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Encyclopedia > White movement
Armies of Russia

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Army (1721-1917) A Red Army is a communist army. ... // Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias... Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ...


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White Guard (1917-1921) Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ...


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Red Army (1918-1991) The Workers and Peasants Red Army (Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия, Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya; RKKA or usually simply the Red Army) were the armed forces first organized by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918 and that in 1922 became the army of the Soviet Union. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


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Army (1991-Present) The Russian Ground Forces (Russian: Сухопутные силы России) are the land forces of Russia, formed from parts of the collapsing Soviet Army in 1992. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The White movement, whose military arm is known as the White Army (Белая Армия) or White Guard (Белая Гвардия, белогвардейцы) and whose members are known as Whites (Белые, or the derogatory Беляки) or White Russians (a term that has other meanings) comprised some of the Russian forces, both political and military, which opposed the Bolsheviks after the October Revolution and fought against the Red Army during the Russian Civil War from 1918 to 1921 (as did the Ukrainian nationalist Green Army and the anarchist Black Army). White army may refer to: The military arm of the White movement, a loose coalition of anti-Bolshevik forces in the Russian Civil War The Saudi Arabian National Guard The National Guard of Kuwait Category: ... The term White Russian may refer to: A member of the White movement, which opposed the Bolsheviks after the October Revolution and fought against the Red Army during the Russian Civil War. ... Bolshevik Party Meeting. ... Red October redirects here. ... The Workers and Peasants Red Army (Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия, Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya; RKKA or usually simply the Red Army) were the armed forces first organized by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918 and that in 1922 became the army of the Soviet Union. ... Combatants Red Army (Bolsheviks) White Army (Monarchists, SRs, Anti-Communists) Green Army (Peasants and Nationalists) Black Army (Anarchists) Commanders Leon Trotsky Mikhail Tukhachevsky Semyon Budyonny Lavr Kornilov, Alexander Kolchak, Anton Denikin, Pyotr Wrangel Alexander Antonov, Nikifor Grigoriev Nestor Makhno Strength 5,427,273 (peak) +1,000,000 Casualties 939,755... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... The Green Army, which functioned during the Russian Civil War, had its roots in nonpolitical, anarchist or nationalist movements, and formed a third force in contradistinction both to the Reds and to the Whites. ... The Black Guards flag, whit Nestor Makhno. ...

White Army armoured train's flag with "To Moscow!" slogan inscribed on it, now stored in the Moscow Red Army museum
White Army armoured train's flag with "To Moscow!" slogan inscribed on it, now stored in the Moscow Red Army museum

Contents

ImageMetadata File history File links Namoskvu. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Namoskvu. ... An armoured train is a train protected with armour. ... The Workers and Peasants Red Army (Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия, Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya; RKKA or usually simply the Red Army) were the armed forces first organized by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918 and that in 1922 became the army of the Soviet Union. ...

Structure and Ideology

The designation White has several interpretations. First, it stood in contradistinction to the Reds—the revolutionary Red Army who supported the soviets and Communism. Second, the word "white" had monarchist associations: historically each Russian Tsar was solemnly called the white tsar. The Workers and Peasants Red Army (Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия, Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya; RKKA or usually simply the Red Army) were the armed forces first organized by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918 and that in 1922 became the army of the Soviet Union. ... A soviet (Russian: сове́т) originally was a workers local council in late Imperial Russia. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ...


Strictly speaking, no monolithic "White Army" existed; lacking central coordination, the White forces were never more than a loose confederation of counter-revolutionary forces. The officers who made up the core of the White Army mostly upheld monarchist ideals, and the White Army as a whole generally believed in a united multinational Russia (being opposed to separatists who wanted to create nation-states in the place of the old Russian Empire). Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A monarchy, from the Greek μονος, one, and αρχειν, to rule, is a form of government that has a monarch as head of state. ... The term nation-state, while often used interchangeably with the terms unitary state and independent state, refers properly to the parallel occurence of a state and a nation. ...


The White Army also drew support from other political movements, including democrats, social revolutionaries, and others who opposed the October Revolution; at other times and in other places, the same groups supported the Red Army instead. Socialist-Revolutionary election poster, 1917. ... Red October redirects here. ...


The rank-and-file troops of the White Army included both active opponents of the Bolsheviks (many Cossacks, for example), and spanned a variety of volunteers and conscripts, from nobles to peasants. Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks to Sultan Mehmed IV of Ottoman Empire. ...


