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Encyclopedia > William Booth
William Booth
General Booth of The Salvation Army
Born April 10, 1829
Sneinton, Nottingham, England
Died August 20, 1912
Hadley Wood, London

William Booth (April 10, 1829August 20, 1912) was a British Methodist preacher who founded The Salvation Army and became the first General (1878-1912). The Christian movement, with a quasi-military structure and government - but with no physical weaponry, founded in 1865 has spread from London, England, to many parts of the world and is known for being one of the largest distributors of humanitarian aid. Image File history File links Williambooth. ... William Booth may refer to: In Christianity: William Booth, the founder and 1st General of The Salvation Army William Booth (Anglican clergyman), Sub-dean of the Chapel Royal, Deputy Clerk of the Closet, and Subalmoner of the Royal Almonry William Booth (archbishop), Archbishop of York William Bramwell Booth, the 2nd... April 10 is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organization. ... 1st General, William Booth General is the title of the International Leader of The Salvation Army, a Christian denomination with extensive charitable social services that gives quasi-military rank to its ministers (who are therefore known as officers). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2007 estimate 50...

Contents

Early life

Booth was born in Sneinton, Nottingham, England, the only son of four surviving children born to Samuel Booth and Mary Moss. His father was wealthy by the standards of the time, but during Booth's childhood, as a result of his father's bad investments, the family descended into poverty. Sneinton (pronounced Snenton) is a north-eastern suburb of Nottingham, England. ... Nottingham is a city (and county town of Nottinghamshire) in the East Midlands of England. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Mary Moss (1791 - January 3, 1875) was the mother of William Booth and the second wife of Samuel Booth. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ...


In 1842, Samuel Booth, who by then was bankrupt, could no longer afford his son's school fees, and 13 year-old William Booth was apprenticed to a pawnbroker. Later that same year Samuel Booth died. Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration - see text) in the UK. Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organizations to pay their... Apprenticeship is a system of training a new generation of skilled crafts practitioners, which is still popular in some countries. ... A pawnbroker offers monetary loans in exchange for an item of value to the given pawn broker. ...


A few years into his appenticeship Booth was converted to Christianity. He then read extensively and trained himself in writing and in speech, becoming a Methodist lay preacher. When his apprenticeship ended in 1848, Booth spent a year looking in vain for more suitable work than pawnbroking, which he disliked. In 1849, Booth reluctantly left his family and moved to London, where he found work and lodging in a pawnbroker's shop. Booth tried to continue lay preaching in London, but the small amount of preaching work that came his way frustrated him, and so he resigned as a lay preacher and took to open-air evangelising in the streets and on Kennington common. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For school of ancient Greek medicine, see Methodism (history of medicine). ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ... Preacher is a colloquial term for a clergyman, in particular a local priest, pastor or Minister; one who preaches. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kennington Park is in Kennington, London, England, in London SE11, and lies between Kennington Park Road and St Agnes Place. ...


In 1851 Booth joined the Reformers (Wesleyan Reform Union), and on April 10, 1852, his 23rd birthday, he left pawnbroking and became a full-time preacher at their headquarters at Binfield Chapel in Clapham. William styled his preaching after the revivalist American James Caughey, who had made frequent visits to England and preached at Booth's favorite church, Broad Street Chapel. Just over a month after he started full-time preaching, on May 15 1852, William Booth became formally engaged to Catherine Mumford. In November 1853 Booth was invited to become the Reformers' minister at Spalding in Lincolnshire. The Wesleyan Reform Union is an Independent Methodist Connexion based in the United Kingdom. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Clapham is a neighbourhood in the London Borough of Wandsworth, South London. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (136th in leap years). ... Catherine Booth (January 17, 1829 – October 4, 1890) was the Mother of The Salvation Army. ... Spalding is a market town in Lincolnshire, England, perhaps best known for its annual Flower Parade. ... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the east of England. ...


Early ministry

Booth was encouraged to be an evangelist primarily through his best friend, Will Sansom. Sansom and Booth both began in the 1840's to preach to the poor and the "sinners" of Nottingham, and Booth would probably had remained Sansom's partner in his new "Mission" ministry, as Sansom titled it, but his dear friend died of tuberculosis in 1848. Later he would name a new ministry after this one, calling it "the Christian Mission" (see below). Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is an evangelical Christian denomination founded in 1865 by one time Methodist minister William Booth. ...


Though Booth became a prominent Methodist evangelist, he was unhappy that the annual conference of the denomination kept assigning him to a pastorate, the duties of which he had to neglect to respond to the frequent requests that he do evangelistic campaigns. At the Liverpool conference in 1861, after having spent three years at Gateshead, his request to be freed for evangelism full-time was refused yet again, and Booth resigned from the ministry of the Methodist New Connexion. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A pastor is a minister or priest of a Christian church. ... Liverpool is a city and metropolitan borough in Merseyside, England, along the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary. ... This article is about Gateshead, England. ...


