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Encyclopedia > Westminster Abbey
Westminster Palace, Westminster Abbey and Saint Margaret's Churcha
UNESCO World Heritage Site
The Abbey's western façade
State Party United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iv
Identification #426
Regionb Europe and North America

Inscription History “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... The Anglican church of St. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... West view of Westminster Abbey, London. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ...

Formal Inscription: 1987
11th Session

a Name as officially inscribed on the WH List
b As classified officially by UNESCO
A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English monarchs. Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... A church building (or simply church) is a building used in Christian worship. ... A cathedral is a religious building for worship, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Roman Catholic, Anglican and some Lutheran churches, which serves as a bishops seat, and thus as the central church of a diocese. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... This is a list of famous cemeteries, mausoleums and other places people are buried, world-wide. ... The Kingdom of England was first unified as a state by Athelstan of Wessex. ...

Contents

History

According to tradition a shrine was first founded in 616 on the present site, then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island); its tradition of miraculous consecration after a fisherman on the River Thames saw a vision of Saint Peter justifying the presents of salmon from the Thames fishermen that the Abbey received. In the 960s or early 970s Saint Dunstan, assisted by King Edgar, planted a community of Benedictine monks here. The stone Abbey was built around 1045–1050 by King Edward the Confessor, who had selected the site for his burial: it was consecrated on December 28, 1065, only a week before the Confessor's death and subsequent funeral. It was the site of the last coronation prior to the 1066 Norman invasion, that of his successor King Harold. The word tradition comes from the Latin word traditio which means to hand down or to hand over. ... Thorney Island was the eyot on the Thames, upstream of mediæval London, where Westminster Abbey and Westminster Palace (now the Houses of Parliament) were built. ... The Thames (pronounced //) is a river flowing through southern England, and one of the major waterways in England. ... Saint Peter, also known as Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha — original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... Dunstan is also a village in Northumberland, and a lake in New Zealand Dunstan shoeing the Devils hoof, as illustrated by George Cruikshank Dunstan (909 - May 19, 988) was an Archbishop of Canterbury (961 - 980) who was later canonized as a saint. ... King Edgar or Eadgar I ( 942 – July 8, 975) was the younger son of King Edmund I of England. ... Munichs city symbol celebrates its founding by Benedictine monks—the origin of its name A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... Munichs city symbol celebrates its founding by Benedictine monks—and the origin of its name A monk is a person who practices religious asceticism, the conditioning of mind and body in favor of the spirit. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... Events December 28 - Westminster Abbey is consecrated. ... Name Harold Godwinson Lived c. ...

A layout plan dated 1894.

The only extant depiction of the original Abbey, in the Romanesque style that is called Norman in England, together with the adjacent Palace of Westminster, is in the Bayeux Tapestry. Increased endowments supported a community increased from Dunstan's dozen to about eighty monks (Harvey 1993 p 2). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (750x1073, 140 KB) Summary source:http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (750x1073, 140 KB) Summary source:http://www. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... Romanesque St. ... The nave of Durham Cathedral demonstrates the characteristic round arched style, though use of shallow pointed arches above the nave is a forerunner of the Gothic style. ... The Bayeux Tapestry (French: Tapisserie de Bayeux) is a 50 cm by 70 m (20 in by 230 ft) long embroidered cloth which depicts the events leading up to, as well as, the Norman invasion of England in 1066. ...


The Abbot and learned monks, in close proximity to the royal Palace of Westminster, the seat of government from the later twelfth century, became a powerful force in the centuries after the Norman Conquest: the Abbot was often employed on royal service and in due course took his place in the House of Lords as of right. Released from the burdens of spiritual leadership, which passed to the reformed Cluniac movement after the mid-tenth century, and occupied with the administration of great landed properties, some of which lay far from Westminster, "the Benedictines achieved a remarkable degree of identification with the secular life of their times, and particularly with upper-class life", Barbara Harvey concluded, to the extent that her depiction of daily life (Harvey 1993) provides a wider view of the concerns of the English gentry in the High and Late Middle Ages. The proximity of the Palace of Westminster did not extend to providing monks or abbots with high royal connections; in social origin the Benedictines of Westminster were as modest as most of the order. The abbot remained lord of the manor of Westminster as a town of two to three thousand persons grew around it: as a consumer and employer on a grand scale the monastery helped fuel the town economy, and relations with the town remained unusually cordial, but no enfranchising charter was issued during the Middle Ages (Harvey 1993 p 6f). The abbey built shops and dwellings on the west side, encroaching upon the sanctuary. The abbey today The Abbey of Cluny (or Cluni, or Clugny) was founded on 2 September 909 by the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Auvergne, William I, who placed it under the immediate authority of Pope Sergius III. The Abbey and its constellation of dependencies soon came to exemplify...


