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Encyclopedia > Whale Shark
Whale shark
Whale shark from Taiwan in the Georgia Aquarium
Whale shark from Taiwan in the Georgia Aquarium
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Chondrichthyes
Subclass: Elasmobranchii
Order: Orectolobiformes
Family: Rhincodontidae
(Müller and Henle, 1839)
Genus: Rhincodon
Smith, 1829
Species: R. typus
Binomial name
Rhincodon typus
(Smith, 1828)

Range of whale shark

The whale shark, Rhincodon typus, is a slow filter feeding shark that is the largest living fish species. This distinctively-marked shark is the only member of its genus Rhincodon and its family, Rhincodontidae (called Rhinodontes before 1984), which is grouped into the subclass Elasmobranchii in the class Chondrichthyes. The shark is found in tropical and warm oceans and lives in the open sea. The species is believed to have originated about 60 million years ago.[2] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2331x1074, 1144 KB) cropped and adjusted version of IMG 1023. ... The Georgia Aquarium, located in Atlanta, Georgia at Pemberton Place, is billed as the worlds largest aquarium with more than 8 million US gallons (30,000 m³; 30,000,000 liters) of marine and fresh water, 1. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn2. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses and Orders See text. ... Superorders Batoidea (rays and skates) Selachimorpha (sharks) Elasmobranchii is the subclass of cartilaginous fish that includes skates, rays (batoidea) and sharks (selachii). ... Families Parascyllidae (collared carpet sharks) Brachaeluridae (blind sharks) Orectolobidae (wobbegongs) Hemiscylliidae (bamboo sharks) Ginglymostomatidae (nurse sharks) Stegostomatidae (zebra shark) Rhincodontidae (whale shark) The order Orectolobiformes, also collectively known as the carpet sharks or wobbegongs (in Australia) because most have carpet-like patterned markings, includes a number of familiar types of... Johannes Peter Müller (July 14, 1801, Koblenz – April 28, 1858, Berlin), was a German physiologist, comparative anatomist, and ichthyologist not only known for his discoveries but also for his ability to synthesize knowledge. ... Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle (b. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Dr. Sir Andrew Smith (1797 - 1872) was a Scottish surgeon and zoologist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dr. Sir Andrew Smith (1797 - 1872) was a Scottish surgeon and zoologist. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1357x628, 57 KB) Distribution of whale shark I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Filter feeders (also known as suspension feeders) are animals that feed by straining suspended matter and food particles from water, typically by passing the water over a specialized structure, such as the baleen of baleen whales. ... Orders Carcharhiniformes Heterodontiformes Hexanchiformes Lamniformes Orectolobiformes Pristiophoriformes Squaliformes Squatiniformes † Symmoriida Sharks (superorder Selachimorpha) are fish with a full cartilaginous skeleton [1] and a streamlined body. ... A giant grouper at the Georgia Aquarium Fish are aquatic vertebrates that are cold-blooded, covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... A family in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in 1997 A family consists of a domestic group of people (or a number of domestic groups), typically affiliated by birth or marriage, or by analogous or comparable relationships — including domestic partnership, cohabitation, adoption, surname and (in some cases) ownership (as occurred in the... Superorders Batoidea (rays and skates) Selachimorpha (sharks) Elasmobranchii is the subclass of cartilaginous fish that includes skates, rays (batoidea) and sharks (selachii). ... Subclasses and Orders See text. ...

Contents

Naming

The species was first identified in April 1828 following the harpooning of a 4.6 metre (15.1 ft) specimen in Table Bay, South Africa. It was described the following year by Andrew Smith, a military doctor associated with British troops stationed in Cape Town. He proceeded to publish a more detailed description of the species in 1849. The name "whale shark" comes from the fish's physiology; that is, a shark as large as a whale that shares a similar filter feeder eating mode. The metre (American English:meter) is a measure of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Cape Town, False Bay (top) and Table Bay (right) from space, February 1995. ... Dr. Sir Andrew Smith (1797 - 1872) was a Scottish surgeon and zoologist. ... City motto: Spes Bona (Latin: Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Province Western Cape Mayor Helen Zille Area  - % water 2,499 km² N/A Population  - Total (2004)  - Density Not ranked 2,893,251 1,158/km² Established 1652 Time zone SAST (UTC+2... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A Fin Whale The term whale is ambiguous: it can refer to all cetaceans, to just the larger ones, or only to members of particular families within the order Cetacea. ...


