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Encyclopedia > White Poplar
White Poplar
White Poplar foliage
White Poplar foliage
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Malpighiales
Family: Salicaceae
Genus: Populus
Section: Populus
Species: P. alba
Binomial name
Populus alba
L.

The White Poplar (Populus alba) is a species of poplar, most closely related to the aspens (Populus sect. Populus). It is native from Spain and Morocco through central Europe (north to Germany and Poland) to central Asia. It grows in moist sites, often by watersides, in regions with hot summers and cold to mild winters.[1][2] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1106x737, 152 KB) Populus alba branch; note the white undersides to the leaves. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Orders See text. ... Families Family Achariaceae Family Balanopaceae Family Bonnetiaceae Family Caryocaraceae Family Chrysobalanaceae Family Clusiaceae Family Ctenolophonaceae Family Dichapetalaceae Family Elatinaceae Family Erythryloxaceae (coca family) Family Euphorbiaceae (spurge family) Family Euphroniaceae Family Goupiaceae Family Humiriaceae Family Hypericaceae (St Johns wort family) Family Irvingiaceae Family Ixonanthaceae Family Lacistemaceae Family Linaceae (flax family... Genera See text. ... This article is about woody plants of the genus Populus. ... For other uses, see Aspen (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... This article is about woody plants of the genus Populus. ... For other uses, see Aspen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...

White Poplar leaves; underside left, upper side right
White Poplar leaves; underside left, upper side right
White Poplar trunk, showing the characteristic diamond-shaped marks
White Poplar trunk, showing the characteristic diamond-shaped marks

It is a medium-sized deciduous tree, growing to heights of up to 16-27 m (rarely more), with a trunk up to 1 m diameter and a broad rounded crown. The bark is smooth and greenish-white to greyish-white with characteristic diamond-shaped dark marks on young trees, becoming blackish and fissured at the base of old trees. The young shoots are covered with whitish-grey down, including the small buds. The leaves are 4-15 cm long, five-lobed, with a thick covering of white scurfy down on both sides but thicker underneath; this layer wears off the upper side but not the lower, which stays white until autumn leaf fall. Larger, deeply lobed leaves are produced on fast-growing young trees, and smaller, less deeply lobed leaves on older, slow-growing trees. The flowers are catkins up to 8 cm long, produced in early spring; they are dioecious, with male and female catkins on separate trees; the male catkins are grey with conspicuous dark red stamens, the female catkins are greyish-green. The female catkins lengthen to 8–10 cm after pollination, with several green seed capsules, maturing in late spring to early summer. It also propagates by means of root suckers growing from the lateral roots, often as far as 20-30 m from the trunk, to form extensive clonal colonies.[2][3] Image File history File links Populus alba leaves - under side left, upper side right. ... Image File history File links Populus alba leaves - under side left, upper side right. ... Image File history File links Populus alba trunk showing characteristic diamond-shaped marks. ... Image File history File links Populus alba trunk showing characteristic diamond-shaped marks. ... Deciduous forest after leaf fall Like many deciduous plants, Forsythia flowers during the leafless season For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... For other meanings of bark, see Bark (disambiguation). ... Look up foliage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Flower (disambiguation). ... A male catkin on a willow a male flowering catkin on a willow Catkins, or aments, are slim, cylindrical flower clusters, wind-pollinated (anemophilous) and without petals, that can be found in many plant families, including Betulaceae, Fagaceae, Moraceae, and Salicaceae. ... Close-up of an Echinopsis spachiana flower, showing both carpels and stamen, making it a complete flower. ... A sucker emerging from the base of a young tree This stump is almost entirely obscured by suckers. ... A clonal colony is a group of plants (or fungi) that have grown in a given location, all originating vegetatively, not sexually, from a given single ancestor. ...


White Poplar hybridises with the closely related Common Aspen (Populus tremula); the resulting hybrid, known as Grey Poplar (Populus × canescens), is intermediate between its parents, with a thin grey downy coating on the leaves, which are also much less deeply lobed than White Poplar leaves. It is a very vigorous tree with marked hybrid vigour, reaching 40 m tall and over 1.5 m trunk diameter (much larger than either of its parents). Most Grey Poplars in cultivation are male, but female clones are occasionally found.[2] For other uses, see Aspen (disambiguation). ... // This article is about a biological term. ... Heterosis is increased strength of different characteristics in hybrids; the possibility to obtain a better individual by combining the virtues of its parents. ...


