FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Where No Fan Has Gone Before
Futurama episode
"Where No Fan Has Gone Before"
Episode no. 65
Prod. code 4ACV11
Airdate April 21, 2002
Writer(s) David A. Goodman
Director Pat Schinagawa
Opening subtitle WHERE NO FAN HAS GONE BEFORE
Opening cartoon Unknown
Guest star(s) William Shatner
Leonard Nimoy
Walter Koenig
George Takei
Nichelle Nichols
Jonathan Frakes
Season 4
January 2002 – August 2003
  1. Kif Gets Knocked Up a Notch
  2. Leela's Homeworld
  3. Love and Rocket
  4. Less Than Hero
  5. A Taste of Freedom
  6. Bender Should Not Be Allowed on TV
  7. Jurassic Bark
  8. Crimes of the Hot
  9. Teenage Mutant Leela's Hurdles
  10. The Why of Fry
  11. Where No Fan Has Gone Before
  12. The Sting
  13. Bend Her
  14. Obsoletely Fabulous
  15. The Farnsworth Parabox
  16. Three Hundred Big Boys
  17. Spanish Fry
  18. The Devil's Hands are Idle Playthings
List of all Futurama episodes...

"Where No Fan Has Gone Before" is the eleventh episode of the fourth season of the animated series Futurama. It originally aired in the United States on April 21, 2002. This article is about the television series. ... Image File history File links Futurama_ep65. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... David A. Goodman is on of the producers of Family Guy Presents: Stewie Griffin: The Untold Story. ... William Alan Shatner (born on March 22, 1931) is a Canadian actor who gained fame for playing James Tiberius Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ... Leonard Simon Nimoy (born March 26, 1931) is an American actor, film director, poet, musician and photographer. ... Walter Marvin Koenig (born September 14, 1936) is an American actor, writer, teacher and director, known for his roles as Chekov in Star Trek, and as Bester on the series Babylon 5. ... George Hosato Takei (IPA: ) (born April 20, 1937) is an American actor known for his role in the TV series Star Trek, in which he played the helmsman Hikaru Sulu on the USS Enterprise. ... Nichelle Nichols (born Grace Nichols on December 28, 1932) is an American singer, actress, and voice actress. ... Jonathan Frakes (born August 19, 1952) is an American actor and director best known for his portrayal of Commander William T. Riker in the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation and David Xanatos on Disneys Gargoyles. ... The complete Futurama DVD collection The following is an episode list for the FOX animated television series Futurama. ... Kif Gets Knocked Up A Notch is the first episode in season four of Futurama. ... Leelas Homeworld is the second episode of Futuramas fourth season. ... ‹ The template below (Unreferenced episode) is being considered for deletion. ... Less Than Hero is the fourth episode in the fourth season of Futurama. ... A Taste of Freedom is the fifth episode of the fourth production season of Futurama. ... ‹ The template below (Unreferenced episode) has been proposed for deletion. ... Jurassic Bark is the seventh episode of season four of Futurama, airing November 17, 2002. ... “Crimes of the Hot” is the eighth episode of the fourth production season of the television show Futurama. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline for Television episodes. ... The Why of Fry is the tenth episode in the fourth season of the animated television series Futurama. ... The Sting is episode twelve in season four of Futurama. ... Bend Her is the thirteenth episode of the fourth production season of Futurama. ... Obsoletely Fabulous is the fourteenth episode of the fourth production season of Futurama. ... “The Farnsworth Parabox” is the fifteenth episode of the fourth production season of Futurama. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Spanish Fry is the seventeenth episode of Season four of Futurama. ... The Devil’s Hands are Idle Playthings is the eighteenth and final episode in season four of the TV series Futurama. ... The complete Futurama DVD collection The following is an episode list for the FOX animated television series Futurama. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... This article is about the television series. ...

Contents

Plot

Bender, Leela and Fry, along with most of the cast of Star Trek: The Original Series, are court-martialed by Zapp Brannigan, who has the group recount the events that led to the court-martial for travelling to the forbidden planet Omega 3. Bender Bending Rodríguez, more commonly known as Bender, is a main character in the animated television series Futurama. ... Turanga Leela (often referred to simply as Leela) (born A.D. 2975) is the primary female character in the animated television series Futurama. ... Philip J. Fry is the protagonist of the animated television series Futurama and is voiced by Billy West. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... Major General Webelo Zapp Brannigan is a fictional character in the television series Futurama. ...


It is explained to Fry that Star Trek is forbidden in the future, because by the 23rd century, it had become a religion that had too many followers. All the episodes of the original series and movies were jettisoned to a forbidden planet. Fry runs to the Head Museum to talk to Leonard Nimoy’s Head. Nimoy's head tries to deny knowledge of the show, but realizes he can't escape the Star Trek craze and recounts to Fry how the rest of the cast left Earth. He did not go with them as he recently signed a six month lease on his apartment. Fry, Leela, Bender and Nimoy's head journey to the forbidden planet where they crash and find several original sets from Star Trek as well as the cast, complete with their bodies and eternal youth. A large energy being named Melllvar reveals himself and explains that he became an obsessed Star Trek fan after watching the tapes over and over again. Mellvar gives Nimoy a body, and orders the actors and the Planet Express crew to participate in a Star Trek convention until all time stops. While Melllvar forces the cast to perform his fan script, Bender, Leela and Fry escape in the Planet Express ship. Fry then convinces the crew to go back for the actors, only to have Melllvar destroy the ship's engine as it crashes back on the planet. Leonard Simon Nimoy (born March 26, 1931) is an American actor, film director, poet, musician and photographer. ... This article is about a property agreement in private law. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about living for infinite period of time. ... Science fiction conventions are gatherings of the community of fans (called science fiction fandom) of various forms of speculative fiction including science fiction and fantasy. ...


