FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > William Carlos Williams
William Carlos Williams

Dr. William Carlos Williams (sometimes known as WCW) (September 17, 1883March 4, 1963), was an American poet closely associated with modernism and Imagism. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1882 in literature, other events of 1883, 1884 in literature, list of years in literature. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1962 in literature, other events of 1963, 1964 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The poets listed below were either born in the United States or else published much of their poetry while living in that country. ... Mountebanks ... Ezra Pound, one of the prime movers of Imagism. ...

Contents

Life

Williams was born in Rutherford, New Jersey, a community near the city of Paterson. His father was an English immigrant, and his mother was born in Puerto Rico. He attended public school in Rutherford until 1897, then was sent to study at Château de Lancy near Geneva, Switzerland, the Lycée Condorcet in Paris, France, for two years and Horace Mann School in New York City. Then, in 1902, he entered the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. During his time at Penn, Williams befriended Ezra Pound, Hilda Doolittle (best known as H.D.) and the painter Charles Demuth. These friendships supported his growing passion for poetry. He received his M.D. in 1906 and spent the next four years in internships in New York City and in travel and postgraduate studies abroad (e.g., at the University of Leipzig where he studied pediatrics). He returned to Rutherford in 1910 and began his medical practice, which lasted until 1951. Surprisingly, most of his patients knew little if anything of his writings; instead they viewed him as a doctor who helped deliver more than 3,000 of their children into the world. Today, Rutherford is home to a theater, "The Williams Center," named after the poet. Map highlighting Rutherfords location within Bergen County. ... View of Paterson New Jersey 1880. ... This article is about the English as a nation. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Coat of arms of the Canton of Geneva Coat of arms of the City of Geneva Geneva (French: Genève, German: Genf, Italian: Ginevra, Romansh Genevra, Spanish: Ginebra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland (after Zurich), located where Lake Geneva (French: Lac de Genève or Lac L... La cour du lycée. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Horace Mann School is an independent college preparatory school in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn, although the former is the preferred and recognized nickname of the University) is a private, nonsectarian, research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Ezra Pound in 1913. ... H.D. in the mid 1910s Hilda Doolitle(September 10, 1886, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States – September 27, 1961, Zürich, Switzerland), prominently known only by her initials H.D., was an American poet, novelist and memoirist. ... Charles Demuth (November 9, 1883 - October 23, 1935) was an American precisionist painter. ... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The University of Leipzig (German Universität Leipzig), located in Leipzig in the Free State of Saxony (former Kingdom of Saxony), Germany, is one of the oldest universities in Europe. ... Clinical Examination Pediatrics (also spelled paediatrics) is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents (from newborn to age 16-21, depending on the country). ...


Williams married Florence Herman (1891 - 1976) in 1912. They moved into a house in Rutherford which was their home for many years. Shortly afterwards, his first book of serious poems, The Tempers, was published. On a trip to Europe in 1924, Williams spent time with writers Ezra Pound and James Joyce. Flossie and Williams's sons stayed behind in Europe to experience living abroad for a year as Williams and his brother had in their youth. Ezra Pound in 1913. ... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ...


Although his primary occupation was as a doctor, Williams had a full literary career. His work consists of short stories, poems, plays, novels, critical essays, an autobiography, translations and correspondence. He wrote at night and spent weekends in New York City with friends - writers and artists like the avant-garde painters Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia and the poets Wallace Stevens and Marianne Moore. He became involved in the Imagist movement but soon he began to develop opinions that differed from those of his poetic peers, Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot. Later in his life, Williams toured the United States giving poetry readings and lectures. A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the... Francis Picabia in his studio. ... Wallace Stevens Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955) was a major American Modernist poet. ... Marianne Moore photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Marianne Moore (December 11, 1887 - February 5, 1972) was a Modernist American poet and writer. ... Ezra Pound, one of the prime movers of Imagism. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot (September 26, 1888 - January 4, 1965), was a major Modernist Anglo-American poet, dramatist, and literary critic. ...


