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Encyclopedia > Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner
Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner
Wile E. Coyote (left) and the Roadrunner (right) in Adventures of the Road-Runner.
First appearance Fast and Furry-ous (September 16, 1949)
Created by Chuck Jones
Voiced by Wile E. Coyote: Mel Blanc (until his death in 1989)
Joe Alaskey (Tiny Toons Adventures)
Dee Bradley Baker (Duck Dodgers)
Maurice LaMarche (current)
The Road Runner: Paul Julian (1949 to 1995)
Dee Bradley Baker (current)

Wile E. Coyote (also known simply as "The Coyote") and the Road Runner are cartoon characters from a series of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons, created by Chuck Jones in 1948 for Warner Brothers. The E never refers to a name within the context of the cartoon, but a 1975 comic has it standing for 'Ethelbert'. Chuck Jones based the character of the coyote on Mark Twain's Roughing It, in which Twain describes the coyote as "a long, slim, sick and sorry-looking skeleton" that is "a living, breathing allegory of Want. He is always hungry." Twain also notes that despite his poor appearance, the coyote is so fast that if threatened, by the time you have aimed your rifle "nothing but an unusually long-winded streak of lightning could reach him where he is now." Wile E. has brown fur, wiry body, huge ears and black nose. Wile E. speaks in the cartoons in which he battles Bugs Bunny, but otherwise he speaks rarely. In those he has an upper-class English accent and an egotistical bearing. The Road Runner has dark blue and dark lavender feathers. Wile E. was voiced by Mel Blanc and the Road Runner by Paul Julian. One point of view is that Chuck Jones' Coyote is an example of a 'cartoon actor' that plays multiple roles - The Coyote, Wile E. Coyote, and Ralph Wolf. Image File history File links Tobeepornottobeep. ... Adventures of the Road-Runner is an animated film, directed by Chuck Jones and co-directed by Maurice Noble and Tom Ray. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Fast and Furry-ous is a 1948 Warner Bros. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An animator is one who is involved in the process of animation. ... Chuck Jones in 1976 Charles Martin Chuck Jones (September 21, 1912 – February 22, 2002) was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Bros. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Melvin Jerome Blanc (May 30, 1908 – July 10, 1989) was a prolific American voice actor. ... Joe Alaskey (born May 26, 1949 in Watervliet, New York) is credited as one of the successors (including Billy West) of the great Mel Blanc in impersonating the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and other characters from Warner Bros. ... Tiny Toon Adventures is an animated television series created by the Warner Bros. ... Dee Bradley Baker was born August 31, 1962 [1] in Indiana. ... Duck Dodgers is the fictional star of a series of cartoons produced by Warner Bros. ... Maurice LaMarche (born March 30, 1958 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian voice actor and former stand up comedian. ... Paul Julian (June 25, 1914 - September 5, 1995) was an American artist and designer most noted for his work as a background artist for Warner Brothers Looney Tunes cartoon shorts. ... Dee Bradley Baker was born August 31, 1962 [1] in Indiana. ... A fictional character is any person who appears in a work of fiction. ... Looney Tunes opening title Looney Tunes is a Warner Brothers animated cartoon series which ran in many movie theatres from 1930 to 1969. ... Merrie Melodies end title Merrie Melodies is the name of a series of animated cartoons distributed by Warner Bros. ... Chuck Jones in 1976 Charles Martin Chuck Jones (September 21, 1912 – February 22, 2002) was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Bros. ... Warner Bros. ... Roughing It is a semi-non-fiction work written by American author Mark Twain. ... Melvin Jerome Blanc (May 30, 1908 – July 10, 1989) was a prolific American voice actor. ... Paul Julian (June 25, 1914 - September 5, 1995) was an American artist and designer most noted for his work as a background artist for Warner Brothers Looney Tunes cartoon shorts. ... Chuck Jones in 1976 Charles Martin Chuck Jones (September 21, 1912 – February 22, 2002) was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Bros. ...


Chuck Jones once said of his most famous protagonist and antagonist that "Wile E. is my reality, Bugs Bunny is my goal." He originally created the Road Runner cartoons as a parody of traditional "cat and mouse" cartoons (such as Tom and Jerry) which were increasingly popular at the time. The major difference is that the audience's sympathy is drawn to Wile E., a comically ineffectual predator whose hunts always end in disaster. Chuck Jones in 1976 Charles Martin Chuck Jones (September 21, 1912 – February 22, 2002) was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Bros. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... For other uses, see Antagonist (disambiguation). ... Bugs Bunny is an animated rabbit who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ...

Contents

Premise

The Road Runner
Wile E. Coyote

The shorts are simple in their premise: a Road Runner (loosely based on a real bird, the Greater Roadrunner) is chased down the highways of the Southwestern United States by a hungry coyote named Wile E. Coyote, a pun on "wily coyote". Image File history File links Roadrunner. ... Image File history File links Roadrunner. ... Image File history File links Wileecoyote. ... Image File history File links Wileecoyote. ... Binomial name Geococcyx californianus (Lesson, 1829) The Greater Roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus) is a large, long-legged bird in the cuckoo family, Cuculidae. ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pun (disambiguation). ...


Despite numerous clever attempts, the coyote practically never catches or kills the Road Runner. All of his elaborate schemes backfire, end up injuring him in humorous instances of highly exaggerated cartoon slapstick violence. While Wile E. is the aggressor in the series, he and his hopelessly futile efforts are the focus of the audience's sympathy as well as virtually all of the humor. Wile E. seems doomed, like Sisyphus, forever to try but never to succeed. For other uses, see Slapstick (disambiguation). ... For the genus of dung beetle, see Sisyphus (beetle). ...


There is almost never any "spoken" communication, save the Road Runner's "beep-beep" (which actually sounds more like "mheep-mheep") and the Road Runner sticking out his tongue (which sounds like someone patting the opening of a glass bottle with the palm of their hand - how sound effects expert Treg Brown produced it[citation needed]), but the two characters do sometimes communicate by holding up signs to each other, the audience, or the cartoonist. Wile E. Coyote also shouts from pain on at least one occasion, and wiggles his eyebrows at the audience when feeling particularly pleased with himself (and therefore, usually, just before a catastrophe). Beep-beep is an onomatopoeia sound most commonly associated with the Road Runner in the Looney Tunes cartoons featuring the speedy-yet-flightless bird and his constant pursuer, Wile E. Coyote. ... The fourth wall is the imaginary invisible wall at the front of the stage in a proscenium theater, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ...


The Road Runner's personality is less developed, and consequently the audience lacks a context for empathy or identification with him. He is cheeky and seems to show satisfaction in defying the schemes of the Coyote, and the timing of some of the instances when he comes up behind the coyote with a surprise "beep-beep" is nothing less than sadistic - but the majority of the time he is just a running object in the distance.


Wile E. Coyote later appeared in some Bugs Bunny shorts, and much later in some of the "Little Beeper" cartoons on Tiny Toon Adventures. In the Bugs Bunny shorts, he calls himself a "super genius" ("Operation: Rabbit", 1952; his first speaking appearance, and his first appearance in which he is called "Wile E. Coyote"); in another cartoon he claims an IQ of 207 ("Zip Zip Hooray!", 1965). Bugs Bunny is an animated rabbit who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... Little Beeper is a fictional character from Tiny Toon Adventures. ... Steven Spielberg Presents Tiny Toon Adventures (also known as Tiny Toon Adventures or Tiny Toons) is an American animated television series created and produced as a collaborative effort between Steven Spielberg and Warner Bros. ... IQ redirects here. ...


