FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > William Blake
William Blake

William Blake in an 1807 portrait by Thomas Phillips.
Born November 28, 1757(1757-11-28)
London, England
Died August 12, 1827 (aged 69)
London, England
Occupation Poet, Painter, Printmaker
Literary movement Romanticism

William Blake (28 November 175712 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake's work is today considered seminal and significant in the history of both poetry and the visual arts. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1423x1848, 583 KB) Portrait of William Blake by Thomas Phillips, painted in 1807. ... He is a fag and an asshole. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... ... Romantics redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Dante redirects here. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... Yeats redirects here. ... Harold Hart Crane (July 21, 1899 – April 27, 1932) was an American poet. ... Khalil Gibran Gibran Khalil Gibran (January 6, 1883 - April 10, 1931) was a Lebanese poet and artist. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Many regard William Shakespeare as the greatest English poet. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Printmaking is a process for producing a work of art in ink; the work (called a print) is created indirectly, through the transfer of ink from the surface upon which the work was originally drawn or otherwise composed. ...


Blake's prophetic poetry has been said to form "what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the language."[1] His visual artistry has led one modern critic to proclaim him "far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced."[2] Although he only once traveled any further than a day's walk outside London over the course of his life,[3] his creative vision engendered a diverse and symbolically rich corpus, which embraced 'imagination' as "the body of God,"[4] or "Human existence itself."[5] For other uses, see Imagination (disambiguation). ...


Once considered mad for his idiosyncratic views, Blake is highly regarded today for his expressiveness and creativity, and the philosophical and mystical currents that underlie his work. His work has been characterized as part of the Romantic movement, or even "Pre-Romantic,"[6] for its largely having appeared in the 18th century. Reverent of the Bible but hostile to the established Church, Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of the French and American revolutions,[7] as well as by such thinkers as Emanuel Swedenborg.[8] Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ...


Despite these known influences, the originality and singularity of Blake's work make it difficult to classify. One 19th century scholar characterised Blake as a "glorious luminary,"[9] "a man not forestalled by predecessors, nor to be classed with contemporaries, nor to be replaced by known or readily surmisable successors."[10]

Contents

Early life

The archetype of the Creator is a familiar image in Blake's work. Here, the demiurgic figure Urizen prays before the world he has forged. The Song of Los is the third in a series of illuminated books painted by Blake and his wife, collectively known as the Continental Prophecies.
The archetype of the Creator is a familiar image in Blake's work. Here, the demiurgic figure Urizen prays before the world he has forged. The Song of Los is the third in a series of illuminated books painted by Blake and his wife, collectively known as the Continental Prophecies.

William Blake was born in 28A Broad Street, Golden Square, London, England on 28 November 1757, to a middle-class family. He was the third of seven children,[11] two of whom died in infancy. Blake's father, James, was a hosier.[11] He never attended school, being educated at home by his mother.[12] The Blakes were Dissenters, and are believed to have belonged to the Moravian Church. The Bible was an early and profound influence on Blake, and would remain a source of inspiration throughout his life. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 356 × 476 pixelsFull resolution (356 × 476 pixel, file size: 29 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): William Blake ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 356 × 476 pixelsFull resolution (356 × 476 pixel, file size: 29 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): William Blake ... Demiurge (from the Greek , Latinized , meaning artisan or craftsman, literally worker in the service of the people, from of the people + work) is a term for a creator deity, responsible for the creation of the physical universe. ... Urizen is depicted in Blakes watercoloured etching The Ancient of Days. In the complex mythology of William Blake, Urizen was the embodiment of reason and law. ... In the strictest definition of illuminated manuscript, only manuscripts decorated with gold or silver, like this miniature of Christ in Majesty from the Aberdeen Bestiary (folio 4v), would be considered illuminated. ... We dont have an article called Golden Square Start this article Search for Golden Square in. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Hosiery describes undergarments worn directly on the feet and legs. ... The term dissenter (from the Latin dissentire, to disagree), labels one who dissents or disagrees in matters of opinion, belief, etc. ... The Moravian Seal, as rendered by North Carolina artist Marie Nifong. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ...


Blake began engraving copies of drawings of Greek antiquities purchased for him by his father, a practice that was then preferred to actual drawing. Within these drawings Blake found his first exposure to classical forms, through the work of Raphael, Michelangelo, Marten Heemskerk and Albrecht Dürer. His parents knew enough of his headstrong temperament that he was not sent to school but was instead enrolled in drawing classes. He read avidly on subjects of his own choosing. During this period, Blake was also making explorations into poetry; his early work displays knowledge of Ben Jonson and Edmund Spenser. Hercules fighting the Centaurs , engraving by Sebald Beham Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, usually flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... For scale drawings or plans, see Plans (drawings). ... This article is about the Renaissance artist. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Marten Heemskerk self-portrait (detail) Marten Jacobszoon Heemskerk van Veen or Maarten van Heemskerck (1498, Heemskerk – October 1, 1574, Haarlem), was one of the leading Dutch portrait and religious painters of the sixteenth century, famous for his depictions of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced ) (May 21, 1471 – April 6, 1528)[1] was a German painter, engraver and mathematician. ... For other persons of the same name, see Ben Johnson (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Apprenticeship to Basire

On 4 August 1772, Blake became apprenticed to engraver James Basire of Great Queen Street, for the term of seven years.[11] At the end of this period, at the age of 21, he was to become a professional engraver. is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1772 (MDCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... Great Queen Street is a street in central London, England. ...


There is no record of any serious disagreement or conflict between the two during the period of Blake's apprenticeship. However, Peter Ackroyd's biography notes that Blake was later to add Basire's name to a list of artistic adversaries—and then cross it out.[13] This aside, Basire's style of engraving was of a kind held to be old-fashioned at the time,[14] and Blake's instruction in this outmoded form may have been detrimental to his acquiring of work or recognition in later life. Peter Ackroyd (born October 5, 1949, London) is an English author. ...


After two years Basire sent him to copy images from the Gothic churches in London (it is possible that this task was set in order to break up a quarrel between Blake and James Parker, his fellow apprentice), and his experiences in Westminster Abbey contributed to the formation of his artistic style and ideas; the Abbey of his day was decorated with suits of armour, painted funeral effigies and varicoloured waxworks. Ackroyd notes that "the most immediate [impression] would have been of faded brightness and colour".[15] In the long afternoons Blake spent sketching in the Abbey, he was occasionally interrupted by the boys of Westminster School, one of whom "tormented" Blake so much one afternoon that he knocked the boy off a scaffold to the ground, "upon which he fell with terrific Violence".[16] Blake beheld more visions in the Abbey, of a great procession of monks and priests, while he heard "the chant of plain-song and chorale". The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... For other uses, see Westminster School (disambiguation). ... Broadly speaking, plainsong is the name given to the body of traditional songs used in the liturgies of the Catholic Church. ... A chorale was originally a hymn of the Lutheran church sung by the entire congregation. ...