After Williams suffered a heart attack in 1948, his health began to decline, and after 1949 a series of strokes followed. He also underwent treatment for clinical depression in a psychiatric hospital during 1953.[1] Williams died on March 4, 1963 at the age of seventy-nine. Two days later, a British publisher finally announced that he was going to print his poems – one of fate’s ironies, since Williams had always protested against the English influence on American poetry. During his lifetime, he had not received as much recognition from Britain as he had from the United States. Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Career

During the First World War, when a number of European artists established themselves in New York City, Williams became friends with members of the avant-garde such as Man Ray, Francis Picabia and Marcel Duchamp. In 1915 Williams began to be associated with a group of New York artists and writers known as "The Others." Founded by the poet Alfred Kreymborg and by Man Ray, this group included Walter Conrad Arensberg, Wallace Stevens, Mina Loy, Marianne Moore and Duchamp. Through these involvements Williams got to know the Dadaist movement, which may explain the influence on his earlier poems of Dadaist and Surrealist principles. His involvement with The Others made Williams a key member of the early modernist movement in America. Man Ray, photographed at Gaite-Montparnasse exhibition in Paris by Carl Van Vechten on June 16, 1934 Man Ray (August 27, 1890–November 18, 1976) was an American artist who spent most of his career in Paris, France. ... Francis Picabia in his studio. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the... Alfred Francis Kreymborg (1883–1966) was an American poet, novelist, playwright, literary editor and anthologist. ... Walter Conrad Arensberg (1878, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - 1954) was an American art collector, critic and poet. ... Wallace Stevens Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955) was a major American Modernist poet. ... Image:Loy-Haweis1904. ... Marianne Moore photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Marianne Moore (December 11, 1887 - February 5, 1972) was a Modernist American poet and writer. ...


Williams disliked Ezra Pound's and especially T.S. Eliot's frequent use of allusions to foreign languages and Classical sources, as in Eliot's The Waste Land. Williams preferred to draw his themes from what he called "the local." In his modernist epic of place, Paterson (published between 1946 and 1958), an account of the history, people and essence of Paterson, New Jersey, he examined the role of the poet in American society. Williams most famously summarized his poetic method in the phrase "No ideas but in things" (from his 1944 poem "A Sort of Song"). He advocated that poets leave aside traditional poetic forms and unnecessary literary allusions, trying to see the world directly and using a language and form appropriate to the subject itself. Marianne Moore, another skeptic of traditional poetic forms, wrote Williams had used "plain American which cats and dogs can read," with distinctly American idioms. The Waste Land (1922), sometimes mistakenly written as The Wasteland, is a highly influential 434-line modernist poem by T. S. Eliot. ... Paterson is a poem by influential modern American poet William Carlos Williams. ...


