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Encyclopedia > Wheelchair
Wheelchair seating in a theater.
Wheelchair seating in a theater.

A wheelchair is a wheeled mobility device in which the user sits. The device is propelled either manually (by pushing the wheels with the hands) or via various automated systems. Wheelchairs are used by people for whom walking is difficult or impossible due to illness, injury, or disability. People with both sitting and walking disability often need to use a wheelbench. The earliest record of the wheelchair in England dates from the 1670s [Oxford English Dictionary, (2nd Ed.), 1989, Vol. XX., p. 203.], and in continental Europe this technology dates back to the German Renaissance. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Wheelchair seating Source: NTSB File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Wheelchair seating Source: NTSB File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Illness (sometimes referred to as ill-health) can be defined as a state of poor health. ... Look up disability in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A wheelbench // A wheelbench is a wheeled mobility device in which the user lies down. ...

Contents

History of the wheelchair

Wooden wheelchair with a single rear wheel
Wooden wheelchair with a single rear wheel

There have been many attempts to connect furniture to wheels, dating back to 530 BCE when the Greeks placed wheels on a bed, creating the first known wheeled furniture. By 525 CE, the Chinese had placed wheels on chairs. However the first recognisable wheelchair was invented for King Phillip II of Spain. A drawing of the King dated 1595 shows him in a chair with wheels, armrests and footrests. However, it was not self propelled, and perhaps had a closer resemblance to a highchair than a wheelchair of today. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,728 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 717 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,728 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 717 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For the UK band, see Furniture (band). ... For other uses of chair, see chair (disambiguation). ... Philip II of Spain (1527 – September 13, 1598), King of Spain (r. ...


The modern wheelchair began to take shape in the late 19th century to early 20th century with the advent of push rims for self-propulsion in 1881, and wire spoked wheels replacing wooden ones in 1900.


The 20th century saw a rapid development in wheelchairs, from the first motorised wheels in 1918, to the first folding wheelchair, built in 1933 by Herbert B. Everest, paralysed in 1919 in a mining accident, and his friend Harry C. Jennings Sr., a mechanical engineer. By the mid 1970s Errol Markheim at Sopur in Germany, Jeff Minnebraker at Quadra in California, and Rainier Kuschall in Europe, had all created lightweight, aluminum, highly-adjustable chairs. Quadra can mean: Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra, Spanish explorer Quadra Island, an island in British Columbia, Canada, which is named after the explorer Quadra, São Paulo, a municipality in Brazil also named after the explorer Vancouver Quadra, a federal electoral district in British Columbia, Canada Macintosh... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The most recent two decades have seen the progress in the modern wheelchair accelerate. They are lighter and perform better than ever before. There are now many possibilities available to improve the ride, from suspension systems which help to remove vibrations and jolts, to ultra-light weight frames which enable better performance, to special designs for every individualised need and taste.


Types of wheelchair

Wheelchair fitted with Mecanum wheels, taken at an exhibition in the early 1980s.
Wheelchair fitted with Mecanum wheels, taken at an exhibition in the early 1980s.

A basic standard manual wheelchair incorporates a seat and back, two small front (caster) wheels and two large wheels, one on each side, and a foot rest. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (544x800, 90 KB) Summary Photograph taken by Euchiasmus (me) on a conference exhibition stand which featured an electric wheelchair with Ilon wheels. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (544x800, 90 KB) Summary Photograph taken by Euchiasmus (me) on a conference exhibition stand which featured an electric wheelchair with Ilon wheels. ... Mecanum wheel Mecanum wheelchair The Mecanum wheel is a wheel which can move in any direction. ... The 2006 LinuxWorld trade show at the Boston Convention and Exposition Center. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


Wheelchairs are often variations on this basic design, but there are many types of wheelchairs, and they are often highly customised for the individual user's needs. The seat size (width and depth), seat-to-floor height, footrests/leg rests, front caster outriggers, adjustable backrests, controls, and many other features can be customized on, or added to, many basic models, while some users, often those with specialised needs, may have wheelchairs custom-built. See also: Caster (Fate Stay Night), an anime character Casters on a desk chair. ...