The Royal Academy

In 1778, Blake became a student at the Royal Academy in Old Somerset House, near the Strand. While the terms of his study required no payment, he was expected to supply his own materials throughout the six-year period. There, he rebelled against what he regarded as the unfinished style of fashionable painters such as Rubens, championed by the school's first president, Joshua Reynolds. Over time, Blake came to detest Reynolds' attitude toward art, especially his pursuit of "general truth" and "general beauty". Reynolds wrote in his Discourses that the "disposition to abstractions, to generalizing and classification, is the great glory of the human mind"; Blake responded, in marginalia to his personal copy, that "To Generalize is to be an Idiot; To Particularize is the Alone Distinction of Merit".[17] Blake also disliked Reynolds' apparent humility, which he held to be a form of hypocrisy. Against Reynolds' fashionable oil painting, Blake preferred the Classical precision of his early influences, Michelangelo and Raphael. The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London, England. ... Strand, May 2001 St. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... Sir Joshua Reynolds in a self-portrait Colonel Acland and Lord Sydney, The Archers, 1769. ... Mona Lisa, Oil on wood panel painting by Leonardo da Vinci. ... Classicism door in Olomouc, The Czech Republic Teatr Wielki in Warsaw Church La Madeleine in Paris Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity, as setting standards for taste which the classicist seeks to emulate. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... This page is about the artist. ...


Gordon Riots

Blake's first biographer Alexander Gilchrist records that in June 1780, Blake was walking towards Basire's shop in Great Queen Street when he was swept up by a rampaging mob that stormed Newgate Prison in London.[18] They attacked the prison gates with shovels and pickaxes, set the building ablaze, and released the prisoners inside. Blake was reportedly in the front rank of the mob during this attack. These riots, in response to a parliamentary bill revoking sanctions against Roman Catholicism, later came to be known as the Gordon Riots; they provoked a flurry of legislation from the government of George III, as well as the creation of the first police force. Alexander Gilchrist (1828 – November 30, 1861) was the biographer of William Blake; the biography is still the standard reference work on the poet. ... Newgate, the old city gate and prison. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Gordon Riots is a term used to refer to a number of events in a predominantly Protestant religious uprising in London aimed against the Roman Catholic Relief Act, 1778, relieving his Majestys subjects, of the Catholic Religion, from certain penalties and disabilities imposed upon them during the reign... George III redirects here. ...


Despite Gilchrist's insistence that Blake was "forced" to accompany the crowd, some biographers have argued that he accompanied it impulsively, or supported it as a revolutionary act.[19] In contrast, Jerome McGann argues that the riots were reactionary, and that events would have provoked "disgust" in Blake.[20]


Marriage and early career

Oberon, Titania and Puck with Fairies Dancing (1786)
Oberon, Titania and Puck with Fairies Dancing (1786)

In 1782, Blake met John Flaxman, who was to become his patron, and Catherine Boucher, who was to become his wife. At the time, Blake was recovering from a relationship that had culminated in a refusal of his marriage proposal. Telling Catherine and her parents the story, she expressed her sympathy, whereupon Blake asked her, "Do you pity me?" To Catherine's affirmative response he responded, "Then I love you." Blake married Catherine – who was five years his junior – on 18 August 1782 in St. Mary's Church, Battersea. Illiterate, Catherine signed her wedding contract with an 'X'. Later, in addition to teaching Catherine to read and write, Blake trained her as an engraver; throughout his life she would prove an invaluable aid to him, helping to print his illuminated works and maintaining his spirits throughout numerous misfortunes. John Flaxman (July 6, 1755 - December 7, 1826), was an English sculptor and draughtsman. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... St. ... In the strictest definition of illuminated manuscript, only manuscripts decorated with gold or silver, like this miniature of Christ in Majesty from the Aberdeen Bestiary (folio 4v), would be considered illuminated. ...


At this time George Cumberland, one of the founders of the National Gallery, became an admirer of Blake's work. Blake's first collection of poems, Poetical Sketches, was published around 1783. After his father's death, William and his brother Robert opened a print shop in 1784, and began working with radical publisher Joseph Johnson. Johnson's house was a place of meeting for some of the leading intellectual dissidents of the time in England: Joseph Priestley, scientist; Richard Price, philosopher; John Henry Fuseli;[21] Mary Wollstonecraft, an early feminist; and Thomas Paine, American revolutionary. Along with William Wordsworth and William Godwin, Blake had great hopes for the American and French revolution and wore a Phrygian cap in solidarity with the French revolutionaries, but despaired with the rise of Robespierre and the Reign of Terror in the French revolution. Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ... Only known portrait of Joseph Johnson by William Sharp (after Moses Haughton)[1] Joseph Johnson (15 November 1738 – 20 December 1809) was an influential eighteenth-century London bookseller, often called the father of the book trade in England. ... Priestley by Ellen Sharples (1794)[1] Joseph Priestley (March 13, 1733 (old style) – February 8, 1804) was an eighteenth-century British natural philosopher, Dissenting clergyman, political theorist, theologian, and educator. ... Richard Price (February 23, 1723 – April 19, 1791), was a Welsh moral and political philosopher. ... Henry Fuseli (in German Johann Heinrich Füssli) (February 7, 1741 - April 16, 1825) was a British painter and writer on art, of German-Swiss family. ... Mary Wollstonecraft (circa 1797) by John Opie Mary Wollstonecraft (27 April 1759 – 10 September 1797) was a British writer, philosopher and feminist. ... For other persons of the same name, see Thomas Paine (disambiguation). ... Wordsworth redirects here. ... William Godwin William Godwin (3 March 1756 – 7 April 1836) was an English political and miscellaneous writer, considered one of the important precursors of both utilitarian and liberal anarchist thought. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... A Phrygian cap The Phrygian cap or Bonnet Phrygien is a soft, red, conical cap with the top pulled forward, worn in antiquity by the inhabitants of Phrygia, a region of central Anatolia. ... Maximilien François Marie Odenthalius Isidore de Robespierre [1] (IPA: ; 6 May 1758 – 28 July 1794) is one of the best-known leaders of the French Revolution. ... For other uses of terror, see Terror; Great Fear . ...


Blake illustrated Original Stories from Real Life (1788; 1791) by Mary Wollstonecraft. They seem to have shared some views on sexual equality and the institution of marriage, but there is no evidence proving without doubt that they actually met. In 1793's Visions of the Daughters of Albion, Blake condemned the cruel absurdity of enforced chastity and marriage without love and defended the right of women to complete self-fulfillment. Original Stories from Real Life with Conversations calculated to Regulate the Affections, and Form the Mind to Truth and Goodness, published in 1788, is the only work of childrens fiction by Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797). ... Mary Wollstonecraft (circa 1797) by John Opie Mary Wollstonecraft (27 April 1759 – 10 September 1797) was a British writer, philosopher and feminist. ... Visions of the Daughters of Albion is a 1793 poem by William Blake, produced as a book with his own illustrations. ...


