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Encyclopedia > Wiki
Look up Wiki in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

A wiki is software that allows users to easily create, edit, and link pages together. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites and to power community websites. These wiki websites are often also referred to as wikis; for example, Wikipedia is one of the best known wikis.[1] Wikis are used in many businesses to provide affordable and effective Intranets and for Knowledge Management. Ward Cunningham, developer of the first wiki, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as "the simplest online database that could possibly work".[2] Look up wiki in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Software redirects here. ... // A hyperlink, is a reference or navigation element in a document to another section of the same document or to another document that may be on a (different) website. ... Collaboration is a process defined by the recursive interaction of knowledge[1] and mutual learning between two or more people working together[2] toward a common goal typically creative in nature. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Wikipedia (IPA: , or ( ) is a multilingual, web-based, free content encyclopedia project, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization. ... An intranet is a private computer network that uses Internet protocols, network connectivity to securely share part of an organizations information or operations with its employees. ... Knowledge Management (KM) comprises a range of practices used by organisations to identify, create, represent, and distribute knowledge. ... Oh Yes, Hes Ward Cunningham! Howard Cunningham redirects here. ... WikiWikiWeb The WikiWikiWeb, or simply WikiWiki or Wiki (with a capital W), is the first ever wiki, written in Perl. ...


Wiki Wiki (/wiːkiː wiːkiː/) is a reduplication of wiki, a Hawaiian word for "fast". Some have suggested that wiki means, "What I Know Is." However, this is a backronym. Reduplication, in linguistics, is a morphological process in which the root or stem of a word, or only part of it, is repeated. ... The Hawaiian language is an Austronesian language that takes its name from HawaiÊ»i, the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed. ... A backronym (or bacronym) is a phrase that is constructed after the fact from a previously existing abbreviation, the abbreviation being an initialism or an acronym. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of wikis
Wiki Wiki bus at Honolulu International Airport
Wiki Wiki bus at Honolulu International Airport

WikiWikiWeb was the first site to be called a wiki. Ward Cunningham started developing WikiWikiWeb in 1994, and installed it on the Internet domain c2.com on March 25, 1995. It was named by Cunningham, who remembered a Honolulu International Airport counter employee telling him to take the "Wiki Wiki" shuttle bus that runs between the airport's terminals. According to Cunningham, "I chose wiki-wiki as an alliterative substitute for 'quick' and thereby avoided naming this stuff quick-web."[3][4] There were several historical antecedents to the wiki, which is a website with pages that can be edited by any visitor. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... For the United States Air Force use of this facility, see Hickam Air Force Base. ... WikiWikiWeb The WikiWikiWeb, or simply WikiWiki or Wiki (with a capital W), is the first ever wiki, written in Perl. ... Oh Yes, Hes Ward Cunningham! Howard Cunningham redirects here. ... The term domain name has multiple related meanings: A name that identifies a computer or computers on the internet. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Wiki Wiki Bus The Wiki Wiki Shuttle is a famous Hawaii native bus system that transports people from airplanes to passenger loading terminals at the Honolulu International Airport on Oahu. ...


Cunningham was in part inspired by Apple's HyperCard. Apple had designed a system allowing users to create virtual "card stacks" supporting links among the various cards. Cunningham developed Vannevar Bush's ideas by allowing users to "comment on and change one another's text".[1][5] In the early 2000s, wikis were increasingly adopted in enterprise as collaborative software. Common uses included project communication, intranets, and documentation, initially for technical users. Today some companies use wikis as their only collaborative software and as a replacement for static intranets. There may be greater use of wikis behind firewalls than on the public Internet. HyperCard was an application program from Apple Computer that was among the first successful hypermedia systems before the World Wide Web. ... Vannevar Bush (March 11, 1890 – June 30, 1974) was an American engineer and science administrator, known for his political role in the development of the atomic bomb, and the idea of the memex—seen as a pioneering concept for the World Wide Web. ... A corporate wiki is a wiki application designed to be used in a corporate context. ... An intranet is a private computer network that uses Internet protocols, network connectivity to securely share part of an organizations information or operations with its employees. ... This article is about the network security device. ...