Various optional accessories are available, such as anti-tip bars or wheels, safety belts, adjustable backrests, tilt and/or recline features, extra support for limbs or neck, mounts or carrying devices for crutches, walkers or oxygen tanks, drink holders, and clothing protectors. A knee support crutch A patient using underarm crutches A typical forearm crutch Crutches are medical tools used in the event that ones leg or legs may be injured or unable to support weight. ...


Experiments have also been made with unusual variant wheels, like the omniwheel or the mecanum wheel. These allow more directional movement options. A simple omni wheel. ... Mecanum wheel Mecanum wheelchair The Mecanum wheel is a wheel which can move in any direction. ...


The electric wheelchair shown on the right is fitted with Mecanum wheels (sometimes known as Ilon wheels) which give it complete freedom of movement. It can be driven forwards, backwards, sideways, and diagonally, and also turned round on the spot or turned around while moving, all operated from a simple joystick. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mecanum wheel Mecanum wheelchair The Mecanum wheel is a wheel which can move in any direction. ...


Manual wheelchairs

Manual wheelchairs are those that require human power to move them. There are three types of manual wheelchair: self-propelled, attendant-propelled, and wheelbase. Many manual wheelchairs can be folded for storage or placement into a vehicle, although modern wheelchairs are just as likely to be rigid framed.


Manual or self-propelled wheelchairs are propelled by the occupant, usually by using large rear wheels, from 20-26 inches in average diameter, and resembling those of bicycle wheels. The user moves the chair by pushing on the handrims, which are made of circular tubing attached to the outside of the large wheels. The handrims have a diameter that is slightly less than that of the rear wheels. Skilled users can control speed and turning and often learn to balance the chair on its rear wheels - do a "wheelie". The wheelie is not just for show - a rider that can control the chair in this manner can climb and descend curbs and move over small obstacles.


One-arm drive enables a user to guide and propel a wheelchair from one side. Two handrims, one smaller than the other, are located on one side of the chair, left or right. On most models the outer, or smaller rim, is connected to the opposite wheel by a folding axle. When both handrims are grasped together, the chair may be propelled forward or backward in a straight line. When either handrim is moved independently, the chair will turn left or right in response to the handrim used. Another alternative is a lever-drive chair that propels the chair forwards by using a lever that is pumped back and forth. Some chairs are also configured to allow the occupant to propel using one or both feet instead of using the rims.


Attendant-propelled chairs are designed to be propelled by an attendant using the handles, and thus the back wheels are rimless and often smaller. These chairs are often used as 'transfer chairs' to move a patient when a better alternative is unavailable, possibly within a hospital, as a temporary option, or in areas where a user's standard chair is unavailable. These chairs are commonly seen in airports. Special airplane transfer chairs are available on most airlines, designed to fit narrow airplane aisles and transfer a wheelchair-using passenger to and from their seat on the plane.


Wheelbase chairs are wheeled platforms with specially-molded seating systems interfaced with them for users with a more complicated posture. A molded seating system involves taking a cast of a person's best achievable seated position and the either carving the shape from memory foam or forming a plastic mesh around it. This seat is then covered, framed, and attached to a wheelbase. One half of a bronze mold for casting a socketed spear head dated to the period 1400-1000 BC. There are no known parallels for this mold. ... While not moving, a human can be in one of the following main positions. ... How memory foam reacts to heat Memory foam is made from polyurethane with additional chemicals that add to its viscosity level, thereby increasing its density. ...


Light weight and high cost are related in the manual wheelchairs market. At the low-cost end, heavy, tubular steel chairs with sling seats and little adaptability dominate. Users may be temporarily disabled, or using such a chair as a loaner, or simply unable to afford better. Heavy unmodified manual chairs are common as "loaners" at large facilities such as airports, amusement parks and shopping centers. In a higher price range, and more commonly used by persons with long-term disabilities, are major manufacturer lightweight chairs with more options. The high end of the market contains ultra-light models, fancy seating options and accessories, all-terrain features, and so forth.