Relief etching

Blake's Newton (1795) demonstrates his opposition to the "single-vision" of scientific materialism: Newton fixes his eye on a compass (recalling Proverbs 8:27, an important passage for Milton) to write upon a scroll which seems to project from his own head.
Blake's Newton (1795) demonstrates his opposition to the "single-vision" of scientific materialism: Newton fixes his eye on a compass (recalling Proverbs 8:27, an important passage for Milton[22]) to write upon a scroll which seems to project from his own head.[23]

In 1788, at the age of 31, Blake began to experiment with relief etching, a method he would use to produce most of his books, paintings, pamphlets and of course his poems, including his longer 'prophecies' and his masterpiece the "Bible." The process is also referred to as illuminated printing, and final products as illuminated books or prints. Illuminated printing involved writing the text of the poems on copper plates with pens and brushes, using an acid-resistant medium. Illustrations could appear alongside words in the manner of earlier illuminated manuscripts. He then etched the plates in acid in order to dissolve away the untreated copper and leave the design standing in relief (hence the name). William Blakes Newton (1795), colour print with pen & ink and watercolour. ... William Blakes Newton (1795), colour print with pen & ink and watercolour. ... This article is about methodological naturalism. ... The Book of Proverbs is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ... // Milton may refer to: People with the surname Milton: John Milton (1608–1674), English poet Milton (surname), other people with that surname People with the given name Milton: Milton (given name) In Australia: Milton, New South Wales Milton, Queensland Milton railway station, Brisbane In Canada: Milton, Ontario Milton (GO Station... Christ Preaching, known as The Hundred Guilder print; etching c1648 by Rembrandt Etching is the process of using strong acid to cut into the unprotected parts of a metal surface to create a design in intaglio in the metal (the original process - in modern manufacturing other chemicals may be used... An illuminated manuscript is a manuscript, often of a religious nature, in which the text is supplemented by the addition of colourful ornamentation, such as decorated initials, borders and the like. ...


This is a reversal of the normal method of etching, where the lines of the design are exposed to the acid, and the plate printed by the intaglio method. Relief etching, which Blake invented, later became an important commercial printing method. The pages printed from these plates then had to be hand-coloured in water colours and stitched together to make up a volume. Blake used illuminated printing for most of his well-known works, including Songs of Innocence and Experience, The Book of Thel, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, and Jerusalem. Christ Preaching, known as The Hundred Guilder print; etching c1648 by Rembrandt Etching is the process of using strong acid to cut into the unprotected parts of a metal surface to create a design in intaglio in the metal (the original process - in modern manufacturing other chemicals may be used... Intaglio is a printmaking technique in which the image is incised into a surface. ... Songs of Innocence and Experience is the name of two books of poetry by William Blake usually considered together. ... The Book of Thel is a poem by William Blake, dated 1789 and probably worked on in the period 1788 to 1790. ... The Marriage of Heaven and Hell is one of William Blakes books, a series of texts written in imitation of biblical books of prophecy, but expressing Blakes own intensely personal Romantic and revolutionary beliefs. ...


Later life and career

Blake's marriage to Catherine remained a close and devoted one until his death. There were early problems such as Catherine's illiteracy and the couple's failure to produce children[citation needed]. Gilchrist refers to "stormy times" in the early years of the marriage.[24] It is possible that at one point, in accordance with the beliefs of the Swedenborgian Society, Blake suggested bringing in a concubine.[25] Catherine was distressed at the idea, and Blake promptly withdrew it. Blake taught her to write, and she helped him to colour his printed poems.[26] Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... A swampy marsh area ...


Felpham

Hecate, 1795. Blake's vision of Hecate, Greek goddess of black magic and the underworld
Hecate, 1795. Blake's vision of Hecate, Greek goddess of black magic and the underworld

In 1800, Blake moved to a cottage at Felpham in Sussex (now West Sussex) to take up a job illustrating the works of William Hayley, a minor poet. It was in this cottage that Blake wrote Milton: a Poem (published between 1805 and 1808). The preface to this work includes a poem beginning "And did those feet in ancient time", which became the words for the anthem, "Jerusalem". Over time, Blake came to resent his new patron, coming to believe that Hayley was disinterested in true artistry, and preoccupied with "the meer drudgery of business".[27] Blake's disenchantment with Hayley has been speculated to have influenced Milton: a Poem, in which Blake wrote that "Corporeal Friends are Spiritual Enemies" (3:26).[27] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2024x1497, 295 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hecate ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2024x1497, 295 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hecate ... For other uses, see Hecate (disambiguation). ... A 1947 Ordnance Survey map, showing Bognor Regis with Felpam to the right Felpham (sometimes pronounced locally as Felf-ham) is a village in West Sussex. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... William Hayley (November 9, 1745 - November 12, 1820), was an English writer, best known as the friend and biographer of William Cowper. ... “Jerusalem (song)” redirects here. ...


Blake's trouble with authority came to a head in August 1803, when was involved in a physical altercation with a soldier called John Schofield.[28] Blake was charged not only with assault, but also with uttering seditious and treasonable expressions against the King. Schofield claimed that Blake had exclaimed, "Damn the king. The soldiers are all slaves."[29] Blake would be cleared in the Chichester assizes of the charges. According to a report in the Sussex county paper, "The invented character of [the evidence] was ... so obvious that an acquittal resulted."[30] Schofield was later depicted wearing "mind forged manacles" in an illustration to Jerusalem.[31] For the larger local government district, see Chichester (district). ... The Courts of Assize, or Assizes, were periodic criminal courts held around England and Wales until 1972, when together with the Quarter Sessions they were abolished by the Courts Act 1971 and replaced by a single permanent Crown Court. ...


Return to London

Blake's The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed with Sun (1805) is one of a series of illustrations of Revelation 12.
Blake's The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed with Sun (1805) is one of a series of illustrations of Revelation 12.

Blake returned to London in 1804 and began to write and illustrate Jerusalem (1804–1820), his most ambitious work. Having conceived the idea of portraying the characters in Chaucer's Canterbury Pilgrims, Blake approached the dealer Robert Cromek, with a view to marketing an engraving. Knowing that Blake was too eccentric to produce a popular work, Cromek promptly commissioned Thomas Stothard to execute the concept. When Blake learned that he had been cheated, he broke off contact with Stothard, formerly a friend. He also set up an independent exhibition in his brother's shop, designed to market his own version of the Chaucer illustration, along with other works. As a result he wrote his Descriptive Catalogue (1809), which contains what Anthony Blunt has called a "brilliant analysis" of Chaucer. It is regularly anthologised as a classic of Chaucer criticism.[32] It also contained detailed explanations of his other paintings. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 506 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 1489 pixel, file size: 239 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 506 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 1489 pixel, file size: 239 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902 Chanticleer the rooster from an outdoor production of Chanticleer and the Fox at Ashby_de_la_Zouch castle Geoffrey Chaucer (ca. ... For other uses, see The Canterbury Tales (disambiguation). ... Robert Hartley Cromek (1770-1812) was an engraver, art dealer and entrepreneur who was most active in the early nineteenth century. ... Thomas Stothard (August 17, 1755 - April 27, 1834) was an English painter and engraver. ... Anthony Frederick Blunt (26 September 1907 – 26 March 1983), known as Sir Anthony Blunt, KCVO between 1956 and 1979, was an English art historian, formerly Professor of the History of Art, University of London and director of the Courtauld Institute of Art, London (1947-74). ...


