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Encyclopedia > Whitelaw Reid
Whitelaw Reid
Whitelaw Reid

Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor, as well as the author of a popular history of Ohio in the Civil War. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (450x615, 41 KB)Whitelaw Reid source This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (450x615, 41 KB)Whitelaw Reid source This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... October 27 is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 65 days remaining. ... | Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... United States is the current Good Article Collaboration of the week! Please help to improve this article to the highest of standards. ... During the American Civil War, nearly 320,000 Ohioans served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York and Pennsylvania. ...


A native of Ohio, Reid graduated from Miami University with honors in 1856. At Miami, he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon, and lobbied for the expulsion of the six members who ultimately went on to found Sigma Chi (Thomas Cowan Bell, James Parks Caldwell, Daniel William Cooper, Isaac M. Jordan, Benjamin Piatt Runkle, and Franklin Howard Scobey.) He was the longtime editor of the New York Tribune and close friend of Horace Greeley. He was a leader of the Liberal Republican movement in 1872. Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Miami University, founded in 1809, is the second-oldest public university west of the Allegheny Mountains and seventh-oldest public university in the United States. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D K E or Deke) is the second oldest secret college mens fraternity of New England origin. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest international all-male college social fraternities, with chapters at universities predominantly in the United States and several in Canada. ... Thomas Cowan Bell (1832 - 1919) was born near Dayton, Ohio. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Daniel William Cooper was born near Frederickstown, Ohio. ... Isaac M. Jordan, born on a farm in central Pennsylvania, was 20 years old when he became one of the founding members of the Sigma Chi Fraternity in 1855 at Miami University. ... Benjamin Piatt Runkle, one of the original seven founders of Sigma Chi fraternity, was born in West Liberty, Ohio on September 3, 1836. ... Franklin Howard Scobey was one of the founding members of the Sigma ChiFraternity. ... The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ... Photographic portrait of Greeley Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811–November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... Liberal Republicans were an American political party that existed during the 1872 election. ...


A Republican, he had an illustrious career as an diplomat, serving as U.S. ambassador to France from 1889 to 1892, and again as U.S. Ambassador to the Court of St. James from 1905 to 1912. In 1892, he was the Republican vice presidential nominee on a ticket headed by incumbent President Benjamin Harrison. Reid was given a spot on the Peace Commission following the Spanish-American War. Manhattanville College in Purchase, New York of Westchester County is currently located on his former estate. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The office of United States Ambassador (or Minister) to the United Kingdom (also known as Ambassador to the Court of St. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Dick Cheney 46th and current Vice President (2001- ) The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States, serving one term from 1889 to 1893. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba First Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Casualties 379 U.S. dead; considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties Unknown[1] The Spanish-American War took place... The architectural and administrative centerpiece of the Manhattanville campus, Reid Hall (1864), is named after Whitelaw Reid owner of the New York Tribune. ... Purchase, New York is part of the town of Harrison, in Westchester County. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ...


He is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery near Sleepy Hollow, New York. Sleepy Hollow Cemetery is the resting place of numerous famous figures, including Washington Irving, whose story The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is set in the adjacent Old Dutch Burying Ground. ... Sleepy Hollow is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ...


Trivia

Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States, serving one term from 1889 to 1893. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Miami University, founded in 1809, is the second-oldest public university west of the Allegheny Mountains and seventh-oldest public university in the United States. ... Reid Hall is a complex of academic facilities owned and operated by Columbia University that is located in the Montparnasse district of Paris, France. ... A typical American college dorm room Many colleges and universities are now using the term residence hall (UK: halls of residence) instead of dormitory. ... Political science is an academic and research discipline that deals with the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ...

External links

Preceded by:
Levi P. Morton
Republican Party Vice Presidential candidate
1892 (lost)
Succeeded by:
Garret Hobart

  Results from FactBites:
 
Whitelaw Reid - LoveToKnow 1911 (300 words)
WHITELAW REID (1837-), American journalist and diplomatist, was born of Scotch parentage, near Xenia, Ohio, on the 27th of October 1837.
He graduated at Miami University in 1856, and spoke frequently in behalf of John C. Fremont, the Republican candidate for the presidency in that year; was superintendent of schools of South Charleston, Ohio, in 1856-58, and in 1858-59 was editor of the Xenia News.
He declined an appointment as United States minister to Germany in 1877 and again in 1881, but served as minister to France in 1889-92, and in 1892 was the unsuccessful Republican candidate for vice-president on the ticket with Benjamin Harrison.
Whitelaw Reid Biography and Summary (133 words)
Whitelaw Reid was a journalist who achieved fame in Civil War battle reports--some of which stand as classics--and who wielded power and influence as editor of the New York Tribune for more than thirty years.
Whitelaw Reid(October 27, 1837- December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor, as well as the author of a popular history of Ohio in the Civil War.
A native of Ohio, Reid graduated from Miami University with honors in 1856.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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