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Encyclopedia > William Blount

Italic text:For the English scholar see William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy. Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy, (c. ...

William Blount
William Blount

William Blount, (March 26, 1749 (O.S.)/April 6, 1749 (N.S.) – March 21, 1800) was a United States statesman. He was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention for North Carolina, the first and only governor of the Southwest Territory, and Democratic-Republican Senator from Tennessee (1796-1797). He played a major role in establishing the state of Tennessee. He was the first U.S. Senator to be expelled from the Senate. Download high resolution version (600x798, 65 KB)William Blount This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (600x798, 65 KB)William Blount This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (86th in leap years). ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... Old Style or O.S. is a designation indicating that a date conforms to the Julian calendar, formerly in use in many countries, rather than the Gregorian calendar, currently in use in most countries. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (81st in leap years). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... This article discusses the history of the United States Constitution. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... The Southwest Territory, also known as the Territory South of the River Ohio, was an organized territory of the United States formed on May 26, 1790. ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...

Contents

Early Life and Revolutionary War

Blount was born near Windsor, North Carolina in Bertie County into a family of distinguished merchants and planters who owned extensive properties along the banks of the Pamlico River. Windsor is a town located in Bertie County, North Carolina. ... Bertie County (pronounced BURT-TEE) is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Pamlico Sound with the southern Outer Banks. ...


During the Revolutionary War, Blount accepted appointment as the regimental paymaster for the 3rd North Carolina Regiment. Although a regimental paymaster was not a commissioned officer with command responsibility on the battlefield, Blount served under a warrant on the regimental staff and drew the same pay and allowances as a captain. He also participated in the regiment's march north in the late spring of 1777 when it joined Washington's main army in defense of Philadelphia against Sir William Howe's Royal forces. Blount and his comrades had participated in one of the key battles of the war. By demonstrating Washington's willingness to fight and the Continental Army's recuperative powers, the battle convinced France that the Americans were in the war to the end and directly influenced France's decision to support the Revolution openly. The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... The 3rd North Carolina Regiment was raised on January 16, 1776 at Wilmington, North Carolina for service with the Continental Army. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first president of the United States under the U.S. Constitution. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Cradle of Liberty, the City That Loves You Back, the Quaker City, The Birthplace of America Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Government... For the surrealist painter, see William Howe (painter). ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ...


After the battle, Blount returned home to become chief paymaster of state forces and later deputy paymaster general for North Carolina. For the next three years he remained intimately involved in the demanding task of recruiting and reequipping forces to be used in support both of Washington's main army in the north and of separate military operations in defense of the southern tier of states.


The fall of Charleston, South Carolina, to British forces under Sir Henry Clinton in May 1780 exposed North Carolina to invasion. The state again faced the difficult task of raising new units, this time to counter a force of British, Hessian, and Loyalist troops under General Charles Cornwallis. Blount not only helped organize these citizen-soldiers but also took to the field with them. His North Carolina unit served under General Horatio Gates, who hastily engaged Cornwallis in a bloody battle at Camden, South Carolina. On August 16 Gates deployed his units — his continentals to the right, the North Carolina and Virginia militia on his left flank — and ordered an advance. The American soldiers were exhausted from weeks of marching and insufficient rations. Furthermore, the militia elements had only recently joined with the regulars, and disciplined teamwork between the two components had not yet been achieved. Such teamwork was especially necessary before hastily assembled militia units could be expected to perform the intricate infantry maneuvers of 18th century linear warfare. While the Continentals easily advanced against the enemy, the militia quickly lost their cohesion in the smoke and confusion, and their lines crumbled before the counterattacking British. Cornwallis then shifted all his forces against the continentals. In less than an hour Gates' army had been lost. This second defeat in the South, the result of inadequate preparations, provided the young Blount a lesson that would stand him in good stead in later years.[citation needed] It also marked the end of Blount's active military career. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... General Sir Henry Clinton K.B. Commander-in-Chief of British troops in America. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis (December 31, 1738-October 5, British general and colonial governor. ... Horatio Gates Horatio Gates (Full name: Horatio Lloyd Gates) (1726 – 1806) was an American general during the Revolutionary War. ... Camden is a city located in Kershaw County, South Carolina. ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... Lexington Minuteman representing militia minuteman John Parker Militia is the activity of one or more citizens organized to provide defense or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


Blount's political offices

The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives is the presiding officer of one of the houses of the North Carolina General Assembly. ... The Continental Congress is the label given to these two girls that i know. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Southwest Territory, also known as the Territory South of the River Ohio, was an organized territory of the United States formed on May 26, 1790. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first president of the United States under the U.S. Constitution. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Published in Rogersville, Tennessee in 1791. ... Rogersville is a town located in Hawkins County, Tennessee. ... Published in Rogersville, Tennessee in 1791. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF...

