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Encyclopedia > William F. Buckley, Jr
William F. Buckley Jr.

William F. Buckley, Jr., on his long-running television show Firing Line
Born: November 24, 1925 (1925-11-24) (age 81)
New York City USA
Occupation: author
commentator
television personality
Spouse: Patricia Taylor Buckley (d. 2007)
Children: Christopher Buckley (b.1952)

William Frank Buckley Jr. (born November 24, 1925), is an American author and commentator. He founded the political magazine National Review in 1955, hosted the television show Firing Line from 1966 until 1999, and is a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist. His writing style is characterized by use of uncommon words.[1] Over the course of his career, Buckley's views have changed on some issues, such as drug legalization, which he now favors.[2] Image File history File links This work is copyrighted. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... New York, NY redirects here. ... Cosette Dwyer is an amazing author. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A celebrity is a person who is widely recognized in a society. ... Patricia Alden Austin Taylor Pat Buckley (July 1, 1926–April 15, 2007) was an American socialite noted for her fundraising abilities. ... Christopher Buckley Christopher Taylor Buckley (born 1952) is an American political satirist and author of several novels. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley Jr. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Firing Line (1966-1999) was a public affairs show founded and hosted by conservative William F. Buckley, Jr. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The prohibition of drugs through legislation or religious law is a common means of controlling the perceived negative consequences of recreational drug use at a society- or world-wide level. ...


Buckley is the author of a series of novels featuring the character of CIA agent Blackford Oakes, along with several books on writing, speaking, history, politics. Buckley refers to himself "on and off" as either libertarian or Conservative.[3][4] He is based in New York City and Sharon, Connecticut and is semi-retired. Buckley often signs his name as "WFB." The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Blackford Blackie Oakes is a fictional CIA agent and the protagonist of a series of novels written by William F. Buckley, Jr. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... New York, NY redirects here. ... Sharon is a town located in Litchfield County, Connecticut, in the northwest corner of the state. ...

Contents

Childhood

Buckley was born in New York City to lawyer and oil baron William Frank Buckley, Sr., of Irish Catholic descent, and Aloise Steiner, a Southerner of Swiss-German descent. The sixth of ten children, young Buckley moved with his family to Sharon, Connecticut. He soon moved to Paris where he attended first grade and learned French. By age seven, he had received formal training in English at a day school in London, Connecticut. As a boy, Buckley developed a love for music, sailing, horses, hunting, skiing, and story telling. All of these interests would reflect in his later writings. He is also an accomplished amateur harpsichord player. He attended St John's Beaumont in England at age 13 just before World War II. During the war, his family took in the future British historian, Alistair Horne, as a war refugee. Buckley and Horne have remained life-long friends. Buckley and Horne both attended Millbrook School, in Millbrook, New York, and graduated as members of the Class of 1943. At Millbrook, Buckley founded and edited the school's yearbook, The Tamarack, his first experience in publishing. New York, NY redirects here. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... William Frank Buckley, Sr. ... Irish Catholics are persons of predominantly Irish descent who adhere to the Roman Catholic faith. ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Sharon is a town located in Litchfield County, Connecticut, in the northwest corner of the state. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is any of a family of European keyboard instruments, including the large instrument currently called a harpsichord, but also the smaller virginals, the muselar virginals and the spinet. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... An historian is someone who writes history, a written accounting of the past. ... Sir Alistair Allan Horne (November 9, 1925-) is a British historian of modern France. ... Millbrook School is a private, coeducational preparatory school located in Dutchess County, New York. ... Millbrook is a village in Dutchess County, New York, USA. The population was 1,429 at the 2000 census. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ...