Signature "Beep"

Zoom and Bored

The source of the Road Runner's "Beep-Beep" was background painter Paul Julian, who worked for Friz Freleng's unit. His identity was a mystery for many years, but was confirmed by Jones' primary gag writer Michael Maltese and Julian himself in the DVD commentary for the short "Fast and Furry-ous" on Looney Tunes Golden Collection Volume 1.[1] Image File history File links Zoomandbored-roadrunner. ... Image File history File links Zoomandbored-roadrunner. ... Paul Julian (June 25, 1914 - September 5, 1995) was an American artist and designer most noted for his work as a background artist for Warner Brothers Looney Tunes cartoon shorts. ... Isadore Friz Freleng (August 21, 1906[1]–May 26, 1995) was an animator, cartoonist, director, and producer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons from Warner Bros. ... Michael Maltese (February 6, 1908 - February 22, 1981) was born on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York. ... A major selling point of DVD video is that its storage capacity allows for a wide variety of extra features in addition to the feature film itself. ... Fast and Furry-ous is a 1948 Warner Bros. ... The Looney Tunes Golden Collection is a yearly series of four-disc DVD box sets from Warner Bros. ...


Julian first made the noise around the Warner Bros. lot (imitating a car horn) as a lighthearted means of getting people out of his way when he was in a hurry. At the producers' request, Julian performed several variations of the sound at a single recording session. Editor Treg Brown then sped up and looped some of them to make even more versions. Tregoweth Treg Brown (November 4, 1899–April 1984) was a motion picture sound editor who was responsible for the sound effects in Warner Bros. ...


The use of a staff member to perform a voice caused a rift with the performers' union. Chuck Jones was forced to agree that, for all future recording sessions, an accredited actor would be used. He got around this by simply reusing Julian's initial recording (and Brown's variants) in all future Road Runner cartoons. A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers. ...


Because of the union problems, the studio refused to acknowledge the real voice of the Road Runner for decades. Many sources erroneously claimed that Mel Blanc performed the character. Blanc, in his autobiography That's Not All Folks!, claimed that a klaxon horn was used in the first short, but that he personally took over the role when that prop later came up missing. Melvin Jerome Blanc (May 30, 1908 – July 10, 1989) was a prolific American voice actor. ... Audio sample: Klaxon (file info) — A sample of a submarine dive klaxon used by United States Navy submarines during World War II Problems listening to the file? See media help. ...


Blanc's account had long been questioned by animation buffs since the Road Runner noise never sounded like an ordinary klaxon and there was no reason the original soundtrack couldn't have been reused or a replacement horn found.


A non-vocal effect was used to make the noise produced when the Road Runner flicks his tongue at the Coyote. In an interview in the above-referenced DVD commentary, Treg Brown revealed one of his assistants created the hollow sound by sticking his thumb into an empty glass bottle and pulling it out rapidly. The Foley artist on a film crew is the person who creates and records many of the sound effects, (thesedays many often associate the Foley artist with the job of capturing the natural/everyday sounds leaving the the role of special (audio-) effects to the Sound_designer. ...


List of episodes

The series consists in 45 shorts (6-7 min.), 1 short film (26 min.), and 3 Webtoons (2-3 min.).

# Release date Title Duration Road Runner
(Geococcyx californianus)
Wile E. Coyote
(Canis latrans)
01 September 161949 Fast and Furry-ous 6:55 Accelleratii Incredibus Carnivorous Vulgaris
02 May 24, 1952 Beep, Beep 6:45 Accelerati Incredibilus Carnivorous Vulgaris
03 August 23, 1952 Going! Going! Gosh! 6:25 Acceleratti Incredibilus Carnivorous Vulgaris
04 September 14, 1953 Zipping Along 6:55 Velocitus Tremenjus Road-Runnerus Digestus
05 August 14, 1954 Stop! Look! And Hasten!! 7:00 Hot-Roddicus Supersonicus Eatibus Anythingus
06 April 30, 1955 Ready, Set, Zoom! 6:55 Speedipus Rex Famishus-Famishus
07 December 10, 1955 Guided Muscle 6:40 Velocitus Delectiblus Eatibus Almost Anythingus
08 May 05, 1956 Gee Whiz-z-z-z 6:35 Delicius-Delicius Eatius Birdius
09 November 10, 1956 There They Go-Go-Go! 6:35 Dig-Outius Tid-Bittius Famishius Fantasticus
10 January 26, 1957 Scrambled Aches 6:50 Tastyus Supersonicus Eternalii Famishiis
11 September 04, 1957 Zoom and Bored 6:15 Birdibus Zippibus Famishus Vulgarus
12 April 12, 1958 Whoa, Be Gone! 6:10 Birdius High-Ballius Famishius Vulgaris Ingeniusi
13 October 11, 1958 Hook, Line and Stinker 5:55 Burnius-Roadibus Famishius-Famishius
14 December 06, 1958 Hip Hip-Hurry! 6:00 Digoutius-Unbelieveus Eatius-Slobbius
15 May 09, 1959 Hot-Rod and Reel! 6:25 Super-Sonicus-Tonicus Famishius-Famishius
16 October 10, 1959 Wild About Hurry 6:45 Batoutahelius Hardheadipus Oedipus
17 January 19, 1960 Fastest with The Mostest 7:20 Velocitus Incalculus Carnivorous Slobbius
18 October 08, 1960 Hopalong Casualty 6:05 Speedipus-Rex Hard-Headipus Ravenus
19 January 21, 1961 Zip 'N' Snort 5:50 Digoutius-Hot-Rodis Evereadii Eatibus
20 June 03, 1961 Lickety-Splat 6:20 Fastius Tasty-us Apetitius Giganticus
21 November 11, 1961 Beep Prepared 4:20 Tid-Bittius Velocitus Hungrii Flea-Bagius
22 June 30, 1962 Zoom at the Top 6:30 Disappearialis Quickius Overconfidentii Vulgaris
Film June 2, 1962 Adventures of the Road-Runner 26:00 Super-Sonnicus Idioticus Desertous-operativus Idioticus
23 December 28, 1963 To Beep or Not to Beep* 6:35 None None
24 June 06, 1964 War and Pieces 6:40 Burn-em Upus Asphaltus Caninus Nervous Rex
25 1965 Zip Zip Hooray* 6:15 None None
26 1965 Road Runner A-Go-Go* 6:05 None None
27 February 27, 1965 The Wild Chase 6:30 None None
28 July 31, 1965 Rushing Roulette 6:20 None None
29 August 21, 1965 Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner 6:00 None None
30 September 18, 1965 Tired and Feathered 6:20 None None
31 October 09, 1965 Boulder Wham! 6:30 None None
32 October 30, 1965 Just Plane Beep 6:45 None None
33 November 13, 1965 Hairied and Hurried 6:45 None None
34 December 11, 1965 Highway Runnery 6:45 None None
35 December 25, 1965 Chaser On the Rocks 6:45 None None
36 January 08, 1966 Shot and Bothered 6:30 None None
37 January 29, 1966 Out and Out Rout 6:00 None None
38 February 19, 1966 The Solid Tin Coyote 6:15 None None
39 March 12, 1966 Clippety Clobbered 6:15 None None
40 November 05, 1966 Sugar and Spies 6:20 None None
41 November 27, 1979 Freeze Frame 6:05 Semper Food-Ellus Grotesques Appetitus
42 May 21, 1980 Soup or Sonic 9:10 Ultra-Sonicus Ad Infinitum Nemesis Riduclii
43 December 21, 1994 Chariots of Fur 7:00 Boulevardius Burnupius Dogius Ignoramius
44 2000 Little Go Beep 7:55 Morselus Babyfatious Tastius Poor Schinookius
45 November 1, 2003 The Whizzard of Ow TBD Geococcyx californianus Canis latrans
Web Unknown Judge Granny Case 2** [1] TBD Birdius Tastius Poultrius Devourius
Web Unknown Wild Kingdumb** [2] TBD Birdus Tastius Poultrius Devourius
Web Unknown Wile E. Coyote Ugly** [3] TBD None None

