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Encyclopedia > William Farrar Smith
William F. "Baldy" Smith
William F. "Baldy" Smith

William Farrar Smith (February 17, 1824February 28, 1903), was a civil engineer, a police commissioner, and Union general in the American Civil War. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (474x681, 42 KB) Library of Congress Civil War collection File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (474x681, 42 KB) Library of Congress Civil War collection File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... The Union Army refers to the United States Army during the American Civil War. ... General is a military rank used by nearly every country in the world. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ...


Smith, known to his friends as "Baldy", was born at St. Albans, Vermont, graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1845, and was assigned to the topographical engineers. He was twice assistant professor of mathematics at West Point (18461848 and 18551856). St. ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Main article: History of mathematics The evolution of mathematics can be seen to be an ever increasing series of abstractions. ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


During the First Battle of Bull Run, Smith served on the staff of Major General Irvin McDowell. In August 1861, he became brigadier general of volunteers after helping organize the First Vermont Brigade. He was brevetted lieutenant colonel in the Regular Army for his gallantry at the Battle of White Oak Swamp in the Seven Days Battles. On July 4, 1862, he received promotion to the rank of major general of volunteers. Smith led his division with conspicuous valor at Antietam, and was again brevetted in the regular army. When his corps commander, William B. Franklin, was reassigned to a superior command, Smith was placed at the head of the VI Corps of the Army of the Potomac, which he led at the disastrous Battle of Fredericksburg. The First Battle of Bull Run, referred to as the First Battle of Manassas in the South, (July 21, 1861), was the first major land battle of the American Civil War. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... General Irvin McDowell Irvin McDowell (October 15, 1818 – May 4, 1885) was an American military officer, famous for his participation in the American Civil War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... The First Vermont Brigade, or Old Brigade was an infantry brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War. ... In the military, brevet refers to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... The Regular Army is the name given by many countries to the permanent force of the a countries army that is maintained during peacetime. ... Battle of White Oak Swamp Conflict American Civil War Date June 30, 1862 Place Henrico County, Virginia Result Inconclusive The Battle of White Oak Swamp took place on June 30, 1862 in Henrico County, Virginia as part of the Peninsula Campaign of the American Civil War. ... Eastern Theater operations in 1862 The Seven Days Battles was a series of six major battles over the seven days from June 25 to July 1, 1862, near Richmond, Virginia, in the American Civil War. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Battle of Antietam (known as the Battle of Sharpsburg in the South), fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, part of the Maryland Campaign, was the first major battle in the American Civil War to take place on Northern soil. ... Major General William B. Franklin William Buel Franklin ( February 27, 1823 – March 8, 1903) was a career Army officer and Union Army general in the American Civil War. ... The VI Corps (Sixth Corps) was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Generals Burnside, Hancock, Couch, Ferro, Patrick, Wilcox, Cochrane, Buford and others. ... Battle of jo mama Conflict American Civil War Date December 11–15, 1862 Place Spotsylvania County and Fredericksburg Result Confederate victory The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought on December 13, 1862 between General Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac commanded by Maj. ...


The recriminations that followed Fredericksburg led to a famous general order in which army commander Ambrose Burnside proposed to dismiss several of the senior officers of the army. President Abraham Lincoln prevented this order from taking effect and relieved Burnside of his command. Smith was one of the affected officers, but it is to his credit that he did not leave the army. However, his indiscretion in communicating to Lincoln directly about Burnside's shortcomings, compounded by the fact that General Smith was a close friend of out-of-favor Major General George B. McClellan, resulted in his losing both his corps command and his rank; the Senate failed to confirm his nomination to major general, which expired on March 4, 1863. So, returned to the rank of brigadier general, he commanded troops of the Department of the Susquehanna in Pennsylvania during the critical days of the Gettysburg Campaign, including the unsuccessful pursuit of Robert E. Lee back to the Potomac River. He followed this in division command in West Virginia. Portrait of Ambrose Burnside by Mathew Brady, ca. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Order: 16th President Vice President: Hannibal Hamlin (1861-1865); Andrew Johnson (1865) Term of office: March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865 Preceded by: James Buchanan Succeeded by: Andrew Johnson Date of birth: February 12, 1809 Place of birth: Hardin County, Kentucky (now in LaRue County) Date of death: April 15... George McClellan George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 – October 29, 1885) was a Major General of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... Battle of Gettysburg Conflict American Civil War Date July 1–3, 1863 Place Adams County Result Union victory The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1–3, 1863), which took place in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, was one of the largest battles ever conducted in the Western Hemisphere, and... Robert Edward Lee, as a U.S. Army Colonel before the war Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... Upper part of the Potomac River The Potomac River flows into Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... State nickname: Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Governor Joe Manchin (D) Official languages English Area 62,809 km² (41st)  - Land 62,436 km²  - Water 376 km² (0. ...