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Buckley attended the National Autonomous University of Mexico (or UNAM) in 1943 and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the US Army the following year. In his book, Miles Gone By, he fleetingly recounts being a member of Franklin Roosevelt's honor guard when the president died. With the end of World War II in 1945, he enrolled in Yale University, where he became a member of the secret Skull and Bones society, and was an active member of the Conservative Party and of the Yale Political Union, and served as Chairman of the Yale Daily News. This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ... Cultural conservatism is conservatism with respect to culture. ... Liberal conservatism is a variant of conservatism that combines the classical conservative concern for established tradition, respect for authority and (sometimes) religious values with liberal ideas, especially on economic issues (see economic liberalism, which advocates free market capitalism). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Neoconservatism is a political movement which has emerged in the 1960s, coalesced in the 1970s, and has significant presence in the administration of George W. Bush. ... Paleoconservatism (sometimes shortened to paleo or paleocon when the context is clear) is an anti-communist, anti-authoritarian[1] right wing movement based primarily in the United States that stresses tradition, civil society and classical federalism, along with familial, religious, regional, national and Western identity. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy that holds that individuals should be allowed complete freedom of action as long as they do not infringe on the freedom of others. ... Fiscal conservatism (also known as economic conservatism) is a term used in the United States to refer to economic and political policy that advocates restraint of government taxation, government expenditures and deficits, and government debt. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... The rule of law is the principle that governmental authority is legitimately exercised only in accordance with written, publicly disclosed laws adopted and enforced in accordance with established procedure. ... Social order is a concept used in sociology, history and other social sciences. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Many countries have political parties that are deemed to represent conservative, center-right, or Tory views which may be referred to informally as conservative parties even if not explicitly named so. ... The International Democrat Union (IDU) is an international grouping of conservative, neoliberal and Christian democratic political parties. ... The European Peoples Party (EPP) is the largest European political party. ... Bolivar is the image in which conservatism in Colombia creates its ideologies: the ideals of this great character were used by many years on the different conservative movements. ... Conservatism in Germany encompasses a large number of strains of the past three hundred years. ... In Canada, political conservatism is generally considered to be primarily represented by the Conservative Party of Canada at the federal level, and by the various right-leaning parties at the provincial levels. ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military, opposition to internationalism,[4] and promotion of states rights. ... The National Autonomous University of Mexico (Spanish: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, abbreviated as UNAM) is today the most important Mexican university and was founded in 1551 by Royal Decree signed by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor at Valladolid, Spain. ... The National Autonomous University of Mexico (Spanish: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México; abbreviation: UNAM) was founded in 1551, and is now the largest university in Latin America and it is considered the best University of this region based on the Beijing University and the London Times suplemments. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), often referred to as FDR, was the 32nd (1933–1945) President of the United States. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Emblem of the Skull and Bones society The Order of Skull and Bones, once known as The Brotherhood of Death[1], is a secret society based at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, and one of the earliest-established of student secret societies to rival Phi Beta Kappa, also originally... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A front page of the Yale Daily News. ...


Buckley graduated from Yale in 1950. That same year, he married the former Patricia Alden Austin Taylor, (July 1, 1926 - April 15, 2007), the daughter of industrialist Austin C. Taylor. He met Pat, a Protestant from Vancouver, British Columbia, while she was a student at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. Buckley was her roommate's brother. Their son is the author Christopher Buckley. Pat Buckley was a prominent charity fundraiser for such organizations as the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery at New York University Medical Center and the Hospital for Special Surgery. She also raised money for Vietnam War veterans and AIDS patients. 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Business magnate. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Vancouver (pronounced: ) is a city in south-western British Columbia, Canada. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo - Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 36 - Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area Ranked 4th - Total 944,735 km... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, highly selective liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... Poughkeepsie City of Poughkeepsie Town of Poughkeepsie Poughkeepsie, Arkansas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Christopher Buckley Christopher Taylor Buckley (born 1952) is an American political satirist and author of several novels. ... The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City is a cancer treatment and research institution founded in 1884 as the New York Cancer Hospital. ... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ...


In 1951, Buckley was recruited into the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), yet served for less than a year. Little has been published regarding Buckley's work with the CIA, but in a 2001 letter to author W. Thomas Smith, Jr., Buckley wrote, “I did training in Washington as a secret agent and was sent to Mexico City. There I served under the direct supervision of Howard Hunt, about whom of course a great deal is known.” 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an intelligence agency of the United States government. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... W. Thomas Smith Jr. ... Nickname: Ciudad de los Palacios Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ... Everette Howard Hunt, Jr. ...


In a November 1, 2005, editorial for the National Review, he recounted that: November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley Jr. ...

When in 1951 I was inducted into the CIA as a deep cover agent, the procedures for disguising my affiliation and my work were unsmilingly comprehensive. It was three months before I was formally permitted to inform my wife what the real reason was for going to Mexico City to live. If, a year later, I had been apprehended, dosed with sodium pentothal, and forced to give out the names of everyone I knew in the CIA, I could have come up with exactly one name, that of my immediate boss (E. Howard Hunt, as it happened). In the passage of time one can indulge in idle talk on spook life. In 1980 I found myself seated next to the former president of Mexico at a ski-area restaurant. What, he asked amiably, had I done when I lived in Mexico? "I tried to undermine your regime, Mr. President." He thought this amusing, and that is all that it was, under the aspect of the heavens. Sodium thiopental (also called sodium pentothal (™ of Abbott Laboratories), thiopental (or thiopentone) sodium) is a rapid-onset, short-acting barbiturate general anesthetic. ... Everette Howard Hunt, Jr. ...

