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Encyclopedia > White Plains, New York
White Plains (New York)
White Plains
White Plains (New York)
White Plains, New York
Coordinates: 41°2′24″N 73°46′43″W / 41.04, -73.77861
Country United States
State New York
County Westchester
Government
 - Mayor Joseph M. Delfino (Rep)
Area
 - City  10.8 sq mi (23.3 km²)
 - Land  10.4 sq mi (25.7 km²)
 - Water  2.3 sq mi (5.1 km²)
Elevation  213 ft (65 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 53,077
 - Density 5,341.9/sq mi (2,062.5/km²)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 10600-10699
Area code(s) 914
FIPS code 36-81677GR2
GNIS feature ID 0977432GR3
Website: http://www.cityofwhiteplains.com/

White Plains is a city in south-central Westchester County, New York, about 4 miles (6 km) east of the Hudson River and 2.5 miles (4 km) northwest of Long Island Sound. It is bordered to the north by the town of North Castle, to the north and east by the town/village of Harrison, to the south by the town/village of Scarsdale and to the west by the town of Greenburgh. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 53,077, but a 2002 census estimate put the city's population at over 55,000 and subsequent residential development has raised this figure even higher. White Plains is one of the edge cities that have developed outside of New York City. The daytime weekday population is estimated at over 200,000. White Plains is the name of some places in the United States: White Plains, New York (with a population over 50,000, the most populous of all cities that share the name) White Plains, Georgia White Plains, Kentucky White Plains, Maryland White Plains, North Carolina USS White Plains is the... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... Image File history File links Downtown_White_PLains. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the state. ... List of New York counties Map of the counties of New York State (click for larger version) Albany County: formed in 1683 as one of the original 12 counties. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... 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Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... 914 is the area code for Westchester County, New York. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the state. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... New York City waterways: 1. ... North Castle is a town located in Westchester County, New York. ... Harrison is a town/village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... Scarsdale is both a town and village in Westchester County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, its population was 17,823. ... Greenburgh is a town located in Westchester County, New York. ... The United States Census of year 2000, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Edge city is an American term for a relatively new concentration of business, shopping and entertainment outside a traditional urban area, in what had recently been a residential suburb or semi-rural community. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

Contents

History

Early history

At the time of the Dutch settlement of Manhattan in the early 17th century, the region had been used as farmland by the Weckquaeskeck tribe, members of the Mohican nation and was called "Quarropas".,[1] To early traders it was known as "the White Plains", either from the groves of white balsam which are said to have covered it,[1] or from the heavy mist that local tradition suggests hovered over the swamplands near the Bronx River.[2] The first non-native settlement came in November, 1683, when a party of Connecticut Puritans moved westward from an earlier settlement in Rye and bought about 4,400 acres (17.8 km²), presumably from the Weckquaeskeck. However, one John Richbell of Mamaroneck, NY, claimed to have earlier title to much of the territory, he also having purchased a far larger plot extending 20 miles (32 km) inland, perhaps from a different tribe. The matter wasn't settled until 1721, when a Royal Patent for White Plains was granted by King George II. For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... The Rye, NY City Seal. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Mamaroneck, New York may refer to two places in New York: The Town of Mamaroneck, a town in Westchester County The Village of Mamaroneck, a village partially within the town This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... George II King of Great Britain and Ireland George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ...


In 1758, White Plains became the seat of Westchester County when the colonial government for the county left West Chester, which was located in what is now the northern part of the borough of the Bronx, in New York City. The unincorporated village remained part of the Town of Rye until 1788, when the Town of White Plains was created.[2] For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ...


On July 9, 1776, a copy of the Declaration of Independence was delivered to the New York Provincial Congress, which was meeting in the county courthouse. The delegates quickly adopted a resolution approving the Declaration, thus declaring both the colony's independence and the formation of the State of New York. The Declaration itself was first publicly read from the steps of the courthouse on July 11.[2] is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


