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Encyclopedia > Wheaton College (Illinois)

Wheaton College

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Motto Christo et Regno Ejus
(For Christ and His Kingdom)
Established 1860
Type Private Evangelical Protestant
Endowment $304 million
President Duane Litfin
Faculty 191 full time
81 part time
Students 2,890
Undergraduates 2,440
Postgraduates 450
Location Wheaton, Illinois, USA
Campus Suburban, 80 acres
Colors Blue, Orange
Nickname Thunder
Affiliations Council for Christian Colleges and Universities
Website www.wheaton.edu

Wheaton College is a private Evangelical Protestant, coeducational, liberal arts college in Wheaton, Illinois, a suburb 25 miles west of Chicago in the United States. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... The word evangelicalism usually refers to religious practices and traditions which are found in conservative, almost always Protestant Christianity. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A. Duane Litfin is the president of Wheaton College in Wheaton Illinois. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Incorporated City in 1859. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A organization designed to help Christian institutions of higher education communicate with one another. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... The word evangelicalism usually refers to religious practices and traditions which are found in conservative, almost always Protestant Christianity. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women at the same school facilities. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Incorporated City in 1859. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Nickname: The Windy City, The Second City, Chi Town, City of the Big Shoulders, The 312, The City that Works Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government...

Contents

History

Wheaton College was founded in 1860. Its predecessor, the Illinois Institute, had been founded in late 1853 by Wesleyan Methodists as a college and preparatory school. Wheaton's first president, Jonathan Blanchard, was a former president of Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois and a staunch abolitionist with ties to Oberlin College. Blanchard separated the college from any denominational support and was responsible for its new name, given in honor of trustee and benefactor Warren L. Wheaton. 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... The Wesleyan Church in America (formerly Wesleyan Methodist) was officially formed in 1843 at an organizing conference in Utica, New York, as a group of ministers and laymen splitting from the Methodist Episcopal Church, primarily over the issue of slavery, though they had secondary issues as well. ... Reverend Jonathan Blanchard (1811–1892) was a social reformer, abolitionist and the first president of Wheaton College, Illinois. ... Knox College is a four-year coeducational private liberal arts college located in Galesburg, Illinois. ... Galesburg is a city in Knox County, Illinois, in the United States. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Oberlin College is a small, selective liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ...


At this time, Wheaton was the only school in Illinois with a college-level women's program. Blanchard used the school as a platform for abolitionism, anti-Masonic advocacy, and his national presidential campaign on the anti-Masonic American Party ticket in 1884. This English poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery. ... Anti-Masonry (alternatively called Anti-Freemasonry) is defined as Avowed opposition to Freemasonry.[1] However, there is no homogeneous anti-Masonic movement. ...


In 1882, Charles A. Blanchard succeeded his father as president of the college. Blanchard Hall, Wheaton College Charles A. Blanchard (1848 - 1925) was the second president of Wheaton College. ...


In the fall of 1925, J. Oliver Buswell, an outspoken Presbyterian, delivered a series of lectures at Wheaton College. Shortly thereafter, President Charles Blanchard died and Buswell was called to be the third president of Wheaton. Upon his installation in April 1926, he became the nation's youngest college president at age 31. Buswell's tenure was characterized by expanding enrollment (from approximately 400 in 1925 to 1,100 in 1940), a building program, strong academic development, and a boom in the institution's reputation. It was also known for growing divisiveness over faculty scholarship and personality clashes. In 1940 this tension led to the sacking of Buswell for being, as two historians of the college put it, "too argumentative in temperament and too intellectual in his approach to Christianity."[1] By the late 1940s, Wheaton was emerging as a fortress of neo-evangelicalism. Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Neo-Evangelical movement was a response among traditionally orthodox Protestants to fundamentalist Christianitys separatism, beginning in the 1920s and 1930s. ...


By 1950, enrollment at the college surpassed 1,600, and in the second half of the twentieth century enrollment growth and more selective admissions accompanied athletic success, additional and improved facilities, and expanded programs.


In 1951, Honey Rock, a camp in northern Wisconsin, was purchased by the college. Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked...