* Part of the animated film Adventures of the Road-Runner This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Events A Roman army of 90,000 men commanded by Germanicus gains a victory at Idistaviso, defeating the German war chief Arminius and capturing his wife Thusnelda, and recovering the lost eagles of Varus legions. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fast and Furry-ous is a 1948 Warner Bros. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beep, Beep is a 1952 Warner Bros. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Going! Going! Gosh! is a 1952 Warner Bros. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Zipping Along is a 1953 Warner Bros. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stop! Look! And Hasten! is a 1954 Warner Bros. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Ready, Set, Zoom! is a 1955 Warner Bros. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Guided Muscle is a 1955 Warner Bros. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gee Whiz-z-z-z is a 1956 Warner Bros. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... There They Go-Go-Go! is a 1956 Warner Bros. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Scrambled Aches is a 1957 Warner Bros. ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Zoom and Bored is a 1957 Warner Bros. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Whoa, Be-Gone! is a 1958 Warner Bros. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hook, Line and Stinker is a 1958 Warner Bros. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hip Hip-Hurry! is a 1958 Warner Bros. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wild About Hurry is a 1959 Warner Bros. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hopalong Casualty is a 1960 Warner Brothers Merrie Melodies theatrical animated short, featuring the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beep Prepared is a Warner Brothers Merrie Melodies theatrical cartoon short released in 1961. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Zoom at the Top is a Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoon. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Adventures of the Road-Runner is an animated film, directed by Chuck Jones and co-directed by Maurice Noble and Tom Ray. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... To Beep or Not to Beep (an obvious play on the most famous line in Shakespeares Hamlet) is a 1963 animated short featuring Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... War and Pieces is a Warner Bros. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... The Wild Chase is a Looney Tunes short in which Sylvester and Wile E. Coyote are paired against Speedy Gonzales and the Road Runner. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Run, Run Sweet Roadrunner is an animated cartoon in the Looney Tunes series released by Warner Bros. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in Leap years). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... The Solid Tin Coyote is a cartoon featuring Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Freeze Frame is a 1979 animated cartoon which features Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Chariots of Fur is a six-minute Looney Tunes short released in 1994. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Adventures of the Road-Runner is an animated film, directed by Chuck Jones and co-directed by Maurice Noble and Tom Ray. ...


** Webtoon (looneytunes.warnerbros.com)


It is also noted that in Soup or Sonic, the "Beep-beep" of the Road Runner is referred to as beepus-beepus.


In Stop! Look! and Hasten!, Wile E. follows the instructions in a manual titled How to Build a Burmese Tiger Trap. Hearing the trap activated, he leaps in and immediately withdraws, panicked, because instead of the Road Runner he has caught an actual Burmese tiger, who is identified as such and given the pseudo-Latin name Surprisibus surprisibus. For other uses, see Tiger (disambiguation). ...


Scenery

The desert scenery in the first two Road Runner cartoons, Fast and Furry-ous (1949) and Beep Beep (mid 1952), was designed by Robert Gribbroek and was quite realistic. In most later cartoons the scenery was designed by Maurice Noble and was far more abstract. Several different styles were used. In The Wild Chase (1965), featuring a race between the Road Runner and Speedy Gonzales, it is stated that the Road Runner is from Texas, insofar as the race announcer calls him the "Texas Road Burner." This suggests that most of the Wile E. and Road Runner cartoons could take place in Texas. Screenshot from Zoom and Bored This work is copyrighted. ... Screenshot from Zoom and Bored This work is copyrighted. ... Zoom and Bored is a 1957 Warner Bros. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Gribbroek was a layout artist and background painter at the Warner Brothers Cartoon studio from 1945 until 1964. ... Maurice Noble (1911-2001)[1] was an American animation background artist and layout designer whose contributions to the industry spanned more than 60 years. ... For the Speedy Gonzales song, see Pat Boone. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


In Going! Going! Gosh! (late 1952) through Guided Muscle (late 1955) the scenery was 'semi-realistic' with an offwhite sky (possibly suggesting overcast/cloudy weather condition). Gravity-defying rock formations appeared in Ready, Set, Zoom! (early 1955). A bright yellow sky made its debut in Gee Whiz-z-z-z! (early 1956) but was not used consistently until There They Go-Go-Go!, later in the same year.


Zoom and Bored (late 1957) introduced a major change in background style. Sharp, top-heavy rock formations became more prominent, and warm colours (yellow, orange and red) were favoured. Bushes were crescent-shaped. Except for Whoa Be-Gone (early 1958), whose scenery design harked back to Guided Muscle in certain aspects (such as off-white sky), this style of scenery was retained as far as Fastest with the Mostest (early 1960). Hopalong Casualty (mid 1960) changed the colour scheme, with the sky reverting to blue, and some rocks becoming off-white, while the bright yellow desert sand colour is retained, along with the 'sharp' style of rock formations pioneered by Zoom and Bored. The crescent shapes used for bushes starting with Zoom and Bored were retained, and also applied to clouds. In the last scene of War and Pieces (1964), Wile E. Coyote's rocket blasts him through the center of the Earth to China, which is portrayed with abstract Oriental backgrounds. This scene features a Chinese Road Runner. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... War and Pieces is a Warner Brothers Merrie Melodies theatrical animated short which was released in 1964. ... The term the Orient - literally meaning sunrise, east - is traditionally used to refer to Near, Middle, and Far Eastern countries. ...


The Format Films cartoons used a style of scenery similar to Hopalong Casualty and its successors, albeit less detailed and with small puffy clouds rather than crescent-shaped ones.


Freeze Frame, a made-for-television short originally shown as part of the 1979 CBS special Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales, depicts the Road Runner taking a turn that leads the chase into mountains and across a wintery landscape of ice and snow.


The Acme Corporation

Main article: Acme Corporation
Gee Whiz-z-z-z
Gee Whiz-z-z-z

Wile E. Coyote often obtains complex and ludicrous devices from a mail-order company, the fictitious Acme Corporation, which he hopes will help him catch the Road Runner. The devices invariably fail in improbable and spectacular ways (see Rube Goldberg machine). Whether this is result of operator error or faulty merchandise is debatable. The coyote usually ends up burnt to a crisp, squashed flat, or at the bottom of a canyon (some cartoons show him suffering a combination of these fates). Occasionally Acme products do work quite well (e.g. the Rocket Sled, Jet Powered Roller Skates); the problem then for the coyote is the products stop working at the worst possible time. The Acme Corporation (sometimes made a backronym to: A Company (that) Makes Everything - though this is in dispute) is a fictional corporation that exists in the Looney Tunes universe. ... Image File history File links Geewhizz-batman. ... Image File history File links Geewhizz-batman. ... Gee Whiz-z-z-z is a 1956 Warner Bros. ... The Acme Corporation (sometimes made a backronym to: A Company (that) Makes Everything - though this is in dispute) is a fictional corporation that exists in the Looney Tunes universe. ... A Rube Goldberg machine performs a simple task in a complex way. ... Grand Canyon, Arizona Noravank Monastery complex and canyon in Armenia. ...


