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Encyclopedia > Will Rogers
William Penn Adair Rogers

Will Rogers
Born November 4, 1879(1879-11-04)
Oologah, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma)
Died August 15, 1935 (aged 55)
Point Barrow, Alaska Territory
Occupation actor, comic, columnist, radio personality
Spouse Betty (1908–1944)
Children William Vann "Bill"
Mary Amelia
James Blake
Fred Stone

William Penn Adair Rogers (November 4, 1879August 15, 1935) was a Cherokee-American cowboy, comedian, humorist, social commentator, vaudeville performer, and actor. Download high resolution version (519x640, 45 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Will Rogers Categories: U.S. history images ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Oklahoma1911flag. ... Oologah is a town in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Alaska. ... Point Barrow or Nuvuk, is a headland at the northernmost point of Alaska and of the United States, on the Arctic Ocean, Panoramic view of the tip of point Barrow, Alaska. ... Alaska Territory was an organized territory of the United States from August 24, 1912 to January 3, 1959, when Alaska became the 49th state. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... a Radio Personality is the modern incarnation of the disk jockey, or DJ. In the 1990s, successful radio stations began to focus less on the musical expertise of their hosts and more on the individual hosts personalities. ... William Vann Rogers, generally known as Will Rogers, Jr. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cowboy (disambiguation). ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... A humorist is an author who specializes in short, humorous articles or essays. ... Social commentary is the act of expressing an opinion on the nature of society. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ...


Known as Oklahoma's favorite son,[1] Rogers was born to a prominent Indian Territory family and learned to ride horses and use a lariat so well that he was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records for throwing three ropes at once—one around the neck of a horse, another around the horse's rider, and a third around all four legs of the horse. He ultimately traveled around the world three times, made 71 movies (50 silent films and 21 "talkies"),[2] wrote more than 4,000 nationally-syndicated newspaper columns,[3] and became a world-famous figure. Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... A lasso is a loop of rope that is designed to be thrown around a target and tighten when pulled. ... The Guinness Book of Records (or in recent editions Guinness World Records, and in previous US editions Guinness Book of World Records) is a book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of superlatives: both in terms of human achievement and the extrema of the natural world. ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... Print Syndication is a form of syndication in which news articles, columns, or comic strips are made available to newspapers and magazines. ...


By the mid-1930s, Rogers was adored by the American people, and was the top-paid movie star in Hollywood at the time. On an around-the-world trip with aviator Wiley Post, Rogers died when their small airplane crashed near Barrow, Alaska Territory in 1935. Classical Hollywood cinema designates both a visual and sound style for making motion pictures and a mode of production that arose in the Los Angeles film industry of the 1910s and 1920s. ... Wiley Hardeman Post (November 22, 1898 – August 15, 1935) was the first pilot to fly solo around the world. ... Barrow is a city in North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Alaska Territory was an organized territory of the United States from August 24, 1912 to January 3, 1959, when Alaska became the 49th state. ...

Contents

Beginnings

Will Rogers was born on the Dog Iron Ranch in Indian Territory, near present-day Oologah, Oklahoma. The house in which he was born was built in 1875 and was known as the "White House on the Verdigris River."[2] His parents, Clement Vann Rogers (1839–1911) and Mary America Schrimsher (1838–1890), were each of Cherokee heritage. Rogers quipped that his ancestors didn't come over on the Mayflower but they "met the boat."[4] Clement Rogers was a distinguished figure in Indian Territory. A Cherokee senator and judge, he served as a delegate to the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention. Rogers County, Oklahoma is named in honor of Clement Rogers.[2] Mary Rogers was the daughter of a Cherokee chief. She died when Will was 11, and his father remarried less than two years after her death.[5] The house at Dog Iron Ranch The Dog Iron brand, from Oklahomas Brand Book, is held in trust for the estate of Will Rogers. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... Oologah is a town in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... The Verdigris River is a tributary of the Arkansas River in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma in the United States. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... Kinship and descent is one of the major concepts of cultural anthropology. ... For other uses, see Mayflower (disambiguation). ... Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma The Constitution of the State of Oklahoma is the governing document of the state of Oklahoma, superseded only by the Federal Constitution. ... Rogers County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ...

The "White House on the Verdigris River", the home where Will Rogers was born, near Oologah, Oklahoma

Rogers was the youngest of his parents' eight children. Only three of his siblings, sisters Sallie Clementine, Maude Ethel, and May (Mary), survived into adulthood. The children attended Willow Hassel School in Neosho, Missouri, and later Kemper Military School in Boonville, Missouri. He ended his studies after the 10th grade. He admitted he was a poor student, saying that he "studied the Fourth Reader for ten years."[4] He was much more interested in cowboys and horses, and learned to rope and use a lariat. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 90 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The main house at Dog Iron Ranch, the Birthplace of Will Rogers Taken by David Stapleton (Dsmdgold) on April 18, 2007. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 90 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The main house at Dog Iron Ranch, the Birthplace of Will Rogers Taken by David Stapleton (Dsmdgold) on April 18, 2007. ... Oologah is a town in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. ... Neosho, incorporated in 1878, is a city located at the western edge of the Missouri Ozarks serving as the county seat of Newton County, Missouri, USA. The name Neosho (pronounced nÄ“-ō-shō - originally nÄ“-ō-zhō, or nÄ“-ō-zhÅ«) is generally accepted to be of Native American (most likely Osage) derivation... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Kemper Military School was a private military academy located in Boonville, Missouri. ... Boonville is a city located in Cooper County, Missouri, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 8,202. ... For other uses, see Cowboy (disambiguation). ... A lasso is a loop of rope that is designed to be thrown around a target and tighten when pulled. ...