While in Mexico, Buckley edited The Road to Yenan, a book addressing the communist quest for global domination, by Peruvian author Eudocio Ravines. Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ...


Career

In 1951, the same year he was recruited into the CIA, Buckley's first book, God and Man at Yale, was published. The book was written in Hamden, Connecticut, where Willian and Pat Buckley had settled as newlyweds. A critique of Yale University, the work argues that the school had strayed from its original educational mission. In 1954, Buckley co-wrote a book with his brother-in-law, the late L. Brent Bozell, entitled McCarthy and His Enemies, in which Buckley and Bozell strongly defended Wisconsin U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy, albeit with some reservations, as a patriotic crusader against communism. The next year, he made some telling concessions in an article for Commonweal. God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of Academic Freedom, is a book that was published in 1951, and was written by William F. Buckley, who eventually became the leading voice in the conservative movement of the twentieth century. ... Hamden is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ... Patriotism is a feeling of love and devotion to ones own homeland (patria, the land of ones fathers). ...

[W]e have got to accept Big Government for the duration—for neither an offensive nor a defensive war can be waged, given our present government skills, except through the instrument of a totalitarian bureaucracy within our shores. … And if they deem Soviet power a menace to our freedom (as I happen to), they will have to support large armies and air forces, atomic energy, central intelligence, war production boards, and the attendant centralization of power in Washington—even with Truman at the reins of it all.[3]

Buckley worked as an editor for The American Mercury in 1951 and 1952 before he founded National Review in 1955. Under Buckley and co-founder Frank Meyer, National Review became the standard bearer of American conservatism, promoting the fusion of traditional conservatives and libertarians. In 1957, Buckley published a review of Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged by Whittaker Chambers, ostensibly "reading her out of the conservative movement."[5] Objectivists have accused Chambers of merely skimming the novel.[6] In 1960, Buckley helped form Young Americans for Freedom. In 1964, Buckley very strongly supported the candidacy of Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater, first for the Republican nomination against New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller and then for the Presidency. Buckley used the National Review as a forum for mobilizing support for Goldwater. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Frank Meyer (born 1909, died 1972) was a conservative political philosopher and co-founding editor of National Review. ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... Fusionism is an American political term for the combination or fusion of libertarians and traditional conservatives in the American conservative movement. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher,[1] best known for developing Objectivism and for writing the novels We the Living, The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and the novella Anthem. ... Atlas Shrugged is a novel by Ayn Rand, first published in 1957 in the USA. It was Rands last work of fiction before concentrating her writings exclusively on philosophy, politics and cultural criticism. ... Whittaker Chambers, 1948 Jay Vivian (David Whittaker) Chambers (April 1, 1901 – July 9, 1961) was an American writer, editor, Communist party member and spy for the Soviet Union who defected and became an outspoken opponent of communism. ... Objectivism is a philosophy[1] developed by Ayn Rand that encompasses positions on metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, and aesthetics. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Official seal of Young Americans for Freedom. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998[1]) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for President in the 1964 election. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ...


A year later, in 1965, he ran for mayor of New York City as the candidate for the young Conservative Party, because of his dissatisfaction with the very liberal Republican candidate John Lindsay, who later became a Democrat. Buckley finished third with 13 percent of the vote. When asked what he would do if he won the race, Buckley issued his classic response, "I'd demand a recount." In October 1965, Buckley denounced Robert W. Welch Jr. and the John Birch Society, who he had previously been friendly with, in the National Review as lunatic-fringe fanatics promoting strange and bizarre conspiracy theories, and urged the GOP to purge itself of JBS members. 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... The Conservative Party of New York is a minor political party active only in New York State. ... Republican In Name Only, or RINO, is a disparaging term for a member of the Republican Party of the United States whose political views or actions are perceived as not conservative and outside the conservative mainstream. ... John Vliet Lindsay (November 24, 1921 – December 19, 2000) was an American politician who served as a Congressman (1959-1965) and mayor of New York City (1966-1973). ... Look up October in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Robert Henry Winborne Welch Jr. ... The John Birch Society is an Americanist organization founded in 1958 to fight what it saw as growing threats to the Constitution of the United States, especially a suspected communist infiltration of the United States government, and to support free enterprise. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ...