He was introduced by George Cumberland to a young artist named John Linnell. Through Linnell he met Samuel Palmer, who belonged to a group of artists who called themselves the Shoreham Ancients. This group shared Blake's rejection of modern trends and his belief in a spiritual and artistic New Age. At the age of 65 Blake began work on illustrations for the Book of Job. These works were later admired by Ruskin, who compared Blake favourably to Rembrandt, and by Vaughan Williams, who based his ballet Job: A Masque for Dancing on a selection of the illustrations. John Linnell (June 16, 1792 - January 20, 1882) was an English landscape painter. ... Self-portrait of the young Samuel Palmer, circa 1826. ... The Ancients, or Shoreham Ancients, were a group of English artists who admired and followed the work of William Blake in the 1820s and 1830s The group, comprised of George Richmond, Samuel Palmer and Edward Calvert, gathered regularly at the home of Palmer. ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ... Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (July 15, 1606 - October 4, 1669) is generally considered one of the greatest painters in European art history, and the most important United Provinces (Netherlands) painter of the seventeenth century. ... A statue of Ralph Vaughan Williams in Dorking. ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... Job: A Masque for Dancing is a ballet written by the famous British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams. ...


Later in his life Blake began to sell a great number of his works, particularly his Bible illustrations, to Thomas Butts, a patron who saw Blake more as a friend than a man whose work held artistic merit; this was typical of the opinions held of Blake throughout his life. For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ...


Dante's Inferno

The commission for Dante's Inferno came to Blake in 1826 through Linnell, with the ultimate aim of producing a series of engravings. Blake's death in 1827 would cut short the enterprise, and only a handful of the watercolours were completed, with only seven of the engravings arriving at proof form. Even so, they have evoked praise: DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... Gravel pits of Kensington, 1811-1812. ...

'[T]he Dante watercolours are among Blake's richest achievements, engaging fully with the problem of illustrating a poem of this complexity. The mastery of watercolour has reached an even higher level than before, and is used to extraordinary effect in differentiating the atmosphere of the three states of being in the poem'.[33]
Blake's The Lovers' Whirlwind illustrates Hell in Canto V of Dante's Inferno
Blake's The Lovers' Whirlwind illustrates Hell in Canto V of Dante's Inferno

Blake's illustrations of the poem are not merely accompanying works, but rather seem to critically revise, or furnish commentary on, certain spiritual or moral aspects of the text. In illustrating Paradise Lost, for instance, Blake seemed intent on revising Milton's focus on Satan as the central figure of the epic; for example, in Satan Watching the Endearments of Adam and Eve (1808), Satan occupies an isolated position at the picture's top, with Adam and Eve centered below. As if to emphasise the effects of the juxtaposition, Blake has shown Adam and Eve caught in an embrace, whereas Satan may only onanistically caress the serpent, whose identity he is close to assuming. Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ...


In this instance, because the project was never completed, Blake's intent may itself be obscured. Some indicators, however, bolster the impression that Blake's illustrations in their totality would themselves take issue with the text they accompany: In the margin of Homer Bearing the Sword and His Companions, Blake notes, "Every thing in Dantes Comedia shews That for Tyrannical Purposes he has made This World the Foundation of All & the Goddess Nature & not the Holy Ghost." Blake seems to dissent from Dante's admiration of the poetic works of the ancient Greeks, and from the apparent glee with which Dante allots punishments in Hell (as evidenced by the grim humour of the cantos). This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... The Holy Spirit, from the Christian viewpoint, while related to Gods will, is not Gods will personified. ... The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... This article is about the theological or philosophical afterlife. ... A canto is a significant section of a long poem or the highest part in a piece of choral music. ...


At the same time, Blake shared Dante's distrust of materialism and the corruptive nature of power, and clearly relished the opportunity to represent the atmosphere and imagery of Dante's work pictorially. Even as he seemed to near death, Blake's central preoccupation was his feverish work on the illustrations to Dante's Inferno; he is said to have spent one of the very last shillings he possessed on a pencil to continue sketching.[34] In philosophy, materialism is that form of physicalism which holds that the only thing that can truly be said to exist is matter; that fundamentally, all things are composed of material and all phenomena are the result of material interactions; that matter is the only substance. ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... Dante shown holding a copy of the Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelinos fresco. ... This article is about coinage. ...


Blake's death

Monument near Blake's unmarked grave in London
Monument near Blake's unmarked grave in London

On the day of his death, Blake worked relentlessly on his Dante series. Eventually, it is reported, he ceased working and turned to his wife, who was in tears by his bedside. Beholding her, Blake is said to have cried, "Stay Kate! Keep just as you are – I will draw your portrait – for you have ever been an angel to me." Having completed this portrait (now lost), Blake laid down his tools and began to sing hymns and verses.[35] At six that evening, after promising his wife that he would be with her always, Blake died. Gilchrist reports that a female lodger in the same house, present at his expiration, said, "I have been at the death, not of a man, but of a blessed angel."[36]


George Richmond gives the following account of Blake's death in a letter to Samuel Palmer: George Richmond (1809 - 1896) was an English painter. ... Self-portrait of the young Samuel Palmer, circa 1826. ...

He died ... in a most glorious manner. He said He was going to that Country he had all His life wished to see & expressed Himself Happy, hoping for Salvation through Jesus Christ — Just before he died His Countenance became fair. His eyes Brighten'd and he burst out Singing of the things he saw in Heaven.[37]

Catherine paid for Blake's funeral with money lent to her by Linnell. He was buried five days after his death – on the eve of his forty-fifth wedding anniversary – at the Dissenter's burial ground in Bunhill Fields, where his parents were also interred. Present at the ceremonies were Catherine, Edward Calvert, George Richmond, Frederick Tatham and John Linnell. Following Blake's death, Catherine moved into Tatham's house as a housekeeper. During this period, she believed she was regularly visited by Blake's spirit. She continued selling his illuminated works and paintings, but would entertain no business transaction without first "consulting Mr. Blake".[38] On the day of her own death, in October 1831, she was as calm and cheerful as her husband, and called out to him "as if he were only in the next room, to say she was coming to him, and it would not be long now".[39] For other uses, see Salvation (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Blake Memorial in Bunhill Fields Bunhill Fields is a cemetery located in the London Borough of Islington, north of the City of London, and managed by the Corporation of London. ... Edward Calvert (1799 - 1883) was an English engraver and painter. ...


On her death, Blake's manuscripts were inherited by Frederick Tatham, who burned several of those which he deemed heretical or too politically radical. Tatham had become an Irvingite, one of the many fundamentalist movements of the 19th century, and was severely opposed to any work that smacked of blasphemy.[40] Sexual imagery in a number of Blake's drawings was also erased by John Linnell.[41] Blake is now recognised as a saint in the Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica. The Blake Prize for Religious Art was established in his honour in Australia in 1949. In 1957 a memorial was erected in Westminster Abbey, in memory of him and his wife.[42] Edward Irving (August 4, 1792 - December 7, 1834), Scottish church divine, generally (but wrongly) regarded as the founder of the Catholic Apostolic Church, was born at Annan, Dumfriesshire. ... For the black metal band, see Blasphemy (band). ... Saints redirects here. ... Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica (EGC), or the Gnostic Catholic Church, is the ecclesiastical arm of Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO), an international fraternal initiatory organization devoted to promulgating the Law of Thelema. ... The Blake Prize for Religious Art is an annual art prize in Australia. ...


Blake and religion

Blake's Ancient of Days. The "Ancient of Days" is described in Chapter 7 of the Book of Daniel.
Blake's Ancient of Days. The "Ancient of Days" is described in Chapter 7 of the Book of Daniel.

