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Encyclopedia > Wilberforce University
Wilberforce University

Motto: By one’s own toil, effort, courage
Established 1856
Type: Private
President: Rev. Dr. Floyd H. Flake
Staff: 59
Undergraduates: 700 total enrollment
Location Wilberforce, Ohio, OH, USA
Campus: Rural
Colors: Green and Gold
Mascot: Bulldogs
Website: Wilberforce University

Wilberforce University is a private, coed, liberal arts historically African-American university located in Wilberforce, Ohio, that is affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church and participates in the United Negro College Fund. Wilberforce University was founded by a Black Bishop, Bishop Daniel Paine. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Floyd Flake Reverend Dr. Floyd Harold Flake (born January 30, 1945 in Los Angeles) is the senior pastor of the 23,000 member Allen African Methodist Episcopal Church in Jamaica, Queens, New York, and president of Wilberforce University. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Wilberforce is an unincorporated community and census-designated place located in Greene County, Ohio. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Wilberforce is an unincorporated community and census-designated place located in Greene County, Ohio. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... United Negro College Fund logo The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is a Fairfax, Virginia-based American philanthropic organization that fundraises college tuition money for African-American students and general scholarship funds for 39 historically black colleges and universities. ...


Wilberforce was the first university owned and operated by African-Americans, and is named for the 18th century English statesman and abolitionist William Wilberforce. The school played a role in the Underground Railroad. The campus is located three miles from Xenia, Ohio, and 21 miles from Dayton, Ohio. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... William Wilberforce (24 August 1759–29 July 1833) was a British politician and philanthropist. ... This article is about a 19th-century slave escape route. ... Xenia (pronounced Zeen-yuh) is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Greene County. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ...

Contents

History

Founded in 1856 by the Methodist Episcopal Church, Wilberforce closed temporarily in 1862 during the American Civil War and reopened the following year after being sold to the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Growth drove the need to build a new campus in 1967, located one mile away. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ...


In 1974, a tornado destroyed much of the city of Xenia and the old campus, part of the Super Outbreak tornado storm. The old campus contains the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center. Other old campus buildings still in use include the Carnegie Library built in 1909, Shorter Hall built in 1922, and the Charles Leander Hill Gymnasium built in 1958. This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Xenia (pronounced Zeen-yuh) is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Greene County. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Super Outbreak is the largest tornado outbreak on record. ...


Wilberforce is one of two four-year institutions in the United States that require all students to participate in cooperative education[1] to meet graduation requirements. The cooperative program places students in internships that provide practical experience in addition to academic training. Cooperative education is a structured method of combining academic education with practical work experience. ...


Degrees offered

Bachelor of Arts degree programs

  • Communications
  • Fine Arts
  • Liberal Studies
  • Literature
  • Music
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Rehabilitation Services
  • Sociology

Bachelor of Science degree programs

  • Accounting
  • Biology
  • Business Economics
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Comprehensive Science
  • Computer Engineering
  • Computer Information Systems
  • Computer Science
  • Economics
  • Engineering Physics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Finance
  • Health Services Administration
  • Industrial Engineering
  • Liberal Arts
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Mass Media Communications
  • Mathematics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Music Education
  • Pre-law
  • Philosophy/Religion
  • Psychology

Master of Science degree program

  • Rehabilitation Counseling

Athletic programs

Wilberforce is a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and participates in the American Mideast Conference. The Bulldogs participate in the following intercollegiate sports: basketball (men's and women's), and volleyball (women's). Students also participate in the following intramural sports: basketball, softball, volleyball, flag football, and tennis. The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ... The American Mideast Conference is an affiliate of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics that includes 20 member institutions in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ...


NASA SEMAA project

In October 2006, Wilberforce held the grand opening and dedication for the NASA Science, Engineering, Mathematics and Aerospace Academy (SEMAA) and the associated Aerospace Education Laboratory (AEL). It was attended by Dr. Bernice G. Alston, deputy assistant administrator of NASA’s office of Education, and the Honorable David L. Hobson, state representative from Ohio’s 7th congressional district.[2] The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (IPA [ˈnæsÉ™]) is an agency of the United States government, responsible for the nations public space program. ... David Lee Hobson (born October 17, 1936) is an American politician of the Republican Party who serves as a U.S. representative from the seventh congressional district of Ohio, based in Springfield. ...