Buckley appeared in a series of televised debates opposite Gore Vidal during the 1968 political conventions. In their penultimate debate on August 22 of that year, the two disagreed over the actions of the Chicago police and the protesters at the ongoing Democratic Convention in Chicago. At one point Vidal called Buckley a “pro crypto-Nazi”, to which Buckley replied, “Now listen, you queer, stop calling me a crypto-Nazi or I'll sock you in your goddamn face, and you'll stay plastered.”[7] Gore Vidal in 1948, photographed by Carl Van Vechten Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3, 1925) (pronounced , occasionally , , etc) is an American author of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays. ... The 1968 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party was held at International Amphitheatre in Chicago, Illinois, from August 26 to August 29, 1968, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. presidential election. ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ... Crypto-fascism is when a party or group secretly adheres to the doctrines of fascism while attempting to disguise it as another political movement. ... The word queer has traditionally meant strange or unusual, but it is also currently often used in reference to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and asexual communities. ...


This feud continued the following year in the pages of Esquire Magazine, which commissioned an essay from both Buckley and Vidal on the television incident. Buckley's essay "On Experiencing Gore Vidal," was published in the August 1969 issue, and led Vidal to sue for libel. Vidal's September essay in reply, "A Distasteful Encounter with William F. Buckley," was similarly litigated by Buckley. The presiding judge in Buckley's subsequent libel suit against Vidal initially concluded that "[t]he court must conclude that Vidal's comments in these paragraphs meet the minimal standard of fair comment. The inferences made by Vidal from Buckley's [earlier editorial] statements cannot be said to be completely unreasonable." However, Vidal also strongly implied that, in 1944, Buckley and unnamed siblings had vandalized a Protestant church in their Sharon, Connecticut, hometown after the pastor's wife had sold a house to a Jewish family. Buckley sued Vidal and Esquire for libel; Vidal counter-claimed for libel against Buckley, citing Buckley's characterization of Vidal's novel Myra Breckenridge as pornography. Both cases were dropped, but Buckley's legal expenses were reimbursed by Vidal, and Vidal's were not. Buckley also received an editorial apology in the pages of Esquire.[8] Esquire is a magazine for men owned by the Hearst Corporation. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


In 1973, Buckley served as a delegate to the United Nations. In 1981, Buckley informed President-elect (and personal friend) Ronald Reagan that he would decline any official position offered to him in Reagan's administration. Reagan jokingly replied that that was too bad, because he had wanted to make Buckley ambassador to (then Soviet-occupied) Afghanistan. Buckley replied that he was willing to take the job but only if he were to be supplied with "10 divisions of bodyguards."[9] 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Soviet redirects here. ...


Buckley participated in a debate following the airing of The Day After, a 1983 made-for-TV movie about the effects of nuclear war. A staunch anti-communist, Buckley consistently defended the strategy of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War. In 1991, Buckley received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President George H. W. Bush. The Day After is an American TV-movie which aired on November 20, 1983 on the ABC network. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nuclear War is a card game designed by Douglas Malewicki, and originally published in 1966. ... Mutual assured destruction (MAD) is the doctrine of military strategy in which a full scale use of nuclear weapons by one of two opposing sides would result in the destruction of both the attacker and the defender. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other major civilian award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, which... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ...

William F. Buckley, Jr., on the cover of his autobiography Miles Gone By

Buckley retired as active editor from National Review in 1990, and relinquished his controlling shares of National Review in June 2004 to a pre-selected board of trustees. The following month he published the memoir Miles Gone By. Buckley continues to write his syndicated newspaper column, as well as opinion pieces for National Review magazine and National Review Online. He remains editor-at-large at the magazine and also lectures, grants occasional radio interviews and makes guest appearances on national television news programs. Image File history File links Milesgoneby. ... Image File history File links Milesgoneby. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley Jr. ... National Review Online is the online presence of the prominent conservative political magazine National Review. ...


Buckley has recently criticized certain aspects of policy within the modern conservative movement. He has said, "Bush is conservative, but he is not a conservative", and that the president was not elected "as a vessel of the conservative faith." According to Buckley, the war in Iraq was "anything but conservative. The reality of the situation is that missions abroad to effect regime change in countries without a bill of rights or democratic tradition are terribly arduous." He was careful to add: "This isn’t to say that the Iraq war is wrong, or that history will judge it to be wrong. But it is absolutely to say that conservatism implies a certain submission to reality; and this war has an unrealistic frank and is being conscripted by events".[10] In a column published earlier this year in NRO and distributed by Universal Press Syndicate, Buckley stated unequivocally that, "One can't doubt that the American objective in Iraq has failed." Buckley has also stated that "...it's important that we acknowledge in the inner councils of state that it (the war) has failed, so that we should look for opportunities to cope with that failure."[11] There have been three conflicts in the late 20th century and early 21st century called Gulf War, all of which refer to conflicts in the Persian Gulf region: Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988) (aka First Gulf War). ... Universal Press Syndicate, an Andrews McMeel Universal company, provides syndication for a number of lifestyle and opinion columns, comics, and various other content. ...