After ending his brief formal studies, Rogers worked the Dog Iron Ranch for a few years. Near the end of 1901, he and a friend left home with aspirations to work as gauchos in Argentina.[4] They made it to Argentina in May 1902, and spent five months trying to make it as ranch owners in the Argentine pampas. Unfortunately, Rogers and his partner lost all their money, and in his words, "I was ashamed to send home for more," so the two friends separated and Rogers sailed for South Africa, where he took a job breaking in horses for the British Army near the end of the Boer War.[6] For other uses, see Gaucho (disambiguation). ... The pampas (from Quechua for plain) are the fertile lowlands that extend across c. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians...


When the war ended and the British Army no longer required his services, he began his show business career as a trick roper in "Texas Jack's Wild West Circus":

He (Texas Jack) had a little Wild West aggregation that visited the camps and did a tremendous business. I did some roping and riding, and Jack, who was one of the smartest showmen I ever knew, took a great interest in me. It was he who gave me the idea for my original stage act with my pony. I learned a lot about the show business from him. He could do a bum act with a rope that an ordinary man couldn't get away with, and make the audience think it was great, so I used to study him by the hour, and from him I learned the great secret of the show business—knowing when to get off. It's the fellow who knows when to quit that the audience wants more of.[6]

Grateful for the guidance but anxious to move on, Rogers quit the circus and went to Australia. Texas Jack gave him a reference letter for the Wirth Brothers Circus there, and Rogers continued to perform as a rider and trick roper, and worked on his pony act. He returned to the United States in 1904, and began to try his roping skills on the American vaudeville circuits.


The toast of New York

On a trip to New York City, Rogers was at Madison Square Garden when a wild steer broke out of the arena and began to climb into the viewing stands. Rogers quickly roped the steer to the delight of the crowd. The feat got front page attention from the newspapers, giving him valuable publicity and an audience eager to see more. William Hammerstein came to see his vaudeville act, and quickly signed Rogers to appear on the Victoria Roof—which was literally on a rooftop—with his pony. For the next 10 years, Rogers estimated he worked for 50 weeks a year at the Roof and at the city's myriad vaudeville theaters.[6] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ...


In 1908, Rogers married Betty Blake, and the couple had four children: Will Rogers, Jr. (Bill), Mary Amelia (Mary), James Blake (Jim), and Fred Stone. Bill became a World War II hero, played his father in two films, and became a member of Congress. Mary became a Broadway actress, and Jim was a newspaperman and rancher; Fred died of diphtheria at age two.[3] The family lived in New York, but they managed to make it home to Oklahoma during the summers. In 1911, Rogers bought a 20-acre (8.1 hectare) ranch near Claremore, Oklahoma, which he intended to use as his retirement home, for US$500 per acre.[3] William Vann Rogers, generally known as Will Rogers, Jr. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... Claremore is the county seat of Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. ... USD redirects here. ...

A photo of Rogers taken sometime before 1900
A photo of Rogers taken sometime before 1900

In the fall of 1915, Rogers began to appear in Florenz Ziegfeld's Midnight Frolic. The variety revue began at midnight in the top-floor night club of Ziegfeld's New Amsterdam Theatre, and drew many influential—and regular—customers. By this time, Rogers had refined his act to a science. His monologues on the news of the day followed a similar routine every night. He appeared on stage in his cowboy outfit, nonchalantly twirling his lasso, and said, "Well, what shall I talk about? I ain't got anything funny to say. All I know is what I read in the papers." He then made jokes about what he had read in that day's newspapers. The line "All I know is what I read in the papers" is often incorrectly described as Rogers' most famous punch line, when it was in fact his opening line. Will Rogers (19th century photo) This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Will Rogers (19th century photo) This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... 1928 Time cover featuring Ziegfeld Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. ... A variety show is a show with a variety of acts, often including music and comedy skits, especially on television. ... The New Amsterdam Theatre is a playhouse located at 214 West 42nd Street in New York Citys Broadway district. ... A punch line is the final part of a joke, usually the word, sentence or exchange of sentences which is intended to be funny and to provoke laughter from listeners. ...