During September and October 1776, troops led by George Washington took up positions in the hills of the village, hotly pursued by the British under General Sir William Howe, who attacked on October 28. The Battle of White Plains took place primarily on Chatterton Hill, (later known as "Battle Hill," and located just west of what was then a swamp but which is now the downtown area) and the Bronx River. Howe's force of 4,000-6,000 British and Hessian soldiers required three attacks before the Continentals, numbering about 1,600 under the command of Generals Alexander McDougall and Israel Putnam, retreated, joining Washington's main force, which did not take part in the battle. Howe's forces had suffered 250 casualties, a severe loss, and he made no attempt to pursue the Continentals, whose casualties were about 125 dead and wounded. Three days after the battle Washington withdrew north of the village, which was then occupied by Howe's forces. But after several inconclusive skirmishes over the next week Howe withdrew on November 5, leaving White Plains to the Continentals.[2] Ironically, one of Washington's subordinates, Major John Austin, who was probably drunk after having celebrated the enemy's withdrawal, reentered the village with his detachment and proceeded to burn it down. Although he was court-martialed and convicted for this action he escaped punishment.[2] George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... For the surrealist painter, see William Howe (painter). ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United States Britain Commanders George Washington William Howe Strength 14,500 men 14,000 men Casualties 300 killed and wounded 313 killed and wounded Battle of White Plains Historic Site : George Washingtons HQ The Battle of White Plains was an inconclusive meeting on October 28, 1776 in the... The term Hessian refers to the inhabitants of the German state of Hesse. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first United States Census, in 1790, listed the White Plains population at 505, of whom 46 were slaves. (New York City's population at that time was about 33,000.) By 1800, the population stood at 575 and in 1830, 830. By 1870, 26 years after the arrival of the New York Central Railroad, it had swelled to 2,630[2] and by 1890 to 4,508. In the decades that followed the count grew to 7,899 (1900) and 26,425 (1910).[1] White Plains was incorporated as a village in 1866 and as a city in 1916. The United States Census is a decennial census mandated by the United States Constitution. ... For the current company, see New York Central Lines LLC. The New York Central Railroad (AAR reporting marks NYC), known simply as the New York Central in its publicity, was a railroad operating in the Northeastern United States. ...


Modern history

Main Street in White Plains
Main Street in White Plains
The brand new Ritz Carlton
The brand new Ritz Carlton

Early in the 20th century, White Plains' downtown area developed into a dominant suburban shopping district and featured branch stores of many famous New York-based department and specialty stores. Some of these retail locations were the first large scale suburban stores built in America, and ushered in the eventual post-World War II building boom. With the construction of the parkways and expressways in the 1940s and 1960s, White Plains' role as a destination retail location was only enhanced. Among some of these early stores were such storied names as B. Altman & Co., Rogers Peet, Saks Fifth Avenue, Alexander's, Macy's, Wallach's and a short-lived branch of Bergdorf Goodman, which was later converted to sister chain, Neiman Marcus, in 1981. Image File history File links Mainstwilliamst22hu. ... Image File history File links Mainstwilliamst22hu. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 2. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Saks Fifth Avenue is a chain of upscale American department stores that is owned and operated by Saks Fifth Avenue Enterprises (SFAE), a subsidiary of Saks Incorporated. ... Alexanders, was a former department store in the New York metropolitan area. ... This article is about the R.H. Macy & Co. ... Bergdorf Goodman is a major luxury goods department store based in Midtown, Manhattan in New York City. ... Categories: Stub | Retail companies of the United States ...


During the late 1960s, the city of White Plains developed an extensive urban renewal plan for residential, commercial and mixed-use redevelopment that effectively called for the demolition of its entire central business district from the Bronx River Parkway east to Mamaroneck Avenue. By 1978, the massive urban renewal program centered around the construction of the Westchester County Courthouse (1974), the Westchester One office building (1975), the Galleria at White Plains mall (1978), and a number of other office towers, retail centers and smaller commercial buildings. Within a generation, the original village-like character of downtown White Plains was altered into becoming one of America's first and most dynamic edge cities. The Bronx River Parkway was one of the earliest limited access automobile highways. ... 1999 photograph looking northeast on Chicagos now demolished Cabrini-Green housing project, one of many urban renewal efforts. ... The Galleria at White Plains is an large enclosed urban shopping mall located in the downtown area of White Plains, New York, a large commercial and residential suburb, 20 miles north of New York City and the county seat of Westchester County, New York. ... Edge City is an American term for a relatively new concentration of business, shopping and entertainment outside a traditional urban area, in what had recently been a residential suburb or semi-rural community. ...


At the time of its construction, the Westchester One building was the largest office building between New York City and Albany, and east to Hartford. New York State Capitol Building, completed in 1899 at a cost of $25 million was the most expensive government building of its time. ... Hartford is the capital of the state of Connecticut, in Hartford County. ...