U.S. Senate

While serving as U.S. Senator, Blount's affairs took a sharp turn for the worse. In 1797 his land speculations in western lands led him into serious financial difficulties. That same year, he also apparently concocted a plan to incite the Creek and Cherokee Indians to aid the British in conquering the Spanish territory of West Florida. A letter he wrote alluding to the plan fell into the hands of President John Adams, who turned it over to the Senate on July 3, 1797. Five days later, that body voted 25 to 1 to expel Blount. The United States House of Representatives impeached him, but the Senate dropped the charges in 1799 on the grounds that no further action could be taken beyond his dismissal, which set an important precedent for the future with regard to the limitations on actions which could be taken by Congress against its members and former members. The Creeks are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... Map of East and West Florida in the early 1800s. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) served as the nations first President of the United StatesPresident (1789–1797) and as its second President (1797–1801). ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Type Bicameralism Houses Senate House of Representatives United States Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D, since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D, since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican...


However, the episode did not seem to hamper Blount's career in Tennessee. In 1798 he was elected to the Tennessee State Senate and rose to the speakership. He died two years later at Knoxville. He is buried there in the cemetery of the First Presbyterian Church. 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Tennessee State Senate is the upper house of the Tennessee General Assembly, the formal name of the Tennessee state legislature. ...


Legacy

In 1792, while governor of the Southwest Territory, Blount built the Blount Mansion in Knoxville. The mansion is a National Historic Landmark. 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: The Marble City, K-Town, Big Orange Country, Knox Vegas, 865 Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee Coordinates: Cities in Tennessee Tennessee Government  - Mayor Bill Haslam (R) Area  - City 254. ... USS Constitution A National Historic Landmark (NHL) is a building, district, site, structure, or object, almost always within the United States, officially recognized for its historical significance. ...


Blount County, Tennessee is named after Blount. Grainger County, Tennessee and Maryville, Tennessee are both named after his wife, Mary Grainger Blount. William Blount High School, William Blount Middle School, and Mary Blount Elementary School are named after Blount and his wife. (Blount County, Alabama is named after his younger half-brother Willie Blount, later governor of Tennessee). Raleigh, North Carolina has a street named after Blount going though the center of its downtown. Blount County is a U.S. county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Grainger County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Maryville is a city located in Blount County, Tennessee, 20 miles south of Knoxville. ... Blount County is a county located in the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Willie Blount (April 18, 1768 - September 10, 1835) served as Governor of Tennessee from 1809 to 1815. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... Nickname: City of Oaks Motto: You Can See the Whole State from Here Map of Wake County, North Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State North Carolina County Wake County Founded 1792 Government  - Mayor Charles Meeker (D) Area  - City  115. ...


Blount was the father of William Grainger Blount (1784-1827), Tennessee state representative and U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1815-1819. He was half-brother of Willie Blount (1767–1835), Governor of Tennessee, 1809-1815. He was brother to Thomas Blount (1759-1812), Revolutionary War veteran and U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1793-1799, 1805-1809, and 1811-1812. William Grainger Blount (1784-May 21, 1827) was a statesman from Tennessee, the son of William Blount and the nephew of Thomas Blount. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Willie Blount (April 18, 1768 - September 10, 1835) served as Governor of Tennessee from 1809 to 1815. ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Thomas Blount (May 10, 1759-February 7, 1812) was an American Revolutionary War veteran and statesman from the state of North Carolina. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Sources

  • Biographical Dictionary of the U.S. Congress
  • National Archive & Records Administration
  • Soldier-Statesmen of the Constitution from the U.S. Army Center for Military History
  • United States Senate

The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ...

External links

  • Blount Mansion
Preceded by
none
United States Senator (Class 2) from Tennessee
1796 – 1797
Served alongside: William Cocke
Succeeded by
Joseph Anderson

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Blount - LoveToKnow 1911 (426 words)
WILLIAM BLOUNT (1749-1800), American politician, was born in Bertie county, North Carolina, on the 26th of March 1749.
In 1797 his connexion became known with a scheme, since called "Blount's Conspiracy," which provided for the co-operation of the American frontiersmen, assisted by Indians, and an English force, in the seizure on behalf of Great Britain of the Floridas and Louisiana, then owned by Spain, with which power England was then at war.
Blount was enthusiastically supported by his constituents, and upon his return to Tennessee was made a member and the presiding officer of the state senate.
WILLIAM BLOUNT (1778 words)
Indeed, Blount had led the fight in North Carolina for ratification of the new Constitution because he, like many of his fellow veterans, had already come to realize that the various political and economic promises of independence could be fulfilled only by a strong, effective union of all the states.
Although a regimental paymaster was not a commissioned officer with command responsibility on the battlefield, Blount served under a warrant on the regimental staff and drew the same pay and allowances as a captain.
Blount and his comrades had participated in one of the key battles of the war.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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