His run at the New Amsterdam ran on into 1916, and Rogers' obvious popularity led to an engagement on the more-famous Ziegfeld Follies. Ziegfeld saw comedians as mere 'stage-fillers' who entertained the audience while the stage was reset for the next spectacle of beautiful girls in stunning costumes. Rogers managed to not only hold his own, but achieved star status, with both his roping and his precise satire on the daily news. An editorial in the The New York Times said that "Will Rogers in the Follies is carrying on the tradition of Aristophanes, and not unworthily."[7] Rogers branched into silent films too, for Samuel Goldwyn's company Goldwyn Pictures. He made his first silent movie, Laughing Bill Hyde, filmed in Fort Lee, New Jersey, in 1918. Many early films were made near the major New York performing market, so Rogers could make the film, yet still rehearse and perform in the Follies. He eventually appeared in most of the Follies from 1916 to 1925. The Ziegfeld Follies were a series of elaborate theatrical productions on Broadway in New York City from 1907 through 1931. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , ca. ... Samuel Goldwyn (July 1882 (some sources say 17 August 1882, others 1879 [1]) – 31 January 1974) was an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning producer, also a well-known Hollywood motion picture producer and founding contributor of several motion picture studios. ... Goldwyn Pictures Corporation was an American motion picture production company founded in 1916 by Samuel Goldfish in partnership with Broadway producers Edgar and Archibald Selwyn using a combination of both last names to create the name. ... Map highlighting Fort Lees location within Bergen County. ... “NJ” redirects here. ...


California, here he comes

Rogers and his young family moved permanently to the West Coast in 1919, when Goldwyn Pictures moved to join the rise of filmmaking in California.[8] During the same period of time Rogers made 12 silent movies for Goldwyn, until his contract ended in 1921, he was also making the Illiterate Digest film-strip series for the Gaumont Film Company. Gaumont is a French film production company and is the worlds oldest film company. ...


While Rogers enjoyed film acting, his appearances in silent movies suffered from the obvious restrictions of silence—not the strongest medium for him, having gained his fame as a commentator on stage. It helped somewhat that he wrote a good many of the title cards appearing in his films. In 1923, he began a one-year stint for Hal Roach and made 12 pictures. He made two other feature silents and a travelogue series in 1927, and did not return to the screen until his time in the 'talkies' began in 1929. In motion pictures, an intertitle is a piece of filmed, printed text edited into the midst of (i. ... Harold Eugene Roach, Sr. ... 1902 poster advertising Gaumonts sound films, depicting an optimistically vast auditorium A sound film is a motion picture with synchronized sound, or sound technologically coupled to image, as opposed to a silent film. ...


From 1929 to 1935, Rogers became the star of the Fox Film lot (now 20th Century Fox). Far from being a "B-Movie" level performer, Rogers appeared in 21 feature films alongside such noted performers as Lew Ayres, Billie Burke, Jane Darwell, Andy Devine, Stepin Fetchit, Janet Gaynor, Boris Karloff, Myrna Loy, Joel McCrea, Hattie McDaniel, Ray Milland, Maureen O'Sullivan, ZaSu Pitts, Dick Powell, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Mickey Rooney, and Peggy Wood. He was directed three times by John Ford. Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Lew Ayres (December 28, 1908 – December 30, 1996) was an American actor. ... Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Burke (August 7, 1885 – May 14, 1970) was an Oscar-nominated American actress primarily known to modern audiences for her role as Glinda the Good Witch of the North in the musical The Wizard of Oz. ... Jane Darwell (October 15, 1879 – August 13, 1967) was an Academy Award-winning American theater and film actress. ... For the Emmerdale actor, see Andy Devine (actor). ... Stepin Fetchit Stepin Fetchit was the stage name of American comedian and film actor Lincoln Theodore Monroe Andrew Perry (May 30, 1902–November 19, 1985). ... Janet Gaynor (October 6, 1906 – September 14, 1984) was an American actress who, in 1928, became the first winner of the Academy Award for Best Actress. ... Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt) (London, November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969) was an English actor, who immigrated to Canada in the 1910s, best known for his roles in horror films and the creation of Frankensteins monster in 1931s Frankenstein. ... Myrna Loy (August 2, 1905 – December 14, 1993) was an American motion picture actress. ... Joel Albert McCrea, (November 5, 1905 - October 20, 1990) was an American film actor. ... Hattie McDaniel (June 10, 1895 – October 26, 1952) was an African American actress. ... Ray Milland (January 3, 1905 – March 10, 1986) was a successful Welsh actor and director who worked primarily in the United States. ... Maureen OSullivan as Jane in Tarzan and His Mate Maureen O’Sullivan (17 May 1911 – 23 June 1998) was an Irish actress. ... ZaSu Pitts (January 3, 1894 – June 7, 1963) (IPA: ) was an American movie actress. ... Richard Ewing Dick Powell (November 14, 1904 – January 2, 1963) was an American singer, actor, producer, and director. ... Bill Bojangles Robinson ( May 25, 1878 – November 25, 1949) was a pioneer and pre-eminent African-American tap dance performer. ... Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Peggy Wood (February 9, 1892 - March 18, 1978) was an American actress of film and television. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ...


With his voice becoming increasingly familiar to audiences, he was able to basically play himself, without normal makeup, in each film, managing to ad-lib and even work in his familiar commentaries on politics at times. The clean moral tone of his films led to an activity nearly unimaginable today: various public schools taking their classes, during the school day, to attend special showings of some of them. His most unusual role may have been in the first talking version of Mark Twain's novel A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. His popularity soared to new heights with films including Young As You Feel, Judge Priest, and Life Begins at 40 with Richard Cromwell and Rochelle Hudson. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthurs Court is an 1889 novel by American humorist and writer Mark Twain. ... Richard Cromwell (January 8, 1910 - October 11, 1960) was an American actor, born LeRoy Melvin Radabaugh. ... Rochelle Hudson Rochelle Hudson (March 6, 1914 (some sources indicate 1916) - January 17, 1972) was an American film actress from the 1930s through the 1960s. ...