Some leaders of the White movement, particularly General Wrangel, formulated political concepts based on Russian traditionalism that were taken up and developed in emigre circles after the end of the Civil War by Russian thinkers such as Ivan Ilyin; who had many philosophical similarities with the Slavophiles. This became known as the "White Idea". Baron Wrangel At a prayer vigil upon accepting command. ... A tradition is a story or a custom that is memorized and passed down from generation to generation, originally without the need for a writing system. ... A White emigré (in Russian Beloemigrant, or Белоэмигрант) is a term used to describe a Russian who had left Russia in the wake of the Russian Revolution and Russian Civil War. ... Ivan Ilyin Ivan Alexandrovich Ilyin (Russian: Иван Александрович Ильин) (March 28, 1883 - December 21, 1954) was a Russian religious and political philosopher, and émigré anti-communist publicist associated with the White movement. ... A Slavophile was an advocate of the supremacy of Slavic culture over that of others, especially Western European culture. ...

Emblem of Kolchak government
Emblem of Kolchak government

Monarchist tendencies reached a peak amidst the veterans of the White movement, while republicanism became rarer. The liberal policies of Alexander Kerensky and his socialist-democratic oriented provisional government were seen as largely responsible for preparing the country for the October Revolution. In August of 1922, two months before its defeat, the far eastern White Army of General Mikhail Diterikhs went as far as to convene the Zemskiy Sobor of Preamursk, and elect (without his participation) Grand Duke Nikolai Nikoaievich Romanov as tsar of all Russia. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Alexander Kerensky Alexander Fyodorovich Kerensky (Russian: ; May 2 [O.S. April 22] 1881 – June 11, 1970) was a Russian revolutionary leader who was instrumental in toppling the Russian monarchy. ... Mikhail Diterikhs (in Russian: Михаил Константинович Дитерихс, b. ... The zemsky sobor (Russian: зе́мский собо́р) was the first Russian parliament of the feudal Estates type, in the 16th and 17th centuries. ... Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich Grand Duke Nikolai (Nicholas) Nikolayevich Romanov (Russian: Николай Николаевич Романов (младший - the younger)) (6 November 1856 - 5 January 1929) was a Russian general in World War I. A grandson of Nicholas I of Russia, he was commander in chief of the Russian armies on the main... Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ...


There were also external groups such as the Green Army as well as the Black Army of Nestor Makhno, who declared themselves against both the Reds and Whites, although occasionally they sought alliances with one side or the other. The Green Army, which functioned during the Russian Civil War, had its roots in nonpolitical, anarchist or nationalist movements, and formed a third force in contradistinction both to the Reds and to the Whites. ... Black Army can refer to several different groups and affiliations: Black Guards Matthias Corvinus Black Army Revolutionary Insurrectionary Army of Ukraine a term used for several anarchist fractions of the Russian Civil War the supporter club of the Swedish sports association Allmänna idrottsklubben (AIK) This is a disambiguation page... Nestor Makhno. ...


At times the Western Allies, the Central Powers, and other foreign forces provided assistance to several White Army units. This caused the Soviets to accuse the White Army of representing the interests of foreign powers.