Electric Powered Wheelchairs

Three general styles of electric powered chairs (EPWs) exist: rear, center, front wheel driven or four wheel driven. Each style has particular handling characteristics. EPWs are also divided by seat type; some models resemble manual chairs, with a sling-style seat and frame, whereas others have 'captain's chair' seating like that of an automobile. EPWs run the gamut from small and portable models, which can be folded or disassembled, to very large and heavy full-featured chairs (these are often called 'rehab' chairs).


EPWs may be designed specifically for indoor use, outdoor use, or both. They are generally prescribed for persons who have difficulty using a manual chair due to arm, hand, shoulder or more general disabling conditions, and do not have the leg strength to propel a manual chair with their feet. A person with full function of the arms and upper torso will generally be prescribed a manual chair, or find that their insurance will not cover an EPW.


The user typically controls speed and direction by operating a joystick on a controller. Many other input devices can be used if the user lacks coordination or the use of the hands or fingers, such as chin controls and puff/sip scanners for those with C2-3 spinal cord lesions or head injuries (the user blows into a tube located near the mouth, which powers the movement of the chair). This controller is the most delicate and usually the most expensive part of the chair. EPWs can offer various powered functions such as tilt, recline, leg elevation, seat elevation, and others useful or necessary to health and function. For other uses, see Joystick (disambiguation). ... Gross motor coordination addresses the gross motor skills: walking, running, climbing, jumping, crawling, lifting ones head, sitting up, etc. ... The Spinal cord nested in the vertebral column. ... Skin lesions caused by Chickenpox A lesion is any abnormal tissue found on or in an organism, usually damaged by disease or trauma. ...


EPWs use electric motors to move the wheels. They are usually powered by 4 or 5 amp deep-cycle rechargeable batteries, similar to those used to power outboard boat engines. These are available in wet or dry options; currently dry cell batteries are more popular[citation needed]. Many EPWs carry an on-board charger which can be plugged into a standard wall outlet; older or more portable models may have a separate charger unit. Electric motors of various sizes. ... For other uses, see Ampere (disambiguation). ... A rechargeable lithium polymer Nokia mobile phone battery. ... Bolinders two cylinder Trim outboard engine. ... A wet cell is a galvanic electrochemical cell with a liquid electrolyte. ... A dry cell is a galvanic electrochemical cell with a pasty low-moisture electrolyte. ...


Other wheelchair variants

A standing wheelchair is one that supports the user in a nearly standing position. They can be used as both a wheelchair and a standing frame, allowing the user to sit or stand in the wheelchair as they wish. They often go from sitting to standing with a hydraulic pump or electric-powered assist. A standing frame (also known as a stand, stander, standing technology, standing aid, standing device, standing box, tilt table) is assistive technology used by a child or adult who uses a wheelchair for mobility. ... Excavator. ...


A mobility scooter (see full article) is a motorized assist device similar to an EPW, but with a steering 'tiller' or bar instead of the joystick, and fewer medical support options. Mobility scooters are available without a prescription in some markets, and range from large, powerful models to lightweight folding ones intended for travel. A mobility scooter is a mobility aid similar to a wheelchair but configured like a motorscooter. ...


A bariatric wheelchair is one designed to support larger weights; most standard chairs are designed to support no more than 250 lbs. on average. Bariatrics is the specialty of medicine dealing with the medical and surgical treatment of obesity. ...


Pediatric wheelchairs are another available subset of wheelchairs. Pediatrics (also spelled paediatrics or pædiatrics) is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants and children. ...