Traveling the world

Rogers began a weekly column, titled "Slipping the Lariat Over," at the end of 1922.[9] He had already published a book of wisecracks and had begun a steady stream of humor books.[4] Through the continuing series of columns between 1922 and 1935, as well as in his personal appearances and radio broadcasts, he won the loving admiration of the American people, poking jibes in witty ways at the issues of the day and prominent people—often politicians. He wrote from a non-partisan point of view and became a friend of presidents and a confidant of the great. Loved for his cool mind and warm heart, he was often considered the successor to such greats as Artemus Ward and Mark Twain. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Charles Farrar Browne, (April 23, 1834 - March 6, 1867) was a United States humorous writer, best known under his nom de plume of Artemus Ward. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ...


From 1925 to 1928, Rogers traveled the length and breadth of the United States in a "lecture tour". (He began his lectures by pointing out that "A humorist entertains, and a lecturer annoys!") During this time he became the first civilian to fly from coast to coast with pilots flying the mail in early air mail flights. The National Press Club dubbed him "Ambassador at Large of the United States." He visited Mexico City with Charles Lindbergh as a guest of U.S. Ambassador Dwight Morrow, whose daughter Anne later married Lindbergh. In subsequent years, Rogers gave numerous after-dinner speeches, became a popular convention speaker, and gave dozens of benefits for victims of floods, droughts, or earthquakes. In 1928 he ran for President of the United States.[10] After the Great Depression hit the United States, Rogers gave radio talks on unemployment with former President Calvin Coolidge, President Herbert Hoover, and former presidential candidate Al Smith. Airmail imprint on an envelope (Thailand) Airmail (or air mail) is mail that is transported by aircraft. ... The National Press Club is an association of journalists based in Washington, D.C. It is well-known for its gatherings with invited speakers, including many presidential candidates and other influential public figuress. ... Nickname: Motto: Capital en movimiento Location of Mexico City in south central Mexico Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (4 February 1902 – 26 August 1974), known as Lucky Lindy and The Lone Eagle, was an American pilot famous for the first solo, non-stop flight across the Atlantic, from Roosevelt Field, Long Island to Paris in 1927 in the Spirit of St. ... Time Magazine, October 12, 1925 Dwight Whitney Morrow (January 11, 1873–October 5, 1931) was an American businessman, politician, and diplomat. ... Anne Morrow Lindbergh (June 22, 1906 – February 7, 2001) was an author and pioneering American aviator. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ...


From 1930 to 1935, he made radio broadcasts for the Gulf Oil Company. Since he easily rambled from one subject to another, reacting to his studio audience, he often lost track of the half-hour time limit in his earliest broadcasts, and was cut off in mid-sentence. To correct this, he brought in a wind-up alarm clock, and its on-air buzzing alerted him to begin wrapping up his comments. By 1935, his show was being announced as "Will Rogers and his famous Alarm Clock." Gulf Oil was a major global oil company from the 1900s to the 1980s. ... A basic digital clock radio with analog tuning A wind-up, spring-driven alarm clock An alarm clock is a clock that is designed to make an alert sound at a specific date and/or time. ...


He made a trip to the Orient in 1931 and to Central and South America the following year. In 1934, he made a globe-girdling tour and returned to play the lead in Eugene O'Neill's stage play Ah, Wilderness! He had tentatively agreed to go on loan from Fox to MGM to star in the 1935 movie version of the play; however, his concern over a fan's reaction to the 'facts-of-life' talk between his character and its son caused him to decline the role—and that freed his schedule to allow him to fly with Wiley Post that summer. He often touted the advantages of flying. The Orient is a term traditionally used in Western culture to refer to the Middle East (Southwest Asia and Egypt), South Asia and East Asia. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... Ah, Wilderness! is a play by Eugene ONeill, and has the distinction of being the only true comedy he would ever write. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Wiley Hardeman Post (November 22, 1898 – August 15, 1935) was the first pilot to fly solo around the world. ...


In 1934, Rogers hosted the 6th Annual Academy Awards Ceremony, held at the Fiesta Room of the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. At the same time, he also began writing a popular syndicated short item called "Will Rogers Says". Literally a telegram which he composed daily to address each day's news, it often appeared on the front pages of its subscribing papers. In it, he expressed his disappointment with big government and the effect it had on the nation, particularly during the Depression era. His wit was often caustic: as he explained, "There's no trick to being a humorist when you have the whole government working for you." Nevertheless, he identified with the Democratic Party, saying "I don't belong to any organized party. I'm a Democrat," and was a vocal supporter of Franklin D. Roosevelt. At one point, he was even asked to run for governor of Oklahoma, the party hoping to benefit from his immense popularity. The 6th Academy Awards were held on March 16, 1934 at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, California. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Ambassadors Cocoanut Grove circa the late 1950s. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... Big government is a pejorative term generally used by political conservatives or laissez-faire advocates to describe a government which is excessively large or inefficient, or which is inappropriately involved in certain areas of public policy. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... FDR redirects here. ...