Final public speech

On November 1, 2006, at the Yale Political Union, Buckley delivered a speech which he said would be his last on matters of policy. The topic of his speech was "Resolved: The Democratic Candidates for November 7th Should Withdraw". [4] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Firing Line

For many Americans, Buckley's erudite style on his weekly PBS show Firing Line was their primary exposure to the man. In it he displayed a scholarly, non-confrontational, and humorous conservatism and was known for his facial expressions, gestures and particularly probing intellectual questions of his guests. Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Firing Line (1966-1999) was a public affairs show founded and hosted by conservative William F. Buckley, Jr. ...


Throughout his career as a media figure, Buckley has received much criticism, largely from the American left but also from certain factions on the right, such as the John Birch Society and the Objectivists. Objectivism is a philosophy[1] developed by Ayn Rand that encompasses positions on metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, and aesthetics. ...


On language

Buckley is well known for his command of language.[12] Buckley came late to the English language, not learning it until he was 7 (his first language was Spanish, learned in Mexico, and his second French, learned in Paris).[13] He speaks it with an idiosyncratic accent: something between an old-fashioned, upper class Mid-Atlantic accent and British Received Pronunciation, a consequence of his relatively late arrival to English. Idiosyncrasy comes from Greek ιδιοσυγκρασία a peculiar temperament, habit of body (idios ones own and sun-krasis mixture). It is defined as a structural or behavioral characteristic peculiar to an individual or group. ... For the region within the United States, see: Mid-Atlantic States Mid-Atlantic English describes a version of the English language which is neither predominantly American or British in usage. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

Family

  • When Buckley was a young man, his father, William F. Buckley, Sr., was an acquaintance of libertarian author, Albert Jay Nock. William F. Buckley, Sr., convinced his son to read Nock's works.
  • Buckley's son, Christopher Buckley, is an author, essayist and humorist. On a visit to Laugh-In, William was asked why he had consented to an interview which appeared in the May, 1970, issue of Playboy. William said he did the interview, "To communicate my views to my son!"
  • Buckley's sister Priscilla L. Buckley is the author of Living It Up With National Review: A Memoir for which he wrote the foreword.
  • April 15th, 2007, The wife of William F. Buckley, Jr., Patricia Buckley, died of an infection after a long illness, she was 80.

See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Albert Jay Nock (October 13, 1870 or 1872 - August 19, 1945) was an influential American libertarian author, educational theorist, and social critic of the early and middle 20th century. ... Christopher Buckley Christopher Taylor Buckley (born 1952) is an American political satirist and author of several novels. ... Rowan & Martins Laugh-In was a United States comedy television show broadcast from January 22, 1968 through 1973 over the NBC Network. ... The first issue of Playboy. ... James Buckley James Lane Buckley (born March 9, 1923 in New York City) was a United States Senator from the Conservative Party of New York State from January 3, 1971 to January 3, 1977. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... NY redirects here. ... L. Brent Bozell, Jr. ... L. Brent Bozell III is the founder and president of the Media Research Center and president of the Parents Television Council. ... Image:BBozell. ...

Trivia

  • Buckley also plays the harpsichord very well and did so once on Late Night With Conan O'Brian. Buckley is also an accomplished pianist and was once a guest on Marian McPartland's NPR show "Piano Jazz".
  • With his ability to engage on a wide range of subjects, Buckley was a favorite guest of Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show. Carson considered him a friend and would introduce him as "Bill Buckley".[citation needed]
  • Impressionist David Frye included Buckley in his portfolio in the 1960s and 1970s, mastering Buckley's quirky mannerisms, such as his deliberate speech pattern, his use of pen or pencil as a prop, and his tendency to grin and open his eyes wide when making a self-satisfying verbal point.
  • Comic actor Joe Flaherty frequently portrayed Buckley on the television show SCTV.
  • Buckley has taken Ritalin for decades, for low blood pressure.
  • Buckley is also a great fan of Bach and has said that he would want it played at his funeral.
  • Buckley has made several transoceanic sailing voyages across the Pacific and Atlantic oceans.
  • The comic strip Mallard Fillmore mentioned Buckley, encouraging him to run for president in 2008.[14]