On March 15, 2007, wiki entered the Oxford English Dictionary Online.[6] is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of...


Trust and security

Controlling changes

History comparison reports highlight the changes between two revisions of a page.
History comparison reports highlight the changes between two revisions of a page.

Wikis are generally designed with the philosophy of making it easy to correct mistakes, rather than making it difficult to make them. Thus, while wikis are very open, they provide a means to verify the validity of recent additions to the body of pages. The most prominent, on almost every wiki, is the "Recent Changes" page—a specific list numbering recent edits, or a list of all the edits made within a given time frame.[7] Some wikis can filter the list to remove minor edits and edits made by automatic importing scripts ("bots").[7] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (834x575, 14 KB)Miss Sri Lanka is the best File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (834x575, 14 KB)Miss Sri Lanka is the best File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Internet bots, also known as web robots, WWW robots or simply bots, are software applications that run automated tasks over the internet. ...


From the change log, other functions are accessible in most wikis: the Revision History showing previous page versions; and the diff feature, highlighting the changes between two revisions. Using the Revision History, an editor can view and restore a previous version of the article. The diff feature can be used to decide whether or not this is necessary. A regular wiki user can view the diff of an edit listed on the "Recent Changes" page and, if it is an unacceptable edit, consult the history, restoring a previous revision; this process is more or less streamlined, depending on the wiki software used.[7] In computing, diff is a file comparison utility that outputs the differences between two files. ... Please see the MediaWiki Users Guide to page history on meta for full details on this feature. ...


In case unacceptable edits are missed on the "Recent Changes" page, some wiki engines provide additional content control. It can be monitored to ensure that a page, or a set of pages, keeps its quality. A person willing to maintain pages will be warned of modifications to the pages, allowing him or her to verify the validity of new editions quickly.[7]


Trustworthiness

Critics of publicly-editable wiki systems argue that these systems could be easily tampered with, while proponents argue that the community of users can catch malicious content and correct it.[1] Lars Aronsson, a data systems specialist, summarizes the controversy as follows:

Most people, when they first learn about the wiki concept, assume that a website that can be edited by anybody would soon be rendered useless by destructive input. It sounds like offering free spray cans next to a grey concrete wall. The only likely outcome would be ugly graffiti and simple tagging, and many artistic efforts would not be long lived. Still, it seems to work very well.[8]

Security

The open philosophy of most wikis, allowing anyone to edit content, does not ensure that all editors are well-meaning. Vandalism can be a major problem. In larger wiki sites, such as those run by the Wikimedia Foundation, vandalism can go unnoticed for a period of time. Wikis by their very nature are susceptible to intentional disruption, known as "trolling". Wikis tend to take a soft security[9] approach to the problem of vandalism; making damage easy to undo rather than attempting to prevent damage. Larger wikis often employ sophisticated methods, such as bots that automatically identify and revert vandalism and JavaScript enhancements that show how many characters have been added in each edit. In this way vandalism can be limited to just "minor vandalism" or "sneaky vandalism", where the characters added/eliminated are so few that bots do not identify them and users do not pay much attention to them. For the wiki software used and developed by the Wikimedia Foundation, see MediaWiki. ... Vandalism is the conspicuous defacement or destruction of a structure, a symbol or anything else that goes against the will of the owner/governing body. ... An Internet troll, or simply troll in Internet slang, is someone who intentionally posts controversial or contrary messages in an on-line community such as an on-line discussion forum with the intention of baiting users into an argumentative response. ... Soft security usually refers to security which protects something from harm in quiet and unobtrusive ways; often invisibly and after the fact, rather than with visible barriers before the fact. ...