Although Blake's attacks on conventional religion were shocking in his own day, his rejection of religiosity was not a rejection of religion per se. His view of orthodoxy is evident in The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, a series of texts written in imitation of Biblical prophecy. Therein, Blake lists several Proverbs of Hell, amongst which are the following: Download high resolution version (767x1092, 155 KB)William Blakes etching/watercolour Ancient of Days, public domain, from http://www. ... Download high resolution version (767x1092, 155 KB)William Blakes etching/watercolour Ancient of Days, public domain, from http://www. ... Ancient of Days is a name for God in Aramaic (Atik Yomin); in the Greek Septuagint: (Palaios Hemeron); and in the Vulgate: (Antiquus Dierum). ... For other uses, see Book of Daniel (disambiguation). ... Bible prophecy is the concept held by various people that many Bible verses contain prophecies. ...

Prisons are built with stones of Law, Brothels with bricks of Religion.
As the caterpillar chooses the fairest leaves to lay her eggs on, so the priest lays his curse on the fairest joys.

In The Everlasting Gospel, Blake does not present Jesus as a philosopher or traditional messianic figure but as a supremely creative being, above dogma, logic and even morality: This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ...

If he had been Antichrist, Creeping Jesus,
He'd have done anything to please us:
Gone sneaking into the Synagogues
And not used the Elders & Priests like Dogs,
But humble as a Lamb or an Ass,
Obey himself to Caiaphas.
God wants not man to humble himself

Jesus, for Blake, symbolises the vital relationship and unity between divinity and humanity: all had originally one language and one religion: this was the religion of Jesus, the everlasting Gospel. Antiquity preaches the Gospel of Jesus. Blake designed his own mythology, which appears largely in his prophetic books. Within these Blake describes a number of characters, including 'Urizen', 'Enitharmon', 'Bromion' and 'Luvah'. This mythology seems to have a basis in the Bible and in Greek mythology,[43] and it accompanies his ideas about the everlasting Gospel. Yhosef Bar Kayafa (Hebrew יְהוֹסֵף בַּר קַיָּפָא, ), also known as Caiaphas (Greek Καϊάφας) in the New Testament, was the Jewish high priest to whom Jesus was taken after his arrest in the garden of Gethsemane, and who played a part in Jesus trial before the Roman Governor, Pontius Pilate. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ...

"I must Create a System, or be enslav'd by another Man's. I will not Reason & Compare; my business is to Create."

Words uttered by Los in Blake's Jerusalem: The Emanation of the Giant Albion.

One of Blake's strongest objections to orthodox Christianity is that he felt it encouraged the suppression of natural desires and discouraged earthly joy. In A Vision of the Last Judgement, Blake says that: The term Cucumber may refer to: The Eastern Orthodox Church: the Eastern Christian churches of Byzantine tradition that adhere to the seven Ecumenical Councils. ...

Men are admitted into Heaven not because they have curbed & govern'd their Passions or have No Passions, but because they have Cultivated their Understandings. The Treasures of Heaven are not Negations of Passion, but Realities of Intellect, from which all the Passions Emanate Uncurbed in their Eternal Glory.

One may also note his words concerning religion in The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: The Marriage of Heaven and Hell is one of William Blakes books, a series of texts written in imitation of biblical books of prophecy, but expressing Blakes own intensely personal Romantic and revolutionary beliefs. ...

All Bibles or sacred codes have been the causes of the following Errors.
1. That Man has two real existing principles Viz: a Body & a Soul.
2. That Energy, call'd Evil, is alone from the Body, & that Reason, call'd Good, is alone from the Soul.
3. That God will torment Man in Eternity for following his Energies.

But the following Contraries to these are True

1. Man has no Body distinct from his Soul for that call'd Body is a portion of Soul discern'd by the five Senses, the chief inlets of Soul in this age.
2. Energy is the only life and is from the Body and Reason is the bound or outward circumference of Energy.
3. Energy is Eternal Delight.
The Body of Abel Found by Adam and Eve, c. 1825. Watercolour on wood.
The Body of Abel Found by Adam and Eve, c. 1825. Watercolour on wood.

Blake does not subscribe to the notion of a distinct body from the soul, and which must submit to the rule of soul, but rather sees body as an extension of soul derived from the 'discernment' of the senses. Thus, the emphasis orthodoxy places upon the denial of bodily urges is a dualistic error born of misapprehension of the relationship between body and soul; elsewhere, he describes Satan as the 'State of Error', and as being beyond salvation.[44] With regard to living things, a body is the integral physical material of an individual. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ...


Blake opposed the sophistry of theological thought that excuses pain, admits evil and apologises for injustice. He abhorred self-denial,[45] which he associated with religious repression and particularly with sexual repression:[46] "Prudence is a rich ugly old maid courted by Incapacity. / He who desires but acts not, breeds pestilence."[47] He saw the concept of 'sin' as a trap to bind men’s desires (the briars of Garden of Love), and believed that restraint in obedience to a moral code imposed from the outside was against the spirit of life: Sophism was originally a term for the techniques taught by a highly respected group of philosophy and rhetoric teachers in ancient Greece. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Look up Pain in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Evil (disambiguation). ... Justice is a concept involving the fair and moral treatment of all persons, especially in law. ... For other uses, see Sin (disambiguation). ...

Abstinence sows sand all over
The ruddy limbs & flaming hair,
But Desire Gratified
Plants fruits & beauty there.

He did not hold with the doctrine of God as Lord, an entity separate from and superior to mankind[48]; this is shown clearly in his words about Jesus Christ: "He is the only God ... and so am I, and so are you." A telling phrase in The Marriage of Heaven and Hell is "men forgot that All deities reside in the human breast". This is very much in line with his belief in liberty and equality in society and between the sexes. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Liberty (disambiguation). ... EQUAL is a popular artificial sweetener Equal (sweetener) Equality can mean several things: Mathematical equality Social equality Racial equality Sexual equality Equality of outcome Equality, a town in Illinois See also Equity Egalitarianism Equals sign This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise...


Assessment

Creative mindset

Northrop Frye, commenting on Blake's consistency in strongly held views, notes that Blake "himself says that his notes on [Joshua] Reynolds, written at fifty, are 'exactly Similar' to those on Locke and Bacon, written when he was 'very Young'. Even phrases and lines of verse will reappear as much as forty years later. Consistency in maintaining what he believed to be true was itself one of his leading principles ... Consistency, then, foolish or otherwise, is one of Blake's chief preoccupations, just as 'self-contradiction' is always one of his most contemptuous comments".[49] Herman Northrop Frye, CC, MA, D.Litt. ...

Blake's "A Negro Hung Alive by the Ribs to a Gallows", an illustration to J. G. Stedman's Narrative, of a Five Years' Expedition, against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam (1796).
Blake's "A Negro Hung Alive by the Ribs to a Gallows", an illustration to J. G. Stedman's Narrative, of a Five Years' Expedition, against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam (1796).

Blake abhorred slavery and believed in racial and sexual equality.[50] Several of his poems and paintings express a notion of universal humanity: "As all men are alike (tho' infinitely various)". In one poem, narrated by a black child, white and black bodies alike are described as shaded groves or clouds, which exist only until one learns "to bear the beams of love": Download high resolution version (640x730, 42 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (640x730, 42 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Slave redirects here. ...