Good Night, and Good Luck is a 2005 film by George Clooney about the conflict between journalist Edward R. Murrow and anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy and the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. ... Joseph McCarthy This article is about the American politician. ... April 8, 1956: CBS newsman Edward R. Murrow talking to reporters during a stop in Wiesbaden, Germany. ... See It Now was a television newsmagazine and documentary broadcast by CBS in the 1950s. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is any of a family of European keyboard instruments, including the large instrument currently called a harpsichord, but also the smaller virginals, the muselar virginals and the spinet. ... Late Night with Conan OBrien is an American late night television talk show on NBC featuring varied comedic material and celebrity interviews. ... For other people named John Carson, see John Carson (disambiguation). ... The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson was the full name of NBCs The Tonight Show during the years that Johnny Carson hosted from 1962 to 1992. ... David Frye (born 1934 in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is an American comedian, specializing in comic imitations of famous political figures - mostly American. ... Joe Flaherty Joe Flaherty (June 21, 1941) is an American Canadian comedian. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Methylphenidate (C14H19NO2), or MPH, is an amphetamine-like prescription stimulant commonly used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. ... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... For other uses, see Titanic. ... The Nautile. ... For the U.S. President with a similar name, see Millard Fillmore. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ For complete, searchable texts see Buckley Online.
  2. ^ The Openmind: Buckley on Drug Legalization
  3. ^ C-SPAN Booknotes 10/23/1993
  4. ^ Buckley, William F., Jr. Happy Days Were Here Again: Reflections of a Libertarian Journalist, Random House, ISBN 0-679-40398-1, 1993.
  5. ^ Big Sister is Watching You
  6. ^ A Half-Century-Old Attack on Ayn Rand Reminds Us of the Dark Side of Conservatism
  7. ^ Vidal calls Buckley a 'crypto-Nazi'. Buckley called Vidal, a cousin of future Vice President Al Gore, a 'queer' and a drunkard, and threatened to punch him
  8. ^ Buckley and Vidal: One More Round
  9. ^ http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6724737060193073610&q=william+buckley Reagan: A Life in Letters, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2003), 64.
  10. ^ Season of Conservative Sloth
  11. ^ It Didn’t Work
  12. ^ See Schmidt, Julian. (June 6, 2005) National Review. Notes & asides. (Letter to the Editor) Volume 53; Issue 2. Pg. 17. ("Dear Mr. Buckley: You can call off the hunt for the elusive "encephalophonic." I have it cornered in Webster's Third New International Dictionary, where the noun "encephalophone" is defined as "an apparatus that emits a continuous hum whose pitch is changed by interference of brain waves transmitted through oscillators from electrodes attached to the scalp and that is used to diagnose abnormal brain functioning." I knew right where to look, because you provoked my search for that word a generation ago, when I first (and not last) encountered it in one of your books. If it was used derisively about you, I can only infer that the reviewer's brain was set a-humming by a) his failure to follow your illaqueating (ensnaring) logic, b) his dizzied awe at your manifold talents, and/or c) his inability to distinguish lexiphanicism (the use of pretentious words) from lectio divina. I say, keep it up. We could all do with more brain vibrations.")
  13. ^ William F. Buckley, Jr., Miles Gone By: A Literary Autobiography. Early chapters recount his early education and mastery of languages.
  14. ^ [1]

Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley Jr. ... William Frank Buckley Jr. ... An electroencephalophone is a musical instrument which uses brain waves (measured in the same way as an EEG) to generate or modulate sounds. ... 1888 advertisement for Websters Dictionary Websters Dictionary is a common title given to English language dictionaries in the United States, deriving its name from American lexicographer Noah Webster. ... A hum is a sound with a particular timbre (or sound quality), usually a monotone or with slightly varying tones, often produced by machinery in operation or by insects in flight. ... Electroencephalography is the neurophysiologic exploration of the electrical activity of the brain by the application of electrodes to the scalp. ... Alternative meanings: There is also an Electric-type Pokémon named Electrode. ... The scalp is the anatomical area bordered by the face anteriorly and the neck to the sides and posteriorly. ... Abnormality is a subjectively defined characteristic, assigned to those with rare or dysfunctional conditions. ... Lectio Divina is Latin for “spiritual reading” and represents an early Roman Catholic monastic technique of prayer that continues in practice though less widely, intended to achieve communion with God as well as providing special spiritual insights and peace from that experience. ...