Distribution and habitat

The whale shark inhabits the world's tropical and warm-temperate oceans. While thought to be primarily pelagic, seasonal feeding aggregations of the sharks occur at several coastal sites such as Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia; Útila in Honduras; Donsol and Batangas in the Philippines; and the Tanzanian islands of Pemba and Zanzibar. Though it is often seen offshore, it has also been found closer to shore, entering lagoons or coral atolls, and near the mouths of estuaries and rivers. Its range is restricted to about ±30 ° latitude. It is found to a depth of 700 metres (2,300 ft)[3]. The whale shark is solitary and rarely seen in groups unless feeding at locations with an abundance of food. Males range over longer distances than females (which appear to favour specific locations). The pelagic zone is the part of the open sea or ocean comprising the water column, i. ... Ningaloo Reef is a coral reef located off the west coast of Australia, approximately 1200km north of Perth. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $100,900 (4th)  - Product per capita  $50,355/person... Útila (Isla de Útila) is the third largest of Hondurass Bay Islands, after Guanaja. ... Donsol is a 4th class municipality in the province of Sorsogon, Philippines. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Map of Pemba Island Pemba is an island about 50 kilometres to the north of the island of Zanzibar. ... Map of Zanzibars main island Zanzibar is part of Tanzania Coordinates: , Country Tanzania Islands Unguja and Pemba Capital Zanzibar City Settled AD 1000 Government  - Type semi-autonomous part of Tanzania  - President Amani Abeid Karume Area  - Both Islands  637 sq mi (1,651 km²) Population (2004)  - Both Islands 1,070...


Anatomy and appearance

Size comparison of a whale shark and a human

As a filter feeder, it has a capacious mouth which can be up to 1.5 metres (4.9 ft) wide and can contain between 300–350 rows of tiny teeth.[4] It has five large pairs of gills. Two small eyes are located towards the front of the shark's wide, flat head. The body is mostly grey with a white belly; three prominent ridges run along each side of the animal and the skin is marked with a "checkerboard" of pale yellow spots and stripes. These spots are unique to each whale shark and because of this they can be used to identify each animal and hence make an accurate population count. Its skin can be up to 10 centimetres (3.9 in) thick. The shark has a pair each of dorsal fins and pectoral fins. A juvenile whale shark's tail has a larger upper fin than lower fin while the adult tail becomes semi-lunate (or crescent-shaped). The whale shark's spiracles are just behind the eyes Image File history File links Rhtyp_u0_white_bg. ... Image File history File links Rhtyp_u0_white_bg. ... Filter feeders (also known as suspension feeders) are animals that feed by straining suspended matter and food particles from water, typically by passing the water over a specialized structure, such as the baleen of baleen whales. ... For other uses, see Gill (disambiguation). ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Dorsal fin of an orca A dorsal fin is a fin located on the backs of fishes, whales, dolphins, and porpoises, as well as the (extinct) ichthyosaurs. ... Fish anatomy is primarily governed by the physical characteristics of water, which is much denser than air, holds a relatively small amount of dissolved oxygen, and absorbs light more than does air. ... Spiracles are small openings on the surface of animals that usually lead to respiratory systems. ...

Whale shark in main tank at Osaka Aquarium.
Whale shark in main tank at Osaka Aquarium.

The whale shark is not an efficient swimmer since the entire body is used for swimming, which is unusual for fish and contributes to an average speed of only around kilometres per hour (3.1 mph). The largest specimen regarded as accurately recorded was caught on November 11, 1947, near the island of Baba, not far from Karachi, Pakistan. It was 12.65 metres (41.5 ft) long, weighed more than 21.5 tonnes (47,300 lb), and had a girth of 7 metres (23 ft).[5] Stories exist of vastly larger specimens—quoted lengths of 18 metres (59 ft) are not uncommon in the popular shark literature—but no scientific records exist to support their existence. In 1868 the Irish natural scientist E. Perceval Wright spent time in the Seychelles, during which he managed to obtain several small whale shark specimens, but claimed to have observed specimens in excess of 15 metres (49.2 ft), and tells of reports of specimens surpassing 21 metres (68.9 ft). Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 291 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Original summary at enwiki was: Photo taken by Bobak HaEri. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 291 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Original summary at enwiki was: Photo taken by Bobak HaEri. ... Kaiyukan Aquarium Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan (海遊館 Kaiyūkan, literally playing in the Sea Pavilion) is one of the largest aquariums in the world. ... Kilometres per hour (American spelling: kilometers per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...   (Urdu: , Sindhi: ) is the capital of the province of Sindh, and the largest city in Pakistan. ... A tonne or metric ton (symbol t), sometimes referred to as a metric tonne, is a measurement of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms. ... The pound (abbreviations: lb or, sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass in a number of different systems, including various systems of units of mass that formed part of English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...