When I from black, and he from white cloud free,
And round the tent of God like lambs we joy,
I'll shade him from the heat till he can bear
To lean in joy upon our Father's knee;
And then I'll stand and stroke his silver hair,
And be like him, and he will then love me.[51]

Blake retained an active interest in social and political events for all his life, often cloaking social and political statements in mystical allegory. His views on what he saw as oppression and restriction of rightful freedom extended to the Church. His spiritual beliefs are evidenced in Songs of Experience (1794), in which he distinguishes between the Old Testament God, whose restrictions he rejected, and the New Testament God (Jesus Christ in Trinitarianism), whom he saw as a positive influence. Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Trinitarianism is the Christian doctrine that God, although one being, exists in three distinct persons (hypostases) known collectively as the Holy Trinity. ...


Blake's visions

From a young age, William Blake claimed to have seen visions. The earliest of these visions may have occurred as early as the age of four when, according to one anecdote, the young artist "saw God" when God "put his head to the window", causing Blake to break into screaming.[52] At the age of eight or ten in Peckham Rye, London, Blake claimed to have seen "a tree filled with angels, bright angelic wings bespangling every bough like stars."[52] According to Blake's Victorian biographer Gilchrist, he returned home and reported this vision, and he only escaped being thrashed by his father for telling a lie through the intervention of his mother. Though all evidence suggests that his parents were largely supportive, his mother seems to have been especially so, and several of Blake's early drawings and poems decorated the walls of her chamber. On another occasion, Blake watched haymakers at work, and thought he saw angelic figures walking among them.[52] In religion, visions comprise inspirational renderings, generally of a future state and/or of a mythical being, and are believed (by followers of the religion) to come from a deity, directly or indirectly via prophets, and serve to inspire or prod believers as part of a revelation or an epiphany. ... Peckham Rye is a town (or area of Peckham) just south of Peckham in the London borough of Southwark. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


Blake claimed to experience visions throughout his life. They were often associated with beautiful religious themes and imagery, and therefore may have inspired him further with spiritual works and pursuits. Certainly, religious concepts and imagery figure centrally in Blake's works. God and Christianity constituted the intellectual center of his writings, from which he drew inspiration. In addition, Blake believed that he was personally instructed and encouraged by Archangels to create his artistic works, which he claimed were actively read and enjoyed by those same Archangels. In a letter to William Hayley, dated May 6, 1800, Blake writes: This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Archangels are superior or higher-ranking angels. ... William Hayley (November 9, 1745 - November 12, 1820), was an English writer, best known as the friend and biographer of William Cowper. ...

I know that our deceased friends are more really with us than when they were apparent to our mortal part. Thirteen years ago I lost a brother, and with his spirit I converse daily and hourly in the spirit, and see him in my remembrance, in the region of my imagination. I hear his advice, and even now write from his dictate.

The Ghost of a Flea, 1819-1820. Having informed painter-astrologer John Varley of his visions of apparitions, Blake was subsequently persuaded to paint one of them. Varley's anecdote of Blake and his vision of the flea's ghost became well-known.
The Ghost of a Flea, 1819-1820. Having informed painter-astrologer John Varley of his visions of apparitions, Blake was subsequently persuaded to paint one of them.[53] Varley's anecdote of Blake and his vision of the flea's ghost became well-known.[53]

In a letter to John Flaxman, dated September 21, 1800, Blake writes: John Flaxman (July 6, 1755 - December 7, 1826), was an English sculptor and draughtsman. ...

[The town of] Felpham is a sweet place for Study, because it is more spiritual than London. Heaven opens here on all sides her golden Gates; her windows are not obstructed by vapours; voices of Celestial inhabitants are more distinctly heard, & their forms more distinctly seen; & my Cottage is also a Shadow of their houses. My Wife & Sister are both well, courting Neptune for an embrace... I am more famed in Heaven for my works than I could well conceive. In my Brain are studies & Chambers filled with books & pictures of old, which I wrote & painted in ages of Eternity before my mortal life; & those works are the delight & Study of Archangels.

In a letter to Thomas Butts, dated April 25, 1803, Blake writes:

Now I may say to you, what perhaps I should not dare to say to anyone else: That I can alone carry on my visionary studies in London unannoy'd, & that I may converse with my friends in Eternity, See Visions, Dream Dreams & prophecy & speak Parables unobserv'd & at liberty from the Doubts of other Mortals; perhaps Doubts proceeding from Kindness, but Doubts are always pernicious, Especially when we Doubt our Friends.

In A Vision of the Last Judgement Blake writes:

Error is Created. Truth is Eternal. Error, or Creation, will be Burned up, & then, & not till Then, Truth or Eternity will appear. It is Burnt up the Moment Men cease to behold it. I assert for My Self that I do not behold the outward Creation & that to me it is hindrance & not Action; it is as the Dirt upon my feet, No part of Me. "What," it will be Question'd, "When the Sun rises, do you not see a round disk of fire somewhat like a Guinea?" Oh no, no, I see an Innumerable company of the Heavenly host crying, 'Holy, Holy, Holy, is the Lord God Almighty.' I question not my Corporeal or Vegetative Eye any more than I would Question a Window concerning Sight. I look thro' it & not with it.[54]

William Wordsworth remarked, "There was no doubt that this poor man was mad, but there is something in the madness of this man which interests me more than the sanity of Lord Byron and Walter Scott."[55] Wordsworth redirects here. ... Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... Raeburns portrait of Sir Walter Scott in 1822. ...


Blake in popular culture

In addition to his influence on writers and artists, Blake's role as a song-writer and as an exponent of sexual and imaginative freedom have made him an influential figure in popular culture, especially since the 1960s. Far more than any other canonical writer his songs have been set and adapted by popular musicians including U2, Van Morrison, Jah Wobble, Tangerine Dream, Bruce Dickinson, David Axelrod , Mark E. Smith and Kathleen Yearwood. Folk musicians have adapted his work, and figures such as Bob Dylan and Allen Ginsberg have been influenced by him. The genre of the graphic novel traces its origins to Blake's etched songs and Prophetic Books.[56] Children's author Maurice Sendak and exponents such as Grant Morrison, Robert Crumb, and J.M. DeMatteis have all cited Blake as one of their major inspirations. William Blake, The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed in Sun William Blakes body of work has significantly impacted countless writers, poets and painters, and his legacy is often apparent in modern popular culture. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a Grammy Award-winning Irish singer, songwriter, author, poet and multi-instrumentalist, who has been a professional musician since the late 1950s. ... Jah Wobble (born John Wardle, Stepney 1958) is an English bass guitarist, singer, poet and composer. ... Tangerine Dream is a German electronic music group founded in 1967 by Edgar Froese. ... For the record producer in the Saturday Night Live skit, see More cowbell. ... David Axelrod is a Democratic political consultant based in Chicago. ... Mark E. Smith (born 5 March 1957) is the lead singer, lyricist, frontman, and sole consistent member of The Fall, a renowned and idiosyncratic offshoot from the UK post-punk/new wave music scenes. ... Kathleen Yearwood is a Canadian experimental singer-songwriter. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Maurice Bernard Sendak (born June 10, 1928) is an American writer and illustrator of childrens literature who is best known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, published in 1963. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... Robert Dennis Crumb (born August 30, 1943), often credited simply as R. Crumb, is an American artist and illustrator recognized for the distinctive style of his drawings and his critical, satirical, subversive view of the American mainstream. ... John Marc DeMatteis is an American writer of comic books. ...