How the coyote acquires these Acme products without any money is not explained until the 2003 movie Looney Tunes: Back in Action, in which he is shown to be an employee of Acme. In a Tiny Toon Adventures episode, Wile E. makes mention of his protege Calamity Coyote possessing an unlimited Acme credit card account, which might serve as another possible explanation. Wile E. being a "beta tester" for Acme has been another suggested explanation. Wile E. also uses war equipment such as cannons, rocket launchers, grenades, and bayonets which are "generic", not Acme products. In a Cartoon Network commercial promoting Looney Tunes, they ask the Coyote why does he insist on purchasing products from the Acme Corporation when all previous contraptions have backfired on him, to which the Coyote responds with a wooden sign (right after another item blows up in his face): "Good line of Credit". Looney Tunes: Back in Action was a 2003 Warner Bros. ... Calamity Calamity Coyote is a fictional anthropomorphic coyote and a cartoon character, who appeared on the early 1990s series Tiny Toon Adventures. ... Look up credit card in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In software engineering, development stage terminology expresses how far through the development sequence things have progressed and how much further development a product may require. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ...


The company name was likely chosen for its irony (acme means the highest point, as of achievement or development). The common expansion A (or American) Company that Makes (or Making) Everything is a backronym. The origin of the name might also be related to the Acme company that built a fine line of animation stands and optical printers; however, the most likely explanation is the Sears house brand called Acme that appeared in their ubiquitous early 1900s mail-order catalogues. Ironic redirects here. ... A backronym (or bacronym) is a phrase that is constructed after the fact from a previously existing abbreviation, the abbreviation being an initialism or an acronym. ...


Laws and rules

As in other cartoons, the Road Runner and the coyote follow the laws of cartoon physics. For example, the Road Runner has the ability to enter the painted image of a cave, while the coyote cannot (unless there is an opening through which he can fall). Sometimes the coyote is allowed to hang in midair until he realizes that he is about to plummet into a chasm (a process occasionally referred to elsewhere as Road-Runnering). The coyote can overtake rocks which fall before he does, and end up being squashed by them. Cartoon physics is a joking reference to the fact that animation allows regular laws of physics to be ignored in humorous ways for dramatic effects. ... [[: Le Image:Mural de Narbonne. ...


In his book, Chuck Amuck, Chuck Jones explains some of the rules the writers and artists followed in making the Coyote-Road Runner series: Chuck Jones in 1976 Charles Martin Chuck Jones (September 21, 1912 – February 22, 2002) was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Bros. ...

  1. The Road Runner cannot harm the coyote except by going "Beep-beep!" This rule has been violated. For example, in Going! Going! Gosh! the coyote is run over by a truck and we see that the Road Runner is in the driver's seat. The last scene of Fast and Furry-ous has a bus running over Wile E. Coyote. Also, in Rushing Roulette, Wile E. is hit by a bus that is driven by Road Runner. In a more recent cartoon, The Whizzard of Ow, the Road Runner uses Wile's Acme Magic tools to turn everything against him.
  2. No outside force can harm the coyote—only his own ineptitude or the running failure of the Acme products. (This rule was broken once.)
  3. The coyote can stop any time—if he were not a fanatic. (Repeat: "A fanatic is one who redoubles his effort when he has forgotten his aim."—George Santayana; this quote appears on a promotional poster featuring the duo, with the quote appearing in Burma Shave-style clips on signs amid Road Runner's air wake)
  4. There may be no dialogue ever, except "beep-beep!" The coyote may, however, speak to the audience occasionally, through wooden signs that he holds up. (Actually, this rule was broken numerous times through the agonized screams and yelps that came from being damaged by his own products, and him pointing out verbally that he is carrying quick-drying cement when he is planning to stop the Road Runner in his tracks. In Zoom at the Top, there are two violations: the term "HA-HA!" as he takes cover behind a boulder, and the normal-voiced "ouch" after a bear trap snaps on him with a single drop of oil. The Coyote speaks normally in some appearances with Bugs Bunny, but usually the only communications between the Coyote and the Road Runner are written on signs. As a gag, the Road Runner once holds a sign reading "Road Runners can't read". In Road Runner A-Go-Go and Zip Zip Hooray the Coyote breaks the fourth wall and speaks extensively to the audience describing why he chases the Road Runner, but these were cobbled from parts of the 1962 theatrical featurette, The Adventures of the Road Runner, which is outside the main series--Jones' name is not on these shorts.)
  5. The Road Runner must stay on the road—otherwise, logically, he would not be called "Road Runner". (This rule was broken, too.)
  6. All action must be confined to the natural environment of the two characters—the southwest American desert. (This rule was broken in Freeze Frame, 1979.)
  7. All materials, tools, weapons, or mechanical conveniences must be obtained from the Acme Corporation. (This rule was also broken...Wile E. Coyote once used a box in Beep, Beep labeled "Harris Soup" to set up a prop glass of water rigged to ignite dynamite once lifted. He has also used "Ajax Bird Seed".)
  8. Whenever possible, gravity should be made the coyote's greatest enemy.
  9. The coyote is always more humiliated than harmed by his failures.

There was also a tenth and more unofficial rule: Going! Going! Gosh! is a 1952 Warner Bros. ... Fast and Furry-ous is a 1948 Warner Bros. ... George Santayana George Santayana (December 16, 1863, Madrid – September 26, 1952, Rome), was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. ... Burma-Shave was a United States brand of brushless shaving cream famous for its advertising gimmick of posting humorous rhyming poems on sequential highway billboard signs. ... Zoom at the Top is a Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoon. ... The fourth wall is the imaginary invisible wall at the front of the stage in a proscenium theater, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. ... Freeze Frame is the twelfth album by American rock band J. Geils Band, released in 1981 (see 1981 in music). ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ...

  • The sympathy of the audience must lie with the coyote.

The 11th rule stated that the Coyote is never allowed to catch the Road Runner. Otherwise, in one cartoon episode, spoken by one of the kids: "There would be no more Road Runner". The rules were not always followed. Sometimes the episode is concluded with Wile E. being flattened by a truck (with the Road Runner grinning from the rear window). In Going! Going! Gosh! the Road Runner is in the driver's seat. In the 1962 two-reel theatrical short Adventures of the Road-Runner, Wile E. Coyote actually speaks dialogue as he lectures on how best to catch the Road Runner. In the 1965 short Highway Runnery, Road Runner drives a car over Wile E. Coyote. In the 1979 made-for television short Freeze Frame, Wile E. Coyote chases the Road Runner up into a snowy mountainous region, where most of the short is spent. In the rare 2000 short Little Go Beep, they explain the fourth rule by showing a baby Wile E.'s father (voiced by Stan Freberg) telling him not to speak until he has caught a Road Runner. However, there was one instance when Wile E. Coyote actually catches the Road Runner in the short Soup or Sonic (the chase led them through a series of pipes that grew smaller, making them insect-sized. When Wily realized this, he whistled to Roadrunner and motioned for them to go back through, which they did. Roadrunner returned to normal size, however Wily was still tiny. Amused, Roadrunner stops and Wily first jumps over his feet and keeps running, stops, and goes back to grab Roadrunner's leg and prepares to dine until he notices the enormous size difference) after which the Coyote holds up a sign that says "O.K. wise guys, you wanted me to catch him, now what am I supposed to do?" Going! Going! Gosh! is a 1952 Warner Bros. ... Adventures of the Road-Runner is an animated film, directed by Chuck Jones and co-directed by Maurice Noble and Tom Ray. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Stanley Victor Freberg (born August 7, 1926 in Los Angeles) is an American author, recording artist, animation voice actor, comedian, puppeteer and advertising creative director. ...


