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Encyclopedia > Wheaton College (Massachusetts)
Wheaton College
Wheaton Title Logo
Motto "That They May Have Life and Have it Abundantly"
Established 1834 as a female seminary, 1912 chartered as a four-year women's college
Type Private
President Ronald A. Crutcher
Faculty 140
Undergraduates 1,620
Location Norton, Massachusetts USA
Campus Suburban, Residential
Athletics 21 sports teams
Mascot Lyons lyonDropS.gif
Website www.wheatonma.edu

Wheaton College is a four-year, private liberal arts college with an approximate student body of 1,620. Wheaton's residential campus is located in Norton, Massachusetts, between Boston, Massachusetts and Providence, Rhode Island. Founded in 1834 as a female seminary, it is one of the oldest institutions of higher education for women in the United States. Wheaton became a college in 1912. The school began admitting men in 1987, after more than 150 years as a female-only institution. Classes are relatively small: the student-faculty ratio is 11-to-1 and the average class size is between 15 and 20. File links The following pages link to this file: Wheaton College, Massachusetts ... A motto is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A seminary is a specialized university-like institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in theology, often in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... In higher education, particularly in the United States, a womens college is a college (that is, a primarily undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institution) whose students are exclusively women. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... Norton is a town located in Bristol County, Massachusetts. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Mascots at the Mascot Olympics in Orlando, Florida. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The Lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae and one of four big cats in the panthera genus. ... Wheaton Atheletics Logo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This page as shown in the AOL 9. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Norton is a town located in Bristol County, Massachusetts. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Location Location in Massachusetts Government Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas Menino (Dem) Geographical characteristics Area     City 232. ... Nickname: Beehive of Industry, The Renaissance City Official website: http://www. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A seminary is a specialized university-like institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in theology, often in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... This is a timeline of womens colleges in the United States. ... The term college (Latin collegium) is most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


History

The history of Wheaton College is rooted in the affectionate regard and strong personal commitment of a small New England family. In 1834, Eliza Wheaton Strong, the daughter and favorite child of Judge Laban Wheaton, died at the age of thirty-nine. Eliza Baylies Chapin Wheaton, the Judge's daughter-in-law, persuaded him to memorialize his daughter by founding a female seminary. 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The family called upon noted women's educator Mary Lyon for assistance in establishing the seminary. Miss Lyon created the first curriculum with the goal that it be equal in quality to those of men's colleges. She also provided the first principal, Eunice Caldwell. Wheaton Female Seminary opened in Norton, Massachusetts on 22 April 1835, with 50 students and three teachers. 1987 postage stamp issued by the USPS to commemorate Mary Lyon. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Mary Lyon and Eunice Caldwell left Wheaton to open Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in 1837 (now Mount Holyoke College). Following their departure, Wheaton endured a period of fluctuating enrollment and frequent changes in leadership until 1850, when Caroline Cutler Metcalf was recruited as the new prinicpal. Mrs. Metcalf made the hiring of outstanding faculty her top priority, bringing in educators who encouraged students to discuss ideas rather than to memorize facts. The most notable additions to the faculty were Lucy Larcom, who introduced the study of English Literature and founded the student literary magazine The Rushlight; and Mary Jane Cragin, who used innovative techniques to teach geometry and made mathematics the favorite study of many students. Mount Holyoke College, (founded as Mount Holyoke Female Seminary 8 November 1837), is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Table of Geometry, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... Euclid, a famous Greek mathematician known as the father of geometry, is shown here in detail from The School of Athens by Raphael. ...


Mrs. Metcalf retired in 1876. A. Ellen Stanton, a teacher of French since 1871, served as principal from 1880 to 1897. She led the Seminary during a difficult time, when it faced competition from increasing numbers of public high schools and colleges granting bachelor's degrees to women. 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

Campus View in 1898
Campus View in 1898

In 1897, at the suggestion of Eliza Baylies Wheaton, the Trustees hired the Reverend Samuel Valentine Cole as the Seminary's first male president. Preparing to seek a charter as a four-year college, Cole began a program of revitalization that included expanding and strengthening the curriculum, increasing the number and quality of the faculty, and adding six new buildings. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


The Commonwealth of Massachusetts granted Wheaton a college charter in 1912. The Student Government Association was organized to represent the "consensus of opinion of the whole student body", and to encourage individual responsibility, integrity, and self-government. Wheaton received authorization to establish a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in 1932, only twenty years after achieving college status. Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... The term college (Latin collegium) is most often used today to denote an educational institution. ...