One of his most notable contributions to American literature was his willingness to be a mentor for younger poets. Though Pound and Eliot may have been more lauded in their time, a number of important poets in the generations that followed were either personally tutored by Williams or pointed to Williams as a major influence. He had an especially significant influence on many of the American literary movements of the 1950s: poets of the Beat Generation, the San Francisco Renaissance, the Black Mountain school, and the New York School. He personally mentored Charles Olson, who was instrumental in developing the poetry of the Black Mountain College and subsequently influenced many other poets. Robert Creeley and Denise Levertov, two other poets associated with Black Mountain, studied under Williams. Williams was friends with Kenneth Rexroth, the founder of the San Francisco Renaissance. A lecture Williams gave at Reed College was formative in inspiring three other important members of that Renaissance: Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen and Lew Welch. One of the most dynamic relationships of Williams and his students was with fellow New Jerseyite Allen Ginsberg. Ginsberg claimed that Williams essentially freed his poetic voice. Williams included several of Ginsberg's letters in Paterson, stating that one of them helped inspire the fifth section of that work. Williams also wrote introductions to two of Ginsberg's books, including Howl. Though Williams consistently loved the poetry of those he mentored (his children, so to speak), he did not always like the results of his influence on other poets (the perceived formlessness, for example, of other Beat Generation poets). Williams believed more in the interplay of form and expression. The Beat Generation was a group of American writers who came to prominence in the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... The term San Francisco Renaissance is used as a global designation for a range of poetic activity centred around that city and which brought it to prominence as a hub of the American poetic avant-garde. ... The Black Mountain poets, sometimes called the Projectivist poets, were a group of mid 20th century American avant-garde or postmodern poets centered around Black Mountain College. ... The New York School (synonymous with abstract expressionist painting) was an informal group of American poets, painters, dancers, and musicians active in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s in New York City. ... Charles Olson (27 December 1910 – 10 January 1970) was an important 2nd generation American modernist poet who was a crucial link between earlier figures like Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams and the New American poets, a rubric which includes the New York School, the Black Mountain School, the Beat... This article is in need of attention. ... Robert Creeley (May 21, 1926 - March 30, 2005) was an American poet, author of more than sixty books, and usually associated with the Black Mountain poets, though his verse aesthetic diverged from that schools. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Kenneth Rexroth (December 22, 1905 – June 6, 1982) was an American poet, translator and critical essayist. ... Young Gary Snyder, on one of his early book covers Gary Snyder (born May 8, 1930) is an American poet (originally, often associated with the Beat Generation), essayist, lecturer, and environmental activist. ... Philip Whalen (October 20, 1923 – June 26, 2002) was a poet and a key figure in the San Francisco Renaissance and the Beat generation. ... Lewis Barrett Welch, Jr. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Howl and Other Poems was published in the fall of 1956 as number four in the Pocket Poets Series from City Lights Books This article is about the poem by Allen Ginsberg. ...


In May 1963 he was posthumously awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Pictures from Brueghel and Other Poems (1962) and the Gold Medal for Poetry of the National Institute of Arts and Letters. His major works are Kora in Hell (1920), Spring and All (1923), Pictures from Brueghel and Other Poems (1962), Paterson (1963, repr. 1992), and Imaginations (1970). The Poetry Society of America continues to honor William Carlos Williams by presenting an annual award in his name for the best book of poetry published by a small, non-profit or university press. The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Pictures of Brueghel and other poems Pieter Brueghel the Elder was a Flemish painter (1525-1569) famous for pictures of peasant life. ... Langston Hughes, National Institure of Arts and Letters This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Pictures of Brueghel and other poems Pieter Brueghel the Elder was a Flemish painter (1525-1569) famous for pictures of peasant life. ... Paterson is a poem by influential modern American poet William Carlos Williams. ...


Poetry

Williams' most anthologized poem is "The Red Wheelbarrow," considered an example of the Imagist movement's style and principles (see also "This Is Just To Say"). However, Williams, like his associate Ezra Pound, had long ago rejected the imagist movement by the time this poem was published as part of Spring and All in 1923. Williams is more strongly associated with the American Modernist movement in literature, and saw his poetic project as a distinctly American one; he sought to renew language through the fresh, raw idiom that grew out of America's cultural and social heterogeneity, at the same time freeing it from what he saw as the worn-out language of British and European culture. William Carlos Williams 1923 poem The Red Wheelbarrow exemplifies the Imagist-influenced philosophy of “no ideas but in things”. The poem, written in two minutes or so, portrays the scene outside the window of one of Dr. Williams patients, a very sick child he was attending. ... Ezra Pound, one of the prime movers of Imagism. ... This Is Just To Say is a famous imagist poem by William Carlos Williams. ... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ...


Williams tried to invent an entirely fresh form, an American form of poetry whose subject matter was centered on everyday circumstances of life and the lives of common people. He then came up with the concept of the variable foot evolved from years of visual and auditory sampling of his world from the first person perspective as a part of the day in the life as a physician. The variable foot is rooted within the multi-faceted American Idiom. This discovery was a part of his keen observation of how radio and newspaper influenced how people communicated and represents the "machine of words" (as he described a poem on one occasion) just as the mechanistic motions of a city can become a consciousness. Williams didn’t use traditional meter in most of his poems. His correspondence with Hilda Doolittle also exposed him to the relationship of sapphic rhythms to the inner voice of poetic truth: The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... Ancient Greek bust. ...