In an interview years after the series was made, writer Michael Maltese insisted he had never heard of the "Rules" before and certainly never felt bound by any. This would explain why they've been "broken" so often.


Later cartoons

The original Chuck Jones productions ended in 1963 after Jack Warner closed the Warner Bros. animation studio. War and Pieces, the last Road Runner short directed by Jones, was released in mid-1964. By that time, The Pink Panther co-creator David DePatie and veteran director Friz Freleng had formed DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, moved into the facility just emptied by Warner, and signed a license with Warners to produce cartoons for the big studio to distribute. This article is about Jack Warner, the head of Warner Brothers. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... The Pink Panther cartoon character is the protagonist and main character in a series of animated short films. ... David DePatie worked with Friz Freleng to create the animated character known as the Pink Panther. ... Isadore Friz Freleng (August 21, 1906[1]–May 26, 1995) was an animator, cartoonist, director, and producer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons from Warner Bros. ... DePatie-Freleng Enterprises (sometimes abbreviated to DFE) was a Hollywood-based animation production company, active from 1963 to 1981. ...


Their first to feature the Road Runner was The Wild Chase. This was directed by Friz Freleng himself in 1965, and notably starred Speedy Gonzales and Sylvester the Cat alongside Wile E. and Road Runner. Much of the material was animation lifted from earlier Runner and Gonzales shorts, with the other's characters added in. In total, DePatie-Freleng produced 14 Road Runner cartoons, two of which were directed by Robert McKimson (Rushing Roulette, 1965, and Sugar and Spies, 1966). The Wild Chase is a Looney Tunes short in which Sylvester and Wile E. Coyote are paired against Speedy Gonzales and the Road Runner. ... Isadore Friz Freleng (August 21, 1906[1]–May 26, 1995) was an animator, cartoonist, director, and producer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons from Warner Bros. ... For the Speedy Gonzales song, see Pat Boone. ... Sylvester J. Pussycat Senior is a fictional cat who appears in several Looney Tunes cartoons, often chasing Tweety Bird, Speedy Gonzalez, or Hippety Hopper. ... Robert Bob McKimson, Sr. ...


The remaining 11 were subcontracted to Format Films and directed under ex-Warner Bros. animator Rudy Larriva. The "Larriva Eleven", as the series was later called, lacked the fast-paced action of the Chuck Jones originals and was poorly received by critics. In Of Mice and Magic, Leonard Maltin calls the series "witless in every sense of the word." In addition, except for the planet Earth scene at the tail end of "Highway Runnery", there was only one clip of the Coyote's fall to the ground, used over and over again. These cartoons can easily be distinguished from Chuck Jones's cartoons because they feature the modern "Abstract WB" Looney Tunes opening and closing sequences, and they use the same music cues over and over again in the cartoons, composed by William Lava. Only one of those 11 cartoons - "Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner" - had music that was actually scored instead of the same music cues. Another clear clue is that Jones' previously described "Laws" for the characters were not followed with any significant fidelity. Format Films was a television animation studio, most active during the 1960s, when they produced shows such as The Alvin Show and Underdog. ... Rudolph Rudy Larriva was an American animator and director from the 1940s to the 1980s. ... Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ... William Lava (March 18, 1911 - February 20, 1971 was a musical composer and arranger who worked on the Warner Bros. ...


Wile E. Coyote has also unsuccessfully attempted to catch and eat Bugs Bunny in another series of cartoons. In these cartoons, the coyote takes on the guise of a self-described "super genius" and speaks with a smooth, generic upper-class accent provided by Mel Blanc. Bugs Bunny is an animated rabbit who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... Melvin Jerome Blanc (May 30, 1908 – July 10, 1989) was a prolific American voice actor. ...


In one short (Hare-Breadth Hurry, 1963), Bugs Bunny—with the help of "speed pills"—even sits in for Road Runner, who has "sprained a giblet", and carries out the duties of outsmarting the hungry scavenger. This is the only Bugs Bunny/Wile E. Coyote short in which the coyote does not speak. As usual Wile E. Coyote ends up falling down a canyon. (In a later, made-for-TV short, which had a young Elmer Fudd chasing a young Bugs Bunny, Elmer also falls down a canyon. On the way down he is overtaken by Wile E. Coyote who shows a sign telling Elmer to get out of the way for someone who is more experienced in falling.) Bugs Bunny is an animated rabbit who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... Giblets are the edible viscera (heart, gizzard, liver, etc. ... Elmer J. Fudd is a fictional cartoon character and one of the most famous Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies characters. ...


In the 1962 pilot for a potential television anthology series (but later released as a theatrical short entitled The Adventures of the Road-Runner—later edited and split into three short subjects called To Beep or Not to Beep, Zip Zip Hooray! and Road Runner A-Go-Go), Wile E. lectures two young TV-watching children about the edible parts of a Road Runner, attempting to explain his somewhat irrational obsession with catching it.


Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner had cameo roles in Who Framed Roger Rabbit during the final scene in Marvin Acme's factory. Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner), which blends traditional animation and live action. ...


Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner appear as members of the TuneSquad team in Space Jam. There, Wile E. rigs one of the basketball hoops with dynamite to prevent one of the Monstars from scoring a slam dunk. This article is about the motion picture. ...


Wile E. Coyote appears as an employee of the Acme Corporation in Looney Tunes: Back in Action. There, his role is similar to that of Mustafa from the Austin Powers movies. Looney Tunes: Back in Action was a 2003 Warner Bros. ...


Spin-offs

There They Go-Go-Go!
There They Go-Go-Go!

In another series of Warner Bros. Looney Tunes cartoons, Chuck Jones used the character design (model sheets and personality) of Wile E. Coyote as "Ralph Wolf". In this series, Ralph continually attempts to steal sheep from a flock being guarded by the eternally vigilant Sam Sheepdog. As with the Road Runner series, Ralph Wolf uses all sorts of wild inventions and schemes to steal the sheep, but he is continually foiled by the sheepdog. In a move seen by many as a self-referential gag, Ralph Wolf continually tries to steal the sheep not because he is a fanatic (as Wile E. Coyote was), but because it is his job. In every cartoon, he and the sheepdog punch a timeclock, exchange pleasantries, go to work, take lunch break, and clock out to go home for the day, all according to a factory-like blowing whistle. The most prominent difference between the coyote and the wolf, aside from their locales, is that Wile E. has a black nose and Ralph has a red nose. Image File history File links Gogogo. ... Image File history File links Gogogo. ... There They Go-Go-Go! is a 1956 Warner Bros. ... Sam and Ralph on the job in the short A Sheep in the Deep. ... Species See text. ... Sam and Ralph on the job in the short A Sheep in the Deep. ... A Sheep dog is a type of domestic dog whose original purpose was to herd or guard sheep. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call...


A spin off was forecasted by the writers at Warner Bros. dubbed "C Bear and the Chickens." C Bear, a charismatic cartoon bear, also used zany methods and ACME supplies to capture chickens. However this project was later dismissed after C Bear's madness and cheeky smile were declared unfit for children[citation needed].


Comic books

Panel from the 1975 comic-book story "The Greatest of E's". Art by Jack Manning

The first appearance of the Road Runner in a comic book was in Bugs Bunny Vacation Funnies #8 (August 1958) published by Dell Comics. The feature is titled "Beep Beep the Road Runner" and the story "Desert Dessert". It presents itself as the first meeting between Beep Beep and Wile E. (whose mailbox reads "Wile E. Coyote, Inventor and Genius"), and introduces the Road Runner's wife, Matilda, and their three newly hatched sons. This story established the convention that the Road Runner family talked in rhyme in the comics. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Dell Comics was the comic book publishing arm of Dell Publications, which got its start in pulp magazines. ...


