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Encyclopedia > Whittlesey
Whittlesey
OS Grid Reference: TL271967
Lat/Lon: 52°33′N 0°07′W
Population: 15,581 (2001 Census)
Dwellings: 6,576 (2001 Census)
Formal status: Town
Administration
County: Cambridgeshire
Region: East Anglia
Nation: England
Post Office and Telephone
Post town: Peterborough
Postcode: PE7
Dialling Code: 01733
Map sources for Whittlesey at grid reference TL271967

Whittlesey (historically known as Whittlesea - the name of the railway station is still spelt this way - or Witesie) is an ancient Fenland market town around six miles (10 km) east of Peterborough in the county of Cambridgeshire in England. It has a population of around 15,000 (including the neighbouring parishes of Coates, Eastrea and Pondersbridge). The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... A dwelling is a structure in which humans or other animals live. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Norfolk and Suffolk, the core area of East Anglia. ... Home Nations is a term used to refer to the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (collectively, but also as separate entities, distinct from the United Kingdom as a whole), or the nations of the British Isles (traditionally England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland). ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK and Australian postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Image File history File links Dot4gb. ... Image File history File links Gb4dot. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... Whittlesea railway station serves the town of Whittlesey in Cambridgeshire, England. ... Fenland is a local government district in Cambridgeshire, England. ... The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... For the city in Canada, see Peterborough, Ontario. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ...

Contents

Location

Whittlesey is located between the city of Peterborough, 6 miles (10 km) to the west and the town of March, 11 miles (18 km) to the east, and is bordered to the north by the River Nene and to the south by Whittlesey Dyke. Historically it was connected to Peterborough and March by the Roman road Fen Causeway constructed in the first century AD, a route approximately followed by the modern A605. The rail station is on the line between Peterborough and Ely (historically the Great Eastern Line), with direct trains to Cambridge, Birmingham, Liverpool, Leicester, Stansted Airport and others. The River Nene is a river in the east of England. ... Fen Causeway or the Fen Road is the modern name for a Roman road of England that runs between Denver in the east and Peterborough in the west. ... For the city in Canada, see Peterborough, Ontario. ... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY... Shown within Cambridgeshire Geography Status: City (1951) Region: East of England Admin. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Liverpool is a city and metropolitan borough in Merseyside, England, along the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary. ... Leicester city centre, looking towards the Clock Tower Leicester (pronounced ) is the largest city in the East Midlands of England. ... Terminal building, designed by Sir Norman Foster Stansted Airport is a medium-sized passenger airport with a single runway, located in the English county of Essex about thirty miles north of London. ...


History and architecture

Whittlesey appears in the Domesday Book as Witesie, but it is probable that the name derives from Whittle's Ea, where Ea is a Saxon term for an island. Indeed the land was once owned and presided over by a man named 'Whittle', so the name literally translates as 'Whittle's Island'. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ...


Before the draining of the fens, Whittlesey was an island of dry ground surrounded by the marshy fens. Excavations of nearby Flag Fen indicate thriving local settlements as far back as 1000 BC. In more recent times Whittlesey was linked to Peterborough in the west and March in the east by the Roman Fen Causeway, probably built in the 1st century AD, and Roman artifacts have been recovered at nearby Eldernell. Flag fen near Peterborough, England is a bronze age site, probably religious. ... For the city in Canada, see Peterborough, Ontario. ... Location within the British Isles March is a historic market town in the Cambridgeshire fens, on the River Nene. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Fen Causeway or the Fen Road is the modern name for a Roman road of England that runs between Denver in the east and Peterborough in the west. ...


At one time Whittlesey is thought to have had its own abbey, but subsequently the town's two parishes of St Mary's and St Andrew's were controlled by the abbeys in Thorney and Ely respectively until the Dissolution of the Monasteries (c.1540). St Mary's church dates back to the fifteenth century, but the majority of the building is later, and the church now boasts one of the largest buttressed spires in Cambridgeshire. St Andrew's is a mixture of perpendicular and decorated styles and has records back to 1635. The parishes were combined for administrative purposes by the Whittlesey Improvement Act of 1849. Despite the proximity of Peterborough, Whittlesey is in the Diocese of Ely. The Dissolution of the Monasteries, referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the formal process during the English Reformation by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the monastic institutions in England between 1538 and 1541. ... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY...