Wheaton College made national headlines on February 20, 2003 when it lifted its then 143 year-old ban on student dancing. In addition to allowing undergraduate students to dance, Wheaton granted "adult faculty members and grad students ... the freedom to choose whether they want to smoke or drink alcohol, at least while off-campus." February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Wheaton again appeared in the news when Joshua Hochschild, assistant professor of philosophy, was dismissed in 2004 for becoming Roman Catholic.[2] This article is 58 kilobytes or more in size. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Wheaton College Bench

"The bench" is a well-established tradition at Wheaton College. It was originally a senior privilege - a concrete bench on which only the seniors were allowed to sit. In the 1950's the junior class removed the bench from the grounds, replaced it with a replica, and hid the original in a secret location. When the seniors discovered the imposter and tried to recover the bench, the tradition began. Rules have developed over the years which govern the competition for control of the bench, including that the bench can only be in the possession of either the junior or senior classes - underclassmen can assist upperclassmen in gaining control of the bench, but cannot keep it. Other rules include that the bench must remain within 5 miles of campus, and that it must be shown once a semester to a crowd of at least 50 people from the opposing class. Efforts to show the bench typically involve unusual and creative staging (the objective being to show the bench to a large crowd while at the same time preventing the other class from stealing it), but have gotten out of hand and sometimes require administrative help to resolve conflicts. One legendary showing of the bench included dangling it from a helicopter and flying it over the 1958 Homecoming football game.[3]


Academics

Students may choose from about 40 majors in many liberal arts disciplines and in the sciences. The most popular in recent years have been Business, Communications, English, and Psychology.


Wheaton maintains a strong academic record with an average of 37 National Merit Finalists. U.S. News & World Report has noted that Wheaton is often called the "Harvard of evangelical colleges."[4] A National Merit Finalist is a recipient of an award from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


In 2007, U.S. News & World Report ranked Wheaton College 61 out of 212 Best National Liberal Arts Colleges. Wheaton continued to achieve exceptional rankings in several areas of the report:

  • #18 in freshmen retention (94%)
  • #21 in six-year graduation rate (86%)
  • #25 in SAT/ACT scores (1250–1440)
  • #39 in percentage of freshmen graduating in the top 10 percent of their high-school classes (54%)

In recent years, Wheaton's overall ranking has been as high as 44; despite the demonstrated academic merit of Wheaton's students, the college's academic ranking has fallen due to its poor class size and alumni giving rankings.


Wheaton College ranked 9th in the nation in the total number of graduates (all fields) who went on to earn doctorates according to Franklin and Marshall University's latest survey, which included more than 900 private colleges and universities.


Conservatory of Music

Wheaton College is home to an internationally-recognized Conservatory of Music, fully accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. The Conservatory offers two professional music degrees: the Bachelor of Music (with emphases in performance, suzuki pedagogy, composition, history and literature, or elective studies) and the Bachelor of Music Education. 100% of the teaching faculty in the Conservatory hold doctorates. There are approximately 220 music majors in the Conservatory, with a student:faculty ratio of 7:1. Music majors and liberal arts majors alike perform in the Conservatory's six large ensembles: Concert Choir, Jazz Ensemble, Men's Glee Club, Symphonic Band, Symphony Orchestra, and Women's Chorale. The Suzuki method, (Japanese: スズキ・メソード) (sometimes called Talent Education, the mother-tongue method, or the Suzuki movement) is a way of teaching, or educational philosophy which strives to create high ability and beautiful character in its students through a nurturing environment. ...


Graduate School

The Wheaton College Graduate School was founded in 1937, with the intent to provide further theological and ministerial training. Graduate students come from all over the world to attend, and may study for an M.A., M.A.T., or Ph.D. in Biblical and Theological Studies, or a Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology. The once widely respected Department of Communications of the Graduate School has been closed. Approximately 550 graduate students are enrolled.


Off-campus study

Wheaton's gives students a number of popular off-campus study opportunities.


The college sponsors study-abroad programs in Asia, England, France, Germany, the Holy Lands, Latin America, and Spain, as well as a summer program in Washington, D.C. Participants in Wheaton-in-England, one of the most popular annual programs, take 2–3 courses in literature while studying in London and St. Anne's College, Oxford. St Annes College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


Many students also participate in the Human Needs and Global Resources program. The HNGR program matches select students with six-month internships in the Third World, including opportunities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ...