"The stars about the beautiful moon again hide their radiant shapes, when she is full and shines at her brightest on all the earth"– Sappho.

This is to be contrasted with a poem from Pictures from Brueghel titled "Shadows":

"Shadows cast by the street light
under the stars,
the head is tilted back,
the long shadow of the legs
presumes a world taken for granted
on which the cricket trills"

The breaks in the poem search out a natural pause spoken in the American idiom that is also reflective of rhythms found within jazz sounds that also touch upon Sapphic harmony. Williams never stopped searching for the perfect line. He experimented with different types of lines and eventually found the "stepped triadic line", a long line which is divided into three segments. This line is used in Paterson and in poems like "To Elsie" and "The Ivy Crown." Here again one of Williams' aims is to show the truly American (i.e., opposed to European traditions) rhythm which is unnoticed but present in everyday American language. Rhythm (Greek ρυθμός = tempo) is the variation of the duration of sounds over time. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Paterson is a poem by influential modern American poet William Carlos Williams. ...


Politics

Modern liberals portray Williams as aligned with liberal democratic and left wing issues; however, as his publications in more politically radical journals like Blast and New Masses suggest, his political commitments were further to the left than the term "liberal" indicates. He considered himself a socialist and opponent of capitalism, and in 1935 published "The Yachts", a poem which indicts the rich elite as parasites and the masses as striving for revolution. The poem features an image of the ocean as the "watery bodies" of the poor masses beating at their hulls "in agony, in despair", attempting to sink the yachts and end "the horror of the race".Furthermore, in the introduction to his 1944 book of poems "The Wedge", he writes of socialism as an inevitable future development and as a necessity for true art to develop. In 1949, he published a booklet/poem "The Pink Church" that was about the human body but was understood, in the context of McCarthyism, as being dangerously pro-communist. The anti-communist movement led to his losing a consultantship with the Library of Congress in 1952/3, an event that contributed to his being treated for clinical depression. As is demonstrated in an unpublished article for Blast, Williams believed artists should resist producing propaganda and be "devoted to writing (first and last)." However, in the same article Williams claims that art can also be "in the service of the proletariat".[2] Liberal democracy is a form of representative democracy where elected representatives that hold the decision power are moderated by a constitution that emphasizes protecting individual liberties and the rights of minorities in society, such as freedom of speech and assembly, freedom of religion, the right to private property and privacy... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms that refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially but not exclusively in the American sense of the word... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Capitalism generally refers to an economic system in which the means of production are all or mostly privately[1][2] owned and operated for profit, and in which investments, distribution, income, production and pricing of goods and services are determined through the operation of a free market. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community[1] for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ... The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress. ... Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ... The proletariat (from Latin proles, offspring) is a term used to identify a lower social class; a member of such a class is proletarian. ...


