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Encyclopedia > William Adelin
British Royalty
Normans

William I
Children
   Robert Curthose
   William Rufus
   Adela of Blois
   Henry Beauclerc
William II
Henry I
Children
   Empress Maud
   William Adelin
   Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester
Stephen

William Adelin (1103November 25, 1120) was the only legitimate son of Henry I of England and his wife Maud of Scotland. His maternal grandparents were Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret of Scotland. The Normans (adapted from the name Northmen or Norsemen) were Scandinavian invaders (especially Danish Vikings) who began to occupy the northern area of France now known as Normandy in the latter half of the 9th century. ... This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... King William I of England William I ( 1027–September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Robert (called Curthose for his short squat appearance) (c. ... William II (called Rufus, perhaps because of his red-faced appearance, or maybe his bloody reign) (c. ... Adela of Blois (c. ... Henry I of England, depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry I (c. ... William II (called Rufus, perhaps because of his red-faced appearance, or maybe his bloody reign) (c. ... Henry I of England, depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry I (c. ... Empress Maud (February 7, 1102 – September 10, 1169) is the title by which Matilda, daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England and his wife Maud of Scotland (herself daughter of Malcolm III Canmore and St. ... Robert of Gloucester also frequently refers to the historian Robert_of_Gloucester Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (~1090 - October 31, 1147) was an illegitimate son of Henry I of England, and one of the dominant figures of the English Anarchy period. ... Stephen (1096 - October 25, 1154), the last Norman King of England, reigned from 1135 to 1154, when he was succeeded by his cousin (or, as the gossip of the time had it, his natural son) Henry II, the first of the Angevin or Plantagenet Kings. ... Events April 27 - Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, goes into exile after falling out with Henry I of England Amadeus III becomes Count of Savoy Bohemund I of Antioch is released from imprisonment among the Turks The Scandinavian city of Lund becomes a see within the Roman Catholic Church Births Emperor... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Welcher of Malvern creates a system of measurement for the earth using degrees, minutes, and seconds of latitude and longitude. ... Henry I of England, depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry I (c. ... Edith of Scotland, (c. ... King Malcolm III of Scotland, (1031? - November 13, 1093) also known as Malcolm Canmore (Malcolm with the large head), was the eldest son of King Duncan I of Scotland and first king of the House of Dunkeld. ... Saint Margaret of Scotland (circa 1045 - 1093), Edgar Athelings sister, married King Malcolm Canmore. ...


His early death in the White Ship disaster re-arranged the politics of England and France. The ship was wrecked and William Adelin actually made it to a life-boat, but he was killed trying to rescue his sister Matilda, the Countess of Perche. The White Ship, a 12th century vessel, sank in the English Channel near the Normandy coast off Barfleur, on November 25, 1120. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... The French Republic or France (French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. ...


Since William died when he was 17 or 18, he did not have much impact on the political affairs of his father's domains. But he did figure into the events of the early 12th century in two ways. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ...


During his long reign Henry would face several eruptions of hostilities with alliances of some of his neighbors. As part of an effort to detach Anjou, a long-time rival of Normandy, from such an alliance, in 1113 Henry betrothed William to Matilda, eldest daughter of count Fulk V of Anjou. The marriage itself finally took place in 1119. His wife was sent on another ship, and survived him to become a nun. For other uses, see Anjou (disambiguation). ... Mont Saint Michel is a historic pilgrimage site and a symbol of Normandy Normandy is a former country (a Duchy) situated in northern France occupying the lower Seine area (upper or Haute-Normandie) and the region to the west (lower or Basse-Normandie) as far as the Cotentin Peninsula. ... Events Pierre Abélard opens his school in Paris End of Kyanzitthas reign in Myanmar Alaungsithus reign begins in Myanmar Suryavarman Is reign begins in the Khmer Empire Births Geoffrey of Anjou Deaths Categories: 1113 ... Fulk of Anjou, king of Jerusalem (1092-1143), was the son of Fulk IV, count of Anjou, and his wife Bertrada (who ultimately deserted her husband and became the mistress of Philip I of France). ... Events February 2 - Callixtus II becomes Pope August 20 - Henry I of England routes Louis VI at the Battle of Bremule. ...


The king of France was another of the hostile neighbors. A major item of contention there was the obstensible duty for Henry to do homage for Normandy. In 1115 Henry offered to have William do this in his stead, and this offer was eventually accepted in 1120, after an intervening period of war. William did homage to Louis VI of France sometime in the middle of 1120. For this reason William is sometimes counted as duke of Normandy. Events Clairvaux Abbey is founded by St. ... Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was king of France from 1108 to 1137. ...


William's mother Queen Matilda usually served as Henry's regent in England while he was away in Normandy. After her death in 1118 William was old enough to serve in her stead. He was closely advised in this role by the king's administrators such as Roger of Salisbury. During the last year or so of his life he was sometimes referred to as rex designatus (king designate). Nevertheless William had very little real power. Events Knights Templar founded Baldwin of Le Bourg succeeds his cousin Baldwin I as king of Jerusalem John II Comnenus succeeds Alexius I as Byzantine emperor Gelasius II succeeds Paschal II as pope Births December 21 - Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury Taira no Kiyomori, Japanese general Deaths January 21 - Pope... Roger (d. ...


The second part of his name is variously referred to as Audelin, Atheling, or Aetheling. In any case it is derived from the Old English Ætheling, meaning "son of the king". Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ...


His older sister Empress Maud succeeded him as Heir Presumptive to their father. Empress Maud (February 7, 1102 – September 10, 1169) is the title by which Matilda, daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England and his wife Maud of Scotland (herself daughter of Malcolm III Canmore and St. ... An heir presumptive is one who is first in line to inherit a title or property, such as a monarchy, because there is not yet an heir apparent. ...


Sources

Hollister, C. Warren. Henry I (Yale Monarchs Series)


  Results from FactBites:
 
William II of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2564 words)
William Rufus inherited the Anglo-Norman settlement whose details are reflected in Domesday Book (1086), a survey that could not have been undertaken anywhere in Europe at that time and a signal of the control of the monarchy; but he did not inherit William's charisma or political skills.
William was able to claim the revenues of the archbishopric of Canterbury as long as Anselm remained in exile, and Anselm remained in exile until the reign of William's successor, Henry I.
William's body was abandoned by the nobles at the place where he fell, because the law and order of the kingdom died with the king, and they had to flee to their English or Norman estates to secure their interests.
William Adelin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (484 words)
William Adelin (1103 – November 25, 1120) was the only legitimate son of Henry I of England and his wife Maud of Scotland.
William's new wife was on another ship at the time of the wreck, and survived him to become a nun and eventually, Abbess of Fontevrault.
William's older sister Matilda succeeded him as Heir Presumptive, but on Henry's death those barons who had vowed to support her accession to the throne reneged and Stephen, William and Matilda's cousin, seized the throne.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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