Books

  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (2004). Miles Gone By: A Literary Autobiography. Washington, D.C., Regnery. ISBN 0-89526-089-1. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (2004). The Fall of the Berlin Wall. Wiley, John & Sons, inc. ISBN 0-471-26736-8. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (2003). Getting It Right. Regnery Publishing, Inc. ISBN 0-89526-138-3. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (2002). Nuremberg: The Reckoning. Harcourt. ISBN 1-4132-2282-X. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (2001). Elvis in the Morning. Harcourt. ISBN 0-15-600754-1. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (2001). Let Us Talk of Many Things: The Collected Speeches. Crown Publishing Group. ISBN 0-7615-3409-1. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (2001). Spytime: The Undoing of James Jesus Angleton. Harcourt. ISBN 0-641-52638-5. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1999). The Redhunter: A Novel Based on the Life of Senator Joe McCarthy. Warner Books, Inc. ISBN 0-316-11589-4. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1998). Buckley: The Right Word. Harcourt. ISBN 0-15-600569-7. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1998). The Lexicon: A Cornucopia of Wonderful Words for the Inquisitive Word Lover. Harcourt. ISBN 0-15-600616-2. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1997). Nearer My God: An Autobiography of Faith. New York, Doubleday. ISBN 0-15-600618-9. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1995). Brothers No More. Harvest/HBJ Book. ISBN 0-15-600476-3. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1993). Happy Days Were Here Again: Reflections of a Libertarian Journalist. Random House. ISBN 0-679-40398-1. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1992). In Search of Anti-Semitism. Continuum International. ISBN 0-8264-0619-X. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1992). WindFall: The End of the Affair. Mckay. ISBN 0-679-40397-3. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1990). Gratitude: Reflections on What We Owe to Our Country. Random House. ISBN 0-394-57674-8. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1989). On the Firing Line: The Public Life of Our Public Figures. Random House. ISBN 0-394-57568-7. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1988). Big Game Hunting in Central Africa. St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-02165-8. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1987). Racing through Paradise: A Pacific Passage. Random House. ISBN 0-394-55781-6. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1985). Right Reason: A Collection. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-15235-3. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1984). Airborne: A Sentimental Journey. Little, Brown & Company. ISBN 0-316-11438-3. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1983). Overdrive: A Personal Documentary. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-18269-4. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1982). Atlantic High: A Celebration. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-15233-7. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1980). Who's On First. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-14681-7. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1978). Hymnal: The Controversial Arts. Penguin. ISBN 0-399-12227-3. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1977). Unmaking of a Mayor. Crown Publishing. ISBN 0-87000-391-7. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1975). Execution Eve and Other Contemporary Ballads. Penguin. ISBN 0-399-11531-5. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1974). United Nations Journal: A Delegate's Odyssey. Penguin. ISBN 0-399-11408-4. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1973). Four Reforms: A Guide for the Seventies. G. P. Putnam's Sons. ISBN 0-399-11170-0. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1971). Cruising Speed: A Documentary. Penguin. ISBN 0-399-10181-0. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1964). Dialogues in Americanism. Constructive Action, Inc. ISBN 0-911956-14-X. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1962) The Committee and Its Critics: A Calm Review of the House Committee on Un-American Activities G.P. Putnam's Sons
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1961). Up From Liberalism. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. ISBN 0-8128-2969-7. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1954). McCarthy and His Enemies: The Record and Its Meaning. Regnery Publishing, Inc. ISBN 0-87000-110-8. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1951). God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of Academic Freedom. Regnery Publishing, Inc. ISBN 0-89526-692-X. 

Get It Right or Getting It Right may refer to: Get It Right, a 1983 album by Aretha Franklin Get It Right, a song from this album Get It Right, a song by Raven from their 1985 album Stay Hard Get It Right, a song by The Offspring from their... Whos on First? is a legendary routine by the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. ...

Blackford Oakes book series

  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (2005). Last Call for Blackford Oakes. Harcourt. ISBN 0-15-101085-4. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1999). The Blackford Oakes Reader. iUniverse, Inc. ISBN 1-58348-383-7. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1993). A Very Private Plot. William Morrow & Company, Inc. ISBN 0-688-12795-9. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1990). Tucker's Last Stand. Random House. ISBN 0-394-57675-6. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1987). Mongoose R.I.P.. Random House. ISBN 0-394-55931-2. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1986). High Jinx. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-19443-9. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1985). See You Later Alligator. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-19442-0. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1984). Story of Henri Tod. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-15234-5. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1982). Marco Polo, If You Can. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-15232-9. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1980). Who's On First. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-15231-0. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1978). Stained Glass. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-12542-9. 
  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (1976). Saving the Queen. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-03800-3. 