Sport wheelchairs

A modern racing wheelchair
A modern racing wheelchair

Disabled athletes use streamlined sport wheelchairs for disabled sports that require speed and agility, such as basketball, rugby, tennis and racing. Each wheelchair sport tends to use specific types of wheelchairs, and these no longer look like their everyday cousins. They are usually non-folding (in order to increase solidity), with a pronounced angle for the wheels (which provides stability during a sharp turn) and made of composite, lightweight materials. Sport wheelchairs are not generally for everyday use, and are often a 'second' chair specifically for sport use, although some users prefer the sport options for everyday. Image File history File links Rennrollstuhl. ... Image File history File links Rennrollstuhl. ... Generally, disabled sports are sports played by individuals with physical or mental disabilities; the term often refers to sports which have been devised or modified specifically for this purpose. ... Wheelchair basketball is a sport played primarily by people with disabilities. ... Wheelchair rugby Wheelchair rugby is a team sport for athletes with a disability. ... A wheelchair tennis player serving. ... Wheelchair racingis the racing of wheelcahirs, typically by athletes who are unable to run. ...


Beach wheelchairs

This wheelchair allow users to enter the water and provide a better mobility in the sand. There are lots of different models available. In many countries in Europe where the Accessible Tourism is well set, many beaches are wheelchair accessible and provide this kind of wheelchairs to clients free of charge. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Recent developments

Recent technological advances are slowly improving wheelchair and EPW technology. Some wheelchairs, such as the iBOT, incorporate gyroscopic technology and other advances, enabling the chair to balance and run on only two of its four wheels on some surfaces, thus raising the user to a height comparable to a standing person. They can also incorporate stair-climbing and four-wheel-drive feature motorised assists for hand-powered chairs are becoming more available and advanced. President Clinton and Dean Kamen in the White House The iBOT is a variety of powered wheelchair, developed by Dean Kamen in a partnership between DEKA and Johnson and Johnsons Independence Technology division. ...


Three-wheeled wheelchairs are wheelchairs with the least wheels and are found in EPW technology.


Building access

Wheelchair ramp and disabled parking space
Wheelchair ramp and disabled parking space
A gate for wheelchairs in Hiroshima
A gate for wheelchairs in Hiroshima

Adapting the built environment to make it more accessible to wheelchair users is one of the key campaigns of disability rights movements and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). The most important principle is Universal design - that all people regardless of disability are entitled to equal access to all parts of society like public transportation and buildings. A wheelchair user is less disabled in an environment without stairs. Taken by me February 21, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Wheelchair Image:WheelchairRampAt2500AugustineBlvd. ... Taken by me February 21, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Wheelchair Image:WheelchairRampAt2500AugustineBlvd. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Gate_for_a_wheelchair_1. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Gate_for_a_wheelchair_1. ... For other uses, see Hiroshima (disambiguation). ... “Electioneering” redirects here. ... The disability rights movement aims to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities. ... The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) is the short title of United States Public Law 101-336, 104 Stat. ... Universal design, which is related to inclusive design and design for all, is an approach to the design of products, services and environments to be usable by as many people as possible regardless of age, ability or situation. ...


Sometimes it is necessary to add structures like ramps or elevators in order to permit people in wheelchairs (and those using crutches, canes, walkers and so forth, or those with unsupported walking disabilities) to use a particular building. Other important adaptations are powered doors; lowered fixtures such as sinks and water fountains; and toilets with adequate space and grab bars to allow the person to maneuver himself or herself out of the wheelchair onto the fixture. In the United States, most new construction for public use must be built to ADA standards of accessibility. For other uses, see Elevator (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Toilet (disambiguation). ... Grab bars are architectural products commonly used in toilet stalls for handicapped people. ...