The amount of vandalism a wiki receives depends on how open the wiki is. For instance, some wikis allow unregistered users, identified by their IP addresses, to edit content, whilst others limit this function to just registered users. Most wikis allow IP editing,[citation needed] but give registered users some additional editing functions; on most wikis, becoming a registered user is a short and simple process. Some wikis require an additional waiting period before gaining access to certain tools. For example, on the English Wikipedia, registered users can only rename pages if their account is at least four days old. Other wikis such as the Portuguese Wikipedia use an editing requirement instead of a time requirement, granting extra tools after the user has made a certain number of edits to prove their trustworthiness and usefulness as an editor. Basically, "closed up" wikis are more secure and reliable but grow slowly, whilst more open wikis grow at a steady rate but result in being an easy target for vandalism. A clear example of this would be that of Wikipedia and Citizendium. The first is extremely open, allowing anyone with a computer and internet access to edit it, making it grow rapidly, whilst the latter requires the users' real name and a biography of themselves, affecting the growth of the wiki but creating an almost "vandalism-free" ambiance. An IP address (Internet Protocol address) is a unique address that certain electronic devices currently use in order to identify and communicate with each other on a computer network utilizing the Internet Protocol standard (IP)—in simpler terms, a computer address. ... Logo of Wikipedia The English Wikipedia is the English language edition of the Wikipedia encyclopedia. ... The Portuguese Wikipedia is a Portuguese language edition of Wikipedia (written Wikipédia, in Portuguese), the free encyclopedia. ... The Citizendium (pronounced the citizens compendium of everything) is an English-language online wiki-based free encyclopedia project spearheaded by Larry Sanger, co-founder of Wikipedia. ...


Wiki software architecture

Wiki software is a type of collaborative software that runs a wiki system, allowing web pages to be created and edited using a common web browser. It is usually implemented as a software engine that runs on one or more web servers. The content is stored in a file system, and changes to the content are stored in a relational database management system. Alternatively, Personal wikis run as a standalone application on a single computer. Examples: WikidPad and VoodooPad. Wiki software is a type of collaborative software that runs a wiki system. ... Collaborative software is software designed to help people involved in a common task achieve their goals. ... An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... In computer science, a software engine refers to the core of a computer program. ... The inside/front of a Dell PowerEdge web server The term Web server can mean one of two things: A computer program that is responsible for accepting HTTP requests from clients, which are known as Web browsers, and serving them HTTP responses along with optional data contents, which usually are... For library and office filing systems, see Library classification. ... A relational database management system (RDBMS) is a database management system (DBMS) that is based on the relational model as introduced by E. F. Codd. ... Personal wikis allow people to link information on their desktop or mobile computing devices in a similar way to how a community wiki links information across the internet. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


Wiki communities

"WikiNode" redirects here, for the WikiNode of Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:WikiNode.

Many wiki communities are private, particularly within enterprises. They are often used as internal documentation for in-house systems and applications. The "open to everyone", all-encompassing nature of Wikipedia is a significant factor in its growth, while many other wikis are highly specialized. Look up company in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Computer software is said to have Internal Documentation if the notes on how and why various parts operate is included in the source code as comments. ... Wikipedia (IPA: , or ( ) is a multilingual, web-based, free content encyclopedia project, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization. ...


There also exist WikiNodes which are pages on wikis that describe related wikis. They are usually organized as neighbors and delegates. A neighbor wiki is simply a wiki that may discuss similar content or may otherwise be of interest. A delegate wiki is a wiki that agrees to have certain content delegated to that wiki.


One way of finding a wiki on a specific subject is to follow the wiki-node network from wiki to wiki; another is to take a Wiki "bus tour," for example: Wikipedia's Tour Bus Stop. Domain names containing "wiki" are growing in popularity to support specific niches. The Domain Name System (DNS) associates various sorts of information with so-called domain names; most importantly, it serves as the phone book for the Internet by translating human-readable computer hostnames, e. ...


