FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Wilfrid" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Wilfrid

Wilfrid (c. 634 - April 24, 709) was an English archbishop and saint. Events The Arabs invade Palestine. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... Events Saelred becomes king of Essex Ceolred becomes king of Mercia after his cousin Cenred abdicates to become a monk in Rome A storm separates the Channel Islands of Jethou and Herm Births Emperor Konin of Japan Deaths May 25 - Aldhelm, bishop and scholar Categories: 709 ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Inter. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ...


He was born of good parentage in Northumbria. When serving in King Oswiu's court, he attracted the notice of the queen, Eanfled who, fostering his inclination for a religious life, placed him under the care of an old noble, Cudda, now a monk at Lindisfarne. Later on Eanfled enabled him to visit Rome in the company of Benedict Biscop. At Lyons Wilfrid's pleasing features and quick intelligence made Annemund, the archbishop, desire to adopt him and marry him to his niece. Resisting his offers, the youth went on to Rome, received the papal benediction, and then, in accordance with his promise, returned to Lyons, where he stayed for three years, till the murder of his patron, whose fate the executioners would not let him share. On his return home in 658, Oswiu's son Alchfrith gave him a monastery at Ripon, and, before long, Agilbert, bishop of the Gewissae, or West Saxons, ordained him priest. Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of an Anglian kingdom which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, and of the much smaller earldom which succeeded the kingdom. ... Oswiu (612–February 15, 670), also written as Oswio, Oswy, and Osuiu was an Anglo-Saxon Bretwalda. ... Saint Eanfled or Eanfleda (626-685?) was the daughter of Edwin, king of Northumbria. ... A Roman Catholic monk A monk is a person who practices monasticism, adopting a strict religious and ascetic lifestyle, usually in community with others following the same path. ... This article is about Lindisfarne, England. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... Benedict Biscop (628?-690), also known as Biscop Baducing, English churchman, was born of a good Northumbrian family and was for a time a thegn of King Oswiu. ... Lyons), see Lyons (disambiguation). ... The pope is the Catholic Patriarch and Bishop of Rome, and leader of the Catholic Church. ... A benediction is a short invocation for divine help, blessing and guidance, usually after a church worship service. ... Events The union of Slavic tribes falls apart after Samos death Births Deaths King Samo of the Slavs Categories: 658 ... A monastery is the habitation of monks, derived from the Greek word for a hermits cell. ... Map sources for Ripon at grid reference SE3171 Ripon is a cathedral city in North Yorkshire, England, 214 miles NNW from London. ... Gewissae was a tribal grouping of the Upper Thames region of England which formed the basis of the kingdom of Wessex. ... This article is about the Saxons, a Germanic people. ...


He was probably already regarded as the leading exponent of the Roman discipline in England when his speech at the council of Whitby determined the overthrow of the Celtic party (664). About a year later he was consecrated to the see of York, not, however, in Northumbria, since he refused consecration at the hands of the Celtic Church, but at Compiègne, Agilbert being now bishop of Paris. On his return journey he narrowly escaped the pagan wreckers of Sussex, and only reached his own country to find Ceadda (St Chad) installed in his see. The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the Christian Church whose visible and spiritual head is the Pope, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It teaches that it is the one holy catholic and apostolic Church founded by Jesus Christ, and that the sole Church of Christ which... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Inter. ... The Synod of Whitby was an important synod which eventually led to the unification of the church in Britain. ... This article is about the ancient form of Christianity that existed in the British Isles until outlawed at the Synod of WhitbyCitation needed in 664 because of its competition with the Roman form of Christianity. ... Events September, Synod of Whitby Births Deaths Xuanzang, famous Chinese Buddhist monk. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... York is a city in northern England, at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss. ... Compi gne is a commune in the Oise d partement of France, of which it is a sous-pr fecture. ... The archbishop of Paris is one of twenty-three archbishops in France. ... Within a Christian context, paganism (from Latin paganus) and heathenry are catch-all terms which have come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion, as opposed to the Abrahamic religions based on scriptures. ... The Kingdom of Sussex, (Suth Seaxe, i. ... Chad of Mercia (died March 2, 672) was a monk and priest in 7th century England. ...