The construction of low floor trams and buses is being encouraged, whereas the use of paternosters in public buildings without any alternative method of transportation has been criticized due to the lack of access for wheelchair users. Modern street furniture design now incorporates better accessibility for people with disabilities. Passenger door of a low-floor tram Passenger door of a non-low-floor tram In public transportation, low floor is a term describing vehicles such as busses, trolleybusses and trams whose passenger compartment has a floor which is considerably lower than that of traditional cars. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... Autobus redirects here. ... A paternoster at the University of Vienna, NIG (Neues Institutsgebäude), late 1950s, still in operation A paternoster or paternoster lift is an elevator which consists of a chain of open compartments (each usually designed for two persons) that move slowly in a loop up and down inside a building... Street furniture is a collective term for objects and pieces of equipment installed on streets and roads for various purposes, including benches, bollards, post boxes, phone boxes, streetlamps, street lighting, traffic lights, traffic signs, bus stops, grit bins, tram stops, taxi stands, public lavatories, fountains and memorials, and waste receptacles. ...


Notable users

In historical scholarship, a primary source is a document, or other source of information that was created at or near the time being studied, by an authoritative source, usually one with direct personal knowledge of the events being described. ... In library and information science, historiography and some other areas of scholarship, a secondary source is a document or recording that relates or discusses information originally presented elsewhere. ...

Australia

Judith Durham, OAM (born Judith Mavis Cock on July 3, 1943, in Melbourne, Australia) is a jazz singer who became the lead singer for the Australian popular folk music group The Seekers in 1963. ...

Canada

Steven John Fletcher, MP, BSc (Eng), MBA (born June 17, 1972) is a Canadian politician. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... // Born in Port Alberni, British Columbia, Hansen grew up in Williams Lake, British Columbia. ... David C. Onley book Shuttle. ... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Sam Sullivan, CM (born 1960) is the Mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Lise Thibault (b. ... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of the Canadian province of Quebec. ...

Czech

  • Potměšil, Jan, actor

Jan Potměšil (b. ...

France

Georges August Couthon (1755 - July 28, 1794) was a French revolutionary. ... Maximilien François Marie Odenthalius Isidore de Robespierre [1] (IPA: ; 6 May 1758 – 28 July 1794) is one of the best-known leaders of the French Revolution. ...

Germany

Wolfgang Schäuble Wolfgang Schäuble (born September 18, 1942 in Freiburg im Breisgau as the son of a tax finance advisor) is a German politician. ... The Interior Minister is a member of a Cabinet in a Government. ...

Nigeria

Chinua Achebe (IPA: ), born Albert Chinualumogu Achebe on November 16, 1930, is a Nigerian novelist, poet and critic. ...

Palestine

Sheikh Ahmed Ismail Yassin (1936 - 2004 (about 68 years old)) (Arabic: ) was the co-founder (with Abdel Aziz al-Rantissi) and the spiritual leader of the militant Palestinian Islamist organization of Hamas,[1] originally calling it the Palestinian Wing of the Muslim Brotherhood. ... Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ...

Russia

  • Lenin, Vladimir, leader of the Bolshevik party, first premier of the Soviet Union

Lenin redirects here. ...

Switzerland

Gianclaudio Giuseppe Clay Regazzoni (September 5, 1939 – December 15, 2006) was a Swiss racing car driver. ...

United Kingdom

Morag Balfour (b. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a radical left-wing Scottish political party which campaigns on a socialist economic platform and for Scottish independence. ... Model, Julie Fernandez poses for a shot in a wheelchair Julie Fernandez (born April 20, 1974) is a British actress, television presenter, model, comedian, writer, comedy writer, comedy actress, journalist, model, athlete, and television producer and extra, although she is best known as Brenda, her award-winning role on the... Michael Henry Flanders (March 1, 1922 – April 14, 1975) was a British actor, broadcaster, and writer and performer of comic songs. ... Frank Gardner is a BBC journalist. ... Stephen William Hawking, CH, CBE, FRS, FRSA, (born 8 January 1942) is a British theoretical physicist. ... An astrophysicist is a person whose profession is astrophysics. ... Sir Francis Owen Garbatt Williams CBE (b. ... Not to be confused with Frank Williams Racing Cars, formed by Frank Williams 1967. ...