For those interested in creating their own wiki, there are many publicly available "wiki farms", some of which can also make private, password-protected wikis. PeanutButterWiki, Socialtext, Wetpaint, and Wikia are popular examples of such services. For more information, see List of wiki farms. Note that free wiki farms generally contain advertising on every page. For those interested in how to build a successful wiki community, and encourage wiki use, Wikipatterns is a guide to the stages of wiki adoption and a collection of community-building and content-building strategies. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... PeanutButterWiki or PBwiki is a commercial wiki farm run by David Weekly. ... Socialtext Incorporated is a company based in Palo Alto, California that produces enterprise social software, including a software platform by the same name. ... Wetpaint is a wiki hosting service (or wiki farm) founded in October 2005. ... Wikia (no official pronunciation[2]; originally Wikicities) is a selective wiki hosting service (or wiki farm) operated by Wikia, Inc. ... This is a list of Wiki farms: See also Wikibooks:Wiki Science:How to start a Wiki - lots more information and tips Wiki:WikiFarms list of wiki farms from the original wiki Categories: | ...


The English-language Wikipedia has the largest user base among all wikis[10] and ranks in the top twenty among all websites in terms of traffic.[11] Other large wikis include the WikiWikiWeb, Memory Alpha, Wikitravel, World66 and Susning.nu, a Swedish-language knowledge base. The largest wikis are listed and updated on Wikimedia's "meta" wiki. WikiWikiWeb The WikiWikiWeb, or simply WikiWiki or Wiki (with a capital W), is the first ever wiki, written in Perl. ... Memory Alpha (often abbreviated to MA) is a collaborative project to create the most definitive, accurate and accessible encyclopedic reference for topics related to the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... World66 is a Dutch company which embraced the open content idea and is currently trying to transform it into a profitable business. ... Current logo of Susning. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Wikis and content management systems

Wikis have shared and encouraged several features with generalized content management systems (CMS), which are used by enterprises and communities-of-practice. Those looking to compare a CMS with an enterprise wiki should consider these basic features: Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... A Content Management System (CMS) is a software system used for content management. ...

  1. The name of an article is embedded in the hyperlink.
  2. Articles can be created or edited at anytime by anyone (with certain limitations for protected articles).
  3. Articles are editable through the web browser.
  4. Each article provides one-click access to the history/versioning page, which also supports version differencing ("diff") and retrieving prior versions.
  5. The most recent additions/modifications of articles can be monitored actively or passively.
  6. Easy revert of changes is possible.

None of these are particular to a wiki, and some have developed independently. Still the concept of a wiki unequivocally refers to this core set of features. Taken together, they fit the generative nature of the Internet, in encouraging each user to help build it.[12] It is yet to be studied whether an enterprise wiki encourages more usage, or leads to more knowledgeable community members, than other content management systems.


See also

Find more about wiki on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
Meta has related information at:

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Image File history File links Metawiki. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Content Management System (CMS) is a software system used for content management. ... Customer Engagement (CE) refers to the engagement of customers with one another, with a company or a brand. ... The term massively distributed collaboration was coined by Mitchell Kapor, in a presentation at UC Berkeley on 2005-11-09, to describe an emerging activity of wikis and electronic mailing lists and blogs and other content-creating virtual communities online. ... Revision control (also known as version control (system) (VCS), source control or (source) code management (SCM)) is the management of multiple revisions of the same unit of information. ... It has been suggested that History of social software be merged into this article or section. ... Structured wikis provide database-like manipulation of fields stored on pages, and usually offer an extraction and presentation language or markup with functionality somewhat similar to SQL. // Wikis are typically used as shared whiteboards that allows users to add, remove, or otherwise edit all content very quickly and easily. ... The Wikipedia community is the group of people who edit and volunteer their time to build Wikipedia[1][2][3][4][5] and to select what content in Wikipedia is best representative of the projects work. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Personal wikis allow people to link information on their desktop or mobile computing devices in a similar way to how a community wiki links information across the internet. ... A Bliki (also known as a WikiLog, Wog, WikiWeblog, Wikiblog, or Bloki), is combination of the two Internet concepts of a blog and wiki. ... A Semantic Wiki is a Wiki that has an underlying model of the knowledge described in its pages beyond structured structrued text and hyperlinks. ... Structured wikis provide database-like manipulation of fields stored on pages, and usually offer an extraction and presentation language or markup with functionality somewhat similar to SQL. // Wikis are typically used as shared whiteboards that allows users to add, remove, or otherwise edit all content very quickly and easily. ... A corporate wiki is a wiki application designed to be used in a corporate context. ... Peer-to-peer wiki is a server-less system that allows wiki sites to be shared between peers. ... Wiki software is a type of collaborative software that runs a wiki system. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A wiki application (also known as an application wiki) is a web application that runs on a wiki. ... A wiki-based database is a collection of wiki files that can be accessed using SQL-like commands. ... Wikitext as it is used in Wikipedia Wikitext language or wiki markup is a markup language that offers a simplified alternative to HTML and is used to write pages in wiki websites such as Wikipedia. ... InterWiki is a facility for creating links to the many wiki wiki webs on the World Wide Web. ... // This is an incomplete list of wikis (sites based on the wiki model) of comparative notability. ... This is a list of notable wiki software applications. ... A wiki farm is a server or an array of servers that provides hosting for a wiki, or a group of wikis hosted on such servers. ... The following tables compare general and technical information for a number of wiki software packages. ... Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) can be defined broadly as any form of data exchange across two or more networked computers. ... Online discourse environments are online spaces where people interact with one another by some means of discourse. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... An electronic mailing list, a type of Internet forum, is a special usage of e-mail that allows for widespread distribution of information to many Internet users. ... A typical Internet forum discussion, with common elements such as quotes and spoiler brackets A page from a forum showcasing emoticons and Internet slang An Internet forum is a web application for holding discussions and posting user generated content. ... Synchronous conferencing is the formal term used in science, in particular in computer-mediated communication, collaboration and learning, to describe text chat technologies. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Chat room. ... // Instant messaging (IM) is a form of real-time communication between two or more people based on typed text. ... A chat room or chatroom is a term used primarily by mass media to describe any form of synchronous conferencing, occasionally even asynchronous conferencing. ... Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a form of instant communication over the Internet. ... Web chat sites are websites that allow users to communicate in real time using easily accessible web interfaces. ... Web conferencing is used to conduct live meetings or presentations over the Internet. ... It has been suggested that H.331 be merged into this article or section. ... Data Conferencing refers to a communication session among two or more participants sharing computer data in real time. ... Voice chat is a modern form of communication used on the Internet. ... IP Telephony, also called Internet telephony, is the technology that makes it possible to have a telephone conversation over the Internet or a dedicated Internet Protocol (IP) network instead of dedicated voice transmission lines. ... This article needs to be wikified. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c "wiki",Britannica, 2007