Beginning in the 1950s, many major corporations based in New York City relocated all or part of their headquarters operations to White Plains and other nearby locations. These included General Foods, PepsiCo, Hitachi USA, IBM, Nestle, Snapple and Heineken USA. At the height of the 1980s at least 50 Fortune 500 corporations called Westchester County and nearby Fairfield County, CT home, but with the corporate mergers and downsizing of the 1990s many of these companies either reduced their operations in White Plains or left the area completely. A corporation (usually known in the United Kingdom and Ireland as a company) is a legal entity (distinct from a natural person) that often has similar rights in law to those of a Civil law systems may refer to corporations as moral persons; they may also go by the name... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... General Foods, formerly shorthand for the General Foods Corporation, is now a brand of Kraft Foods. ... PepsiCo, Incorporated (NYSE: PEP) is a global American beverage and snack company. ... It has been suggested that Hitachi Works be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... Nestlé S.A. or Société des Produits Nestlé S.A. (SWX:NESN), headquartered in Vevey, Switzerland, is the worlds biggest food and beverage company. ... Snapple is a beverage company based in Rye Brook, New York that produces a variety of teas and fruit drinks which are sold in glass bottles, soda-style cans, and plastic bottles. ... Heineken (or Heineken Brouwerijen) is a Dutch beer brewer, established in 1863 when Gerard Adriaan Heineken purchased a brewery in Amsterdam. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ...

Arts Exchange Building in the Downtown
Arts Exchange Building in the Downtown

At the Arts Exchange Building, the headquarters of the Westchester Arts Council, artists, emerging cultural organizations and new creative businesses are developing and flourishing. Since March 1999, this vibrant community resource, which is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, has served as an artist's venue for exhibition and performance, a classroom, conference center, film house, banquet hall and proud symbol of the revitalization of downtown White Plains. Image File history File links Arts_Exchange. ... Image File history File links Arts_Exchange. ...


The construction of the Galleria at White Plains mall in the 1970s ushered in a new era of downtown retail and office development, but by the early 1990s, economic development had stagnated, hampered by a deep recession and the overbuilding of the commercial real estate markets. For a time, White Plains had the dubious distinction of having one of the highest office vacancy rates in the Northeast. Consolidation within the retail industry led to the closing of many of downtown's original department and specialty stores as well. After its bankruptcy, the B. Altman store closed in 1989 and was eventually demolished to make way for the massive upscale retail mall, The Westchester, which opened in 1995 with anchors Nordstrom and Neiman Marcus. A freestanding branch of Macy's, one of downtown's original retail anchors, was relocated two blocks away to The Galleria mall by its parent company, Federated Department Stores, replacing the location of sister retailer, Abraham & Straus when these two store divisions were merged in 1995. In early 2002, the Saks Fifth Avenue location was also closed and demolished; it was replaced in 2004 with the large retail complex called The Source at White Plains, featuring the high-end jewelery and home goods store Fortunoff's, and local outlets of the upscale restaurants Morton's of Chicago, The Cheescake Factory, and the gourmet supermarket chain Whole Foods Markets. The Galleria at White Plains is an large enclosed urban shopping mall located in the downtown area of White Plains, New York, a large commercial and residential suburb, 20 miles north of New York City and the county seat of Westchester County, New York. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Westchester is an upscale mall located in White Plains, New York. ... This is the page for the department store. ... Categories: Stub | Retail companies of the United States ... This article is about the R.H. Macy & Co. ... Federated Department Stores, Inc. ... Abraham & Straus (or A&S), now defunct, was a major New York City department store, based in Brooklyn New York. ... Saks Fifth Avenue is a chain of upscale American department stores that is owned and operated by Saks Fifth Avenue Enterprises (SFAE), a subsidiary of Saks Incorporated. ... Fortunoff is a New York-based retailer of jewelry, furniture, and other discount goods. ... Mortons Restaurant Group, Inc. ... The Cheesecake Factory, Inc. ... Whole Foods Market NASDAQ: WFMI is an Austin, Texas-based natural foods grocer, which, as of May 2006, consisted of 183 locations in the United States, Canada, and Great Britain. ...

The City Center on Mamaroneck Ave.
The City Center on Mamaroneck Ave.