Wile E. was called Kelsey Coyote in his comic book debut, a Henery Hawk story in Looney Tunes and Merrie Meolodies #91 (May 1949). Henery Hawk (sometimes misremembered as Henry) is a cartoon character from the American Looney Tunes series who appeared in twelve cartoons. ...


Dell initially published "Beep Beep the Road Runner" as part of Four Color Comics #918, 1008, and 1046 before launching a separate title for the character numbered #4–14 (1960–62), with the three try-out issues counted as the first three issues. After a hiatus, Gold Key Comics took over the character with issues #1–88 (1966–84). During the 1960s, the artwork was done by Pete Alvarado and Phil De Lara; from 1966-1969, the Gold Key issues consisted of Dell reprints. Afterward, new stories began to appear, initially drawn by Alavardo and De Lara before Jack Manning became the main artist for the title. New and reprinted Beep Beep stories also appeared in Golden Comics Digest and Gold Key's revival of Looney Tunes in the 1970s. During this period, one comic story revealed his middle name to be "Ethelbert"[2] in the story "The Greatest of E's" in issue #53 (cover-date September 1975) of Gold Key Comics' licensed comic book, Beep Beep the Road Runner.[3] One of the earlier issues of Four Color, featuring Walt Disneys Donald Duck. ... Gold Key Comics was an imprint of Western Publishing cteated for comic books distributed to newstands. ... Peter J. Alvarado, Jr. ... Information Family Todd Manning (father) Blair Cramer (mother) Starr Manning (sister) Brendan Thornhart (maternal half-brother; deceased) Thomas Tommy McBain (paternal half-brother) Jack Manning is a fictional character on the American soap opera One Life to Live. ... Golden Comics Digest was one of three digest size comics published by Gold Key Comics in the early 1970s. ... Looney Tunes opening title Looney Tunes is a Warner Brothers animated cartoon series which ran in many movie theatres from 1930 to 1969. ... Gold Key Comics was an imprint of Western Publishing cteated for comic books distributed to newstands. ...


The Road Runner and Wile E. also make appearances in the DC Comics Looney Tunes title. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...


Television

Gee Whiz-z-z-z

The Road Runner appeared on Saturday mornings as part of The Bugs Bunny and Road Runner Show on CBS from 1968 to 1985. By 1980, the shorts were heavily censored. The show was later shown on ABC until 2000, and on Global until 1998. Image File history File links Geewhizz. ... Image File history File links Geewhizz. ... Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck performing The Bugs Bunny Show theme song, The Bugs Bunny Overture (This is It!). The Bugs Bunny Show was a long-running American television anthology series hosted by Bugs Bunny, that was comprised of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons made between 1948 and 1963. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Global Television Network (more commonly called Global TV or just Global) is a Canadian English language privately owned television network. ...


In the 1970s, Chuck Jones directed three Road Runner short films for the educational children's TV series The Electric Company. These short cartoons used the Coyote and the Road Runner to display words for children to read, but the cartoons themselves were a refreshing return to Jones' glory days. The Electric Company was an educational American childrens television series produced by the Childrens Television Workshop (now Sesame Workshop) for PBS in the United States. ...


At the end of Bugs Bunny's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Bunny (part of Chuck Jones' TV special, Bugs Bunny is Bustin' Out All Over), Bugs mentions to the audience that he and Elmer may have been the first pair of characters to have chase scenes in these cartoons, but then suddenly, a pint-sized, baby Wile E. Coyote (wearing a diaper and holding a small knife and fork) appears right in front of Bugs, chasing a gold-colored, unhatched (mostly, except for the tail which is sticking out) Road Runner egg, which is running rapidly while some high-pitched "meep-meeps" can be heard.


Wile E. and the Road Runner later appeared in several episodes of Tiny Toon Adventures. In this series, Wile E. (voiced in the Jim Reardon episode "Piece of Mind" by Joe Alaskey) was the dean of Acme Looniversity and the mentor of Calamity Coyote. The Road Runner's protege in this series was Little Beeper. In the episode "Piece of Mind", Wile E. narrates the life story of Calamity while Calamity is falling from the top of a tall skyscraper. In the direct-to-video Tiny Toon movie, How I Spent My Summer Vacation, the Road Runner finally gets a taste of humilation by getting run over by a mail truck that "brakes for coyotes." Steven Spielberg Presents Tiny Toon Adventures (also known as Tiny Toon Adventures or Tiny Toons) is an American animated television series created and produced as a collaborative effort between Steven Spielberg and Warner Bros. ... Jim Reardon is a director and storyboard consultant for episodes of the animated TV series The Simpsons. ... Joe Alaskey (born May 26, 1949 in Watervliet, New York) is credited as one of the successors (including Billy West) of the great Mel Blanc in impersonating the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and other characters from Warner Bros. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... Tiny Toon Adventures is an animated television series created by the Warner Bros. ... Calamity Calamity Coyote is a fictional anthropomorphic coyote and a cartoon character, who appeared on the early 1990s series Tiny Toon Adventures. ... Little Beeper is a fictional character from Tiny Toon Adventures. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ...


The two were also seen in cameos in Animaniacs. They were together in two Slappy Squirrel cartoons: "Bumbie's Mom" and "Little Old Slappy from Pasadena". In the latter the Road Runner is outrun by Slappy's car and holds up a sign saying "I quit"—immediately afterwards, Buttons, who was launched into the air during a previous gag, lands squarely on top of him. Wile E. appears without the bird in a The Wizard of Oz parody, dressed in his batsuit from one short, in a twister (tornado) funnel in "Buttons in Ows". This article is about the television series. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Buttons and Mindy are characters that were regularly featured on the animated childrens television show Animaniacs. ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... “Chiroptera” redirects here. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ...


In a Cartoon Network TV ad about The Acme Hour, Wile E. Coyote utilized a pair of jet roller skates to catch the Road Runner and (quite surprisingly) didn't fail. While he was cooking his prey, it was revealed that the roller skates came from a generic brand. The ad said that other brand isn't the same thing. For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... Acme Hour originally aired on Cartoon Network in the US. It was an hour-long compilation of various Warner Bros. ...


In the 2000s, toddler versions of Wile E. and the Road Runner have been featured in episodes of the series Baby Looney Tunes. Boy toddler Toddler is a common term for a a young child who is learning to walk or toddle,[1] generally considered to be the second stage of development after infancy and occurring predominantly during the ages of 12 to 36 months old. ... Baby Looney Tunes is an American animated television series that shows Looney Tunes characters as toddlers. ...


Wile E. Coyote had a cameo as the true identity of an alien hunter (a parody of Predator) in the Duck Dodgers episode "K-9 Quarry," voiced by Dee Bradley Baker. In that episode, he was hunting Martian Commander X-2 and K-9. This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Duck Dodgers was an American animated television series based on the classic cartoon short Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century produced by Warner Bros. ... Dee Bradley Baker was born August 31, 1962 [1] in Indiana. ...


In Loonatics Unleashed, Wile E. Coyote and Roadrunner's 28th century descendants are Tech E. Coyote and Rev Runner. Tech E. coyote was the tech expert of the Loonatics (influenced by the past cartoons with many of the machines ordered by Wile E. from Acme), and has magnetic hands and the ability to molecularly regenerate himself (influenced by the many times in which he painfully failed to capture Roadrunner). Tech E. Coyote speaks, but does not have a British accent as Wile E. Coyote did. Rev Runner is also able to talk, though extremely rapidly, and can fly without the use of jet packs, which are used by other members of the Loonatics. He also has super speed, also a take off of Roadrunner. Loonatics Unleashed is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... Loonatics Unleashed is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... This article details fictional characters in Loonatics Unleashed. ... The Acme Corporation (sometimes made a backronym to: A Company (that) Makes Everything - though this is in dispute) is a fictional corporation that exists in the Looney Tunes universe. ... A jet pack is a technology that is not yet practical but often appears in fiction. ...