  2. ^ Ward Cunningham's original description of Wiki.
  3. ^ Cunningham, Ward. Correspondence on the Etymology of Wiki. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.
  4. ^ Cunningham, Ward. Wiki History. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.
  5. ^ Cunningham, Ward. Wiki Wiki Hyper Card. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.
  6. ^ March 2007 new words, OED. Retrieved on 2007-03-16.
  7. ^ a b c d Richard Heigl, Markus Glaser, Anja Ebersbach(2006), p.51–54.
  8. ^ Richard Heigl, Markus Glaser, Anja Ebersbach(2006), p.10.
  9. ^ Soft Security. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.
  10. ^ WikiStats by S23. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  11. ^ Alexa Web Search - Top 500. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  12. ^ Zittrain, Jonathan. The Generative Internet. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Jonathan Zittrain Jonathan Zittrain (born 1969) holds the Chair in Internet Governance and Regulation at Oxford University and is a principal of the Oxford Internet Institute. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Aigrain, Philippe (2003). The Individual and the Collective in Open Information Communities. Invited talk at the 16th Bled Electronic Commerce Conference, Bled, Slovenia, June 11, 2003.
  • Aronsson, Lars (2002). Operation of a Large Scale, General Purpose Wiki Website: Experience from susning.nu's first nine months in service. Paper presented at the 6th International ICCC/IFIP Conference on Electronic Publishing, November 8, 2002, Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic.
  • Benkler, Yochai (2002). Coase's penguin, or, Linux and The Nature of the Firm. The Yale Law Journal. v.112, n.3, pp.369–446.
  • Choate, Mark (2006). What makes an enterprise wiki? CMS Watch. April 28, 2006.
  • Cunningham, Ward and Leuf, Bo (2001): The Wiki Way. Quick Collaboration on the Web. Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-71499-X.
  • Delacroix, Jérôme (2005): Les wikis, espaces de l'intelligence collective, M2 Editions, Paris, ISBN 2-9520514-4-5.
  • Ebersbach, Anja, Glaser, Markus and Heigl, Richard (2005): Wiki. Web Collaboration. Springer, ISBN 3-540-25995-3.
  • Heigl, Richard; Glaser, Markus; Ebersbach Anja (2006): Wiki: web collaboration. Springer, ISBN 3540229396
  • Jansson, Kurt (2002): "Wikipedia. Die Freie Enzyklopädie." Lecture at the 19th Chaos Communications Congress (19C3), December 27, 2002 intermot Berlin, Germany.
  • Klobas, Jane and others (2006): Wikis: Tools for Information Work and Collaboration. Oxford, UK, Chandos Publishing, ISBN 1-84334-179-4.
  • Lange, Christoph (ed., 2006). Wikis und Blogs – Planen, Einrichten, Verwalten. Computer- und Literaturverlag, ISBN 3-936546-44-4.
  • Mattison, David (2003). "QuickiWiki, Swiki, TWiki, ZWiki, and the Plone Wars: Wiki as PIM and Collaborative Content Tool." Searcher: The Magazine for Database Professionals, v. 11, no. 4 (April 2003): 32–48
  • Möller, Erik (2003). Loud and clear: How Internet media can work. Presentation at the Open Cultures conference, June 5 & 6, 2003 Vienna, Austria.
  • Möller, Erik (2003). Tanz der Gehirne. Telepolis, May 9–30. Four parts: (i) "Das Wiki-Prinzip", (ii) "Alle gegen Brockhaus", (iii) "Diderots Traumtagebuch", und (iv) "Diesen Artikel bearbeiten".
  • Nakisa, Ramin (2003). "Wiki Wiki Wah Wah"[dead link]. Linux User and Developer v.29, pp.42 sanyodenki
  • Remy, Melanie. (2002). Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Online Information Review. v.26, n.6, p.434
  • New Media: Who are the real winners now we've all gone Wiki-crazy?, The Independent, June 26, 2006.
  • Father of Wiki Speaks Out on Community and Collaborative Development, eWeek, March 20, 2006.

is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wiki Way cover The Wiki Way: Quick collaboration on the Web by Bo Leuf and Ward Cunningham is a book about the WikiWiki collaborative editing system, such as that used on Wikipedia. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Linux User and Developer is a magazine about Linux. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... eWeek:the Enterprise Newsweekly is a weekly magazine published by Ziff Davis Media, featuring editorials, reviews, labs and rumors. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Anti-patterns, comprises the study or specific repeated practices that appear initially to be beneficial, but ultimately result in bad consequences that outweigh the hoped-for advantages. ... HowStuffWorks is a website created by Marshall Brain but now owned by the Convex Group. ... Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nature is a prominent scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wiki - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2670 words)
Many wikis will allow completely unrestricted access so that people are able to contribute to the site without necessarily having to undergo a process of 'registration', as had usually been required by various other types of interactive websites such as Internet forums or chat sites.
Wikis are a true hypertext medium, with non-linear navigational structures.
Wikis have shared, and encouraged, several features with generalized content management systems (CMS) which are used by enterprises and communities-of-practice.
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