Other major projects were completed in the late 1990s and early 2000s that have dramatically altered further the urban character of downtown White Plains. A new courthouse for the Southern District of New York was opened in 1998 and several large scale office properties in and near downtown, including the former General Foods headquarters building, were retrofitted and leased to accommodate smaller businesses. The landmark Macy's store on Main Street remained vacant for several years until it was also later demolished to make way for the massive City Center White Plains complex. This large mixed-use development features two 35-story apartment and condominium towers, 600,000 square foot (60,000 m²) of retail, restaurant and entertainment space and new parking facilities. Aside from the Arts Exchange building (which used to be a bank), another bank next to the City Center was renovated to become Zanaro's, a Westchester-award-winning Italian restaurant. City Center's opening in 2003 marked the beginning of a new downtown development renaissance, and with the improving economy and healthy office leasing activity, White Plains entered the new millennium as the leading retail and office center in Westchester County. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 1. ... The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the following counties: New York, Bronx, Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Orange, Dutchess, and Sullivan. ... Trump Tower at City Center is a 35-story high-rise condominium apartment building built in White Plains, Westchester County, New York. ... Zanaros is a New York-based Italian restaurant controlled by Apple-Metro. ...


White Plains is widely known throughout Westchester County for its bar scene. Mamaroneck Avenue and East Post Road are home to several highly trafficked watering holes, including The Black Bear Saloon, Lazy Boy Tavern, and the Thirsty Turtle.


In 2005, construction began on a second large parcel in the downtown area. The project, dubbed Renaissance Square, will feature two residential and hotel towers, each 40 stories tall, featuring a luxury Ritz-Carlton hotel and more than 400 condominium units. The expected opening date of the first tower is early 2008, at which time White Plains will once again boast the highest building between both New York City and Albany. (This title is currently held by the under-construction 39-story Trump Plaza in nearby New Rochelle, which in 2006 surpassed White Plains' 35-story Trump Tower, which was completed in 2005.) Ritz-Carlton is a brand of luxury hotel and resort with 63 properties that are located in major cities and exclusive resort destinations of 21 countries worldwide. ... Trump Plaza (New Rochelle) is a 42 story luxury residence and hotel with shopping centers. ... New Rochelle City Hall New Roc City New Rochelle (French: Nouvelle-Rochelle) is a city in the southeast portion of the U.S. state of New York in Westchester County, 16 miles (26 km) from Grand Central Terminal in New York City and 2 miles north of the border with... Trump Tower at City Center is a 35-story high-rise condominium apartment building built in White Plains, Westchester County, New York. ...


Beginning in 2000, the city's permanent population experienced a growth spurt as additional apartment buildings were constructed. An infusion of urban professionals, drawn by the city's relatively moderate housing costs and close commuting distance to midtown Manhattan (35 minutes by express train) gave the city a cosmopolitan atmosphere. However, in large part because of its proximity to New York, the cost of living in White Plains, although lower than that of New York City itself, is by some measures among the highest in the world.[2]


Education

Public schools

The White Plains Public School System, [3] with a 2006 enrollment of over 6,000 pupils, maintains 5 elementary schools (grades K-5), 2 middle schools (6-8) and 1 high school (9-12), as well as auxiliary facilities including a pre-kindergarten program,[4] a community school (grades 7-12),[5] adult and continuing education,[6] and a program[7] for school-age patients at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, [8] which campus is located in the city. New York-Presbyterian Hospital is a prominent university hospital in New York City, composed of two medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and the Cornell University Weill Medical Center. ...


Since 1988 the district has operated under a Controlled Parents' Choice Program[9] whereby the parents of elementary and middle school children can select the school which their child attends based on factors other than proximity to the school. (All public school children have the option of being bussed to the school that they attend.)


The five elementary schools, and to a lesser extent, the two middle schools, in addition to teaching core competencies, have different educational focuses: science and technology;[10] communication arts;[11] nurturing of individualized ways of learning;[12] co-operative learning and hands-on practical experiences;[13] and global understanding.[14] The primary distinction between the two middle schools[15],[16] is the number of pupils enrolled. Also, in the smaller middle school, foreign language education begins in the sixth grade rather than the eighth.


White Plains High School,[17] located on a 72 acre tract that was once the homestead of the department-store magnate J. C. Penney, serves all public school students in grades 9-12. James Cash Penney (September 16, 1875—February 12, 1971), commonly known as J.C. Penney, was an American department store pioneer and businessman. ...


The district is governed by a seven-member Board of Education,[18] elected at-large for staggered three-year terms. A schools superintendent reports to the Board.


White Plains is also the home of the German School New York (GSNY), one of the only six German schools in the United States. With some 350 students the school provides education from kindergarten until 12th grade and makes it possible for German students to reach their Abitur (German High School Diploma) away from home.