In a 1925 publication, Hugh M. Smith describes a huge whale shark caught in a bamboo fish trap in Thailand in 1919. The shark was too heavy to pull ashore, but Smith estimated that the shark was at least 17 metres (56 ft) long, and weighed approximately 37 tonnes (81,500 lb), which have been exaggerated to an accurate measurement of 17.98 metres (58.99 ft) and weight 43 tonnes in recent years. There have even been claims of whale sharks of up to 23 metres (75 ft). In 1934 a ship named the Maurguani came across a whale shark in the Southern Pacific ocean, rammed it, and the shark consequently became stuck on the prow of the ship, supposedly with 4.6 metres (15.1 ft) on one side and 12.2 metres (40 ft) on the other.[6] No reliable documentation exists of those claims and they remain little more than "fish-stories". Hugh McCormick Smith Hugh McCormick Smith (November 21, 1865-September 28, 1941) was an American ichthyologist and administrator in the Bureau of Fisheries. ...


Diet

A whale shark in the Maldives
A whale shark in the Maldives

The whale shark is a filter feeder—one of only three known filter feeding shark species (along with the basking shark and the megamouth shark). It feeds on phytoplankton, macro-algae, plankton, krill and small nektonic life, such as small squid or vertebrates. The many rows of teeth play no role in feeding; in fact, they are reduced in size in the whale shark. Instead, the shark sucks in a mouthful of water, closes its mouth and expels the water through its gills. During the slight delay between closing the mouth and opening the gill flaps, plankton is trapped against the dermal denticles which line its gill plates and pharynx. This fine sieve-like apparatus, which is a unique modification of the gill rakers, prevents the passage of anything but fluid out through the gills (anything above 2 to 3 mm in diameter is trapped). Any material caught in the filter between the gill bars is swallowed. Whale sharks have been observed "coughing" and it is presumed that this is a method of clearing a build up of food particles in the gill rakers.[3][7][8] An image of the Whale shark taken from http://www. ... An image of the Whale shark taken from http://www. ... Binomial name (Gunnerus, 1765) Range (in blue) The basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, is the second largest fish, after the whale shark. ... Binomial name Megachasma pelagios Taylor, Compagno and Struhsaker, 1983 The megamouth shark, Megachasma pelagios, is an extremely rare and unusual species of shark, discovered in 1976, with 37 specimens known to be caught or sighted as of 2006. ... Diagrams of some typical phytoplankton Phytoplankton are the autotrophic component of plankton. ... A seaweed (Laurencia) up close: the branches are multicellular and only about 1 mm thick. ... Photomontage of plankton organisms Plankton are any drifting organism that inhabits the water column of oceans, seas, and bodies of fresh water. ... Families Euphausiidae Euphausia Dana, 1852 Meganyctiphanes Holt and W. M. Tattersall, 1905 Nematobrachion Calman, 1905 Nematoscelis G. O. Sars, 1883 Nyctiphanes G. O. Sars, 1883 Pseudeuphausia Hansen, 1910 Stylocheiron G. O. Sars, 1883 Tessarabrachion Hansen, 1911 Thysanoessa Brandt, 1851 Thysanopoda Latreille, 1831 Bentheuphausiidae Bentheuphausia amblyops Krill are shrimp-like marine... Nekton is the grouping of living organisms that live in the water column of the ocean and freshwater lakes. ... Suborders †Plesioteuthididae (incertae sedis) Myopsina Oegopsina Squid are a large, diverse group of marine cephalopods. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Denticles or placoid scales are small outgrowths which cover the skin of many cartilaginous fish including sharks. ... The pharynx (plural: pharynges) is the part of the neck and throat situated immediately posterior to the mouth and nasal cavity, and cranial, or superior, to the esophagus, larynx, and trachea. ...