In 1935, The Wheaton College Science Station was established in the Black Hills of South Dakota for field instruction in the natural sciences. The Black Hills The Black Hills are a small, isolated mountain range rising from the Great Plains of North America in western South Dakota and extending into Wyoming, USA. Set off from the main body of the Rocky Mountains, the region is somewhat of a geological anomaly—accurately described as... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...


In 1951, HoneyRock the Northwoods Campus of Wheaton College was established in Three Lakes, WI. HoneyRock is not only a year round camp for young people but it offers a variety of leadership schools and courses for students. Nearly 3000 people utilize HoneyRock each year.


Due to Wheaton's membership in the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, Wheaton students may also study at the University of Oxford, the Los Angeles Film Studies Center, Wesley Institute in Australia, and Xi'an Foreign Language University in China. The CCCU also sponsors programs in American studies, Latin American studies, Middle Eastern studies, Russian studies, and journalism. The Council for Christian Colleges and Universities is an organization designed to help Christian institutions of higher education communicate with one another. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The Wesley Institute is a tertiary education provider in Sydney, Australia. ...


Campus

Blanchard Hall, Wheaton College
Blanchard Hall, Wheaton College

Wheaton's most recognizable and oldest building is Blanchard Hall, a limestone tower built as the main College building in 1853. At the time, the College building was one of only two on campus, the other (called the "boarding hall") being a frame building at the foot of the hill crowned by the tower. Jonathan Blanchard had a vision for the expansion of this tower structure: its castle-like architecture is, supposedly, patterned after buildings at the University of Oxford which Blanchard admired on a trip to England in 1843. After four additions (1871, 1873, 1890, 1927) the Main Building was completed in 1927. In this year, under college president J. Oliver Buswell, Jr., the Main Building was renamed Blanchard Hall, to honor Wheaton's first two presidents, Jonathan Blanchard and his son Charles Blanchard. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x784, 107 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x784, 107 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Reverend Jonathan Blanchard (1811–1892) was a social reformer, abolitionist and the first president of Wheaton College, Illinois. ...


Academic

In 1900 the brick "Industrial Building" was built. From 1917–45 it housed the Wheaton Academy, and from 1945–60 the Graduate School. In 1960 it was renamed Buswell Hall, and in 1980 renamed Schell Hall in honor of Edward R. Schell.


The science departments are housed in Breyer (Chemistry) and Armerding (Biology, Geology, Math, and Physics) halls. Armerding Hall is also the home to the Wheaton College Observatory (a feature of the college since the presidency of Charles Blanchard in the late-nineteenth century). In 1935, The Wheaton College Science Station was established in the Black Hills of South Dakota for field instruction in the natural sciences. For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Incorrect shortening of Mathematics. ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the discovery and understanding of the fundamental laws which govern matter, energy, space, and time and explaining them using mathematics. ... The Black Hills The Black Hills are a small, isolated mountain range rising from the Great Plains of North America in western South Dakota and extending into Wyoming, USA. Set off from the main body of the Rocky Mountains, the region is somewhat of a geological anomaly—accurately described as...


Athletic

The Gymnasium, later renamed Adams Hall, was built in 1898. Today it is home to the Art Department. The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ...


Alumni Gymnasium (renamed the Edward A. Coray Alumni Gymnasium in 1968, in honor of Coach Ed Coray's long service), was built during the Edman presidency and paid for by alumni. The cornerstone was laid at homecoming on October 11, 1941. A copper box placed in the cornerstone contained a copy of the Wheaton Record, the Wheaton Daily Journal, a college catalog, a student directory, and a copy of the Homecoming program.


Wyngarten Health Center was built in 1958, followed by Centennial Gymnasium in 1959-60, which was extensively renovated and expanded in 2000. It is now known as King Arena and is part of the Sports and Recreation Complex (SRC).


Library and collections

The Library, named after college trustee Robert E. Nicholas, opened in January 1952. In 1975 Buswell Memorial Library, named for the college's third president J. Oliver Buswell, Jr., was built adjacent to the Nicholas Library and an interior corridor linked the two, creating the college's main library.