Bibliography

Illuminated books

Non-Illuminated

Illustrated by Blake

Blakes cover plate for Songs of Innocence and Experience Songs of Innocence is a collection of illustrated lyrical poetry, published by William Blake in 1789. ... The Book of Thel is a poem by William Blake, dated 1789 and probably worked on in the period 1788 to 1790. ... The Marriage of Heaven and Hell is one of William Blakes books, a series of texts written in imitation of biblical books of prophecy, but expressing Blakes own intensely personal Romantic and revolutionary beliefs. ... Visions of the Daughters of Albion is a 1793 poem by William Blake, produced as a book with his own illustrations. ... The First Book of Urizen is a book of lyric poetry by William Blake. ... The Songs of Experience is a poetry collection, forming the second part of William Blakes Songs of Innocence and Experience. ... The Book of Ahania is one of the English poet William Blakes prophetic books. ... William Blake: Tiriel supporting Miratana. ... Mary Wollstonecraft (circa 1797) by John Opie Mary Wollstonecraft (27 April 1759 – 10 September 1797) was a British writer, philosopher and feminist. ... Original Stories from Real Life with Conversations calculated to Regulate the Affections, and Form the Mind to Truth and Goodness, published in 1788, is the only work of childrens fiction by Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797). ... For Her Majesty the Queens private secretary see Edward Young (Royal Household). ... Night Thoughts is the title by which a poem by Edward Young published in nine parts between 1742 and 1745 is most commonly described. ... Robert Blair (1699 - February 4, 1746) was a Scottish poet. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ... John Varley (1778‑1842) was an English watercolour painter and astrologer, and a close friend of William Blake, the poet/painter/mystic. ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... Dante redirects here. ... For other uses see The Divine Comedy (disambiguation), Dantes Inferno (disambiguation), and The Inferno (disambiguation) Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino...

On Blake

  • Peter Ackroyd (1995). Blake. Sinclair-Stevenson. ISBN 1-85619-278-4.
  • Donald Ault (1974). Visionary Physics: Blake's Response to Newton. University of Chicago. ISBN 0-226-03225-6.
  • (1987). Narrative Unbound: Re-Visioning William Blake's The Four Zoas. Station Hill Press. ISBN-10 1886449759.
  • G.E. Bentley Jr. (2001). The Stranger From Paradise: A Biography of William Blake. Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-08939-2.
  • Harold Bloom (1963). Blake’s Apocalypse. Doubleday.
  • Jacob Bronowski (1972). William Blake and the Age of Revolution. Routledge and K. Paul. ISBN 0-7100-7277-5 (hardcover) ISBN 0-7100-7278-3 (pbk.)
  • (1967). William Blake, 1757-1827; a man without a mask. Haskell House Publishers.
  • G. K. Chesterton (1920s). William Blake. House of Stratus ISBN 0-7551-0032-8.
  • S. Foster Damon (1979). A Blake Dictionary. Shambhala. ISBN 0-394-73688-5.
  • David V. Erdman (1977). Blake: Prophet Against Empire: A Poet's Interpretation of the History of His Own Times. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-486-26719-9.
  • Irving Fiske (1951). "Bernard Shaw's Debt to William Blake." (Shaw Society)
  • Northrop Frye (1947). Fearful Symmetry. Princeton Univ Press. ISBN 0-691-06165-3.
  • Alexander Gilchrist, Life and Works of William Blake, (second edition, London, 1880)
  • James King (1991). William Blake: His Life. St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-07572-3.
  • Benjamin Heath Malkin (1806). A Father's Memoirs of his Child.
  • Peter Marshall (1988). William Blake: Visionary Anarchist ISBN 0-900384-77-8
  • W.J.T. Mitchell (1978). Blake's Composite Art: A Study of the Illuminated Poetry. Yale University Press. ISBN 0-691-01402-7.
  • Victor N. Paananen (1996). William Blake. Twayne Publishers. ISBN 0-8057-7053-4.
  • George Anthony Rosso Jr. (1993). Blake's Prophetic Workshop: A Study of The Four Zoas. Associated University Presses. ISBN 0-8387-5240-3.
  • Sheila A. Spector (2001). "Wonders Divine": the development of Blake's Kabbalistic myth, (Bucknell UP)
  • Algernon Swinburne, William Blake: A Critical Essay, (London, 1868)
  • E.P. Thompson (1993). Witness against the Beast. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-22515-9.
  • W. M. Rosetti (editor), Poetical Works of William Blake, (London, 1874)
  • A. G. B. Russell (1912). Engravings of William Blake.
  • Basil de Sélincourt, William Blake, (London, 1909)
  • Joseph Viscomi (1993). Blake and the Idea of the Book, (Princeton UP). ISBN 0-691-06962-X.
  • David Weir (2003). Brahma in the West: William Blake and the Oriental Renaissance, (SUNY Press)
  • Jason Whittaker (1999). William Blake and the Myths of Britain, (Macmillan)
  • William Butler Yeats (1903). Ideas of Good and Evil. Contains essays.

Peter Ackroyd (born October 5, 1949, London) is an English author. ... Donald Ault is a professor at the University of Florida and is widely known for his work on British Romantic poet William Blake and American comics artist Carl Barks. ... Harold Bloom (born July 11, 1930) is an American professor and prominent literary and cultural critic. ... Jacob Bronowski (January 18, 1908, Łódź, Congress Poland, Russian Empire - August 22, 1974, East Hampton, New York, USA) was an English-Polish mathematician, best known as the presenter of the BBC television documentary series, The Ascent of Man. ... Gilbert Keith Chesterton (May 29, 1874–June 14, 1936) was an influential English writer of the early 20th century. ... S. Foster Damon (February 12, 1893 – December 25, 1971) was an American academic, a specialist in William Blake, a critic and a poet. ... Herman Northrop Frye, CC, MA, D.Litt. ... Alexander Gilchrist (1828 – November 30, 1861) was the biographer of William Blake; the biography is still the standard reference work on the poet. ... James King may refer to: James King (soldier) (1589-1652), a Scottish commander in the Battle of Wittstock James King, 17th cent. ... Peter Marshall is a philosopher, historian, biographer,travel writer and poet. ... W.J.T. Mitchell is a professor of English and art history at the University of Chicago. ... Algernon Swinburne, Portrait by Rossetti Algernon Charles Swinburne (April 5, 1837 – April 10, 1909) was a Victorian era English poet. ... Edward Palmer Thompson (1924-1993) was a historian probably best known for his work The Making of the English Working Class, which included his reassessment of the Luddite movement. ... Basil de Sélincourt (1877–1966) was a British essayist and journalist. ... Yeats redirects here. ...