In the Cartoon Network TV series Class of 3000, Wil E. Coyote is seen constantly in one episode, using rocket shoes and howling like a real life coyote. His Latin name is "Jokis Callbackus". For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... Class of 3000 is an American Emmy Award-winning comedy animated television series on Cartoon Network that is created, executive produced by and stars André 3000 of the hip-hop group OutKast as superstar and music teacher Sunny Bridges, set at Atlanta, Georgias Westley School of Performing Arts. ...


Commercial appearances

  • The Plymouth Road Runner was a performance car produced by the Plymouth division of Chrysler between 1968 and 1980. An official licensee of Warner Bros. (paying $50,000 for the privilege), Plymouth used the image of the cartoon bird on the sides and the car had a special horn (with "Voice of Road Runner" labels) that sounds like the bird's signature 'beep-beep'. Some engine options (notably the 426 Hemi) included Road Runner "Coyote Duster" graphics on the air cleaner. The 1970 Plymouth Superbird version of the Road Runner, arguably one of the most spectacular cars of the muscle car era, included a graphic of the Road Runner holding a crash helmet on its massive rear spoiler and one of its headlight covers. On one episode of the television game show Truth or Consequences, a contestant was given all the components of the car on Monday. If she could assemble the parts into a fully functioning car by Friday, she would win the car. She was given the assistance of an auto worker. On Friday, she won the car.
  • London, Ontario radio station BX-93 (CJBX-FM), from its first year on-air, had a mobile broadcast unit known as the BX-93 Road Runner, complete with a Road Runner cartoon character on it
  • General Motors used the Road Runner on its marketing campaign in 1985 for its Holden Barina in Australia. Even in 2004, "Beep-beep Barina" is still known as a catch phrase by many Australians.
  • In 1995, Road Runner became the mascot for Time Warner's cable internet service, also named Road Runner. Interestingly, one commercial involved Wile E. as the "mascot" of DSL. Road Runner is also the mascot of Time Warner's car sales website, BeepBeep.com and appears in commercials on Time Warner cable systems in several television markets.
  • In 1996, Wile E. Coyote appeared alongside football star Deion Sanders in a Pepsi commercial.
  • From 1997 to 1998, Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote appeared in a newly redesigned Pontiac Grand Prix car commercial. Wile E. chases the Road Runner while driving the car but the commercial ends before he is caught. Pontiac used a tagline "Wider is Better".
  • In 2004, Wile E. appeared (along with Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck) in an Aflac commercial, in which he is shown as being a prime candidate for the company's services. Before he plummets, taking an animated version of the Aflac duck with him, he holds up a sign reading the company's tagline, "Ask About It At Work."
  • In the 1980s, both Wile E. and Road Runner appeared in a Honey Nut Cheerios commercial. Before Wile E. was about to fall off a cliff, the Honey Nut Cheerios bee, who is now named BuzzBee, saved him by asking, then convincing him to take and eat a bowl of the cereal.
  • Road Runner was featured in a series of advertisements for the Brazilian Mail and Telegraph Corporation, more specifically their express delivery service (SEDEX).
  • A McDonald's TV commercial in the 1980s showed the Road Runner running in and ordering using his "beep-beep"s while the order taker translated everything he said. Then he picked up the bag and ran over the Coyote on his way out the door.
  • Delivery company Purolator Courier used the Road Runner's "beep-beep"s in a local radio commercial and actually had the phone number 1-800-BEEP-BEEP.
  • In the Philippines, Wile E. and Road Runner appeared on a Boysen paint commercial in 2002, where Road Runner used the paint to fool Wile E. that it is a tunnel, then Road Runner was able to pass the fake tunnel. Wile E. went through as well, but Road Runner came out of the other end of the tunnel first and covered the exit with the paint. Wile E. ended up smashing into the wall and emerged out of the tunnel, dizzy.
  • Oceanic Cable company in Hawaii (a regional branding of Time Warner Cable) uses the Roadrunner as mascot for their high-speed cable modem service. They have also used other Looney Tunes characters, most notably Yosemite Sam, as pitchmen.

Plymouth dealers gave away this promotional windbreaker in 1970. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Chrysler Corporation was a United States-based automobile manufacturer that existed independently from 1925–1998. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Early Hemi in a 1957 Chrysler 300C. A Chrysler Hemi engine is one of three different internal combustion engine families from the Chrysler Corporation (or its successor, DaimlerChrysler) that are Hemi engines; in other words, they utilise a hemispherical combustion chamber. ... On an internal combustion engine, an air cleaner is a device that blocks dirt and debris from entering the induction system, where it might cause internal damage. ... Plymouth Superbird The Plymouth Superbird was an automobile that existed for one reason only - to win at NASCAR, the US stock car racing series. ... The Pontiac GTO is a classic example of the muscle car. ... This Ford F-150 pickup truck has two spoilers one on the roof and another on the tailgate. ... Action Comics #127 (December 1948), featuring Superman appearing on the show with Ralph Edwards Truth or Consequences was an American quiz show, originally hosted on radio by Ralph Edwards from 1940 to 1957, and later on television by Edwards himself from 1950 to 1951, Jack Bailey from 1954 to 1955... Nickname: Location of London in relation to Middlesex County and the Province of Ontario Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario County Middlesex County Settled 1826 as a village Incorporated 1855 as a city Government  - City Mayor Anne Marie DeCicco-Best  - Governing Body London City Council  - MPs Sue Barnes (LPC) Glen Pearson... CJBX-FM is a Country Music radio station in London, Ontario known as BX-93. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... The Holden Barina is an automobile produced by General Motors since 1985 and sold by the Australian automaker Holden. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC) is an American national cable television company that operates in 27 states and has 31 operating divisions. ... An outdated model of the Motorola Surfboard cable modem A cable modem is a type of modem that provides access to a data signal sent over the cable television infrastructure. ... Road Runner is a cable internet service, founded in 1995 by Time Warner Cable. ... DSL may refer to: Damn Small Linux Dark and Shattered Lands, a MUD based loosely on Forgotten Realms and Dragonlance books. ... Deion Luwynn Sanders (born August 9, 1967 in Fort Myers, Florida) is a former National Football League cornerback, Major League Baseball outfielder, and is currently an NFL Network commentator. ... Pepsi Cola is a non-alcoholic carbonated beverage produced and manufactured by PepsiCo. ... The Pontiac Grand Prix is an automobile produced by the Pontiac division of General Motors. ... Bugs Bunny is an animated rabbit who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... Daffy Duck is an animated cartoon character in the Warner Brothers Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons. ... Aflac Incorporated (NYSE: AFL, TYO: 8686 ) sells supplemental health and life insurance in the United States and Japan. ... Energizer Holdings (formerly Eveready Battery), headquartered in St. ... The Energizer Bunny is the marketing icon and mascot of Energizer batteries. ... Honey Nut Cheerios from Canada Honey Nut Cheerios is a variation of Cheerios breakfast cereal, introduced in 1979 by General Mills. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Purolator Courier is a Canadian courier 97% of which is owned by Canada Post. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Geococcyx californianus (Lesson, 1829) The Greater Roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus) is a large, long-legged bird in the cuckoo family, Cuculidae. ... The Rail Runner is a new project to introduce a mass transit system into central New Mexico. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... The Bright House Networks logo. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC) is an American national cable television company that operates in 27 states and has 31 operating divisions. ... For the shortwave radio station, see Yosemite Sam (shortwave). ...