The rest of his life is largely a record of wandering and misfortune. For three years (665 - 668) he ruled his monastery at Ripon in peace, though acting as bishop in Mercia and Kent during vacancies in sees there. On the arrival of Theodore in 669, newly appointed Archbishop of Canterbury, he was restored to his see, and there spent nine years of ceaseless activity, especially in building churches. Events Swithelm succeeded by Sighere and Sebbi as king(s) of Essex Seongnam renamed Hansanju. ... Events Childeric II succeeds Clotaire III as Frankish king Constantine IV becomes Byzantine Emperor, succeeding Constans II Theodore of Tarsus made archbishop of Canterbury. ... Mercia, sometimes spelled Mierce, was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy, in what is now England, in the region of the Midlands, with its heart in the valley of the River Trent and its tributary streams. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... Theodore (602–September 19, 690) was the eighth archbishop of Canterbury. ... Events Theodore appointed Archibishop of Canterbury Births Justinian II, Byzantine emperor Deaths Hasan ibn Ali, grandson of Muhammad and second Shia Imam Categories: 669 ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ...


In 677, Archbishop Theodore divided Wilfrid's diocese. Wilfrid appealed and went to Rome in 679. Pope Agatho held a synod (October, 679) where he ordered his restoration. Wilfrid must have been in Austrasia at this time, because according to his biographer Eddius Stephanus, Wilfrid left Austrasia after the death of Dagobert II, in mortal danger from the supporters of Duke Ebrion. In 686, Wilfred was finally recalled to York. // Events Battle of Syllaeum: Arab fleet destroyed by Byzantines Tang China declares the deposed King Bojang of Goguryeo King of Joseon, placing him in charge of the Liaodong area under the Protectorate General to Pacify the East. ... Events Adamnan becomes abbot of the monastery on Iona. ... Agatho (born 577?, died 10 January 681) was pope from 678 to 681. ... Austrasia & Neustria Austrasia was the northeastern portion of the Kingdom of the Merovingian Franks, comprising parts of what are now eastern France, western Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands. ... Eddius (Æddi) was a Kentish choirmaster recruited by bishop Wilfrid (c. ... Dagobert II the Young (ca 650 – December 23, 679) was a Frankish king, the son of Sigebert III, one of the rois-fainéants (do-nothing kings) and the last Merovingian king of Austrasia. ... Events October 21 - Conon becomes Pope, succeeding Pope John V. Empress Jito ascends to the throne of Japan Kingdom of Kent attacked and conquered by West Saxons under Caedwalla Births August 23 - Charles Martel, winner of the Battle of Tours Deaths Emperor Temmu of Japan Korean Buddhist monk Weonhyo See...


King Ecgfrith refused to obey the demand to restore Wilfrid and imprisoned him. After this, he took refuge in Sussex. Ecgfrith (645–May 20, 685) was the King of Northumbria from 670 until his death. ...


In 691, the subdivision issue arose once more, and Wilfrid left the area for the midlands. In 703, he resigned his post as bishop, and retired to the monastery at Ripon, where he lived in prayer and penitence until his death at Oundle, Northamptonshire, in 709. Events The building of the Dome of the Rock is completed People Theuderic III succeeded by Clovis III Wilfrid, Bishop of Northumbria, expelled to Mercia See also Unterseeboot 691 Categories: 691 ... Events Births Deaths Empress Jito of Japan In Other Fields 703 is the area code for telephone numbers in the Northern Virginia region of the United States. ... Map sources for Oundle at grid reference TL0388 Oundle is an ancient market town on the River Nene in Northamptonshire, England, with a population of 5,345 (2001 census). ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... Events Saelred becomes king of Essex Ceolred becomes king of Mercia after his cousin Cenred abdicates to become a monk in Rome A storm separates the Channel Islands of Jethou and Herm Births Emperor Konin of Japan Deaths May 25 - Aldhelm, bishop and scholar Categories: 709 ...


His feast day is October 12. October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ...

Preceded by:
Chad of Mercia
Bishop of York
664–678
Succeeded by:
Bosa of York

Chad of Mercia (Anglo-Saxon: Ceadda, pronounced chadda) (died March 2, 672) was a monk and priest in 7th century England. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Bosa was a Northumbrian, educated at the great Abbey of Whitby under St. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wilfrid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (491 words)
At Lyons Wilfrid's pleasing features and quick intelligence made Annemund, the archbishop, desire to adopt him and marry him to his niece.
Wilfrid appealed and went to Rome in 679.
Wilfrid must have been in Austrasia at this time, because according to his biographer Eddius Stephanus, Wilfrid left Austrasia after the death of Dagobert II, in mortal danger from the supporters of Duke Ebrion.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Wilfrid (1371 words)
Chiefly owing to Wilfrid's advocacy of the claims of the Holy See the votes of the majority were given to that side, and Colman and his monks, bitterly disappointed, withdrew from Northumbria.
Wilfrid, in consequence of the favours he had then obtained, was elected bishop in Colman's place, and, refusing to receive consecration from the northern bishops, whom he regarded as schismatics, went over to France to be consecrated at Compiègne.
Wilfrid was to return to York, and since subdivision of his diocese was needed, he was to appoint others as his coadjutors.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m