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Encyclopedia > William Dawes
William Dawes, Jr.

Born 5 April, 1745
Boston, Massachusetts
Died 25 February, 1799
Marlborough, Massachusetts
Occupation Tanner
Spouse Mehitable May (3 May 1768 - d. 1793)
Children Two sons and a daughter
Parents William and Lydia Dawes

William Dawes, Jr. (April 5, 1745February 25, 1799) was one of the three men who alerted colonial minutemen of the approach of British army troops prior to the Battle of Lexington and Concord at the outset of the American Revolution. William Dawes may refer to: William Dawes (1745–1799), an American notable for his actions in the American Revolution William Dawes (Royal Marine officer) (1762 – 1836), pioneer to New South Wales (Australia) and scientist William Rutter Dawes (1799–1868), a British astronomer William Dawes (bishop), 3rd Baronet Dawes, bishop of... Image File history File links William_Dawes. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... Lexington Minuteman representing John Parker Minutemen is a name given to members of the militia of the American Colonies, who would be ready for battle in a minutes notice. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Battle of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 was the first battle of the American Revolutionary War and was described as the shot heard round the world in Emersons Concord Hymn. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen...

Contents

Early life

Dawes was born in Boston on April 5, 1745, to William and Lydia Dawes (née Boone), and baptised at Boston's Old South Church. He became a tanner and was active in Boston's militia. On May 3, 1768 Dawes married Mehitable May, the daughter of Samuel and Catherine May (née Mears). The Boston Gazette noted that for his wedding he wore a suit entirely made in North America; at the time, Whigs were trying to organize a boycott of British products to pressure Parliament into repealing the Townshend Acts. Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... The French word née (feminine) or né (masculine) (or the English word nee) is still commonly used in some newspapers when mentioning the maiden name of a woman in engagement or wedding announcements. ... Northwest corner of Copley Square showing Charles Follen McKims Boston Public Library on the left, and Chalres Amos Cummings Old South Church to the right. ... Tanner is a surname, and might refer to Alain Tanner, Swiss film-maker Adam Tanner (Tannerus), Austrian Jesuit mathematician and philosopher Beatrice Stella Tanner, the British actress Mrs Patrick Campbell Charles Albert Tanner, Canadian politician Chuck Tanner, American baseball manager D.J. Tanner, fictional character from Full House Danny Tanner... The Boston Gazette was an early newspaper printed in the British North American colonies; it began publication December 12, 1719 and appeared weekly. ... The Radical Whigs were a group of British political commentators who played a relevant role in the American Revolution. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... The Townshend Acts (1767) passed by Parliament on June 29, 1767 refer to two Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain passed in 1767, which were proposed by Charles Towner . ...


Role in Boston's militia

It is likely that in September 1774, Dawes was instrumental in helping Boston's militia artillery company secure its four small cannon from British army control. The Massachusetts Provincial Congress certainly sent word to him in February 1775 that it was time to move two of those weapons out of Boston. This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Massachusetts Government Act of 1774 annulled the charter the people. ...


Midnight ride

Dawes was assigned by Doctor Joseph Warren to ride from Boston, Massachusetts, to Lexington on the night of April 18, 1775, when it became clear that a British column was going to march into the countryside. Dawes's mission was to warn John Hancock and Samuel Adams that they were in danger of arrest. Dawes took the land route out of Boston through Boston Neck, leaving just before the military sealed off the town.[1] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Boston redirects here. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1642 Incorporated 1713 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Total 16. ... For other persons named John Hancock, see John Hancock (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Samuel Adams (disambiguation). ... The trajectory of the Boston Neck along todays Washington Street. ...


Also acting under Dr. Warren, Paul Revere arranged for another rider waiting across the Charles River in Charlestown to be told of the army's route with lanterns hung in Old North Church. To be certain the message would get through, Revere rowed across the river and started riding westwards himself. Later Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's historically inaccurate poem The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere would focus entirely on Revere, making him a composite of many alarm riders that night. For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... Image of the North End, Boston neighborhood. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members...


Dawes and Revere arrived at the Hancock-Clarke House in Lexington about the same time, shortly after midnight. In fact, Revere arrived slightly earlier, despite having stopped to speak to militia officers in towns along the way, because his ride was shorter and his horse faster. After warning Adams and Hancock to leave, Revere and Dawes chose to proceed to Concord in case that was the British column's goal. Revere no doubt knew that the Provincial Congress had stored munitions there, including the cannon Dawes had helped to secure. Along the way, the two men met Samuel Prescott, a local young physician, who joined them. The Hancock-Clarke House, Lexington, Massachusetts. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Total 25. ... Dr. Samuel Prescott August 19]] 1751 - c. ...


A squad of mounted British officers awaited on the road between Lexington and Concord. They had already arrested some riders heading west with news of the troops, and they called for Dawes, Revere, and Prescott to halt. The three men rode in different directions, hoping one would escape. Dawes, according to the story he told his children, rode into the yard of a house shouting that he had lured two officers there. Fearing an ambush, the officers stopped chasing him. Dawes's horse bucked him off, however, and he had to walk back to Lexington. He later said that in the morning he returned to the same yard and found the watch that had fallen from his pocket. Otherwise, Dawes's activity during the Battle of Lexington and Concord remains unknown.