Theaters of Operation

The Russian Civil War between Whites and Reds raged from November of 1917 until 1921, with isolated pockets of resistance continuing in the Far East until 1923. The White Army, with the occasional aid of Allied (and sometimes, Central powers) forces from outside Russia (Japanese, British, Canadian, French, American, German, Australian (including two who recieved the Victoria Cross for their actions against the Red Army), Greek, Czechoslovak) held sway in some areas (especially Siberia, Ukraine and the Crimea) for periods of time and put considerable bodies of troops into the field. But they failed to unite or to co-operate effectively amongst themselves, and the Bolshevik Red Army eventually gained the upper hand. Combatants Red Army (Bolsheviks) White Army (Monarchists, SRs, Anti-Communists) Green Army (Peasants and Nationalists) Black Army (Anarchists) Commanders Leon Trotsky Mikhail Tukhachevsky Semyon Budyonny Lavr Kornilov, Alexander Kolchak, Anton Denikin, Pyotr Wrangel Alexander Antonov, Nikifor Grigoriev Nestor Makhno Strength 5,427,273 (peak) +1,000,000 Casualties 939,755... Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Warning: Value not specified for common_name Motto: Czech: Pravda vítÄ›zí (Truth prevails; 1918-1989) Latin: Veritas Vincit (Truth prevails; 1989-1992) Anthem: Kde domov můj and Nad Tatrou sa blýska Capital Prague Language(s) Czech, Slovak Government Republic President  - 1918-1935 Tomáš Masaryk  - 1989-1992 V... Siberian Federal District (darker red) and the broadest definition of Siberia (red) arctic northeast Siberia Udachnaya pipe Siberia (Russian: , Sibir; Tatar: ) is a vast region of Russia constituting almost all of Northern Asia and comprising a large part of the Euro-Asian Steppe. ... Motto: Процветание в единстве - Prosperity in unity Anthem: Нивы и горы твои волшебны, Родина - Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Capital Simferopol Largest cities Simferopol, Eupatoria, Kerch, Theodosia, Yalta Official language Ukrainian. ... Bolshevik Party Meeting. ... The Workers and Peasants Red Army (Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия, Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya; RKKA or usually simply the Red Army) were the armed forces first organized by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918 and that in 1922 became the army of the Soviet Union. ...


The major theaters of the White armies can be grouped as follows:

  • The Southern front: Started on November 15 1917 by General Mikhail Alekseev and commanded by General Laurus Kornilov, later headed by General Denikin and named the "Armed Forces of the South of Russia". This front had the most massive scale operations and overall posed the most serious threat to the Bolsheviks. In the beginning, it based itself entirely on volunteer support, a significant amount of it coming from the cossacks who were amidst the first to protest against Bolshevik rule. In 1919, after the Denikin offense on Moscow collapsed, the army was forced into a massive retreat. General Wrangel reorganized the army in Crimea, formed a provisional government (recognized by France), and began a new advance. It quickly failed when Polish leader Józef Piłsudski made a separate peace with the Soviets and withdrew Poland from the war.
  • The Eastern (Siberian) front: Started in the spring of 1918 as an underground movement amidst army officers and right leaning socialist forces. The front began a major offensive in collaboration with Czech troops who were stuck in Siberia (the Bolsheviks would not permit them to leave Soviet Russia). Admiral Kolchak headed the resistance and a provisional Russian government. The army made significant advances in 1919, but was pushed back to the far east where it continued to resist up to October of 1922.
  • The Northern and North-Western fronts: Started immediately after the Bolshevik takeover by Pyotr Krasnov, then headed by General Udenich, General Miller, Prince Liven, and others. These fronts had less coordination than the Southern Army of Denikin, including a few problematic adventurists such as General Bermont Avalov and General Bulakh Bulakhovich (the former declared war on neighboring Estonia). The most notable achievement was the attack on Petrograd, then the capital of Soviet Russia.

The Volunteer Army (Добровольческая армия in Russian, or Dobrovolcheskaya armiya) was a counterrevolutionary army in South Russia during the Russian Civil War of 1918-1920. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Office Chief of State, Marshal of Poland Term of office from November 14, 1918 until December 9, 1922 Profession Statesman Political party none (see Sanacja for details), formerly PPS Spouse Maria PiÅ‚sudska Aleksandra PiÅ‚sudska Date of birth December 5, 1867 Place of birth Zułów, in todays... Ataman Pyotr Krasnov Pyotr Nikolayevich Krasnov (Петр Николаевич Краснов in Russian) (September 22 (10 O.S.), 1869 — January 17, 1947), sometimes referred to in English as Peter Krasnov, was Lieutenant General of the Russian army when the revolution broke out in 1917, and one of the leaders of the counterrevolutionary White movement afterwards. ... Saint Petersburg  listen (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991...

Post-Civil War

After the loss of the Russian civil war, most Whites felt that their feat was necessary to "save the honor of Russia", believing that passivity towards the Soviet regime's takeover of their country would have been anti-patriotic of them. Some others, despondent over their loss and exile, began to feel patriotic sentiments towards the Soviet Union and in some cases returned.