United States

Lionel Barrymore (born Lionel Herbert Blythe on April 28, 1878 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – November 15, 1954 in Van Nuys, California) was an American Academy Award Winning actor of stage, radio and film. ... Joseph Maxwell Cleland (born August 24, 1942) is an American politician from Georgia. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Aaron Fotheringham Aaron Fotheringham (born November 8, 1991 in Las Vegas, Nevada) is a wheelchair athlete, or wheelchair skateboarder who performs tricks adapted from skateboarding and BMX. Aaron calls this ‘hardcore sitting’. He is famed for being the first person to successfully perform a back flip [1] in a wheelchair... John Hockenberry (b. ... Ron Kovic, (left) with Brian Willson at a Veterans for Peace conference. ... Vietnam veteran is a phrase used to describe someone who served in the armed forces of participating countries during the Vietnam War. ... A peace activist is a political activist who strives for peace, and against war. ... James R. Jim Langevin (born April 22, 1964) in Providence, Rhode Island is a politician from Rhode Island. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Eric Lynch (born March 11, 1975), better known as Eric the Midget is a popular, albeit reluctant, member of The Howard Stern Shows Wack Pack. ... The Wack Pack is the name given to a wide assortment of regular guests of The Howard Stern Show. ... Wayne Rainey on the Yamaha YZR500 Wayne Rainey (born October 23, 1960) was one of the most successful American motorcycle road racers during the late 1980s and early 1990s winning the 500 cc World Championship three times. ... Christopher DOlier Reeve[1] (September 25, 1952 – October 10, 2004) was an American actor, director, producer and writer. ... Ed Roberts (January 23, 1939- March 14, 1995) was the first severely-disabled student to attend the University of California Berkeley. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... A standing frame (also known as a stand, stander, standing technology, standing aid, standing device, standing box, tilt table) is assistive technology used by a child or adult who uses a wheelchair for mobility. ... George Corley Wallace, Jr. ... Justin Whitlock Dart, Jr. ... Look up disability in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Fictional

A puppet of Katie from Sesame Park, at the CBC Museum in Toronto.
A puppet of Katie from Sesame Park, at the CBC Museum in Toronto.

Download high resolution version (600x800, 85 KB)Katie from Sesame Park, my photo This work is copyrighted. ... Download high resolution version (600x800, 85 KB)Katie from Sesame Park, my photo This work is copyrighted. ... For other uses, see Secret Garden (disambiguation). ... James Jimmy Brooks is a fictional character in the TV series Degrassi: The Next Generation, portrayed by Aubrey Graham. ... Degrassi: The Next Generation is a Canadian television series, which follows the lives of a group of high school students. ... Second City Television, or SCTV, was a Canadian television sketch comedy show offshoot from the Toronto troupe of The Second City. ... Jason Morgan Ritter (born February 17, 1980 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actor, son of the late actor John Ritter and grandson of actors Tex Ritter and Dorothy Fay. ... Joan of Arcadia is an American television fantasy/family drama, which aired on Fridays, 8-9 p. ... Degrassi Junior High is a Canadian television teen drama series that was produced from 1987-1989 as part of the Degrassi series. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... 5, Rue Sésame is a French language childrens television series based on the American show Sesame Street, aired by France 5. ... Ironside (originally broadcast under the name A Man Called Ironside in the United Kingdom) was a Universal television series which ran on NBC from March 28, 1967 to January 16, 1975. ... Sesame Park was a Canadian version of Sesame Street. ... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... For other persons named John Locke, see John Locke (disambiguation). ... LOST redirects here. ... This article is about the animated television series. ... Lou Todd and Andy Pipkin are fictional characters from the cult BBC TV and Radio Show Little Britain played by Matt Lucas and David Walliams. ... This article is about the British TV show Little Britain. ... Brian Chelsea Potter, one of many fictional characters played by Peter Kay, is the owner of The Phoenix Club in both That Peter Kay Thing and Peter Kays Phoenix Nights. ... Peter Kays Phoenix Nights is a British sitcom about The Phoenix Club, a working mens club in the northern English town of Bolton. ... Carol Ellis is an American author of over fifteen YA books. ... Jeffery Deaver (born May 6, 1950, in Glen Ellyn, Illinois) is a mystery/crime writer. ... The Bone Collector is a 1999 thriller starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie. ... Malcolm in the Middle is a seven-time Emmy-winning,[1] one-time Grammy-winning[1] and seven-time Golden Globe-nominated[1] American sitcom created by Linwood Boomer for the Fox Network. ... For the hit 1987 single by Depeche Mode, see the album Music for the Masses Film poster for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 satirical film directed by Stanley Kubrick. ... Lieutenant Joseph Joe Swanson is a fictional character in the Fox animated television show Family Guy. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Timmy is a fictional character from animated television series South Park, voiced by Trey Parker. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Stupid is a comedy television series for children in the UK, broadcasted on CBBC. It features an immortal king, King Stupid, who controls the stupidity of humans. ... Bentley is a fictional character featured in the Sly Cooper series of video games developed by Sucker Punch Productions for the PlayStation 2. ... Official illustration of Sly Cooper, hero of Sucker Punchs series of platform-adventure games for the PS2. ... Raggs Kids Club Band is a US-based musical troupe of five canine characters who have played over 2,000 live performances on four continents since 2002. ... Augustus Hill. ... Oz was the first one-hour dramatic television series to be produced by HBO. The show, which aired for six seasons between 1997 and 2003, was created by Tom Fontana, and produced by Barry Levinson. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Snow Crash is Neal Stephensons third science fiction novel, published in 1992. ...

