (2000). Cyberpunk and Cyberculture. London: Athlone Press. ISBN 9780485006070. 

References

  1. ^ a b Gibson, William (2003-01-28). THE MATRIX: FAIR COP. williamgibsonbooks.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  2. ^ a b McCaffery, Larry. An Interview with William Gibson. cyberpunk.ru. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  3. ^ a b Gibson, William (2007-01-13). PHILIP K. DICK. williamgibsonbooks.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  4. ^ Gibson, William (7 2005). God's Little Toys:Confessions of a cut & paste artist. Wired.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  5. ^ http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=cyberspace
  6. ^ Gibson, William (2006-03-08). William Gibson: His Blog. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  7. ^ Maddox, Tom (1989). Maddox on Gibson (zine article). #23. Virus. Retrieved on 2007-07-13.
  8. ^ a b c Mark Neale, 'No Maps for These Territories', Docurama, 2000.
  9. ^  Yorkville: Hippie havenYorkville, TorontoCBC.ca. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  10. ^ Bolhafner, J. Stephen (3 1994). "William Gibson interview". Starlog (200). 
  11. ^ Gibson, William; Bruce Sterling (1986). Burning Chrome. New York: Harper Collins. ISBN 0-06-053982-8. 
  12. ^ Hirst, Christopher (2003-05-10). Books: Hardbacks. The Independent. Retrieved on 2007-07-08. “Cyberspace guru William Gibson's tale of urban paranoia has shot straight to No 6”
  13. ^ a b Chang, Angela (2007-01-10). "Q&A: William Gibson". PC Magazine 26 (3). 
  14. ^ Gibson, William (1996-03-31). forward to city come a-walkin'. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  15. ^ a b c d William Gibson Bibliography / Mediagraphy
  16. ^ http://e.discogs.com/release/432896
  17. ^ a b c d Bibliography of Works By William Gibson from the Centre for Language and Literature at Athabasca University.
  18. ^ Goldberger, Paul. "Architecture View; In San Francisco, a Good Idea Falls With a Thud", New York Times, 1990-08-12. 
  19. ^ Alan Liu, The Laws of Cool: Knowledge Work and the Culture of Information (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2004), pp. 339-48.
  20. ^ Introduction to Agrippa: A Book of the Dead by William Gibson
  21. ^ Pattern Recognition. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  22. ^ I'VE FORGOTTEN MORE NEUROMANCER FILM DEALS THAN YOU'VE EVER HEARD OF. Williamgibsonbooks.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-23.
  23. ^ William Gibson’s Idoru Coming to Anime. cyberpunkreview.com (2006-04-21). Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  24. ^ Archive of articles written by Gibson from the Aleph, retrieved April 9, 2007
  25. ^ Neuromancer audiobook, retrieved April 9, 2007.
  26. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113243/trivia
  27. ^ highlighted quote from Neuromancer excerpt
  28. ^ Cyberspace at The Jargon File
  29. ^ Matrix at Netlingo
  30. ^ Tom Maddox Unreal-Time Chat (email exchange). Shop Talk. Retrieved on 2007-07-13.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Wired magazine is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tom Maddox is an American science-fiction writer, known for his part in the early cyberpunk movement. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... No Maps for These Territories is a 1999 documentary film by Mark Neale focusing on the science fiction author William Gibson. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bloor Street Bloor Street Yorkville is an affluent neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the countrys national radio and television broadcaster. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... Starlog is a science-fiction film magazine published by Starlog Group Inc. ... Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... Burning Chrome. ... The Independent is a British compact newspaper published by Tony OReillys Independent News & Media. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PC Magazine is a computer magazine published biweekly (except in January and July ) both in print and online. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Athabasca University, headquartered in Athabasca, Alberta, is a fully accredited institution specialized in the delivery of distance education courses and programs. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jargon File is a glossary of hacker slang. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Official
References
Interviews
Notable fan sites

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Gibson (novelist) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1123 words)
William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948, Conway, South Carolina) is an American science fiction author.
Gibson's second trilogy, the "Bridge trilogy", centers on San Francisco in the near future and evinces Gibson's recurring themes of technological, physical, and spiritual transcendence in an arguably more grounded, matter-of-fact style than his first trilogy.
Gibson was the focus of a 1999 documentary by Mark Neale called No Maps for These Territories, featuring Bono and The Edge reading excerpts from Neuromancer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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