Cultivation and uses

It requires abundant light and ample moisture, and stands up well to flood water and slightly acidic soils. Its green-and-white leaves makes it an effective ornamental tree but the root suckers may need to be managed. It is very attractive as an open-grown tree in water meadows, and, because of its tolerance of salt and extensive root system, is used also to strengthen coastal sand dunes.[4] An ornamental plant is a plant species or cultivar that is grown indoors, or in gardens and parks for its amenity value, or for beauty (in its end use), rather than commercial or other value. ... This article is about the sand formations, for other meanings see Dune (disambiguation) Mesquite Flat Dunes in Death Valley National Park In physical geography, a dune is a hill of sand built by eolian (wind-related) processes. ...


The majority of White Poplars in cultivation in northern Europe are female trees.[3]


It has been introduced into North America, especially along the east coast. It is a highly competitive tree and is the most common introduced tree species on Cape Breton Island.[5] For other uses, see Cape Breton. ...


In intensive forest management it is being replaced by various cottonwood hybrids. The wood is soft, and used to make cellulose and for cheap boxes. Species Populus deltoides L. Populus fremontii [[]] Populus nigra L. This article is about the poplar species. ... // This article is about a biological term. ...


A conical cultivar from Turkestan, Populus alba 'Pyramidalis' (Bolle's Poplar; syn. Populus bolleana) is sometimes planted in parks.[2] This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


History

An old English name "Abele", now rarely used, is derived from the Latin albellus, white, by way of Old French aubel and Low German name abeel.[4] For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... Low German (also called Niederdeutsch, Plattdeutsch or Plattdüütsch) is a name for the regional language varieties of the West Germanic languages spoken mainly in Northern Germany where it is officially called Niederdeutsch (Low German), and in Eastern Netherlands where it is officially called Nedersaksisch (Low Saxon). Low refers to...


According to ancient mythology the White Poplar was consecrated to Hercules because he destroyed Cacus in a cavern adjoining the Aventine Hill, which was covered with these trees; and in the moment of his triumph he bound his brows with a branch of White Poplar as a token of his victory. Persons offering sacrifices to Hercules were always crowned with branches of this tree; and all who had gloriously conquered their enemies in battle wore garlands of it, in imitation of Hercules. Homer in the "Iliad" compares the fall of Simoisius when killed by Ajax to that of a poplar. For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Cacus was a fire-breathing giant. ... The Aventine Hill is one of the seven hills on which ancient Rome was built. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... Ajax Ajax or Aias (ancient Greek: ) was a mythological Greek hero, the son of Telamon and Periboea and king of Salamis. ...

So falls a poplar that on watery ground
Raised high its head with stately branches crowned.

Ovid mentions that Paris had carved the name of Ænone on a poplar, as Shakespeare makes Orlando carve the name of Rosalind upon the trees of the forest of Arden. For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Walter Deverell,The Mock Marriage of Orlando and Rosalind, 1853 William Shakespeares As You Like It is a pastoral comedy written in 1599 or early 1600. ... Walter Deverell,The Mock Marriage of Orlando and Rosalind, 1853 William Shakespeares As You Like It is a pastoral comedy written in 1599 or early 1600. ... Arden is a district in Warwickshire, England, traditionally regarded as stretching from the River Avon to the River Tame[1]. The area was formerly heavily wooded and known as the Forest of Arden. ...


Virgil gives directions for the culture of this tree and Horace speaks of the White Poplar as delighting to grow on the banks of rivers.[5] For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Horace, as imagined by Anton von Werner Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. ...


References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Populus alba
  1. ^ Flora Europaea: Populus alba
  2. ^ a b c d Rushforth, K. (1999). Trees of Britain and Europe. Collins ISBN 0-00-220013-9.
  3. ^ a b Flora of NW Europe: Populus alba
  4. ^ a b Vedel, H., & Lange, J. (1960). Trees and Bushes in Wood and Hedgerow. Metheun & Co. Ltd., London.
  5. ^ a b Keeler, H. L. (1900). Our Native Trees and How to Identify Them pp. 428-432. Charles Scriber's Sons, New York

  Results from FactBites:
 
White Poplar (1434 words)
White poplar is dioecious, that is, staminate and pistillate flowers occur on different trees.
White poplar is native to Europe and Asia.
White poplar is an aggressive exotic tree species that can take over portions of natural areas, especially prairie communities, shading out native vegetation.
White Poplar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (424 words)
The White Poplar (Populus alba) is a species of poplar, most closely related to the aspens (Populus sect.
The White Poplar also propagates by means of root suckers growing from the lateral roots, often as far as 20-30 metres from the trunk.
White Poplar hybridises readily with the closely related Common Aspen (Populus tremula); the resulting hybrid, known as Grey Poplar (Populus x canescens), is intermediate between its parents, with a thin grey downy coating on the leaves, which are also much less deeply lobed than White Poplar leaves.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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