The Marion E. Wade Center, formerly housed in Buswell Library, moved to its new purpose-built home in September 2001. The Marion E. Wade Center, established in 1965 by professor of English Clyde S. Kilby, is an extensive research library and museum of the books and papers of seven British writers: C. S. Lewis, G. K. Chesterton, J.R.R. Tolkien, Owen Barfield, Dorothy L. Sayers, George MacDonald, and Charles Williams. The Wade Center also owns several noteworthy pieces of furniture previously used by some of these authors. The collection boasts the wardrobe made by C.S. Lewis' grandfather, and widely thought to have inspired C.S. Lewis' seven volume Chronicles of Narnia series. Another article is J.R.R. Tolkien's writing desk, where he wrote the entirety of The Hobbit, and worked on The Lord of the Rings. Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Gilbert Keith Chesterton (May 29, 1874–June 14, 1936) was an influential English writer of the early 20th century. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... Owen Barfield (November 9, 1898–December 14, 1997) was a British philosopher, author, poet, and critic. ... Dorothy Leigh Sayers (Oxford, 13 June 1893 – Witham, 17 December 1957) was a renowned British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist. ... George MacDonald (December 10, 1824 – September 18, 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. ... Charles Walter Stansby Williams (September 20, 1886 – May 15, 1945), was a British writer and poet, and a member of the loose literary circle called the Inklings. ...


Buswell Library's special collections also include the archived correspondence, manuscripts, articles, photos, and other papers of Madeleine L'Engle, the Newberry Medal-winning author of A Wrinkle in Time. With items dating as early as 1919, the collection is comprised largely of material sent to the college by L'Engle and has been supplemented by the college with books and other supporting materials. The collection is the most comprehensive research center for L'Engle's work.[5] Madeleine LEngle (born November 29, 1918) is an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, and Many Waters. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the most outstanding American book for children. ... For the movie adaptation, see A Wrinkle in Time (film) . A Wrinkle in Time is a childrens fantasy novel by Madeleine LEngle, written from 1959 to 1960[1] and published in 1962 after over forty rejections by publishers because it was, in LEngles words, too different. ...


Student life

The Memorial Student Center (MSC) was dedicated on June 11, 1951. It was built in memory of over 1600 former students and graduates who served in World War II and in honor of those 39 who gave their lives. It housed the Student Union café, nicknamed "the Stupe" (which has since been moved to the recently constructed Beamer Center). An early pamphlet described the new building and listed some of the rules for its use, such as No Rook Playing and No Playing of Boogie-Woogie, Jazz, or Otherwise Abusing the Piano. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The Dining Hall (now the "Old Dining Hall" ODH) opened January 4, 1953. Today it houses Student Services.


Jenks Hall is home to the Arena Theater, which was established in the Fall of 1974 and has staged over 100 full length productions.


In the fall of 2004, the Todd M. Beamer Student Center was completed. Beamer, a Wheaton alumnus, was part of a small group of passengers who stormed hijackers on United Flight 93, thus bringing down the plane in rural Pennsylvania during the September 11, 2001 attacks, and preventing it from reaching its target. The $20+ million dollar project was commissioned in order to meet the needs of the growing college community. Along with its spacious and sleek, modern design, the Beamer Center features a convenience store, the new "Stupe", a bakery café, several reading rooms and lounges, a recreation/game room, a prayer chapel, an expanded college post office, the offices for several organizations and departments, and several other events rooms. In the fall of 2006, strong rain storms created a flood that destroyed the lower level of the Beamer Center. Wheaton College has since restored the flood damaged building. Todd Beamer Cover to Lets Roll, by Lisa Beamer Todd Morgan Beamer (November 24, 1968 – September 11, 2001) was a victim of the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... United Airlines Flight 93 was a Boeing 757-222 flight that regularly flew from Newark International Airport (now known as Newark Liberty International Airport) in Newark, New Jersey, to San Francisco International Airport continuing on to Narita International Airport in Tokyo, Japan, on a different aircraft. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Spirituality

The Chapel, on the corner of Washington and Franklin streets, was dedicated on November 15, 1925. This building was also used by the college for commencements and other important assemblies. In 1936–37, it was renamed the Orlinda Childs Pierce Memorial Chapel. Neighboring McAlister Hall is home to the Conservatory of Music. November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The college's regular chapel services are held in Edman Memorial Chapel, which seats 2,400. It is named for V. Raymond Edman, fourth president of the college. Edman died in 1967 while speaking in chapel. Campus tradition holds that he was preaching on being in the presence of the King. This chapel/auditorium is also used for many events of Wheaton's performing arts programs. In 2000, an entirely handcrafted organ made by Casavant Frères of Canada was installed. Casavant Frères is a prominent Canadian company that builds fine pipe organs. ...