After seeing the crew's attempt to escape, Melllvar wonders if the Planet Express crew are more worthy of his adoration; he decides to settle the question with a battle to the death. After fighting for several minutes, Melllvar's mother appears and makes him come home for supper. While he is gone, the two groups combine the engine of the cast's ship with the body of the Planet Express ship. In order to lose enough weight to lift off, the cast jettison their bodies. Melllvar soon follows the crew into space, with his own spaceship. The Planet Express ship is then boarded by Brannigan, who starts the court-martial. At this point, Leela points out that during the course of the court-martial, Melllvar is continuing to chase them.


Everyone hurries back to the control room, where they still try to escape from Melllvar. Fry convinces Melllvar that he can't devote his entire life to Star Trek, and Melllvar eventually agrees to end the chase. The crew returns, with the tapes in hand, to Earth. The cast finally agrees to leave, deciding that living with "one really annoying Star Trek fan" was not worth the great things they received.


Production

The writer for this episode, David A. Goodman, states in the DVD audio commentary that making this episode was a "dream come true" for many members of the crew including himself.[1] Pat Schinagawa, who directed the episode also states that there was a certain amount of jealousy that she had gotten to do this episode[2] whereas Matt Groening states that while he is a fan of the Star Trek franchise he has never seen an episode of the original series all the way through, but he has seen the first movie.[3] Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ...


All of the living members of the original Star Trek cast agreed to appear in the episode with the exception of James Doohan who replied with "No way." Because of this, the episode's working title was jokingly named "We got everybody but Scotty".[1] Goodman also notes that this episode may be the reason he later began writing for Star Trek: Enterprise.[1] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ...


Multiple designs for the energy being were considered for this episode however the final version was decided upon due to a desire to keep the design simple.[4] Despite this effort Schinagawa still notes that the final design for Melllvar is more sophisticated than some energy beings featured in the original series.[2]


Star Trek references

In the DVD audio commentary the writer for this episode notes his pride in having included a large number of references to the original series, particularly those items which he claims "the people on the internet" had not found on their own. In particular he noted that in "Shatner's Log", a play on the legendary captain's log, the line "The impossible has happened" is the same line given in the opening log in the episode "Where No Man Has Gone Before."[1] Where No Man Has Gone Before was the second pilot episode of the Star Trek: The Original Series. ...


Broadcast and reception

Although the episode was not the last episode produced for season four it was used as the season finale for the fourth broadcast season. The episode was then nominated for a Nebula Award in 2004 for best script[5][6]. Either due to or in spite of the fact that most of the episode is considered fan service, IGN.com ranked the episode as number ten in their list of the "Top 25 Futurama Episodes" in 2006[7] The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Fan service ), sometimes written as a single word, fanservice, is a vaguely defined term chiefly used for Japanese visual media—particularly in anime fandom—to refer to elements in a story that are unnecessary to a storyline, but designed to amuse or sexually excite the audience[1][2]. It is... IGN is the oldest and most visited general gaming website, and runs one of the most popular forums on the Internet. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d Goodman, David A.. (2003). Futurama season 4 DVD commentary for the episode "Where No Fan Has Gone Before" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  2. ^ a b Schinagawa, Pat. (2003). Futurama season 4 DVD commentary for the episode "Where No Fan Has Gone Before" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  3. ^ Groening, Matt. (2003). Futurama season 4 DVD commentary for the episode "Where No Fan Has Gone Before" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  4. ^ Cohen, David X.. (2003). Futurama season 4 DVD commentary for the episode "Where No Fan Has Gone Before" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  5. ^ Cook, Lucius (April 26, 2004). Hey Sexy Mama, Wanna Kill All Humans?: Looking Backwards at Futurama, The Greatest SF Show You've Never Seen. Locus Online. Retrieved on July 2, 2007.
  6. ^ 2004 Nebula Awards (2004-04-17).
  7. ^ "Top 25 Futurama Episodes". Retrieved on 2006-11-04.
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Where No One Has Gone Before - Memory Alpha - A Wikia wiki (1370 words)
He is highly excited, claiming he has broken the warp barrier and that his name will go down in history.
Then she sees her pet cat and is back on the colony where she grew up, trying to avoid a rape gang.
Picard orders general quarters and tells the crew that they are in a region of space where thoughts become reality, and that they must try to subdue their thoughts.
where no man has gone before: Information from Answers.com (1057 words)
"Where no man has gone before" is a saying used in the introductory sequence of all but one of the episodes of the original Star Trek science fiction television series.
The new quote "where no one has gone before" was then adopted as the mission and motto of the following starships Enterprise.
The gender-neutral version of the quote, "where no one has gone before", was first included in the introductory sequence of Star Trek: The Next Generation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m