Until its draining in 1851, nearby Whittlesey mere was the largest lake in southern England, and the town is still accessible by water, connected to the river Nene by King's Dyke.


Other notables include the market cross, known as the butter cross, dating back to 1680, the old town hall (once also serving as the fire station, and now the town museum) of 1857 and a number of thatched walls.


Straw Bear

The festival of the straw bear is an ancient custom in many English towns, but in Whittlesey is still celebrated today. Starting on Plough Monday (the first Monday after twelfth night) one of the locals was outfitted head to foot in straw and danced from house to house in exchange for gifts of money, food or more importantly beer. The festival was of a stature that farmers would often reserve their best straw for the making of the bear. Plough Monday is the traditional start of the English agricultural year. ... Twelfth Night has at least three meanings: Twelfth Night (holiday), celebrated by some Christians Twelfth Night, or What You Will, a comedic play by William Shakespeare Twelfth Night (band), a progressive rock band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share...


The custom died out at the beginning of the 20th century, but was resurrected by the Whittlesea Society in 1980.


Sir Harry Smith

Whittlesey's most famous son is undoubtedly Sir Harry George Waklyn Smith (1788-1860), hero of the Battle of Aliwal (India), whose life has been the subject of several books. His illustrious military career saw him rise from a cavalryman in the Whittlesea troop up to the rank of Major General, and Baronet of Aliwal. He was governor of the Cape of Good Hope from 1847-1852 during a period of intense unrest, and whilst he eventually lost the faith of his superiors, he was welcomed back to England a hero. Lieutenant-General Harry George Wakelyn Smith (28 June 1787-12 October 1860) was a notable English soldier and military commander of the early 19th century. ... Combatants Great Britain Sikhs Commanders Sir Harry Smith Runjoor Singh The Battle of Aliwal was fought on January 28, 1846 between the British and the Sikhs. ... The Cape of Good Hope; looking towards the west, from the coastal cliffs above Cape Point. ...


Sir Harry is commemorated throughout the Whittlesey area, giving his name to a local school and community centre, among others, and with statues in the centre of town and St Mary's church and a pub named "The Hero of Aliwal" in his honour.


Brian J. Ford

A distinguished resident of Eastrea, a hamlet to the east of Whittlesey, is the scientist and author Brian J. Ford. He is well known for BBC programmes and his many books. Ford is chairman of the Bulls and Herds Grass, a local grant-giving charity also known as the Storers. Brian J. Ford is an English independent scientist, prolific author and popular interpreter of scientific issues for the general populace, whose scientific papers and numerous books have been published internationally. ...


See also

This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the county of Cambridgeshire, England. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Whittlesey - definition of Whittlesey in Encyclopedia (680 words)
Whittlesey (historically known as Whittlesea - the name of the railway station is still spelt this way - or Witesie) is a ancient Fenland market town around 6 miles east of Peterborough in the county of Cambridgeshire in England.
Whittlesey is located between the city of Peterborough, 6 miles to the west and the town of March, 11 miles to the east, and is bordered to the north by the River Nene and to the south by Whittlesey Dyke.
Despite the proximity of Peterborough, Whittlesey is in the Diocese of Ely.
law.com - Decision (2097 words)
Whittlesey argues that the decision of the Court of Appeals of Maryland violates his constitutional double jeopardy rights because, after being prosecuted for robbery and assault with intent to rob, he was subsequently prosecuted for first degree murder.
Whittlesey was sentenced to a ten-year term for the robbery, a consecutive fifteen-year term for the theft of the automobile and the remaining convictions were merged.
Whittlesey was indicted for first degree murder, which in Maryland is proven by a determination by the trier of fact that the homicide (1) was wilful, deliberate, and premeditated, or (2) was committed in the perpetration of a felony (felony murder).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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