Whale sharks congregate at reefs off the Belizean Caribbean coast, supplementing their ordinary diet by feeding on the roe of giant cubera snappers, which spawn in these waters between the full and quarter moons of May, June, and July. “West Indian” redirects here. ... Salmon roe at the Shiogama seafood market in Japan Look up Roe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The whale shark is an active feeder and targets concentrations of plankton or fish by olfactory cues. Rather than simply "vacuuming" constantly, it is able to pump water over its gills. The shark can circulate water at a rate up to 1.7 L/s (3.5 U.S. pint/s).[citation needed] The whale shark does not need to swim forward when feeding; it is often observed in a vertical position, "bobbing" up and down swallowing water and actively filtering it for food. This is in contrast to the basking shark, which is a passive feeder and does not pump water; it relies on its swimming to force water over its gills.[7][3] Olfaction, the sense of smell, is the detection of chemicals dissolved in air (or, by animals that breathe water, in water). ... Binomial name (Gunnerus, 1765) Range (in blue) The basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, is the second largest fish, after the whale shark. ...


Behaviour towards divers

A Whale shark at Ningaloo Reef
A Whale shark at Ningaloo Reef

This species, despite its enormous size, does not pose any significant danger to humans. It is a frequently cited example when educating the public about the popular misconceptions of all sharks as "man-eaters". They are actually quite gentle and can be playful with divers. Divers and snorkellers can swim with this giant fish without any risk apart from unintentionally being hit by the shark's large tail fin. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 637 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1445 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 637 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1445 pixel, file size: 1. ... Ningaloo Reef is a coral reef located off the west coast of Australia, approximately 1200km north of Perth. ...


The shark is often seen by divers in The Bay Islands in Honduras, Thailand, the Maldives, the Red Sea, Western Australia (Ningaloo Reef), Gladden Spit Marine Reserve in Belize, Sodwana Bay (Greater St. Lucia Wetland Park) in South Africa and at the Galapagos Islands. Útila (Isla de Útila) is the third largest of Hondurass Bay Islands, after Guanaja. ... Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $100,900 (4th)  - Product per capita  $50,355/person... Ningaloo Reef is a coral reef located off the west coast of Australia, approximately 1200km north of Perth. ... The Greater St. ... NASA Satellite photo of the Galápagos archipelago. ...


The highest concentration of whale sharks to be found anywhere in the world is in the Philippines. From January to May, they congregate in the shallow coastal waters of Sorsogon province (at Donsol). Lucky divers have also come across whale sharks in the Seychelles and in Puerto Rico. Between December and September, they are well known to swim along the bay of La Paz in Mexico's Baja California. Sometimes, they are accompanied by smaller fish, in particular, the remora. Sorsogon is a province of the Philippines located in the Bicol Region in Luzon. ... Donsol is a 4th class municipality in the province of Sorsogon, Philippines. ... Baja California (literally lower California in Spanish) is the northernmost state of Mexico. ... Genera Echeneis Phtheiricthys Remora Remorina See text for species. ...


Reproduction

The reproductive habits of the whale shark are obscure. Based on the study of a single egg recovered off the coast of Mexico in 1956, it was believed to be oviparous, but the capture of a female in July 1996 which was pregnant with 300 pups indicates that they are ovoviviparous.[3][9] The eggs remain in the body and the females give birth to live young which are 40 centimetres (15.7 in) to 60 centimetres (23.6 in) long. It is believed that they reach sexual maturity at around 30 years and the life span has been estimated to be between 70 and 180 years.[citation needed] Reproduction is the creation of one thing as a copy of, product of, or replacement for a similar thing, e. ... Ovoviviparous animals develop within eggs that remain within the mothers body up until they hatch or are about to hatch. ...


Conservation status

The whale shark is targeted by artisanal and commercial fisheries in several areas where they seasonally aggregate. The population is unknown and the species is considered vulnerable by the IUCN.[1] Artisan fishing is a term sometimes used to describe small scale fishing practises, particularly using traditional techniques such as rod and tackle, arrows and harpoons, throw nets and drag nets, etc. ... Salmon for sale at a marketplace The Fishing industry is the commercial activity of fishing and producing fish and other seafood products. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ...