Other

The building housing the Billy Graham Center (BGC), named after one of the college's most well-known graduates opened in September 1980. The Billy Graham Center itself, as the repository of the evangelist's corporate records, had existed since 1974. The BGC houses several evangelism institutes, a museum of the history of evangelism, the college's Archives and Special Collections, as well as the Wheaton College Graduate School and the school radio station, WETN 88.1 FM. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Billy Graham Center was founded and opened in 1981 on the campus of Wheaton College . ...


The Women's Building, renamed Williston Hall in 1930–31 (in honor of longtime Blanchard friend and donor J. P. Williston), was built in 1895. Its construction required the college to borrow $6,000.


The President's House, or Westgate, formerly owned by college trustee John M. Oury, was presented to President Buswell on the tenth anniversary of his inauguration, April 23, 1936. This served as the home of three of Wheaton's subsequent presidents. It now houses the Office of Alumni Relations. April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1951, HoneyRock the Northwoods Campus of Wheaton College was established in Three Lakes, WI. HoneyRock is not only a year round camp for young people but it offers a variety of leadership schools and courses for students. Nearly 3000 people utilize HoneyRock each year. Through HoneyRock the college owns nearly 800 acres in Northern, WI.


Athletics

Wheaton College competes in many NCAA Division III sports in the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin. The Wheaton men's soccer team captured the NCAA Division III Men's Soccer Championship in 1984 and 1997, to go with runner-up finishes in 1999 and 2006. The women's soccer team won the NCAA Division III Women's Soccer Championship in 2004 and 2006. Wheaton athletics also competed in basketball at the 1904 Summer Olympics. The College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin (CCIW) is a College Athletic Conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Its member teams are located in Illinois and Wisconsin. ... The NCAA began conducting a mens soccer national championship tournament in 1959 with an eight-team tournament. ... This article lists NCAA Womens soccer championships. ... Basketball appeared at the 1904 Summer Olympics for the first time, as a demonstration sport. ...


Notable alumni

Religion

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Roman Catholic institution located in Notre Dame, Indiana, immediately northeast of South Bend, Indiana, United States. ... Rob Bell, Everything is Spiritual Tour, Cleveland, Ohio; Photograph: Virgil Vaduva Robert Rob Bell (born August 23, 1970) is the founding pastor of Mars Hill Bible Church located in Grandville, Michigan. ... Educational institutions run by the Presbyterian Church (USA) which are geared primarily towards the training of ministers. ... William Lane Craig (born August 23, 1949) is an American philosopher, theologian, New Testament historian, and Christian apologist. ... The Catholic University of Leuven is a university in Belgium. ... Piedmont Baptist College is a private, Christian college in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Bart D. Ehrman is a New Testament Scholar and an expert on Early Christianity. ... Philip James Elliot (October 8, 1927 – January 8, 1956) was a Christian missionary to Ecuador, where he was killed by Huaorani Indians. ... Elisabeth Elliot is a missionary who spent some years among the Waorani people. ... David Otis Fuller David Otis Fuller (1903 - 1988) was a graduate of Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois, Princeton Theological Seminary, and Dallas Theological Seminary. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, the Cathedral parish of the Archdiocese. ... The Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, the Cathedral parish of the Archdiocese. ... Carl F. H. Henry (January 22, 1913 - December 7, 2003) was an evangelical Christian theologian, who founded the magazine Christianity Today as a scholarly voice for evangelical Christianity and as a challenge to the liberal Christian Century. ... Arthur F. Holmes (born 1924) was Professor of Philosophy at Wheaton College, Illinois (1951-1994). ... Thomas Howard is a highly acclaimed writer and scholar. ... For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. ... Walter C. Kaiser, Jr. ... This article is about the private university in Philadelphia. ... Joslin Josh McDowell is a Christian apologist, evangelist, and writer. ... Mark Noll, Professor of History at Wheaton College, Illinois, is the prolific progressive evangelical author of A History of Christianity in the United States and Canada (1994), America’s God: From Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln (Oxford University Press) and co-author of the forthcoming Is the Reformation Over? An... It has been suggested that Christian Hedonism be merged into this article or section. ... The reconstructed frame of Nate Saints plane, on display at the headquarters of the Mission Aviation Fellowship Nate Saint (August 30, 1923 – January 8, 1956) was a Christian missionary pilot to Ecuador, where he was killed by Huaorani, or Auca, Indians. ... Philip Yancey is a Christian author. ... Gary Allen Wilde, (born 1955, in Oshkosh, Wisconsin), is an American religious author, and Episcopal priest for the Diocese of Georgia. ... John F. Walvoord (May 1, 1910 - December 20, 2002), was a Christian author and theologian. ...