Bibliography

Poetry

Prose // Andrew Cecil Bradley, Oxford Lectures on Poetry Founding of the Poetry Recital Society (now the Poetry Society) T.E. Hulme leaves the Poets Club, and starts meeting with F.S. Flint and other poets in a new group which Hulme referred to as the Secession Club; they meet at the... // John Masefield, Ballads and Poems W.B. Yeats, Poems: Second Series November 14 — Norman MacCaig (died 1996) Scottish poet December 19 - Jean Genet, French novelist, playwright and poet December 27 — Charles Olson (died 1970), American poet October 17 - Julia Ward Howe, 91, American poet best known as the author of... // Ezra Pound in 1913 Harold Monro founds the Poetry Bookshop in London Ezra Pound travels to London to meet William Butler Yeats, whom he considered the only poet worthy of serious study; from that year until 1916, the two men wintered in the Stone Cottage at Ashdown Forest, with Pound... Al Que Quiere! is a collection of 52 poems by William Carlos Williams, published in 1917 by the Four Seas Company of Boston, Massachusetts. ... // The Egoist Wilfred Owen, a soldier in World War I, writes Dulce et Decorum Est (published posthumously in 1921). ... // The Dial, January 1920 issue Ezra Pound moves from London to Paris where he moved among a circle of artists, musicians and writers who were revolutionising modern art The Dial, a longstanding American literary magazine, is re-established by Scofield Thayer; the publication becomes an important outlet for Modernist poets... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Sour Grapes: a book of poems is an early work by William Carlos Williams. ... // Jorge Luis Borges, writer and poet, returns to Buenos Aires after a period living in Europe. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... // Djuna Barnes, A Book, collection of prose and poetry e. ... // Djuna Barnes, A Book, collection of prose and poetry e. ... // W. B. Yeats rents a house in Dublin. ... Collected Poems, 1921-1931 is a collection of poems by William Carlos Williams published by Objectivist Press in 1934. ... // The Barretts of Wimpole Street, a film directed by Sidney Franklin, with Norma Shearer as Elizabeth Barrett and Fredric March as Robert Browning; redone in 1957, less successfully T. S. Eliot, The Rock George Oppen, Discrete Series Dylan Thomas, Eighteen Poems, including The Force that Through the Green Fuse Drives... An Early Martyr And Other Poems was published by the American poet William Carlos Williams in 1935. ... // George Oppen joins the Communist Party, where his organizing work will increasingly take precedence over his poetry; he writes no more verse until 1958. ... // James Laughlin founds New Directions Publishers in New York, which published many modern poets for the first time; New Directions publishes its first book and its first annual, New Directions in Prose and Poetry with contributions from Wallace Stevens, Ezra Pound, Elizabeth Bishop, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams and others. ... // Cleanth Brooks and Robert Penn Warren, editors, Understanding Poetry (appearing thereafter in revised editions to 1976) Louis MacNeice, The Earth Compels W.B. Yeats, New Poems, including Lapis Lazuli Hawthornden Prize - David Jones for In Parenthesis Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Marya Zaturenska: Cold Morning Sky February 22 — Ishmael Reed, American... // G. S. Fraser - The Fatal Landscape and Other Poems Frost Medal: Robert Frost Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Leonard Bacon: Sunderland Capture October 2 - John Sinclair, poet October 13 - John Snow, cricketer and poet Billy Collins January 6 - F. R. Higgins, poet January 23 - John Oxenham, novelist and poet February 7... // Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (later the post would be called Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress): Robert Penn Warren appointed this year. ... Paterson is a poem by influential modern American poet William Carlos Williams. ... // W.H. Auden becomes a U.S. citizen Cleanth Brooks, The Well Wrought Urn: Studies in the Structure of Poetry Roy Campbell, Talking Bronco Walter De la Mare, The Traveller Henry Reed, A Map of Verona, including Naming of Parts Dylan Thomas, Deaths and Entrances, including Fern Hill and A... // Sometime this year, Jack Kerouac introduced the phrase Beat Generation to describe his friends and as a general term describing the underground, anti-conformist youth gathering in New York at that time to the novelist John Clellon Holmes September — The body of William Butler Yeats who died in Menton, France... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... // Bad Lord Byron, a film directed by David Macdonald about the Romantic poet W.H. Auden, Nones Charles Causley, Farewell Aggie Weston Hugh Kenner, The Poetry of Ezra Pound, highly influential in causing a re-assessment of Pounds poetry Robert Lowell, The Mills of the Kavanaughs Peter Mason Opie... // Queens Gold Medal for Poetry: Francis Cornford American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal in Poetry: Conrad Aiken National Book Award for Poetry: Robert Penn Warren, Promises: Poems, 1954-1956 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Stanley Kunitz, Selected Poems 1928-1958 April 15 - Benjamin Zephaniah, British dub poet March... // Sometime this year, Jack Kerouac introduced the phrase Beat Generation to describe his friends and as a general term describing the underground, anti-conformist youth gathering in New York at that time to the novelist John Clellon Holmes September — The body of William Butler Yeats who died in Menton, France... // In 1950, Charles Olson published his seminal essay, Projective Verse. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Bad Lord Byron, a film directed by David Macdonald about the Romantic poet W.H. Auden, Nones Charles Causley, Farewell Aggie Weston Hugh Kenner, The Poetry of Ezra Pound, highly influential in causing a re-assessment of Pounds poetry Robert Lowell, The Mills of the Kavanaughs Peter Mason Opie... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... // Robert Creeley founds and edits the Black Mountain Review Jack Kerouac reads Dwight Goddards A Buddhist Bible, which will influence him greatly. ... // The Group, a British poetry movement, starts meeting in London with gatherings taking place once a week, on Friday evenings, at first at Hobsbaums flat and later at the house of Edward Lucie-Smith. ... Pictures of Brueghel and other poems Pieter Brueghel the Elder was a Flemish painter (1525-1569) famous for pictures of peasant life. ... // Eric Gregory Award: Donald Thomas, James Simmons, Brian Johnson (poet, Jenny Joseph Queens Gold Medal for Poetry: Christopher Fry National Book Award for Poetry: Alan Dugan, Poems Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Alan Dugan: Poems Poetry List of poetry awards Categories: | ... Paterson is a poem by influential modern American poet William Carlos Williams. ... // Babette Deutsch, Collected Poems, 1919-1962 T.S. Eliot - Collected Poems 1909-1962 Philip Hobsbaum and Edward Lucie-Smith, editors, A Group Anthology Silvia Plath, The Bell Jar, an autobiographical novel published under the pseudonym Victoria Lucas Adrienne Rich, Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law, her third volume of poetry... // Charles Causley, Figgie Hobbin See 1970 Governor Generals Awards for a complete list of winners and finalists for those awards. ... // Joseph Brodsky, To Urania Federico García Lorca, Poeta en Nueva York first translation into English as A Poet in New York this year (written in 1930, first published posthumously in 1940) Philip Larkin, Collected Poems Michael Palmer, Sun The New British Poetry, a poetry anthology, jointly edited by Gillian... // Dead Poets Society, a film with excerpts from many traditional poets, ending with the title and opening line of Walt Whitmans lament on the death of Abraham Lincoln, O Captain! My Captain! My Left Foot, a film about Christy Brown, the Irish poet, and based on his autobiography Edward... // January 20 — Miller Williams of Arkansas reads his poem, Of History and Hope, at President Clintons inauguration. ...

