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Encyclopedia > What the Papers Say

What The Papers Say, is one of the longest running programmes on British television. The format, consisting of readings from the previous week's newspapers, linked by a studio presenter, has remained essentially unchanged for nearly half a century. The show has always been made by Granada Television, the longest-running broadcasting company in the UK other than the BBC, and is the only programme surviving from the company's original line-up of programmes in 1956. A Granada TV logo from the black and white era. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national public service broadcaster of the United Kingdom (see British television). ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


For the first 26 years of its run the programme appeared on ITV. It was originally presented alternately by Kingsley Martin, editor of The New Statesman, and Brian Inglis, assistant editor of The Spectator. Inglis later became the sole presenter, remaining with the programme until 1969 when it was briefly relaunched as The Papers with Stuart Hall as host. However, it soon reverted to its original title, and took on the format it still has today, with a different presenter (almost always a journalist) each week. Current ITV logo. ... An Editor is a person who prepares text—typically language, but also images and sounds—for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it. ... The New Statesman is a left-of-centre political weekly published in London. ... Brian Inglis (b. ... The Spectator is a conservative British political magazine, established 1828, published weekly. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Stuart Hall (b. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Originally the programme ran for 25 minutes, later dropping to 20. The show moved from ITV to Channel Four when the latter launched in 1982, but was dropped in 1989, to be taken up by BBC2 where it is still broadcast on Saturday afternoons, now with a running time of 10 minutes, with the presenters now placed in a virtual studio. The show's distinctive theme music, originally was by Rimsky-Korsakov, when it reverted to the original title in 1969 it was replaced by the "English Dance No.5" by Malcolm Arnold and remains so to this day. Channel 4 is a television broadcaster in the United Kingdom (see British television). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... -1... BBC Two (or BBC2 as it was formerly styled) was the second UK television station to be aired by the BBC. History The channel was scheduled to begin at 7:20pm on April 20, 1964 and show an evening of light entertainment, starting with the comedy show The Alberts and... The virtual is a concept applied in many fields with somewhat differing connotations, and also denotations. ... A television studio is an installation in which television or video productions take place, either for live television, for recording live on tape, or for the acquisition of raw footage for postproduction. ... Sir Malcolm Henry Arnold (born October 21, 1921) is an English composer. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
What the Papers Say - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (308 words)
What The Papers Say, is one of the longest running programmes on British television.
Inglis later became the sole presenter, remaining with the programme until 1969 when it was briefly relaunched as The Papers with Stuart Hall as host.
However, it soon reverted to its original title, and took on the format it still has today, with a different presenter (almost always a journalist) each week.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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