Soon he was barred from campaigning in Methodist congregations, so he became an independent evangelist. His doctrine remained much the same, though; he preached that eternal punishment was the fate of those who do not believe the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the necessity of repentance from sin, and the promise of holiness. He taught that this belief would manifest itself in a life of love for God and mankind. Eventually, the Booths' children became involved in the ministry. Doctrine, from Latin doctrina, (compare doctor), means a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the body of teachings in a branch of knowledge or belief system. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sin is a term used mainly in a religious context to describe an act that violates a moral rule, or the state of having committed such a violation. ... Holiness is the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of God or gods. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


The Christian Mission

In 1865, Booth and his wife Catherine opened The Christian Revival Society in the East End of London, where they held meetings every evening and on Sundays, to offer repentance, salvation and Christian ethics to the poorest and most needy, including alcoholics, criminals and prostitutes. The Christian Revival Society was later renamed The Christian Mission. The East End of London, known locally as the East End, is an area, with no formal authority or boundaries, that spans a number of administative districts of London in England. ... In theology, salvation can mean three related things: being saved from something, such as suffering or the punishment of sin - also called deliverance; being saved for something, such as an afterlife or participating in the Reign of God - also called redemption; being saved through a process of healing or transformation... King Alcohol and his Prime Minister circa 1820 Alcoholism is the consumption of or preoccupation with alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the alcoholics normal personal, family, social, or work life. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is an evangelical Christian denomination founded in 1865 by one time Methodist minister William Booth. ...


Booth and his followers practiced what they preached and performed self-sacrificing Christian and social work, such as opening “Food for the Million” shops (soup kitchens), not caring if they were scoffed at or derided for their Christian ministry work. Professional social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... A soup kitchen is a place where food is offered to the poor for free or at a reasonably low price. ...

Reverend William Booth, General of the Salvation Army

Image File history File links Reverend_William_Booth. ... Image File history File links Reverend_William_Booth. ...

The Salvation Army

In 1878 the name of the organization was changed to The Salvation Army, modelling it in some ways after the military, with its own flag (or colours) and its own music, often with Christian words to popular and folkloric tunes sung in the pubs. He and the other soldiers in God's Army would wear the Army's own uniform, 'putting on the armour,' for meetings and ministry work. He became the "General" and his other ministers were given appropriate ranks as "officers".


Though the early years were lean ones, with the need of money to help the needy an ever growing issue, Booth and The Salvation Army persevered. In the early 1880s, operations were extended to other countries, notably the United States, France, Switzerland, Sweden, and others, and to most of the countries of the British Empire: Australia, Canada, India, South Africa, New Zealand, Jamaica, et.al.


Often the beginnings in other countries occurred through "salvationist" activities by non-officers who had emigrated. With some initial success they would contact London to 'send officers.' In other cases, like Argentina, a non-salvationist let Booth know that there were thousands of British people there who needed salvation. The 4 officers sent in 1890 found that those British were scattered all over the pampas. But the missionaries started ministry in Spanish and the work spread throughout the country - initially following the railroad development, since the British in charge of building the railroads were usually sympathetic to the movement. The pampas (from Quechua for plain) are the fertile lowlands that extend across c. ...


During his lifetime, William Booth established Army work in 58 countries and colonies, travelling extensively and holding "salvation meetings".


Booth regularly published a magazine and was the author of a number of books; he also composed several songs. His book In Darkest England and the Way Out not only became a bestseller after its 1890 release, it set the foundation for the Army's modern social welfare schemes. It compared what was considered "civilized" England with "Darkest Africa" - a land then considered poor and backward. What Booth suggested was that much of London and greater England after the Industrial Revolution was not better off in the quality of life than those in the underdeveloped world. And he proposed a strategy to apply the Christian Gospel and work ethic to the problems. The book speaks of abolishing vice and poverty by establishing homes for the homeless, farm communities where the urban poor can be trained in agriculture, training centres for prospective emigrants, homes for fallen women and released prisoners, aid for the poor, and help for alcoholics. He also lays down schemes for poor men’s lawyers, banks, clinics, industrial schools and even a seaside resort. He says that if the state fails to meet its social obligations it will be the task of each Christian to step into the breach. However, Booth was not departing from his spiritual convictions; the ultimate aim of getting people saved. A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on a list of top-sellers. ... A Watt steam engine. ... Vice is a practice or habit that is considered immoral, depraved, and/or degrading in the associated society. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... A homeless person in Paris. ... Farms, East of Gorgan, Iran. ... A community usually refers to a sociological group in a large place or collections of plant or animal organisms sharing an environment. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Emigration is the action and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country to settle abroad. ...