NASA’s program is designed to provide training in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to underprivileged students to support NASA’s future needs. There are 17 NASA SEMAA project sites through the United States. Through this partnership, Wilberforce will offer training sessions for students in grades K-12 during the academic year and during the summer. The AEL is computerized classroom that provided technology to students in grades 7-12 that supports the SEMAA training sessions.


Notable alumni

Wilberforce alumni have organized chapters in cities throughout the country and continue to participate in activities on campus. Notable alumni include:

  • Victoria Gray Adams, pioneering civil rights activist
  • Regina M. Anderson, playwright, librarian, and member of the Harlem Renaissance
  • Myron (Tiny) Bradshaw, American jazz and rhythm and blues bandleader, singer, pianist, and drummer
  • Hallie Quinn Brown, an educator, writer and activist
  • Floyd H. Flake, U.S. Congressman, Wilberforce-President
  • James H. McGee, a city commissioner and first African-American mayor of Dayton, Ohio
  • George Russell, an American jazz composer and theorist
  • William Grant Still, the first African-American to conduct a major American symphony orchestra, the first to have a symphony of his own performed by a leading orchestra, and the first to have an opera performed by a major opera company
  • Ossian Sweet, an African American doctor notable for his self-defense of his newly-purchased home against a white mob attempting to force him out in Detroit in 1925

Victoria Jackson Gray Adams (November 5, 1926 - August 12, 2006) was a pioneering civil rights activist from Hattiesburg, Mississippi. ... Regina M. Anderson (May 21, 1901–February 5, 1993) was an African American playwright, librarian, and key member of the Harlem Renaissance. ... Myron (Tiny) Bradshaw (1905 – 1958) was an American jazz and rhythm and blues bandleader, singer, composer, pianist, and drummer from Youngstown, Ohio. ... Hallie Quinn Brown was an American educator, writer and activist. ... Floyd Flake Reverend Dr. Floyd Harold Flake (born January 30, 1945 in Los Angeles) is the senior pastor of the 23,000 member Allen African Methodist Episcopal Church in Jamaica, Queens, New York, and president of Wilberforce University. ... James H. Jim McGee (November 8, 1918 – March 4, 2006) was an American politician of the Ohio Democratic party. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... George Allen Russell (born June 23, 1923) is an American jazz composer and theorist. ... William Grant Still William Grant Still (May 11, 1895 - December 3, 1978) was an African-American classical composer who wrote more than 150 compositions. ... Ossian Sweet (October 30, 1895 - March 20, 1960) was an African American doctor notable for his self-defense of his newly-purchased home against a white mob attempting to force him out in Detroit in 1925. ...

NPHC Organizations

Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority, Inc. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Brotherhood of Iota Phi Theta was a local service fraternity at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1973 to 2001. ...

References

  1. ^ Wilberforce University: Yesterday and Today. Wiberforce University. Retrieved on January 1, 2007.
  2. ^ NASA Education Facility Opens at Wilberforce University. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Retrieved on January 1, 2007.

is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

See also

  • Historically black colleges

In the United States, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) (a type of Minority Serving Institution or MSI) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African-American community. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wilberforce University (1138 words)
Wilberforce University was the outcome of a plan by the Cincinnati Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church to establish an educational institution for fls in Ohio.
The famous Wilberforce University fountain was transferred from the original campus and reconstructed on the new campus in the fall of 1974.
Wilberforce is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools to award the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees.
Wilberforce University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (102 words)
Wilberforce University, located in Wilberforce, Ohio, was founded in 1856.
It was the first university owned and operated by African-Americans, and is named for the 18th century English statesman and abolitionist William Wilberforce.
Wilberforce University is affiliated with the A.M.E. Church and is a participant in the United Negro College Fund.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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