White activity re-concentrated in White emigre circles. Considerable numbers of anti-Soviet Russians clustered in Belgrade, Berlin, Paris, Harbin, Istanbul, and Shanghai, setting up military and cultural networks, which lasted through World War II. Thereafter White Russian activity found a new principal home in the United States. A White emigré (in Russian Beloemigrant, or Белоэмигрант) is a term used to describe a Russian who had left Russia in the wake of the Russian Revolution and Russian Civil War. ... Belgrade (Serbian: Београд or Beograd  ) is the capital and largest city of Serbia. ... Berlin is the capital city and one of the sixteen states of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Harbin on a map of China For other meanings of Harbin, see Harbin (disambiguation). ... Istanbul (Turkish: Ä°stanbul, Greek: , historically known in English as Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


In the 1920's and 30's, several White organizations were formed outside Russia with the intention of overthrowing the Soviet government through guerrilla warfare. These included the Russian All-Military Union, the Brotherhood of Russian Truth, and the National Alliance of Russian Solidarists. Seriously challenged by the Soviet secret police agencies and having limited contact with the Soviet population, such attempts were not successful and ended up costing lives. Look up guerrilla in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Russian All-Military Union (in Russian Русский Обще Воинский Союз, abbreviated as РОВС) was founded by White Army General Pyotr Wrangel in Yugoslavia on September 1st, 1924. ... The flag of the BRP The Brotherhood of Russian Truth (in Russian: Братство Русской Правды) was a Russian patriotic organization established by Pyotr Krasnov and other former members of the White movement, for the purpose of overthrowing Bolshevism in Soviet Russia. ... The National Alliance of Russian Solidarists (in Russian Национально Трудовой Союз), known by its Russian abbreviation NTS is a Russian patriotic anticommunist organization founded in 1930 by a group of young Russian anticommunist emigres in Belgrade. ...


Russian cadet corps were founded in several countries in order to prepare the next generation for the "spring campaign" (a term coined by white emigres meaning a hoped for renewal of their campaign against the Bolsheviks). A significant amount of these cadets volunteered for service in the Russian Corps during World War II, when many white Russians desired to participate in the Russian Liberation Movement. The Russian Corps, the Russian Guard Corps, the Russian Corps in Serbia, the Separate Russian Corps (Русский Охранный Корпус, Русский Корпус в Сербии, Russisches Schutzkorps Serbien) was an armed force that existed from 1941 to 1945 in Yugoslavia, predominantly composed of anti-communist Russian emigres. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Russian Liberation Movement (Русское Освободительное Движение) is a term used to describe Russians during World War II who tried to create an anti-communist armed force which would topple the regime of Joseph Stalin. ...


Historiographical Perspectives

Soviet historiography has tended to paint the Civil War as primarily a war of foreign intervention, White generals were stereotyped as monarchists who were bankrolled by foreign governments and business tycoons, wealthy Russian land owners, and the Russian Orthodox Church. The White army was portrayed as an army formed of people from the upper classes (the nobility) as well as forced peasant conscripts. The Russian Orthodox Church (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is that body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ...