"I never met a man that I didn't like"

One of Will Rogers' most famous lines, originally part of a longer quote referring to Leon Trotsky: Leon Trotsky (Russian:  , Lev Davidovich Trotsky, also transliterated Leo, Lyev, Trotskii, Trotski, Trotskij, Trockij and Trotzky) (November 7 [O.S. October 26] 1879 – August 21, 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronstein (), was a Ukrainian-born Bolshevik revolutionary and Marxist theorist. ...

I bet you if I had met him and had a chat with him, I would have found him a very interesting and human fellow, for I never yet met a man that I didn't like.

Saturday Evening Post, November 6, 1926 There have been many publications called the Saturday Evening Post; several were/are local British newspapers. ...

"I never met a man that I didn't like" became Rogers' signature line, often repeated.


William Morris, in his Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins(1988), cited a reported variant instance:

Not long before his death, H. Allen Smith, himself one the great humorists of this century, recounted his first meeting with Will Rogers. Smith was a cub reporter at the time, assigned to cover a rodeo. He and several other young reporters were enjoying a pleasant session of light banter in the press box when it occurred to Smith that it would be interesting if Rogers would join them for a moment or two. So he approached Rogers, saying that they would consider it a great honor if he would visit with them. Rogers reply was scathing: "Get lost, kid!"

H. Allen Smith was an American humorist whose books were popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ...

Death and legacy

An avid booster of aviation, Rogers undertook a flight around the world with a fellow Oklahoman, world-renowned aviator Wiley Post, in the summer of 1935.[1] Post's plane, an experimental and nose-heavy hybrid of Lockheed Explorer and Orion, crashed south of Barrow, Alaska, on August 15, 1935 when its engine failed on takeoff, killing both men. Wiley Hardeman Post (November 22, 1898 – August 15, 1935) was the first pilot to fly solo around the world. ... The Lockheed SR-71 was remarkably advanced for its time and remains unsurpassed in many areas of performance. ... The Lockheed Explorer was the least successful wooden airplane design produced by the Lockheed Aircraft Company. ... The Lockheed Orion Model 9 was a single engine passenger aircraft built in 1931 for commercial airlines. ... Barrow is a city in North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ...


It may be difficult, with the passage of time, to fully comprehend the extraordinary place Rogers held in the minds and hearts of the American people at the time of his death. He was the nation's most widely read newspaper columnist, in the form of his daily "Will Rogers Says" telegrams and in his weekly column; his Sunday night half-hour radio show was the nation's most-listened-to weekly broadcast; and he had been the nation's #2 movie box office draw in 1933 (behind Marie Dressler) and #1 in 1934, ranking 2nd at the time of his death in 1935 only to Shirley Temple. The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... Marie Dressler (born November 9, 1868; died July 28, 1934) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian actress. ... Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928) is an American former child actress. ...


The outpouring of national grief at Rogers' death was said to be the greatest such national mourning since the death of Lincoln.[11]


Oklahoma honors

One of Oklahoma's two statues in the National Statuary Hall Collection, housed in the United States Capitol, is of Rogers. The work was paid for by a state appropriation and was sculpted in clay by Jo Davidson, a close friend of Rogers who he nicknamed the "headhunter" because Davidson was always looking for heads to sculpt, then cast in bronze in Brussels, Belgium. Dedicated on June 6, 1939 before a crowd of more than 2,000 people, the statue faces the floor entrance of the House of Representatives Chamber next to National Statuary Hall. The Architect of the Capitol, David Lynn, said there had never been such a large ceremony or crowd in the Capitol.[1] Part of the National Statuary Hall Collection The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Jo Davidson (March 30, 1883 - January 2, 1952) was a U.S. sculptor. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... National Statuary Hall The National Statuary Hall is an area in the United States Capitol devoted to statues of people and symbols important in American history. ... United States Capitol The Architect of the Capitol is responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the United States Supreme Court building, the United States...


Oklahoma leaders asked Rogers to represent the state as one of their two statues in the Capitol, and Rogers agreed on the condition that his image would be placed facing the House Chamber, supposedly so he could "keep an eye on Congress." Of the statues in this part of the Capitol, the Rogers sculpture is the only one facing the Chamber entrance. According to guides at the Capitol, each President rubs the left shoe of the Rogers statue for good luck before entering the House Chamber to give the State of the Union Address.[12] 2003 State of the Union address given by U.S. President George W. Bush The State of the Union Address is an annual event in which the President of the United States reports on the status of the country, normally to a joint session of the U.S. Congress (the...