  • Kora in Hell (1920)
  • The Great American Novel (1923)
  • Spring and All (1923)
  • In the American Grain (1925, 1967, repr. New Directions 2004)
  • A Voyage to Pagany (1928; repr. 1970)
  • Novelette and Other Prose (1932)
  • The Knife of the Times, and Other Stories (1932; repr. 1974)
  • White Mule (1937; repr. 1967)
  • Life along the Passaic River (1938)
  • In the Money (1940; repr. 1967)
  • Make Light of It: Collected Stories (1950)
  • Autobiography (1951; 1967)
  • The Build-Up (1952)
  • Selected Essays (1954)
  • The Selected Letters of William Carlos Williams (1957)
  • I Wanted to Write a Poem: The Autobiography of the Works of a Poet (1958)
  • Yes, Mrs. Williams: A Personal Record of My Mother (1959)
  • The Farmers' Daughters: Collected Stories (1961)
  • Imaginations (1970)
  • The Embodiment of Knowledge (1974)
  • Interviews With William Carlos Williams: "Speaking Straight Ahead" (1976)
  • A Recognizable Image: William Carlos Williams on Art and Artists (1978)
  • Pound/Williams: Selected Letters of Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams (1996)
  • The Collected Stories of William Carlos Williams (1996)
  • The Letters of Denise Levertov and William Carlos Williams (1998)
  • William Carlos Williams and Charles Tomlinson: A Transatlantic Connection (1998)

