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Encyclopedia > William Eustis

William Eustis (June 10, 1753February 6, 1825) was an early American statesman. June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The term statesman is a respectful term used to refer to diplomats, politicians, and other notable figures of state. ...


He was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts and studied at the Boston Latin School before he entered Harvard College, from which he graduated in 1772. He studied medicine under Dr. Joseph Warren and helped care for the wounded at the Battle of Bunker Hill, where Warren was killed. He served the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War as surgeon of the artillery regiment at Cambridge and then as a hospital surgeon. Cambridge City Hall Cambridge is a city in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts, United States. ... Motto Sumus Primi Founded April 23, 1635 Head Master Ms. ... Harvard College is the main undergraduate section of Harvard University. ... 1772 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants Province of Massachusetts Bay Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders Major General Israel Putnam and Colonel William Prescott Major General William Howe Strength 1,500 2,600 Casualties 140 dead 271 wounded 30 captured {20 POWs Died} 226 dead 828 wounded {{{notes}}} Bunker Hill was a battle of the American... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Netherlands, Spain, Native Americans Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, Native Americans Commanders George Washington Comte de Rochambeau Nathanael Greene William Howe Henry Clinton Charles Cornwallis The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was the military component of the American...


He entered medical practice in Boston after the war and served as surgeon with the Shays Rebellion expedition of 1786–1787. Boston is a town and small port c. ... The Shays Rebellion (also Shayss or Shays) was an armed uprising in Western Massachusetts, United States, that lasted from 1786 to 1787. ...


He became vice president of the Society of the Cincinnati, serving from 1786 to 1810 and again in 1820. The General Society of the Cincinnati is a patriotic, benevolent, and historic association in the United States and France with limited and strict membership requirements. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


He served in the Massachusetts General Court from 1788 to 1794 and was a member of the Governor's Council for two years; and served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1801 to 1804, representing Massachusetts in the 7th and 8th Congresses, and having won close races over Josiah Quincy III and John Quincy Adams. While in the House he was one of the managers appointed by the House of Representatives in 1804 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against John Pickering, judge of the United States District Court for New Hampshire. The Massachusetts General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Eighth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Josiah Quincy III (February 4, 1772 - July 1, 1864) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American lawyer, diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... John Pickering (22 September 1737 - 11 April 1805) served as Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Superior Court and as Judge for the Federal District Court of New Hampshire. ...


He served as United States Secretary of War from March 7, 1809 to January 13, 1813. During his tenure, he attempted to prepare the U.S. Army for the outbreak of the War of 1812, and resigned in the face of criticism following American reversal on the battlefield. The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in Leap years). ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and British Empire from 1812 to 1815, on land in North America and at sea around the world. ...


He was appointed ambassador to Holland by President James Madison, serving from 1814 to 1818. Holland is a region in the central-western part of the Netherlands. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ...


He returned home from Europe because of ill health, at which time he purchased and resided in the historic Shirley Mansion in Roxbury, Massachusetts. He was again elected to the United States House of Representatives and served 1820 to 1823, presiding as chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Military Affairs during this time. He ran unsuccessfully for Governor of Massachusetts three times (in 1820, 1821 and 1822) and was finally elected governor and served two terms, from 1823 to 1825. Roxbury is a neighborhood within Boston, Massachusetts. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


He died in Boston while governor in February 1825 and is buried at the Old Burying Ground, in Lexington, Massachusetts. 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Minute Man statue on Lexington Green, by H. H. Kitson. ...


This article incorporates facts obtained from the public domain Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ...

Preceded by:
Henry Dearborn
United States Secretary of War
1809–1813
Succeeded by:
John Armstrong, Jr.
Preceded by:
John Brooks
Governor of Massachusetts
May 31, 1823February 6, 1825
Succeeded by:
Marcus Morton
Governors of Massachusetts Massachusetts State Flag
Hancock | Cushing | Bowdoin | Hancock | Adams | Sumner | Gill | Governor's Council | Strong | Sullivan | Lincoln | Gore | Gerry | Strong | Brooks | Eustis | Morton | Lincoln Jr. | Davis | Armstrong | Everett | Morton | Davis | Morton | Briggs | Boutwell | Clifford | Washburn | Gardner | Banks | Andrew | Bullock | Claflin | Washburn | Talbot | Gaston | Rice | Talbot | Long | Butler | Robinson | Ames | Brackett | Russell | Greenhalge | Wolcott | Crane | Bates | Douglas | Guild | Draper | Foss | Walsh | McCall | Coolidge | Cox | Fuller | Allen | Ely | Curley | Hurley | Saltonstall | Tobin | Bradford | Dever | Herter | Furcolo | Volpe | Peabody | Volpe | Sargent | Dukakis | King | Dukakis | Weld | Cellucci | Swift | Romney

  Results from FactBites:
 
Residents of Shirley Place (984 words)
William Shirley (1694-1771) was born in London where he studied to be a lawyer.
Eustis was a medical student of Dr. Joseph Warren, and is said to have driven his mentor to Bunker Hill in 1775 where Warren died in the Battle.
William and Caroline Eustis were known as particularly fine hosts, and entertained Lafayette in 1824 during his triumphal return to America.
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON PAPERS AND DOCUMENTS, 1791-1864 (3500 words)
Harrison, William Henry, Governor and Commander in chief of the Indiana Territory and of the district of Louisiana.
Harrison, Will[ia]m Henry, Vincennes to A. Gallatin, Sec'y of the Treasury.
Harrison, Will[ia]m Henry Vincennes, to William Eustis Esqr., Secy.
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