Parochial schools

White Plains is home to a number of primary and secondary parochial schools, including:

  • Archbishop Stepinac High School on Mamaroneck Avenue in the Gedney area
  • Academy of Our Lady of Good Counsel High School on North Broadway, adjacent to the Pace University campus
  • Good Counsel Academy Elementary School on North Broadway
  • Our Lady of Sorrows Elementary School in the Gedney area
  • Solomon Schechter School of Westchester in the Gedney area, off of Dellwood Road

Archbishop Stepinac High School is an all-boys high school operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located in White Plains, New York. ...

Colleges and universities with locations in White Plains

Pace University is a private, co-educational and comprehensive multi-campus university in the New York metropolitan area with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. ... Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry campus Mercy College is a private liberal arts college with its main campus in Dobbs Ferry, New York, and satellite locations throughout southeastern New York. ... Berkeley College is a private college specializing in business, with five campuses in New York and New Jersey. ... The College of Westchester (abbreviated CW), located in White Plains, New York, is a career-focused institution that has been providing students with the skills they need for employment for over ninety years. ...

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 53,077 people, 20,921 households, and 12,699 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,091.1/km² (5,415.5/mi²). There were 21,576 housing units at an average density of 850.1/km² (2,201.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 64.93% White, 15.91% African American, 4.50% Asian, 0.34% Native American, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 10.37% from other races, and 3.88% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 23.51% of the population. There were 20,921 households out of which 26.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.7% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.3% were non-families. 33.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.14. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 21.2% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 32.5% from 25 to 44, 23.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 89.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.7 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $58,545, and the median income for a family was $71,891. Males had a median income of $47,742 versus $36,917 for females. The per capita income for the city was $33,825. About 6.5% of families and 9.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.2% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Transportation

Westchester County Airport serves the city. FAA diagram of Westchester County Airport (HPN) Westchester County Airport (IATA: HPN, ICAO: KHPN, FAA LID: HPN) is a public airport located approximately 9 miles (14. ...


Two Metro-North Railroad stations serve the city. One is stationed in North White Plains and the other next to downtown White Plains. The Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company, or MTA Metro-North Railroad, or, more commonly, Metro-North, is a suburban commuter rail service that is run and managed by an authority of New York State, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, or, more simply, the MTA. Metro-North runs service between New York...


Interstate Highway 287 passes through White Plains. Extensive highway workings are being done such as; building pedestrian walkways over the highway, an extra lane on either side and adding on/off ramps which will help traffic flow and make it easier for pedestrians. The vegetation removals have disrupted some of the community and it is reported that the area will be fixed and trees will be replanted when work on the highway comes to an end Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 287 New Jersey state line along Interstate 287 south I-287 at I-95 in Rye, NY Interstate 287 (abbreviated I-287) is a major interstate highway in New Jersey and New York. ...


Historic sites

  • Jacob Purdy House [24] (constructed prior to 1730), used as General George Washington's headquarters in 1778 and possibly in 1776 during the Battle of White Plains. Repaired and restored in the 1960s, the structure was moved to its present location in 1973. It is now the headquarters of the White Plains Historical Society
  • White Plains Armory [25] (1910), erected on the site of the first Westchester County Courthouse. A monument in front of the building commemorates the first public reading in New York of the Declaration of Independence, on July 11, 1776.
  • White Plains Rural Cemetery [26] (incorporated 1854, although in use as a cemetery from 1797). The cemetery office occupies the structure that was the first Methodist Church in White Plains (1795, rebuilt in 1797 after a fire on the day of its original dedication).
  • Percy Grainger Home, [27] occupied by the composer from 1921 until his death in 1961, and by his widow, Ella Ström-Brandelius, until her death in 1979. It is now maintained as a museum by the International Percy Grainger Society. [28]

The Jacob Purdy House is home to the White Plains Historical Society. ... The White Plains Historical Society traces its genesis to the Battle of White Plains Monument Committee. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Notable residents