President Samuel Valentine Cole died suddenly, following a brief illness, in 1925. During his remarkable career as Wheaton President, Cole oversaw the expansion of the campus from three to twenty-seven buildings, the growth of enrollment from fifty to four hundred fourteen, and the establishment of an endowment. 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The Reverend John Edgar Park, who became president in 1926, continued Cole's building program, and saw the College through the Great Depression, the celebration of its centennial in 1935, and World War II. He retired in 1944, and was succeeded by Dartmouth College Professor of History Alexander Howard Meneely. During his tenure, the Trustees voted to expand the size of the college from 525 to 800-1000 students, and construction of "new campus" began in 1957. 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn, starting in 1929 and lasting through most of the 1930s. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, China, Canada, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, Greece, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma, Slovakia Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... Dartmouth College is a private academic institution in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


President Meneely died in 1961, following a long illness, and was succeeded in 1962 by William C.H. Prentice, a psychology professor and administrator at Swarthmore College. In the early 1960s, Wheaton successfully completed its first endowment campaign. The development of new campus continued, and student enrollment grew to 1200. Wheaton students and faculty joined in nationwide campus protests against United States actions in Indochina in 1970. 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... Psychology (Gk: psyche, soul or mind + logos, speech) is an academic and applied field involving the study of the human mind, brain, and behavior. ... Swarthmore College is a private liberal arts college in the United States, with an enrollment of about 1450 students. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ...


In 1975, Wheaton inaugurated its first woman president, Alice Frey Emerson, Dean of Students at the University of Pennsylvania. During her tenure, Wheaton achieved national recognition as a pioneer in the development of a gender-balanced curriculum. Wheaton celebrated its Sesquicentennial in 1984/85 with a year-long series of symposia, concerts, dance performances, art and history exhibits, and an endowment and capital campaign. In 1987, the Trustees voted to admit men to Wheaton. The first coeducational class was enrolled in September 1988. 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The University of Pennsylvania (Penn is the moniker used by the university itself [2]) is a private, nonsectarian research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Venus de Milo exhibited in the Louvre museum, France. ... For other senses of this word, see history (disambiguation). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Dale Rogers Marshall, Academic Dean at Wellesley College, was inaugurated as Wheaton's sixth president in 1992. She led the college in "The Campaign for Wheaton", to build endowed and current funds for faculty development, student scholarships, and academic programs and facilities. The highest enrollments in Wheaton's history in recent years encouraged the construction of the first new residence halls since 1964, and the improvement and expansion of classroom buildings. Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...

Image:PresCrutcher.jpg
President Crutcher (2004-present)

Wheaton's Board of Trustees appointed Ronald A. Crutcher at the seventh president of Wheaton College on March 23, 2004. President Crutcher came to Wheaton from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, where he served as provost and executive vice president for academic affairs and professor of music. Miami University, founded in 1809, is the second-oldest public college west of the Allegheny Mountains. ... Oxford is located in southwestern Ohio in northwestern Butler County in Oxford Township, originally called the College Township. ... Music is a form of expression in the medium of time using the structures of tones and silence. ...


Presidents

The following is a list of Wheaton College presidents with the years of their presidential tenures.

  • Rev. Dr. Samuel Valentine Cole (1912-1925)
  • George Thomas Smart, Acting President (1925-1926)
  • Rev. Dr. John Edgar Park (1926-1944)
  • Alexander Howard Meneely (1944-1961)
  • Elizabeth Stoffregen May, Acting President (1961-1962)
  • William Courtney Hamilton Prentice (1962-1975)
  • Alice Frey Emerson (1975-1991)
  • Hannah Goldberg, Acting President (1991-1992)
  • Dale Rogers Marshall (1992-2004)
  • Ronald Andrew Crutcher (2004-present)

Curriculum

Wheaton offers a liberal arts curriculum leading to a bachelor of arts degree in more than 36 majors and 50 minors. Students choose from courses in subjects from physics to philosophy, political science to computer science, art history to theater, English to economics. In addition, Wheaton offers highly specialized courses typically found only at large universities. The course selection is extended further through the college's cross-registration programs with Brown University and nine local colleges involved in SACHEM (Southeastern Association for Cooperation in Higher Education in Massachusetts). Wheaton also offers dual-degree programs, enabling its undergraduates to begin graduate-level study in studio art, communications, engineering, business, theology and optometry. It is commonly considered one of the top 20 Liberal Arts colleges in the United States, although does not rank highly in the US News List of Colleges due to its extremely small endowment. Philosopher in Meditation (detail), by Rembrandt. ... Political science is an academic and research discipline that deals with the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ...   Computer science is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Art history usually refers to the history of the visual arts. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... The academic discipline of English studies explores the production and analysis of texts produced in English (or in areas of the world in which English is a common mode of communication). ... Buyers bargain for good prices while sellers put forth their best front in Chichicastenango Market, Guatemala. ... Brown University is an Ivy League university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Studio art, when considered as an academic discipline, is the making of visual art (such as painting, drawing or sculpture), contrasted to the study of art history, for instance. ... Communication studies is the academic discipline that studies communication; subdisciplines include animal communication, argumentation, speech communication, rhetoric, communication theory, group communication, information theory, intercultural communication, interpersonal communication, intrapersonal communication, marketing, organizational communication, persuasion, propaganda, public affairs, public relations and telecommunication. ... Engineering is the application of scientific and technical knowledge to solve human problems. ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason) means reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God. ... Optometry is the health care profession concerned with examination, diagnosis, and treatment of the eyes and related structures, and with determination and correction of vision problems using lenses and other optical aids [1]. An optical refractor in use. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Beginning with the Class of 2007, all Wheaton students take sets of courses that approach a topic from the perspectives of different disciplines. These connected courses are intended to encourage students to explore and think beyond their primary academic interests. [1] For instance, the Connection entitled "Communication through Art and Mathematics" links Arts 298 (Graphic Design I) with Math 127 (Advertising Math).