Booth asserts in his introduction,

I have no intention to depart in the smallest degree from the main principles on which I have acted in the past. My only hope for the permanent deliverance of mankind from misery, either in this world or the next, is the regeneration or remaking of the individual by the power of the Holy Ghost through Jesus Christ. But in providing for the relief of temporal misery I reckon that I am only making it easy where it is now difficult, and possible where it is now all but impossible, for men and women to find their way to the Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ.

In Darkest England and the Way Out was reprinted several times and lately in 2006.


Later years

Grave of William and Catherine Booth in Stoke Newington
Grave of William and Catherine Booth in Stoke Newington

Opinion of the Salvation Army and William Booth eventually changed to that of favour. In his later years, he was received in audience by kings, emperors and presidents, who were among his ardent admirers. Even the mass media began to use his title of 'General' with reverence. Image File history File links Abney_park_booth. ... Image File history File links Abney_park_booth. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


William Booth died at age 83 in Hadley Wood, London. He was buried with his wife in the main London burial ground for nineteenth century nonconformist ministers and tutors, the non-denominational Abney Park Cemetery in Stoke Newington. In his honour, Vachel Lindsay wrote the poem General William Booth Enters Into Heaven, and Charles Ives, who had been Booth's neighbour, set it to music. i suk dik every nite ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Abney Park Cemetery—every turn of the path reveals a new and unique landscape (September 2005). ... The Castle Climbing Centre, once the main Water Board pumping station. ... Nicholas Vachel Lindsay (November 10, 1879 – December 5, 1931) was an American poet. ... Charles Edward Ives (October 20, 1874 – May 19, 1954) was an American composer of classical music. ...


Children of William and Catherine Booth

William Booth and Catherine Mumford were married June 16, 1855 at Stockwell Green Congregational Church in London. They had eight children: June 16 is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Preceded by
New creation
General of The Salvation Army
1878–1912
Succeeded by
Bramwell Booth

Bramwell Booth (March 8, 1856 – June 16, 1929) was the 2nd General of The Salvation Army (1912-1929). ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ballington Booth Ballington Booth (July 28, 1857 – October 5, 1940) was a Salvation Army Officer and a co-founder of Volunteers of America. ... July 28 is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Kate Booth (September 18, 1858-May 9, 1955) was the oldest daughter of William and Catherine Booth. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Emma Booth (January 8, 1860 - October 28, 1903) was the fourth child of Willliam and Catherine Booth. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Herbert Booth (August 26, 1862 – September 25, 1926) was the third son of William and Catherine Booth. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marian Billups Booth (May 4, 1864 – January 5, 1937), better known as Marie Booth, was the third daughter of William and Catherine Booth. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Evangeline Booth (December 25, 1865 – July 17, 1950) was the 4th General of The Salvation Army (1934-1939). ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... July 17 is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lucy Booth (April 28, 1868 – July 18, 1953) was the fifth daughter of William and Catherine Booth. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Media:Example. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1st General, William Booth General is the title of the International Leader of The Salvation Army, a Christian denomination with extensive charitable social services that gives quasi-military rank to its ministers (who are therefore known as officers). ... Bramwell Booth (March 8, 1856 – June 16, 1929) was the 2nd General of The Salvation Army (1912-1929). ...

References

  • Railton, George Scott (1912). The Authoritative Life Of General William Booth. George H. Doran. 
  • Sandall, Robert (1947). The History of the Salvation Army Vol.1 1865-78. Thomas Nelson. 
  • Hattersley, Roy (1999). Blood and Fire: William and Catherine Booth and the Salvation Army. Little Brown. ISBN 0-316-85161-2. 

Works

  • In Darkest England and The Way Out Diggory Press, ISBN 978-1846853777
  • Purity of Heart Diggory Press, ISBN 978-1846853760

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pelastusarmeija - Suomi ja Viro (8314 words)
Pelastusarmeijalla on ollut kaksi naiskenraalia: Evangeline Booth 1934-39 ja Eva Burrows 1986-1993.
Kun Pelastusarmeijan ensimmäiset naiskadetit aloittivat opintonsa, Catherine Booth alkoi suunnitella päähinettä, joka olisi käytännöllinen ja antaisi suojaa vaaratilanteissa.
Koska William ja Catherine Booth toimivat metodistikirkon piirissä, pelastusarmeijan opissa on näkemyksiä, jotka ovat peräisin metodismista.
William Booth - LoveToKnow 1911 (557 words)
WILLIAM BOOTH (1829-), founder and "general" of the Salvation Army, was born at Nottingham on the 10th of April 1829.
In 1864 Booth went to London and continued his services in tents and in the open air, and founded a body which was successively known as the East London Revival Society, the East London Christian Mission, the Christian Mission and (in 1878) the Salvation Army.
The active encouragement of King Edward VIL., at whose instance in 1902 he was invited officially to be present at the coronation ceremony, marked the completeness of the change; and when, in 1905, the "general" went on a progress through England, he was received in state by the mayors and corporations of many towns.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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