Oklahoma has named many places and buildings for Rogers. His birthplace is located two miles east of Oologah, Oklahoma. The house itself was moved about ¾ mile (1.2 km) to its present location overlooking its original site when the Verdigris River valley was flooded to create Oologah Lake. The family tomb is at the Will Rogers Memorial in nearby Claremore, which stands on the site purchased by Rogers in 1911 for his retirement home. In 1944, Rogers' body was moved from a holding vault in California to the tomb; his wife Betty was interred beside him later that year upon her death. A casting of the Davidson sculpture that stands in National Statuary Hall, paid for by Davidson personally, resides at the museum. Both the birthplace and the museum are open to the public. The house at Dog Iron Ranch The Dog Iron brand, from Oklahomas Brand Book, is held in trust for the estate of Will Rogers. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer) (symbol: km) is a unit of length equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words khilia = thousand and metro = count/measure). ... The Verdigris River is a tributary of the Arkansas River in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma in the United States. ... Lake Oologah is a large man-made lake in northeastern Oklahoma. ...


Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City was named for him, as was the Will Rogers Turnpike, also known as the section of Interstate 44 between Tulsa and Joplin, Missouri. Near Vinita, Oklahoma, a statue of Rogers stands outside the west anchor of the McDonald's that spans both lanes of the interstate. Will Rogers World Airport (IATA: OKC, ICAO: KOKC) is located in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and is the primary commercial airport in Oklahoma. ... OKC redirects here. ... The Will Rogers Turnpike runs from Tulsa, Oklahoma to the Missouri state line. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 44 Interstate 44 (abbreviated I-44) is an interstate highway in the central United States. ... Joplin is a city located in parts of southern Jasper County and northern Newton County in the southwestern corner of Missouri. ... Vinita is a city in south-central Craig County, Oklahoma, United States. ... A view from the western parking lot; the statue of Will Rogers can just be seen in front of the building Self-billed as the Worlds Largest, the 29,135 ft² McDonalds that spans the Will Rogers Turnpike of I-44 near Vinita, Oklahoma is a notable example...


There are 13 public schools in Oklahoma named Will Rogers, including Will Rogers High School in Tulsa. The University of Oklahoma named the large Will Rogers Cafeteria in the student union for him, as did the Boy Scouts of America with the Will Rogers Council and the Will Rogers Scout Reservation near Cleveland. Will Rogers High School, located on 3909 E. 5th Place in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was built by Tulsa Public Schools in 1938 and designed by Joseph R. Koberling, Jr. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Oklahoma Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tulsa, Osage, Wagoner, Rogers Government  - Mayor Kathy Taylor (D) Area  - City  186. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma founded in 1890. ... The Oklahoma Memorial Union (OMU) is the University of Oklahomas student union, or student activity center. ... For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ... Life size Boy Scout bronze statue located at the entrance of the Osage County Historical Museum Scouting in Oklahoma has a long history, from the 1910s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live. ... Cleveland is a city located in Pawnee County, Oklahoma. ...


California memorials

Rogers' home, stables, and polo fields are preserved today for public enjoyment as Will Rogers State Historic Park in Pacific Palisades. His widow, Betty, willed the property to the state of California upon her death in 1944. Will Rogers Elementary School in Santa Monica is named for Rogers, as is the United States Navy submarine USS Will Rogers. A small park on Sunset Drive and Beverly in Beverly Hills was named Will Rogers Park after him. Also, a beach in Malibu was named Will Rogers Beach in his honor. Will Rogers State Historic Park is the former estate of American humorist Will Rogers. ... Pacific Palisades is a district within the U.S. city of Los Angeles, California, located between Brentwood to the east, Malibu to the west, Santa Monica to the southeast, the Santa Monica Bay to the southwest, and the Santa Monica Mountains to the north. ... For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ... USN redirects here. ... USS Will Rogers (SSBN-659), a Benjamin Franklin-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the humorist. ...


U.S. Route 66 is known as the Will Rogers Highway; a plaque dedicating the highway to the humorist is located opposite the western terminus of Route 66 in Santa Monica. Route 66 redirects here. ...


National tributes

A casting of "Into the Sunset," a statue of Rogers riding his horse Soapsuds, stands on the campus of Texas Tech University.

Rogers' eldest son, Bill, starred as his father in the 1948 biopic The Will Rogers Story. Rogers also came to life for modern audiences in the Tony Award-winning musical The Will Rogers Follies, with Keith Carradine in the lead role, and he was also portrayed by James Whitmore in the one-man show Will Rogers U.S.A. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Texas Tech University redirects here. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Will Rogers Follies is a musical about the famed humorist, Will Rogers. ... Keith Carradine (born August 8, 1949, in San Mateo, California) is an actor and Academy Award-winning songwriter born into a family of actors. ... Whitmore in The Asphalt Jungle James Allen Whitmore (born October 1, 1921) is an American film actor. ...


On November 4, 1948, the United States Post Office commemorated Rogers with a first day cover of a 3-cent stamp with his image—the inscription reads, "In honor of Will Rogers, Humorist, Claremore, Oklahoma." He was also later honored on the centennial of his birth, in 1979, with the issue of a United States Postal Service 15-cent stamp as part of the "Performing Arts" series. is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Post Office Department was the former name of the United States Postal Service when it was a Cabinet department. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ...