See You Later, Alligator (though more commonly spelled without the comma in the title) is the title of an iconic rock and roll song of the 1950s. ... Whos on First? is a legendary routine by the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... Saving the Queen is a Blackford Oakes novel by William F. Buckley, Jr. ...

References

Books

  • (2001) Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of American Writers. Massachusetts: Merriam-Webster. 
  • (2003) Contemporary Authors. Farmington Hills, Michigan: The Gale Group. 
  • Buckley, Reid (1999). Strictly Speaking. New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-134610-4. 
  • Lamb, Brian (2001). Booknotes: Stories from American History. New York: Penguin. ISBN 1-58648-083-9. 
  • Gottfried, Paul E. The Conservative Movement, 1993. ISBN 0-8057-9749-1
  • John B. Judis. William F. Buckley, Jr.: Patron Saint of the Conservatives (1990), full-scale biography
  • George H. Nash. The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945 (2006)
  • Winchell, Mark Royden (1984). William F. Buckley, Jr.. New York: MacMillan Publishing Company. ISBN 0-8057-7431-9. 
  • Smith, W. Thomas, Jr. (2003). Encyclopedia of the Central Intelligence Agency. New York: Facts on File. ISBN 0-8160-4667-0. 
  • Straus, Tamara (1997). The Literary Almanac: The Best of the Printed Word: 1900 to the Present. New York: High Tide Press. ISBN 1-56731-328-0. 

Web sites

  1. ^ For complete, searchable texts see Buckley Online.
  2. ^ The Openmind: Buckley on Drug Legalization
  3. ^ C-SPAN Booknotes 10/23/1993
  4. ^ Buckley, William F., Jr. Happy Days Were Here Again: Reflections of a Libertarian Journalist, Random House, ISBN 0-679-40398-1, 1993.
  5. ^ Big Sister is Watching You
  6. ^ A Half-Century-Old Attack on Ayn Rand Reminds Us of the Dark Side of Conservatism
  7. ^ Vidal calls Buckley a 'crypto-Nazi'. Buckley called Vidal, a cousin of future Vice President Al Gore, a 'queer' and a drunkard, and threatened to punch him
  8. ^ Buckley and Vidal: One More Round
  9. ^ http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6724737060193073610&q=william+buckley Reagan: A Life in Letters, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2003), 64.
  10. ^ Season of Conservative Sloth
  11. ^ It Didn’t Work
  12. ^ See Schmidt, Julian. (June 6, 2005) National Review. Notes & asides. (Letter to the Editor) Volume 53; Issue 2. Pg. 17. ("Dear Mr. Buckley: You can call off the hunt for the elusive "encephalophonic." I have it cornered in Webster's Third New International Dictionary, where the noun "encephalophone" is defined as "an apparatus that emits a continuous hum whose pitch is changed by interference of brain waves transmitted through oscillators from electrodes attached to the scalp and that is used to diagnose abnormal brain functioning." I knew right where to look, because you provoked my search for that word a generation ago, when I first (and not last) encountered it in one of your books. If it was used derisively about you, I can only infer that the reviewer's brain was set a-humming by a) his failure to follow your illaqueating (ensnaring) logic, b) his dizzied awe at your manifold talents, and/or c) his inability to distinguish lexiphanicism (the use of pretentious words) from lectio divina. I say, keep it up. We could all do with more brain vibrations.")
  13. ^ William F. Buckley, Jr., Miles Gone By: A Literary Autobiography. Early chapters recount his early education and mastery of languages.
  14. ^ [2]

Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley Jr. ... William Frank Buckley Jr. ... An electroencephalophone is a musical instrument which uses brain waves (measured in the same way as an EEG) to generate or modulate sounds. ... 1888 advertisement for Websters Dictionary Websters Dictionary is a common title given to English language dictionaries in the United States, deriving its name from American lexicographer Noah Webster. ... A hum is a sound with a particular timbre (or sound quality), usually a monotone or with slightly varying tones, often produced by machinery in operation or by insects in flight. ... Electroencephalography is the neurophysiologic exploration of the electrical activity of the brain by the application of electrodes to the scalp. ... Alternative meanings: There is also an Electric-type Pokémon named Electrode. ... The scalp is the anatomical area bordered by the face anteriorly and the neck to the sides and posteriorly. ... Abnormality is a subjectively defined characteristic, assigned to those with rare or dysfunctional conditions. ... Lectio Divina is Latin for “spiritual reading” and represents an early Roman Catholic monastic technique of prayer that continues in practice though less widely, intended to achieve communion with God as well as providing special spiritual insights and peace from that experience. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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