Dawes and his companions' warning allowed the town militias to muster a sufficient force for the first open battle of the Revolutionary War and the first colonial victory. The British troops did not find most of the weapons they had marched to destroy and sustained serious losses during their retreat to Boston under guerrilla fire. The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... “Guerrilla” redirects here. ...


Quartermaster

During the war, Dawes worked as a quartermaster in central Massachusetts. British POWs from the Battle of Saratoga complained to Parliament that he gave them short supplies; his family countered that Dawes believed that they were stealing from farmers while being marched to Boston – as most armies on the march were prone to do. Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Combatants British 9th/Hill, 20th/Lynd, 21st/ Hamilton, 62nd/Ansthruter, Simon Fraser Brunswick Major Generals V. Riedesel, 1st Brigade (Brunswickers) Brig. ...


Later life

His wife died in 1793.[2] Dawes died in Marlborough, Massachusetts on February 25, 1799. He is believed to have been buried in the King's Chapel Burying Ground, though his remains may have been moved to his wife's family plot in Forest Hills Cemetery in Jamaica Plain.[2] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Chapel at Cambridge, England, see Kings College Chapel, Cambridge. ... The Forest Hills Cemetery (1848) in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts (formerly in the city of Roxbury, now in the city of Boston) is an early suburban garden cemetery inspired by the Mount Auburn Cemetery. ... Jamaica Plain is a neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


His great-great-grandson, Charles Gates Dawes, would serve as Vice President of the United States. Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865–April 23, 1951) was the 30th Vice President of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ...


Legacy

The poem by Henry Longfellow, "Paul Revere's Ride", has been criticized by modern historians for overstating the role of Revere in the night's events.[citation needed] Revere may have been a better story, as Dawes and Prescott were less successful in achieving their missions. In 1896 Helen F. Moore, dismayed that William Dawes had been forgotten, penned a parody of Longfellow's poem.[3]. This Paul Revere Statue in the North End of Boston, Massachusetts, was made by Cyrus Dallin and unveiled on September 22, 1940. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807–March 24, 1882) was an American poet who wrote many poems that are still famous today, including The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. ... This Paul Revere Statue in the North End of Boston, Massachusetts, was made by Cyrus Dallin and unveiled on September 22, 1940. ...


The difference in Revere's and Dawes´ achievement and legacy is examined by Malcolm Gladwell in his book The Tipping Point, where he concludes that Revere would be classified as a connector whereas Dawes was an "ordinary man". Malcolm Gladwell Malcolm Gladwell (born September 1, 1963) is a United Kingdom-born, Canadian-raised journalist now based in New York City who has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. ... The Tipping Point (ISBN 0316316962) is a book by Malcolm Gladwell, first published by Little Brown in 2000. ... Look up connector in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Dawes's ride is commemorated on a traffic island in Cambridge, Massachusetts heavily travelled by pedestrians, at the intersection of Garden Street and Massachusetts Avenue in Harvard Square, known as Dawes Island. Dawes's passage through the area is represented by bronze horseshoes embedded in the sidewalk, as hoofprints, accompanied by an inscription giving his name and the date, and historical displays. Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Massachusetts Avenue is the name shared by prominent streets located in Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Washington, D.C., USA; and Lawrence, Kansas, USA. Each Massachusetts Avenue is commonly called Mass. ... Chess players in Harvard Square in August of 2005 Harvard Square is a large triangular area in the center of Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue, Brattle Street, and John F. Kennedy Street. ...


See also

For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... Dr. Samuel Prescott August 19]] 1751 - c. ... 1776 reprint of broadside delivered by Bissell Israel Bissell (1752-1823) was a post-rider in Massachusetts born in East Windsor, Connecticut who alerted the colonists of the British attack on April 19, 1775. ...

Further reading

  • David Hackett Fischer, Paul Revere's Ride, Oxford University Press, 1995.

References

  1. ^ http://www.wmdawes.org/ride.html
  2. ^ a b Fletcher, Ron (2005-02-25). Who's buried in Dawes's tomb?. Boston Globe.
  3. ^ The Midnight Ride of William Dawes.

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • William Dawes' grave at findagrave.com.

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Dawes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (720 words)
Dawes was born in Boston on April 5, 1745, to William and Lydia (Boone) Dawes.
Dawes was assigned by Doctor Joseph Warren to ride from Boston, Massachusetts, to Lexington on the night of April 18, 1775, when it became clear that a British column was going to march into the countryside.
Dawes and his companions' warning allowed the town militias to muster a sufficient force for the first open battle of the Revolutionary War, and the first colonial victory.
William Dawes - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (382 words)
Though Revere's importance would later be exaggerated and Dawes overlooked in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem eulogizing the event, The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, Dawes nevertheless did have a major role in organizing the manufacture and storage of gunpowder for the militia and the alert system used during the Powder Alarm raids.
Dawes and Prescott escaped, though Dawes's horse bucked him off and ran away; Dawes had to walk back to Lexington.
The alert that Dawes and Revere sounded succeeded in mustering a sufficient force for the first open battle of the revolution, and the first colonial victory.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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