The Will Rogers Memorial Center was built in Fort Worth, Texas in 1936. A mural of Rogers on his horse, Soapsuds, hangs in the lobby of the coliseum, and a bust of Rogers sits in the rotunda of the Landmark Pioneer Tower. A life-size statue of Rogers on Soapsuds, titled Into the Sunset and sculpted by Electra Waggoner Biggs, resides on the lawn. A casting of Into the Sunset stands in the entrance to the main campus quad at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. The statue is the basis of several campus traditions, including the wrapping of the entire statue in red crepe paper prior to Tech home games. The back of the horse faces in the direction of College Station, Texas, home of football rival Texas A&M, though whether that was intentional is still debated[13]. A third casting resides at the Will Rogers Memorial in Claremore. Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant and Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City  298. ... Texas Tech University redirects here. ... “Lubbock” redirects here. ... College Station is a city in Brazos County, Texas, situated in Central Texas. ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ...


The Barrow, Alaska airport (BRW), located about 16 miles (26 km) from the location of their fatal airplane crash, is known as the Wiley Post-Will Rogers Memorial Airport.


Filmography

Silent films

  • Laughing Bill Hyde (1918)
  • Almost A Husband (1919)
  • Jubilo (1919)
  • Water, Water Everywhere (1919)
  • The Strange Boarder (1920)
  • Jes' Call Me Jim (1920)
  • Cupid The Cowpuncher (1920)
  • Honest Hutch (1920)
  • Guile Of Women (1920)
  • Boys Will Be Boys (1921)
  • An Unwilling Hero (1921)
  • Doubling For Romeo (1921
  • A Poor Relation (1921)
  • The Illiterate Digest (1920)
  • One Glorious Day (1922)
  • The Headless Horseman (1922)
  • The Ropin' Fool (1922
  • Fruits Of Faith (1922)
  • One Day in 365 (1922) (unreleased)
  • Hollywood (1923)
  • Hustling Hank (1923)
  • Two Wagons Both Covered (1923)
  • Jes' Passin' Through (1923)
  • Uncensored Movies (1923)
  • The Cake Eater (1924)
  • The Cowboy Sheik (1924)
  • Big Moments From Little Pictures (1924)
  • High Brow Stuff (1924)
  • Going to Congress (1924)
  • Don't Park There(1924)
  • Jubilo Jr. (1924) (part of the Our Gang series)
  • Our Congressman (1924)
  • A Truthful Liar (1924)
  • Gee Whiz Genevieve (1924)
  • Tip Toes (1927)
  • A Texas Steer (1927)

Travelog Series A poster for the 1931 Our Gang comedy Love Business featuring depictions of (from left to right): Pete the Pup, Jackie Cooper, and Norman Chubby Chaney. ...

  • In Dublin (1927)
  • In Paris (1927)
  • Hiking Through Holland (1927)
  • Roaming The Emerald Isle (1927)
  • Through Switzerland And Bavaria (1927)
  • In London (1927)
  • Hunting For Germans In Berlin (1927)
  • Prowling Around France (1927)
  • Winging Round Europe (1927)
  • Exploring England (1927)
  • Reeling Down The Rhine (1927)
  • Over The Bounding Blue (1928)

Sound films

  • They Had To See Paris (1929)
  • Happy Days (1929)
  • So This Is London (1930)
  • Lightnin' (1930)
  • Young As You Feel (1930)
  • Ambassador Bill (1930)
  • Business And Pleasure (1930)
  • A Connecticut Yankee (1931)
  • Down To Earth (1932)
  • Too Busy To Work (1932)
  • State Fair (1933)
  • Doctor Bull (1933)
  • Mr. Skitch (1933)
  • David Harum (1934)
  • Handy Andy (1934)
  • Judge Priest (1934)
  • The County Chairman
  • Life Begins At Forty (1935)
  • Doubting Thomas (1935)
  • Steamboat Round The Bend (1935)
  • In Old Kentucky (1935)

Happy Days (1929) is an 80 minute musical film, notable for being the first movie shown entirely in widescreen anywhere in the world (French director Abel Gances Napoléon (1927) had some widescreen segments). ... A state fair is a competitive and recreational gathering of a U.S. states population. ...