On October 3, 1863, Smith was assigned to duty as chief engineer of the Army of the Cumberland (and a couple of weeks later, the Military Division of the Mississippi). As such he conducted the engineer operations and launched the Battle of Wauhatchie, which opened the "Cracker Line" to provide supplies and reinforcements to the besieged troops in Chattanooga. Of this action the House Committee on Military Affairs reported in 1865 that "as a subordinate, General WF Smith had saved the Army of the Cumberland from capture, and afterwards directed it to victory." Smith was now again nominated for the rank of major general of volunteers, and Ulysses S. Grant, who was much impressed with Smith's work, insisted strongly that the nomination should be confirmed, which was accordingly done by the Senate on March 9, 1864. Grant, according to his own statement "was not long in finding out that the objections to Smith's promotion were well grounded," but he never stated the grounds of his complaint, and Smith, in the Battles and Leaders series, maintained that they were purely of a personal character. October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in Leap years). ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Union army in the west during the American Civil War, commanded at various times by Generals Robert Anderson, Don Carlos Buell, William S. Rosecrans, and George Thomas. ... Battle of Wauhatchie Conflict American Civil War Date October 28-29, 1863 Place Hamilton County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Wauhatchie, also known as Browns Ferry, was fought October 28–29, 1863, in Hamilton County, Marion County, and Dade County, Tennessee, in the American Civil War. ... The third Battle of Chattanooga (popularly known as The Battle of Chattanooga) was fought November 23–25, 1863, in the American Civil War. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Order: 18th President Vice President: Schuyler Colfax (1869–1873); Henry Wilson (1873–1875) Term of office: March 4, 1869 – March 4, 1877 Preceded by: Andrew Johnson Succeeded by: Rutherford B. Hayes Date of birth: April 27, 1822 Place of birth: Point Pleasant, Ohio Date of death: July 23, 1885 Place... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


For the Overland Campaign of 1864, Smith was assigned by Grant to command the XVIII Corps in Benjamin Butler's Army of the James, which he led in the Battle of Cold Harbor and the first operations against Petersburg. Smith's corps and a division of black troops (under Edward W. Hink) were ordered to take the city. Remembering the debacle at Cold Harbor, Smith performed exhaustive reconnaissance. Determining that the section of the defensive line was manned primarily by artillery, he ordered an attack. However, the attack was delayed and in the meantime he became apprehensive about a rumor circulating that Lee was about to arrive. He lost his nerve, perhaps because of the formidable character of the Confederate works or perhaps because of a recurring bout with malaria, but his hesitation may have lost him the opportunity to shorten the war by nearly a year. On July 19, 1864, he was relieved from command of the XVIII Corps and he spent the remainder of the war on "special duty." Ulysses S. Grant Robert E. Lee The Overland Campaign, or Grants Overland Campaign, was a series of battles fought in Virginia during May and June, 1864, in the American Civil War. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... XVIII Corps was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler Benjamin Franklin Butler (November 5, 1818–January 11, 1893) was an American lawyer, soldier and politician. ... The Army of the James was a Union Army that was composed of unites from the Department of Virginia and North Carolina and served along the James River during the last opperations of the Civil War in Virginia. ... The Battle of Cold Harbor, the final battle of Union Lieut. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans, Black Americans, or simply blacks, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to West and sub-Saharan Africa. ... July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Smith resigned from the volunteers in 1865, and from the U.S. Army in 1867. From 1864 to 1873 he was president of the International Telegraph Company, and from 1875 to 1881 served on the board of police commissioners of New York, becoming its president in 1877. After 1881 he was engaged in civil engineering work in Pennsylvania. He died at Philadelphia in 1903 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... Arlington Cemetery Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Virginia, is an American military cemetery established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Robert E. Lees home. ...


References

  • Eicher, John H., & Eicher, David J.: Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3

  Results from FactBites:
 
Farrar (2669 words)
William Farrar II (son of William, gson of John Jr) was born 1626 at Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA, and died Feb. 1, 1678 in Charles City, VA. He married Mary Piggot Baugh abt 1653 VA. She was born abt 1627 VA, and died 1676 VA. This William Farrar was known as Colonel William Farrar.
William Farrar III was born 1656 in Farrar's Island, VA, and died April 3, 1721 at Farrar's Island.
John William Farrar (son of William, gson of George, g-gson of William III) was born Aug. 1, 1758 in Mecklenburg, VA, and died 1830 in TN.
Sir William Smith - LoveToKnow 1911 (439 words)
SIR WILLIAM SMITH (1813-1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents.
In carrying out this task Smith was most ably seconded by John Murray, the publisher, who, when the original publishers of the dictionaries got into difficulties, volunteered to take a share in the undertaking.
From 1853 to 1869 Smith was classical examiner to the University of London, and on his retirement he became a member of the Senate.
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