Foundations courses focus on writing, quantitative analysis, foreign language study and non-Western perspectives. In their first semester at Wheaton, all freshmen take a First Year Seminar in which they explore contemporary issues and gain academic skills needed for college-level study. The Major concentration and elective courses are also central to the Wheaton Curriculum, which culminates in a senior capstone experience—a thesis, research project, seminar or creative project. Quantitative analysis has different meanings in different contexts. ... A foreign language is a language not spoken by the indigenous people of a certain place: for example, English is a foreign language in Japan. ...


The intent of a formal curriculum seldom coincides with its effects. Frequently, interdisciplinary and exploratory subjects fail to provoke the mental response their inventors expect. In this connection, see Benson Snyder's The Hidden Curriculum (1970). The Hidden Curriculum (1973 edition) The Hidden Curriculum (1970) is a book by Benson R. Snyder, the then-Dean of Institute Relations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ...


Honor code

Wheaton is also one of a select number of schools to use the honor code system in both academic and social settings. Incoming freshmen sign the honor code during orientation. The focus at Wheaton has been particularly upon plagiarism, specifically through the decision to require students to write and sign the Honor Code upon their work. This decision, reached in 2003, was done through the work of both students and faculty. An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Arts

Wheaton's arts buildings, with newly expanded space for study, exhibition and performance, have set the stage for the Evelyn Danzig Haas '39 Visiting Artists Program. Launched in 2003, the program brings distinguished writers, musicians, actors, directors, dancers and artists to campus for short-term residencies to share their work through lectures, master classes, concerts and exhibitions. Arts in the City complements the visiting artists program by taking students and faculty members on trips to Boston, Providence and elsewhere to explore the arts and cultural offerings of the region. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Location Location in Massachusetts Government Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas Menino (Dem) Geographical characteristics Area     City 232. ... Nickname: Beehive of Industry, The Renaissance City Official website: http://www. ...


Athletics

Students can participate in intramural activities, club sports, and intercollegiate teams. Wheaton fields 21 intercollegiate teams for women and men, including baseball, softball, basketball, soccer, track and synchronized swimming. The school's teams play within the NCAA Division III and in the New England Women's and Men's Athletic Conference (NEWMAC). The women's track and field program has been the most successful team at Wheaton. They won the NCAA Division III National Championship in Winter Track 5 straight years from 1999 to 2003 and the 2001, 2002, and 2003 Outdoor Track championships. They were also the first Division III program to win the indoor and outdoor titles 3 years in a row. In 1975, Deborah Simocerian won a share of the AIAW individual collegiate golf championship. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women was founded in 1971 to govern collegiate women’s athletics and to administer national championships. ...


Publications and media

  • Wheaton Quarterly: College magazine [2];
  • The Wheaton [wire]: Weekly student newspaper[3];
  • Nike: School yearbook;
  • Rushlight: Student arts & literary magazine;
  • Midnight Oil: Student literary magazine;
  • WCCS: free-format student-run radio station (General Manager - David Machado (2004-Present))[4];

Films

The following films have been recorded, at least in part, on the Wheaton campus.

Soul Man was a hit song by Sam & Dave in 1967 and has inspired the names of: Soul Man a television sitcom starring Dan Aykroyd as Mike Weber, an Episcopal priest and widowed father of four children. ... Prozac Nation (sub-titled Young and Depressed in America : A Memoir) is an autobiography published in 1994 and written by Elizabeth Wurtzel. ...

Notable alumni


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wheaton College, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1617 words)
Wheaton College is a four-year, private liberal arts college with an approximate student body of 1,550.
Wheaton is also one of a select number of schools to use the honor code system in both academic and social settings.
Wheaton's Board of Trustees appointed Ronald A. Crutcher at the seventh president of Wheaton College on March 23, 2004.
Wheaton - Search Results - MSN Encarta (86 words)
Wheaton (Illinois), city, seat of DuPage County, northeastern Illinois, a residential community near Chicago; incorporated as a city 1890.
Wheaton (Maryland), unincorporated community, Montgomery County, west central Maryland, between Rock Creek and the northwestern branch of the...
Wheaton College (Massachusetts), private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Norton, Massachusetts, 45 km (28 mi) southwest of Boston....
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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