Prominent persons of the White movement

General Mikhail Alekseev Mikhail Vasiliyevich Alekseeev (Russian: Алексеев, Михаил Васильевич) (November 3, 1857 — September 25, 1918) was a Russian military officer before and during World War I, and one of the leaders of counterrevolutionary forces in 1917-1918. ... General StanisÅ‚aw BuÅ‚ak-BaÅ‚achowicz StanisÅ‚aw BuÅ‚ak-BaÅ‚achowicz (Belarusian Станіслаў Булак-Балаховіч, Russian Станислав Булак-Балахович) (1883-1940) was a Polish-Belarusian general, veteran of World War I, Russian Civil War, Polish-Bolshevik War and Polish Defensive War of 1939. ... Pavel Rafalovich Bermondt-Avalov (1884-1973) was an Ussuri Cossack and warlord who led the Bermontians, a group of adventurers who captured Riga in October 1919 and attempted to set up a pro-German government there. ... Anton Denikin on the day of his resignation in 1920 Anton Ivanovich Denikin (Анто́н Ива́нович Дени́кин) (December 16, 1872 - August 8, 1947) was one of the foremost leaders of the counter-revolutionary White Russian forces in the civil war. ... General Mikhail Drozdovsky Mikhail Gordeevich Drozdovsky (Russian: Михаил Гордеевич Дроздовский )(October 7, 1881- January 1, 1919), Russian army officer and one of the leaders of counterrevolutionary White movement during Russian Civil War. ... Mikhail Diterikhs (in Russian: Михаил Константинович Дитерихс, b. ... Ataman Alexander Dutov Dutov, Alexander Ilyich (Дутов, Александр Ильич in Russian) (1879—1921), one of the leaders of the Cossack counterrevolution in the Urals, Lieutenant General (1919). ... Ivan Ilyin Ivan Alexandrovich Ilyin (Russian: Иван Александрович Ильин) (March 28, 1883 - December 21, 1954) was a Russian religious and political philosopher, and émigré anti-communist publicist associated with the White movement. ... General Kaledin Aleksei Maksimovich Kaledin (Russian:Алексей Максимович Каледин)(October 1861-January 29, 1918), was the leader of the Cossack counterrevolution in the Don region from 1917 to 1918, and a Cavalry General. ... Vladimir Oskarovich Kappel (Russian: , April 28 [O.S. April 16] 1883—January 25, 1920) was a White Russian military leader. ... Aleksandr Vasiliyevich Kolchak (Александр Васильевич Колчак in Russian) (November 4 (November 16 NS), 1874 - February 7, 1920) was a Russian naval commander and later head of part of... Lavr Georgiyevich Kornilov (Russian: Лавр Георгиевич Корнилов) (July 18, 1870–April 13, 1918) was a Russian army general best known for the Kornilov Affair, an unsuccessful military coup he staged against Kerenskys Provisional Government during the 1917 Russian Revolution. ... Pyotr Nikolayevich Krasnov (Петр Николаевич Краснов in Russian) (September 22 (10 O.S.), 1869 — January 17, 1947), sometimes referred to in English as Peter Krasnov, was Lieutenant General of the Russian... Alexander Pavlovich Kutepov (Александр Павлович Кутепов in Russian) (9. ... General Sergey Markov in 1917 Sergey Leonidovich Markov (Russian: Марков Сергей Леонидович) (July 7, 1878 - June 25, 1918) - Russian army general and one of the founders of Volunteer Army counterrevolutionary force of the White movement in the southern Russia during Russian Civil War. ... General Vladimir May-Mayevsky Vladimir Zenonovich May-Mayevsky (Russian: Владимир Зенонович Май-Маевский) (September 15, 1867-November 30, 1920) was a Russian army general and one of the leaders of counterrevolutionary White movement during and after Russian Civil War. ... General Evgenii Miller Evgenii Karlovich Miller (Russian: Миллер Евгений Карлович) (September 25, 1867-May 11, 1937) was Russian general and one of the leaders of counterrevolutionary White movement during and after Russian Civil War. ... Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich Grand Duke Nikolai (Nicholas) Nikolayevich Romanov (Russian: Николай Николаевич Романов (младший - the younger)) (6 November 1856 - 5 January 1929) was a Russian general in World War I. A grandson of Nicholas I of Russia, he was commander in chief of the Russian armies on the main... General Pokrovsky Viktor Leonidovich Pokrovsky (Russian: Покровский Виктор Леонидович) (1889 - November 9, 1922)- Russian lieutenant general and one of the leaders of counterrevolutionary White Army during Russian Civil War. ... Grigory Mikhailovich Semenov (Семёнов, Григорий Михайлович in Russian) (September 13(25), 1890 – August 30, 1946), leader of the counterrevolution in the Baikal region and beyond in 1917-1920, Lieutenant General (1919). ... Andrei Shkuro Andrei Grigoriyevich Shkuro (Shkura) (Андрей Григорьевич Шкуро (Шкура) in Russian) (January 19, 1887 (O.S.: January 7) – January 17, 1947) was a Lieutenant General (1919) of the White Army. ... Baron is a specific title of nobility or a more generic feudal qualification. ... Roman Fyodorovich Ungern von Sternberg, ca 1919 Baron Roman (or Robert) Nicolaus von Ungern-Sternberg, in Russian: Roman Fyodorovich Ungern von Shternberg (Роман Фёдорович Унгерн фон Штернберг; although born von Ungern-Sternberg, in later life he used an incorrect Ungern von Sternberg name) (January 22, 1886, new style — September 15, 1921) a. ... Ariadna Vladimirovna Tyrkova-Williams (November 13, 1869, Saint Petersburg - January 12, 1962, Washington, DC, Ariadna Borman during the first marriage) was a Russian liberal politician, journalist, writer and feminist. ... Baron Wrangel At a prayer vigil upon accepting command. ... General Nikolai Yudenich Nikolai Nikolayevich Yudenich (Николай Николаевич Юденич) (July 18, 1862 (July 30, New Style ) – October 5, 1933), was the most successful general of the Russian Imperial Army during World War I. Later a leader of the counterrevolution in Northwestern Russia during the Russian Civil War of 1918-1920. ...