Media & Entertainment

  • Wes Craven[6] (horror film director)
  • Jake Armerding (singer-songwriter)
  • Bryce Bell
  • Susan Bergman (author)
  • Brian Funck (singer-songwriter, Harrod and Funck)
  • The Detholz! (band)
  • Mary Lou Leonard Engle (musician/missionary)
  • Ian Eskelin (singer-songwriter, All Star United)
  • Cathleen Falsani (journalist)
  • Elizabeth A.H. Green (musician)
  • Jason Harrod (singer-songwriter)
  • Claire Holley (singer-songwriter)
  • Margaret Landon
  • Walter R. Ratliff
  • Luci Shaw (poet)
  • Robert H. Siegel (poet)
  • Wesley G. Pippert (journalist)

Wesley Earl Craven (born August 2, 1939 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American film director and writer best known as the creator of many horror films, including the famed Nightmare on Elm Street series featuring the redoubtable Freddy Krueger character. ... Image:Bryce Bell 2003. ... The Detholz are a Chicago-based band. ... Cathleen Falsani (25 September 1970-) is the popular religion writer and columnist from the Chicago Sun-Times. ... Margaret Landon (September 7, 1903 - December 4, 1993) was an American writer who became famous for Anna and the King of Siam, her 1944 novel of the life of Anna Leonowens. ... Walter Ratliff is a journalist with the Associated Press in Washington, DC . ...

Education

Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... Nathan O. Hatch is president of Wake Forest University (he was officially installed as president on October 20, 2005). ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Washington Avenue Bridge at night The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, almost always abbreviated U of M, and sometimes referred to as The U by locals, is the oldest and largest part of the University of Minnesota system. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... The Pacific School of Religion is an ecumenical seminary, affiliated with the United Church of Christ and the United Methodist Church, training clergy from twenty-four religious traditions, located in Berkeley, CA. External links PSR home page Categories: School stubs ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke was founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, moved to Durham in 1892. ... The University of Puget Sound (often called UPS or just Puget Sound) is a private liberal arts college located in the North End of Tacoma, Washington, in the United States. ... Hofstra University is a private institution of higher learning located in Hempstead, Long Island, New York (USA) founded in 1935 on the basis of the estate of wealthy lumber magnate William Hofstra and widow Kate Williams Hofstra. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[2] in the United States, with three residential campuses located in and around New York City. ... Yale redirects here. ... Grove City College is a private liberal arts college in Grove City, Pennsylvania with a population of about 2,500 undergraduate students. ... Grove City College is a private liberal arts college in Grove City, Pennsylvania with a population of about 2,500 undergraduate students. ... Grove City College is a private liberal arts college in Grove City, Pennsylvania with a population of about 2,500 undergraduate students. ...

Politics

Daniel Ray Coats (born May 16, 1943 in Jackson, Michigan) is an American diplomat and politician. ... Michael Gerson (born 1965 in New Jersey) is an advisor to President George W. Bush. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Dennis Hastert (born January 2, 1942) is an American politician and former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... Rep. ... Paul Brentwood Henry (July 9, 1942–July 31, 1993) was an evangelical Christian, professor of political science, and politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. ...

Other

Todd Beamer Cover to Lets Roll, by Lisa Beamer Todd Morgan Beamer (November 24, 1968 – September 11, 2001) was a victim of the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... United Airlines Flight 93 was a regular flight from Newark International Airport (now known as Newark Liberty International Airport) in Newark, New Jersey, to San Francisco International Airport, then continuing on to Narita International Airport in Tokyo, Japan, on a different aircraft. ... Paul Werner Gast (September 11, 1930–May 16, 1973) was an American geochemist and geologist. ... Donnie Nelson is the General Manager and president of basketball operations for the Dallas Mavericks, an NBA team. ... The Dallas Mavericks (also known as the Mavs) are an NBA basketball team based in Dallas, Texas. ... Randy Pfund is a former NBA head coach and a current NBA executive. ... The Miami Heat are a professional basketball team based in Miami, Florida, United States. ... John Wesley Powell, second Director of the USGS. Served from 1881-1894. ...