Whale sharks in captivity

A whale shark in the Georgia aquarium

A whale shark is featured as the main attraction of Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan and as of 2005, three whale sharks are being studied in captivity at the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan. Four whale sharks, two males, Taroko, and Yushan,[10] and two females, Alice and Trixie, are held in the Georgia Aquarium, in Atlanta. Two male whale sharks, Ralph and Norton, died in captivity at the Georgia Aquarium on January 11, 2007 and June 13, 2007 respectively.[11] The two males were added on June 3, 2006 in hopes that reproduction in whale sharks could be studied in captivity. All six whale sharks were imported from Taiwan, where whale sharks are dubbed as Tofu sharks because of the taste and texture of the flesh. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3456 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3456 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ... Kaiyukan Aquarium Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan (海遊館 Kaiyūkan, literally playing in the Sea Pavilion) is one of the largest aquariums in the world. ... The term captivity is used to refer to the following meanings: the state of being confined to a space from which it is hard or impossible to escape; see imprisonment. ... People silhouetted in front of the aquarium panel The Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium (沖縄美ら海水族館, Okinawa churaumi suizokukan) is the worlds second largest aquarium and part of the Ocean Expo Park located in Motobu, Okinawa. ... The Georgia Aquarium, located in Atlanta, Georgia at Pemberton Place, is billed as the worlds largest aquarium with more than 8 million US gallons (30,000 m³; 30,000,000 liters) of marine and fresh water, 1. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tofu (the Japanese Romaji spelling), also called doufu (the Chinese Pinyin spelling often used in Chinese recipes) or bean curd (the literal translation), is a food of Chinese origin[1], made by coagulating soy milk, and then pressing the resulting curds into blocks. ...


See also

Sharks Portal

Image File history File linksMetadata Greyreefsharksmall2. ... // Sharks belong to the superorder Selachimorpha in the subclass Elasmobranchii in the class Chondrichthyes. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Norman, Brad (2000). Rhincodon typus. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 11 May 2006. Database entry includes justification for why this species is vulnerable.
  2. ^ Jurassic Shark (2000) documentary by Jacinth O'Donnell; broadcast on Discovery Channel, August 5, 2006
  3. ^ a b c d Ed. Ranier Froese and Daniel Pauly. Rhincodon typus. FishBase. Retrieved on 17 September 2006.
  4. ^ Compagno, L.J.V.. Species Fact Sheet, Rhincodon typus. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Retrieved on 19 September 2006.
  5. ^ Gerald L. Wood, Animal Facts and Feats, 1990.
  6. ^ Xavier Maniguet, Jaws of Death; 1991.
  7. ^ a b Martin, R. Aidan.. Elasmo Research. ReefQuest. Retrieved on 17 September 2006.
  8. ^ Whale shark. Icthyology at the Florida Museum of Natural History. Retrieved on 17 September 2006.
  9. ^ Dr. Eugenie Clark. Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved on 26 September 2006.
  10. ^ Aquarium gains two new whale sharks. CNN.com (June 1 2007). Retrieved on June 1, 2007.
  11. ^ 2nd whale shark dies at Ga. Aquarium. Yahoo.com (June 13 2007). Retrieved on June 13, 2007.
General references

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Discovery Channel is a United States-based TV channel founded by John Hendricks. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. Eugenie Clark, (born May 4, 1922), popularly called the Shark lady, is an American ichthyologist known for her research on poisonous fishes of the tropical seas and on the behaviour of sharks. ... FishBase is a comprehensive database of information about fish. ... The Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) is a partnership designed to provide consistent and reliable information on the taxonomy of biological species. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... This article is about the US organization called The Nature Conservancy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Whale shark (817 words)
The whale shark is the giant, slow swimming king of the fishes, slowly passing through the tropical waters of the oceans.
The whale shark is ovoviviparous, witch means that the egg cases are hatched in the uterus and that the mother then give birth to live young.
In the past, the whale shark has been of little interest to man. This has resulted in a near lack of scientific research on this species, and today still very little is known about ecology and behavior of the whale shark.
Whale shark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1455 words)
Whale sharks congregate at reefs off the Belizean Caribbean coast, supplementing their ordinary diet by feeding on the roe of giant cubera snappers, which spawn in these waters between the full and quarter moons of May, June and July,.
The reproductive habits of the whale shark are obscure.
Whale sharks are known to frequent the waters off Donsol in the Sorsogon province of the Philippines.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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