  • Percy Grainger (1882-1961), Australian-born U.S. composer, pianist and conductor.
  • Garrick Ohlsson, the internationally acclaimed concert pianist, was raised in White Plains.
  • Jonathan Larson (1960-1996), the writer of the musical Rent, attended White Plains High School.
  • Danger Mouse, a DJ and one half of Gnarls Barkley, was born in White Plains.
  • Alan Alda (born Alfonso Joseph D'Abruzzo) attended Archbishop Stepinac High School.
  • Frank Henderson, Presumably the livest resident in the Highlands area.
  • Andrew S. Tanenbaum, computer scientist and professor, was raised in White Plains.
  • Matisyahu, American Jewish reggae artist, was raised in White Plains.
  • Ralph Waite, the actor who played John Walton in "The Waltons" television series, was born in White Plains
  • Art Monk, NFL wide receiver, was raised in White Plains and graduated from White Plains High School.
  • Bob Hyland, NFL lineman, born and raised in White Plains and graduated from Archbishop Stepinac High School.
  • Channing Frye, NBA forward, was born in White Plains
  • Joseph Campbell, Author and expert on myth and legend, born and raised in White Plains.
  • David Lee, New York Knicks Power Forward
  • J.C. Penney, the department-store magnate, lived in White Plains from the 1920s until the mid-1950s.
  • Leon Davidson, hand selected to work on the atomic bomb, lived in White Plains from early in his marriage to his death on New Year's Day 2007. He is also buried there.
  • A.J. Hammer (born Andrew Goldberg) TV Personality who co-host's CNN's Showbiz Tonight (and previously hosted Court TV's Hollywood Heat and VH1's Countdown) is a 1984 graduate of White Plains High School, White Plains, NY.
  • Vanessa Rousso, a professional poker player, was born in White Plains.
  • Artem Went to school in White Plains for over 3 years.
  • Jackson Davis, founder of charity organization, Protect A Paw.
  • Gordon Parks, famous African-American photographer, attended White Plains High School

Tupac Shakur Percy Aldridge Grainger (8 July 1882 – 20 February 1961) was an Australian-born pianist, composer, and champion of the saxophone and the Concert band. ... Garrick Ohlsson (born April 3, 1948 in New York) is an American classical pianist. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Rent is a rock musical, with music and lyrics by Jonathan Larson[1] based on Giacomo Puccinis opera La bohème. ... Brian Joseph Burton, better known by his stage name Danger Mouse, is an American artist and producer. ... Gnarls Barkley is a Grammy-award winning musical collaboration between DJ, multi-instrumentalist and producer Danger Mouse (Brian Burton) from Baltimore, and rapper/vocalist Cee-Lo Green (Thomas Callaway), from Atlanta. ... Alan Alda (born January 28, 1936) is a five-time Emmy Award-winning, six-time Golden Globe-winning, Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Archbishop Stepinac High School is an all-boys high school operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located in White Plains, New York. ... Frank Hollywood Henderson is an American professional poker player from Houston, Texas. ... Andrew S. Tanenbaum Dr. Andrew Stuart Andy Tanenbaum (sometimes called ast)[1] (born 1944) is a professor of computer science at the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam in the Netherlands. ... Matisyahu is the Hebrew and stage name of Matthew Paul Miller (born June 30, 1979, West Chester, Pennsylvania), an American Jewish reggae musician. ... Ralph Waite (born June 22, 1928 in White Plains, New York) is an American actor whose most famous role was John Walton Sr. ... James Arthur Art Monk (born December 5, 1957 in White Plains, New York) is a former American football wide receiver who played in the National Football League. ... Robert Joseph Hyland (born July 21, 1945 in White Plains, New York) was a guard who played eleven seasons in the National Football League, mainly for the Green Bay Packers. ... Archbishop Stepinac High School is an all-boys high school operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located in White Plains, New York. ... Image:Http://sportsmedia. ... For other uses, see Joseph Campbell (disambiguation). ... David Lee (born April 29, 1983 in St. ... James Cash Penney (September 16, 1875—February 12, 1971), commonly known as J.C. Penney, was an American department store pioneer and businessman. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A.J. Hammer is entertainment anchor for CNN Headline News evening show, Showbiz Tonight. ... Vanessa Rousso is a law student at the University of Miami and a professional poker player. ... Artyom, also spelled Artem, is a Slavic first name. ... Jackson Davis is best known as Jonas from the lonelygirl15 videos series. ... Gordon Parks at Civil Rights March on Washington, 1963. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Encyclopedia Britannica, Eleventh Edition (1911), Volume XXVIII, p. 607.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Hoffman, Redona. Yesterday in White Plains, a Picture History of a Vanished Era, Second Edition, Privately Published, 1984. Available from the White Plains, NY Public Library and other sources.

External links

Coordinates: 41.033333° N 73.766667° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
White Plains, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1686 words)
White Plains is one of the edge cities that have developed outside of New York City.
White Plains is home to one of the campuses of Pace University, as well as the White Plains campuses of Mercy College and the for-profit Berkeley College.
Gedney Farms, a neighborhood located in eastern White Plains, is bounded on the west by Mamaroneck Avenue, on the north by Bryant Avenue, on the east by North Street, and on the south by Ridgeway.
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