Presidents

  • Jonathan Blanchard (1860–1882)
  • Charles Albert Blanchard (1882–1925)
  • Rev. J. Oliver Buswell (1926–1940)
  • V. Raymond Edman (1941–1965)
  • Hudson T. Armerding (1965–1982)
  • J. Richard Chase (1982–1993)
  • A. Duane Litfin (1993— )

Reverend Jonathan Blanchard (1811–1892) was a social reformer, abolitionist and the first president of Wheaton College, Illinois. ... A. Duane Litfin is the president of Wheaton College in Wheaton Illinois. ...

Board of Trustees

Wheaton College is governed by a board of trustees which is usually composed of 18-20 voting members. These include: - Duane Litfin (President) - C. William Pollard (Chairman) - David Gieser (Vice Chairman) - Barbara Anderson (Secretary) - Harold Airhart - Melvin Banks - George Bennett, Jr. - James Bowen - Gregory Campbell - Daniel Coats - Gary Griffin - Jeanette Hsieh - Phillip Hubbard - Walter Kaiser, Jr. - Emery Lindsay - Donald Meyer - Kathleen Nielson - Thomas Pratt - James Plueddemann - Phillip Ryken


Trivia

  • The official student newspaper at Wheaton College is the Wheaton Record, a weekly publication in existence since 1876. The Record is produced by students and published by the college and distributed each Friday after chapel free of charge. The Record was the recipient of the 2006 John David Reed General Excellence Award and 13 other awards from the Illinois College Press Association, of which it is a member. The Record is also a member of the Associated Collegiate Press. The college does not currently permit the Record to be published online.
  • Wheaton College was prominently featured in the PBS documentary Evolution.

The Eagle and Child pub (commonly known as the Bird and Baby) in Oxford where the Inklings met on Thursday nights in 1939. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a fantasy novel for children by C. S. Lewis. ... Westmont College is a Christian liberal arts college in the hills of Montecito, near Santa Barbara, California. ... There have been a number of notable people named Charles Williams: Sir Charles Hanbury Williams (1708–1759), a British Member of Parliament and satirist. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... Pauline Baynes (born 1922, in Hove, Sussex) is an English book illustrator, whose work encompasses more than 100 books. ... Narnia is a fantasy world created by C. S. Lewis as a location for his Chronicles of Narnia, a series of seven fantasy novels for children. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ...

References

  1. ^ The Opening of the Evangelical Mind
  2. ^ "No Catholics at Wheaton?", Daniel Golden, Wall Street Journal, January 7, 2006
  3. ^ Dziedzic, Steve, Wheaton College IL off the record / College Prowler (Pittsburgh: College Prowler, 2006), 149 & 153.
  4. ^ Tolson, Jay. "The new school spirit". U.S. News & World Report, 14 February 2005.
  5. ^ About the Collection — Madeleine L'Engle
  6. ^ Wes Craven official site FAQ
  • T. A. Askew, "The Liberal Arts College Encounters Intellectual Change: A Comparative Study of Education at Knox and Wheaton Colleges, 1837-1925" (unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Northwestern University, 1969).
  • P. M. Bechtel, Wheaton College: A Heritage Remembered, 1860–1984 (Wheaton: Shaw, 1984).
  • E. E. Cairns, V. Raymond Edman: In the Presence of the King (Chicago: Moody, 1972).
  • E. A. Coray, The Wheaton I Remember: Memoirs (Chicago: Books for Living, 1974).
  • M. S. Hamilton, "The Fundamentalist Harvard: Wheaton College and the Continuing Vitality of American Evangelicalism, 1919-1965" (unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, University of Notre Dame, 1995), advisor, Nathan O. Hatch.
  • M. S. Hamilton, The Fundamentalist Harvard: Wheaton College, Evangelicalism, and American Higher Education (Oxford University Press or Columbia University Press, forthcoming).
  • J. D. Lower, "An Evaluation of the Marion E. Wade Collection, Wheaton College, as a Research Collection" (unpublished A.M. thesis, University of Chicago, 1978).

The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...

External links

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