See also

A cart is a vehicle or device, using two wheels and normally one horse, designed for transport. ... A hobcart was a type of invalid carriage designed in the late 1960s by Dr. Steven Perry of Albrighton,Shropshire,UK. In his practice he had two young children, both of whom had the condition Spina Bifida. ... The International Symbol of Accessibility (ISA), also known as the (International) Wheelchair Symbol, consists of a blue square overlaid in white with a stylized image of a person using a wheelchair. ... Several organizations exist that help to give and receive wheelchair equipment. ... A stairlift is a mechanical device for lifting people and wheelchairs up and down stairs. ... A wagon (in British English waggon) or dray is a wheeled vehicle, ordinarily with four wheels, usually pulled by an animal, or animals, such as horses, mules or oxen and used for transport of heavy goods. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The Extremity Games is a multi-sport, action sports competition, similar to the X Games, for athletes with physical disabilities, specifically people living with limb loss (amputees) and limb difference. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wheelchairs
Look up Wheelchair in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • New Mobility magazine - A lifestyle magazine for active adult wheelchair users.
  • Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Wheeled Mobility
  • Dept of Transportation Information for air travelers with disabilities and their rights in the US
  • Etiquette: Wheelchair users Suggestions for better communication with people who use wheelchairs
  • Whirlwind Wheelchair International Wheelchairs for the developing nations.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Wheelchair - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2393 words)
Wheelchairs are used by people for whom walking is difficult or impossible due to illness, injury, or disability.
Wheelchair fitted with Mecanum wheels, taken at an exhibition in the early 1980s.
Manual or self-propelled wheelchairs are propelled by the occupant, usually by using large rear wheels, from 20-26 inches in average diameter, and resembling those of bicycle wheels.
Wheelchair basketball - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (661 words)
Wheelchair basketball retains most major rules and scoring of FIBA basketball, and maintains a 10-foot basketball hoop and standard basketball court.
Wheelchair basketball has intense competition on the international level, and competitions include the Paralympic Games, an event held for athletes with physical disabilities in the Olympic host city two weeks after the Olympic Games, and the Gold Cup, a qualifying tournament held two years after every paralympics.
With this step wheelchair basketball began its journey for full independence and in 1993 IWBF was established as the world body for wheelchair basketball with full responsibility for development of the sport.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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