Bibliography

  • Will Rogers. Rogers-isms, the Cowboy Philosopher on the Peace Conference, available at Project Gutenberg.
  • Rogers, Will [1924] (1975). in Joseph A. Stout, Jr.: Rogers-isms: The Cowboy Philosopher On Prohibition. Stillwater: Oklahoma State University Press. ISBN 091495606X. 
  • Rogers, Will [1924] (March 2003). Illiterate Digest. Kessinger Publishing. ISBN 978-0766143210. 
  • Rogers, Will [1926] (1977). in Joseph A. Stout: Letters Of A Self-Made Diplomat To His President. Stillwater: Oklahoma State University Press. ISBN 0914956094. 
  • Rogers, Will (December 1982). in Steven K. Gragert: More letters of a self-made diplomat. Stillwater: Oklahoma State University Press. ISBN 9780914956228. 
  • Rogers, Will (1927). There's Not A Bathing Suit In Russia. 
  • Rogers, Will [1928] (1982). "He chews to run": Will Rogers' Life magazine articles, 1928. Stillwater: Oklahoma State University Press. ISBN 0914956205. 
  • Rogers, Will (1983). in Steven K. Gragert: Radio Broadcasts of Will Rogers. Stillwater: Oklahoma State University Press. ISBN 0914956248. 
  • The Papers of Will Rogers
    • Rogers, Will (February 1996). in Steven K. Gragert and M. Jane Johansson: The Papers of Will Rogers: The Early Years : November 1879-April 1904. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0806127453. 
    • Rogers, Will (September 2000). in Steven K. Gragert and M. Jane Johansson, eds.: Papers of Will Rogers : Wild West and Vaudeville, April 1904-September 1908, Volume Two. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0806132679. 
    • Rogers, Will (2005-09-28). in Steven K. Gragert and M. Jane Johansson: The Papers of Will Rogers: From Broadway to the National Stage, September 1915 – July 1928. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0806137049. 
    • Rogers, Will (2005-09-28). in Steven K. Gragert and M. Jane Johansson: The Papers of Will Rogers: From Broadway to the National Stage, September 1915 – July 1928. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0806137049. 
    • Rogers, Will (2006-10-31). in Steven K. Gragert and M. Jane Johansson: The Papers of Will Rogers: The Final Years, August 1928 – August 1935. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0806137681. 

Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

See also

The Will Rogers phenomenon is the apparent paradox obtained when moving an element from one set to another set raises the average values of both sets. ... Spencer Penrose tomb, taking the rather unique form of an 80-foot hilltop observation tower which overlooks the resort. ...

Further reading

  • Yagoda, Ben (April 2000). Will Rogers: A Biography. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0806132389. 

References

  1. ^ a b c Curtis, Gene. "Only in Oklahoma: Rogers statue unveiling filled U.S. Capitol", Tulsa World, 2007-06-05. Retrieved on 2007-07-21. 
  2. ^ a b c Rogers State University (2007-04-18). RSU and Will Rogers Museum to Discuss Possible Merger. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-07-20.
  3. ^ a b c Schlachtenhaufen, Mark (2007-05-31). Will Rogers grandson carries on tradition of family service. OkInsider.com. Oklahoma Publishing Company. Retrieved on 2007-07-21.
  4. ^ a b c d Adventure Marked Life of Humorist. The New York Times (1935-08-17). Retrieved on 2007-07-20.
  5. ^ Ferguson, Deborah (2003-01-10). Ferguson's Family Tree & Branches. RootsWeb. Retrieved on 2007-07-20.
  6. ^ a b c "Chewing Gum and Rope in the Temple", The New York Times, 1915-10-03, p. 90. 
  7. ^ "Give A Thought To Will", The New York Times, 1922-11-13, p. 13. 
  8. ^ "Written On The Screen", The New York Times, 1919-06-08, p. 50. 
  9. ^ Rogers, Will. "Slipping the Lariat Over (December 31, 1922)", The New York Times, 1922-12-31. 
  10. ^ Beam, Christopher; Chadwick Matlin (2007-10-23). Will Rogers: The Stephen Colbert of his time.. Slate.
  11. ^ The Story of Will Rogers, NBC Project XX
  12. ^ "Police Dept., police explorers strolls through the streets of the U.S. Capitol, stops for visits", The Anderson Independent-Mail, 2007-07-18. Retrieved on 2007-07-20. 
  13. ^ Sculpting a Tradition. Texas Tech University. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.

The Tulsa World is the daily newspaper for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is the second-most widely circulated newspaper in the state, after The Oklahoman. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rogers State University, also known as RSU, is a public university with its main campus in Claremore, and full service campuses in Bartlesville, and Pryor Creek. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Anderson Independent-Mail is the local newspaper for Anderson County in the state of South Carolina. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Texas Tech University redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Preceded by
Conrad Nagel
5th Academy Awards
Oscars host
6th Academy Awards
Succeeded by
Irvin S. Cobb
7th Academy Awards
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Will Rogers
Persondata
NAME Rogers, William Penn Adair
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Rogers, Will
SHORT DESCRIPTION American humorist and entertainer
DATE OF BIRTH November 4, 1879
PLACE OF BIRTH Oologah, Oklahoma
DATE OF DEATH August 15, 1935
PLACE OF DEATH Point Barrow, Alaska

  Results from FactBites:
 
Will Rogers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2106 words)
Will Rogers was born in Indian Territory in what would later become the state of Oklahoma.
Rogers' birthplace is open to the public and is located two miles east of Oologah, Oklahoma, on land overlooking his original ranch now covered by the reservoir Lake Oologah.
In Colorado Springs, Colorado, the Will Rogers Shrine of the Sun was erected by Spencer Penrose in 1937.
Will Rogers Follies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (232 words)
Will Rogers Follies is a musical about the famed humorist, Will Rogers.
Will Rogers Follies ran for over 900 performances and went on to win the Tony awards for Best Musical, Score, Costume and Lighting Designer, Director of a Musical, and Choreographer.
The musical starred Keith Carradine as Rogers, Dee Hoty as Betty Blake, his wife and Dick Latessa as Clarence Rogers, Will's father and the voice of Gregory Peck as Florenz Ziegfeld.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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