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Encyclopedia > William Froude
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The hulls of swan (above) and raven (below). A sequence of 3, 6 and 12 (shown in the picture) foot scale models constucted by Froude and used in towing trials to establish resistance and scaling laws. Ravens sharp prow followed the "waveline" theory of John Scot Russell, but Swans blunter profile proved to offer lower resistance

William Froude (November 28, 1810, Dartington, Devon, England - May 4, 1879, Simonstown, South Africa) was an engineer, hydrodynamicist and naval architect, and the brother of James Anthony Froude, a historian.


Froude was the first to formulate reliable laws for the resistance that water offers to ships and for predicting their stability. He was educated at Oxford. In 1837 he was assistant to Isambard Kingdom Brunel on the Bristol and Exeter Railway. His is remembered in fluid dynamics by the Froude number named after him.


External links

  • http://www.btinternet.com/~philipr/froude.htm
  • http://www.cartage.org.lb/en/themes/Biographies/MainBiographies/F/Froude/1.html

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Froude - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (162 words)
A sequence of 3, 6 and 12 (shown in the picture) foot scale models constucted by Froude and used in towing trials to establish resistance and scaling laws.
William Froude (November 28, 1810, Dartington, Devon, England - May 4, 1879, Simonstown, South Africa) was an engineer, hydrodynamicist and naval architect, and the brother of James Anthony Froude, a historian.
Froude was the first to formulate reliable laws for the resistance that water offers to ships and for predicting their stability.
James Anthony Froude - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1250 words)
Froude's Life of Caesar (1879), a glorification of imperialism, betrays little acquaintance with Roman politics and the life of Cicero; and his travel book, The English in the West Indies or The Bow of Ulysses (1888) shows that he made little effort to master his subject.
In 1874 Lord Carnarvon, then colonial secretary, sent Froude to South Africa to report on the best means of promoting a confederation of its colonies and states, and in 1875 he was again sent to the Cape as a member of a proposed conference to further confederation.
Froude's first wife, a daughter of Pascoe Grenfell and sister of Mrs Charles Kingsley, died in 1860; his second, a daughter of John Warre, M.P. for Taunton, died in 1874.
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