Video games

Several Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner-themed video games have been produced:

The arcade game was originally to have been a laserdisc-based title incorporating footage from the actual Road Runner cartoons. Atari eventually decided that the format was too unreliable (laserdisc-based games required a great deal of maintenance) and switched it to more conventional raster-based hardware. Road Runner is a 1985 arcade game by Atari Games. ... This article is about a corporate game company. ... Nes is: A municipality in the county of Akershus in Norway, see Nes, Akershus. ... The Atari 2600, released in October 1977, is the video game console credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. ... A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals. ... Looney Tunes opening title Looney Tunes is a Warner Brothers animated cartoon series which ran in many movie theatres from 1930 to 1969. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... Sunsoft is a video game development company founded in 1985 as a division of Sun Corporation, itself a division of Sun Electronics, or Sun Denshi (サン電子) in Japan (its U.S. subsidiary operated under the name Sunsoft of America, though games they published showed a logo that read only SUNSOFT). ... Road Runners Death Valley Rally is a video game released for the Super NES. It is based on the Looney Tunes characters Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner. ... The European SNES design is identical to the Super Famicom. ... Sunsoft is a video game development company founded in 1985 as a division of Sun Corporation, itself a division of Sun Electronics, or Sun Denshi (サン電子) in Japan (its U.S. subsidiary operated under the name Sunsoft of America, though games they published showed a logo that read only SUNSOFT). ... Desert Speedtrap Starring Road Runner & Wile E. Coyote was released in 1994 for the Sega Game Gear color handheld system. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Probe Entertainment was British videogame developer owned by Acclaim Entertainment. ... Wile E Coyote and Road Runner are having a competition to see who will win the acme prize for best customers of the year. ... The Mega Drive/Genesis was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega in Japan (1988), Europe (1990) and most of the rest of the world as the Mega Drive. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Company logo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sam and Ralph on the job in the short A Sheep in the Deep. ... Majesco Entertainment is a video game developer founded in 1986. ... WayForward Technologies is a game development company founded in 1990 by technology entrepreneur Voldi Way. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... Imagine the smiley face in the top left corner as an RGB bitmap image. ...


References in other games


In Gex: Enter The Gecko in the level Out of Toon there is a coyote-shaped hole on the side of a cliff.


References in Pop Culture

  • Wile E. Coyote has made two appearances in Family Guy: In one, Peter runs over the Road Runner, and Wile E. Coyote is in the front seat with him, telling him that Road Runner is fine and to just keep going. In the second, it is revealed that Peter was running the whole ACME corporation, while Wile E. tries to get a refund for a slingshot that just "slammed me into a mountain".
  • Wile E. Coyote has also made a cameo in the sitcom Night Court: During one of the four "Day in the Life" episodes (where the court has to process a large number of cases by midnight), Judge Stone (played by Harry Anderson) starts delivering a lecture from the bench to a defendant, detailing all the options that are available for a hungry man, ending with 'But stop harassing that bird!'. The scene then cut to a wide-angle shot showing prosecutor Dan Fielding (John Larroquette) and defense attorney Christine Sullivan (Markie Post); standing between them was an animated Wile E. Coyote.
  • Mark Knopfler, the lead guitarist and singer of Dire Straits, has made a song called "Coyote" about the cartoon shows of Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner on the 2002 album "The Ragpicker's Dream".
  • On the season three The Simpsons episode Homer Alone, Homer chases Bart through the house at the beginning with the screen freezing on the characters.
  • Wile E. Coyote made a brief appearance in the Just Desserts episode of Bounty Hamster. In it, Marion attempts several Acme-aided stunts similar or identical to some of Wile E. Coyote's exploits. Eventually, Wile E. helps him out of one and advises him to order from a different catalogue (saying it took him thirty painful years to discover this). As can be expected, helping Marion causes the latest device to drop rocks on him.
  • In 2001, the season three episode "Revenging Angel" of Australian sci-fi television series Farscape featured extended cartoon sequences in which characters of the show, John Crichton and Ka D'Argo, played parodies of Road Runner- and Wile E. Coyote. In these sequences, which were hallucinations experienced by Crichton, D'Argo purses Crichton using a variety of familiar gags, such as OZME-brand rockets, explosive "froonium," and fake wormholes painted onto rock walls.
  • Economist Paul Krugman refers to a sudden decline in the value of the US Dollar as a "Wile. E. Coyote scenario" [4]

Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Night Court was an American television situation comedy that aired on NBC from January 1984 until May 1992. ... Harry Anderson (born October 14, 1952) is an American actor and magician. ... John Bernard Larroquette (born November 25, 1947) is an American Emmy Award-winning film and television actor. ... Marjorie Armstrong Post (born on November 4, 1950, in Palo Alto, California) is an actress, best known for her 1985–1992 role as Christine Sullivan on the NBC sitcom Night Court. ... The Ragpickers Dream is Mark Knopflers third solo album, released in 2002. ... The Simpsons Season 3 DVD. The Simpsons 3rd season (September 1991 – May 1992) began on September 19, 1991. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Homer Alone is the fifteenth episode of The Simpsons third season. ... Bounty Hamster is an animated childrens cartoon created by Dave Freeman and Alan Gilbey. ... Revenging Angel is an episode from the third season of the American television series Farscape, written by David Kemper and directed by Andrew Prowse. ... Farscape (1999–2003) is a science fiction television series, featuring a present-day astronaut who accidentally travels through a wormhole to a distant part of the galaxy. ... John Robert Crichton, Jr. ... Ka DArgo (called simply DArgo) is a character in the Farscape universe played by Anthony Simcoe. ... Paul Krugman Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is an American economist. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...

See also

Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck performing The Bugs Bunny Show theme song, The Bugs Bunny Overture (This is It!). The Bugs Bunny Show was a long-running American television anthology series hosted by Bugs Bunny, that was comprised of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons made between 1948 and 1963. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... Coyote is a mythological character common to many Native American cultures, based on the coyote (Canis latrans) animal. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ The interviews included in the DVD commentary were recorded by animation historian Michael Barrier for his book Hollywood Cartoons: American Animation in Its Golden Age.
  2. ^ News from Me (column): "The Name Game" (Feb. 20, 2006), by Mark Evanier
  3. ^ Evanier, News from Me: "Mike Maltese had been occasionally writing the comics in semi-retirement before me, but when he dropped the 'semi' part, I got the job and that was one of the plots I came up with. For the record, the story was drawn by a terrific artist named Jack Manning, and Mr. Maltese complimented me on it. Still, I wouldn't take that as any official endorsement of the Coyote's middle name. If you want to say the Coyote's middle name is Ethelbert, fine. I mean, it's not like someone's going to suddenly whip out Wile E.'s actual birth certificate and yell, 'Aha! Here's incontrovertible proof!' But like I said, I never imagined anyone would take it as part of the official 'canon' of the character. If I had, I'd have said the 'E' stood for Evanier".

Michael Barrier is an American animation historian. ... Michael Maltese (February 6, 1908 - February 22, 1981) was a storyboard artist and screenwriter for Warner Bros. ...

Sources

  • Looney Tunes—Stars Of The Show: Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner (official studio site)
  • "That WASN'T All, Folks!: Warner Bros. Cartoons 1964–1969", by Jon Cooke

External links


 
 

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