Drama See also: 1919 in literature, other events of 1920, 1921 in literature, List of years in literature. ... The Great American Novel is a 1923 novel by William Carlos Williams. ... See also: 1922 in literature, other events of 1923, 1924 in literature, list of years in literature. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... See also: 1922 in literature, other events of 1923, 1924 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1924 in literature, other events of 1925, 1926 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1927 in literature, other events of 1928, 1929 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1931 in literature, other events of 1932, 1933 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1931 in literature, other events of 1932, 1933 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1936 in literature, other events of 1937, 1938 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1937 in literature, other events of 1938, 1939 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1939 in literature, other events of 1940, 1941 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1949 in literature, other events of 1950, 1951 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... See also: 1950 in literature, other events of 1951, 1952 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1951 in literature, other events of 1952, 1953 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Among the numerous literary works titled Selected Essays are the following: Selected Essays by Frederick Douglass Selected Essays by T.S. Eliot Selected Essays by William Troy Category: ... See also: 1953 in literature, other events of 1954, 1955 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1956 in literature, other events of 1957, 1958 in literature, list of years in literature. ... ). Categories: Stub ... See also: 1958 in literature, other events of 1959, 1960 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1960 in literature, other events of 1961, 1962 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1969 in literature, other events of 1970, 1971 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1973 in literature, other events of 1974, 1975 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1975 in literature, other events of 1976, 1977 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1977 in literature, other events of 1978, 1979 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1995 in literature, other events of 1996, 1997 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1995 in literature, other events of 1996, 1997 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1997 in literature, other events of 1998, 1999 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1997 in literature, other events of 1998, 1999 in literature, list of years in literature. ...

  • Many Loves and Other Plays: The Collected Plays of William Carlos Williams (1961)

Short stories Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • The Knife of the Times
  • The Use of Force

William Carlos Williams Dr. William Carlos Williams (sometimes known as WCW) (September 17, 1883 – March 4, 1963), was an American poet closely associated with modernism and Imagism. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Fisher-Wirth, Ann. Williams's "Asphodel, That Greeny Flower". Encyclopedia of American Poetry: The Twentieth Century.
  2. ^ Williams, William Carlos (1978). A Recognizable Image: William Carlos William on Art and Artists. W W Norton & Company. ISBN 0811207048. 

Ann Fisher-Wirth (born January 25, 1947 as Ann Carolyn Welpton) is a transplanted Southern poet and scholar who teaches at the University of Mississippi. ...

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Photo Links Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

  • Photo
  • Photo of William Carlos Williams
  • Signed typescript of Between Walls Source: The Barrett Collection, Alderman Library.
  • Cover of the first edition of Spring and All
  • Page on Williams and the Armory Show. Source of the link to the picture of Williams and the Others.
  • Williams and the visual arts. Pictures by modernist painters related to WCWs work. It also features a self portrait of Williams; his not very well known side as a painter.
  • A critical overview of Williams style: William Carlos William’s To a Friend Concerning Several Ladies by Dan Schneider, 6/14/03
  • Interview (41 page) with William Carlos Williams and his wife Florence.
  • Pictures of WCW (in toddler age, young and older), of WCW and Ezra Pound and of Florence, WCWs wife.
  • Photos of modernists and imagists.
  • Three high resolution photos of William Carlos Williams.
  • High resolution scans of Sappho - A translation by William Carlos Williams Library of Congress, pictures shown there with permission of New Direction.

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Carlos Williams - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1625 words)
Williams was born in Rutherford, New Jersey, a town near the city of Paterson.
Williams returned home alone that year, while his wife and sons stayed in Europe so that the boys could have a year abroad as Williams and his brother had had in their youth.
William Carlos Williams died on March 4, 1963 at the age of seventy-nine.
William Carlos Williams - definition of William Carlos Williams in Encyclopedia (274 words)
William Carlos Williams (September 17, 1883 - March 4, 1963), often abbreviated with the initials "WCW", was an American poet during the Modernist movement.
Williams has often been praised for his observation of "the local" in his poetry and for his pared-down, precise, and sharp style.
Williams simplified the mystery of what makes good poetry when he said: "If it's not a pleasure, it's not a poem." Also, he is known for remarking that a poem is like a small "machine of words".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m