References

  1. ^ Frye, Northrop and Denham, Robert D. Collected Works of Northrop Frye. 2006, page 11-2.
  2. ^ Jones, Jonathan (2005-04-25). Blake's heaven. The Guardian.
  3. ^ Thomas, Edward. A Literary Pilgrim in England. 1917, page 3.
  4. ^ Yeats, W. B. The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats. 2007, page 85.
  5. ^ Wilson, Mona. The Life of William Blake. The Nonesuch Press, 1927. p.167.
  6. ^ The New York Times Guide to Essential Knowledge. 2004, page 351.
  7. ^ Blake, William. Blake's "America, a Prophecy" ; And, "Europe, a Prophecy". 1984, page 2.
  8. ^ Kazin, Alfred (1997). An Introduction to William Blake. Retrieved on 2006-09-23.
  9. ^ Blake, William and Rossetti, William Michael. The Poetical Works of William Blake: Lyrical and Miscellaneous. 1890, page xi.
  10. ^ Blake, William and Rossetti, William Michael. The Poetical Works of William Blake: Lyrical and Miscellaneous. 1890, page xiii.
  11. ^ a b c Bentley, Gerald Eades and Bentley Jr., G. William Blake: The Critical Heritage. 1995, page 34-5.
  12. ^ Raine, Kathleen (1970). World of Art: William Blake. Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-20107-2. 
  13. ^ 43, Blake, Peter Ackroyd, Sinclair-Stevenson, 1995
  14. ^ Blake, William. The Poems of William Blake. 1893, page xix.
  15. ^ 44, Blake, Ackroyd
  16. ^ Blake, William and Tatham, Frederick. The Letters of William Blake: Together with a Life. 1906, page 7.
  17. ^ Erdman, David V. The Complete Poetry and Prose of William Blake, 2nd edition, p641. ISBN 0-385-15213-2. 
  18. ^ Gilchrist, A, The Life of William Blake, London, 1842, p. 30
  19. ^ Erdman, David, Prophet Against Empire, p. 9
  20. ^ McGann, J. "Did Blake Betray the French Revolution", Presenting Poetry: Composition, Publication, Reception, Cambridge University Press, 1995, p.128
  21. ^ Biographies of William Blake and Henry Fuseli, retrieved on May 31st 2007.
  22. ^ Baker-Smith, Dominic. Between Dream and Nature: Essays on Utopia and Dystopia. 1987, page 163.
  23. ^ Kaiser, Christopher B. Creational Theology and the History of Physical Science. 1997, page 328.
  24. ^ Gilchrist, Life of William Blake, 1863, p. 316
  25. ^ Schuchard, MK, Why Mrs Blake Cried, Century, 2006, p. 3
  26. ^ Bentley, G. E, Blake Records, p 341
  27. ^ a b Blake, William. Milton a Poem, and the Final Illuminated Works. 1998, page 14-5.
  28. ^ Wright, Thomas. Life of William Blake. 2003, page 131.
  29. ^ The Gothic Life of William Blake: 1757-1827
  30. ^ Lucas, E.V. (1904). Highways and byways in Sussex. Macmillan. ASIN B-0008-5GBS-C. 
  31. ^ Peterfreund, Stuart, The Din of the City in Blake's Prophetic Books, ELH - Volume 64, Number 1, Spring 1997, pp. 99-130
  32. ^ Blunt, Anthony, The Art of William Blake, p 77
  33. ^ Bindman, David. "Blake as a Painter" in The Cambridge Guide to William Blake, Morris Eaves (ed.), Cambridge, 2003, p. 106
  34. ^ Blake Records, p. 341
  35. ^ Ackroyd, Blake, 389
  36. ^ Gilchrist, The Life of William Blake, London, 1863, 405
  37. ^ Grigson, Samuel Palmer, p. 38
  38. ^ Ackroyd, Blake, 390
  39. ^ Blake Records, p. 410
  40. ^ Ackroyd, Blake, p. 391
  41. ^ Marsha Keith Schuchard, Why Mrs Blake Cried: Swedenborg, Blake and the Sexual Basis of Spiritual Vision, pp. 1-20
  42. ^ Tate UK. William Blake's London. Retrieved on 2006-08-26.
  43. ^ "a personal mythology parallel to the Old Testament and Greek mythology"; Bonnefoy, Yves. Roman and European Mythologies. 1992, page 265.
  44. ^ Damon, Samuel Foster (1988). A Blake Dictionary (Revised Edition). Brown University Press, 358. ISBN 0874514363. 
  45. ^ Makdisi, Saree. William Blake and the Impossible History of the 1790s. 2003, page 226-7.
  46. ^ Altizer, Thomas J.J. The New Apocalypse: The Radical Christian Vision of William Blake. 2000, page 18.
  47. ^ Blake, William. Proverbs of Hell, via The Complete Poetry and Prose of William Blake. 1982, page 35.
  48. ^ Blake, Gerald Eades Bentley (1975). William Blake: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge & K. Paul, 30. ISBN 0710082347. 
  49. ^ Northrop Frye, Fearful Symmetry: A Study of William Blake, 1947, Princeton University Press
  50. ^ William Blake's Ecofeminism, retrieved on May 31st 2007.
  51. ^ Blake, William and Rossetti, William Michael. The Poetical Works of William Blake: Lyrical and Miscellaneous. 1890, page 81-2.
  52. ^ a b c Bentley, Gerald Eades and Bentley Jr., G. William Blake: The Critical Heritage. 1995, page 36-7.
  53. ^ a b Langridge, Irene. William Blake: A Study of His Life and Art Work. 1904, page 48-9.
  54. ^ Blake, William. Complete Writings with Variant Readings. 1969, page 617.
  55. ^ John Ezard (2004-07-06). Blake's vision on show. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2008-03-24.
  56. ^ Jay Shukla, William Blake - The Divine Image

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Yeats redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Herman Northrop Frye, CC, MA, D.Litt. ... The Princeton University Press is a publishing house, a division of Princeton University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Secondary Sources

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature is a collection of biographies of writers by John W. Cousin, published around 1910. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
William Blake
Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
William Blake
Persondata
NAME Blake, William
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Poet, Painter, Printmaker
DATE OF BIRTH November 28, 1757
PLACE OF BIRTH London, England
DATE OF DEATH August 12, 1827
PLACE OF DEATH London, England

The Age of Enlightenment (French: ; Italian: ; German: ; Spanish: ; Swedish: ; Polish: ) was an eighteenth-century movement in Western philosophy. ... Victorianism is the name given to the attitudes, art, and culture of the later two-thirds of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see Realism (disambiguation). ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia4U - William Blake - Encyclopedia Article (1165 words)
William Blake (November 28, 1757- August 12, 1827) was an English poet, mystic, painter and printmaker, or "Author & Printer," as he signed many of his books.
Blake believed himself a prophet of a New Age, and his identification with free love and democracy has helped to make him a hero of many modern artists.
Blake benefited from this group technically, by sharing in their advances in watercolour painting, and personally, by finding a receptive audience for his ideas.
Blake, William. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (732 words)
Blake’s life, except for three years at Felpham where he prepared illustrations for an edition of Cowper, was spent in London.
Blake’s paintings and engravings, notably his illustrations of his own works, works by Milton, and of the Book of Job, are painstakingly realistic in their representation of human anatomy and other natural forms.
Blake exalted love and pure liberty, and abhorred the reductive, rationalist philosophy that served to justify the political and economic inequities attendant upon the Industrial Revolution.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m