See also

The Volunteer Army (Добровольческая армия in Russian, or Dobrovolcheskaya armiya) was a counterrevolutionary army in South Russia during the Russian Civil War of 1918-1920. ... Britain, France, Canada and the United States, along with other World War I Allied countries, conducted a military intervention into the Russian Civil War during the period of 1918 through 1920. ... A White emigré (in Russian Beloemigrant, or Белоэмигрант) is a term used to describe a Russian who had left Russia in the wake of the Russian Revolution and Russian Civil War. ... The Russian All-Military Union (in Russian Русский Обще Воинский Союз, abbreviated as РОВС) was founded by White Army General Pyotr Wrangel in Yugoslavia on September 1st, 1924. ... The Russian Corps, the Russian Guard Corps, the Russian Corps in Serbia, the Separate Russian Corps (Русский Охранный Корпус, Русский Корпус в Сербии, Russisches Schutzkorps Serbien) was an armed force that existed from 1941 to 1945 in Yugoslavia, predominantly composed of anti-communist Russian emigres. ... Russian Liberation Movement (Русское Освободительное Движение) is a term used to describe Russians during World War II who tried to create an anti-communist armed force which would topple the regime of Joseph Stalin. ... A soldier of the Russian Liberation Army Russian Liberation Army or ROA (Русская Освободительная Армия, Russkaya Osvoboditelnaya Armiya), also known as the Vlasov army, was a group of volunteer Russian forces allied with Nazi Germany during World War II. The ROA was organized by former Red Army general Andrey Vlasov, who tried... General Vlasov (in glasses) and members of the Committee for the Liberation of the Peoples of Russia The Committee for the Liberation of the Peoples of Russia (in Russian: Комитет Освобождения Народов России, abbreviated as КОНР) was a committee composed of military and civilian anticommunists from the Soviet Union. ... Operation Keelhaul was a programme carried out in Austria by British forces in May and June 1945 that decided the fate of thousands of post-war refugees fleeing eastern Europe. ... Betrayal of Cossacks at Lientz. ... Monument to the Red Latvian Riflemen in Riga, Latvia Latvian riflemen (Latvian: LatvieÅ¡u strÄ“lnieki, Russian: Латышские стрелки) were military formations assembled starting 1915 in Latvia in order to defend Baltic territories against Germans in World War I. Initially the batallions were formed by volunteers, from 1916 by conscription among Latvian... White- (бело-), a prefix used by Bolsheviks to designate their real and alleged enemies of all sorts, by analogy with the White Army. ...

External links

  • Anti-Bolshevik Russia in pictures
  • (English) Museum and Archives of the White Movement
  • (Russian) Memory and Honour Association
  • (Russian) History of the White Movement

  Results from FactBites:
 
White supremacy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1573 words)
White supremacy is most often thought of in connection with anti-fl racism and anti-Semitism, though it has also been used to justify discrimination against anyone that is supposedly not considered "white" such as; Native Americans, Asians, Irish, Arabs, Blacks, Italians, Roman Catholics, Jews, and others.
White supremacy, as with supremacism in general, is rooted in ethnocentrism and a desire for hegemony.
Less extreme white supremacists or white supremacist groups, along with followers of and groups associated with white nationalism and paleo-conservatism are considered to be cowards and traitors by a lot of white supremacists, the latter two groups reciprocate with a conviction that white supremacists and neo-Nazis especially make them all look bad.
White movement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (492 words)
Second, the word "white" had monarchist associations: historically each Russian Tsar was solemnly called the white tsar, and the monarchist ideal during the civil war was known as the white idea.
The White Army, in intermittent collaboration with interventionist forces from outside Russia (Japanese, British, Canadian, French, American) held sway in some areas (especially Siberia, Ukraine and the Crimea) for periods of time and put considerable bodies of troops into the field.
Some leaders of the White movement, particularly General Wrangel, formulated political concepts based on Russian traditionalism that were taken up and developed in émigré circles after the end of the Civil War by Russian thinkers such as Ivan Ilyin; these thinkers were known as Slavophiles.
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