The Abbey became the coronation site of Norman kings, but none were buried there until Henry III, intensely devoted to the cult of the Confessor, rebuilt the Abbey in Anglo-French Gothic style as a shrine to honour Edward the Confessor and as a suitably regal setting for Henry's own tomb, under the highest Gothic nave in England. The Confessor's shrine subsequently played a great part in his canonisation. The work continued between 1245-1517 and was largely finished by the architect Henry Yevele in the reign of King Richard II. Henry VII added a Perpendicular style chapel dedicated to the Virgin Mary in 1503 (known as the Henry VII Chapel). Much of the stone came from Caen, in France (Caen stone), the Isle of Portland (Portland stone) and the Loire Valley region of France ( tuffeau limestone). Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A tomb is a small building (or vault) for the remains of the dead, with walls, a roof, and (if it is to be used for more than one corpse) a door. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... Henry Yevele (c. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan The Fair Maid of Kent. He was born in Bordeaux and became his fathers successor when his elder brother died in infancy. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder and first patriarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Winchester Cathedral Sherborne Abbey The Perpendicular Gothic period (or simply Perpendicular) is the third historical division of English Gothic architecture, and is so-called because it is characterised by an emphasis on vertical lines; it is also known as the Rectilinear style, or Late Gothic. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ... The Henry VII Lady Chapel is a large chapel at the far eastern end of Westminster Abbey. ... Caen (pronounced /kɑ̃/) is a commune of northwestern France. ... ‘Caen stone’ is a light creamy-yellow Jurassic limestone. ... Chesil Beach from the hill above Fortuneswell, Portland Harbour is on the right. ... The Cenotaph, in Whitehall, London, England, is made from Portland stone Portland stone is limestone from the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. ... Loire Valley (French: Vallée de la Loire) is known as the Garden of France and the Cradle of the French Language. ... Tuffeau is a marine sedimentary stone, found in the Loire Valley of France. ...

The choir in 1848.
The choir in 1848.

In 1535, the Abbey's annual income of £2400-2800 during the assessment attendant on the Dissolution of the Monasteries rendered it second in wealth only to Glastonbury Abbey. Henry VIII had assumed direct royal control in 1539 and granted the Abbey cathedral status by charter in 1540, simultaneously issuing letters patent establishing the diocese of Westminster. By granting the Abbey cathedral status Henry VIII gained an excuse to spare it from the destruction or dissolution which he inflicted on most English abbeys during this period. Westminster was a cathedral only until 1550. The expression "robbing Peter to pay Paul" may arise from this period when money meant for the Abbey, which was dedicated to St Peter, was diverted to the treasury of St Paul's Cathedral. ImageMetadata File history File links Westminster_Abbey_Choir_ILN_1848. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Westminster_Abbey_Choir_ILN_1848. ... dissolution see Dissolution. ... Glastonbury Abbey Glastonbury Abbey in Glastonbury, Somerset, England, now presents itself as traditionally the oldest above-ground Christian church in the World situated in the mystical land of Avalon by dating the founding of the community of monks at AD 63, the legendary visit of Joseph of Arimathea, who was... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 - 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Saint Peter, also known as Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha — original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ...


The Abbey was restored to the Benedictines under the Catholic Queen Mary, but they were again ejected under Queen Elizabeth I in 1559. In 1579, Elizabeth re-established Westminster as a "Royal Peculiar" — a church responsible directly to the sovereign, rather than to a diocesan bishop — and made it the Collegiate Church of St Peter, (that is a church with an attached chapter of canons, headed by a dean). The last Abbot was made the first Dean. It suffered damage during the turbulent 1640s, when it was attacked by Puritan iconoclasts, but was again protected by its close ties to the state during the Commonwealth period. Oliver Cromwell was given an elaborate funeral there in 1658, only to be disinterred in January 1661 and posthumously hanged from a nearby gibbet. Queen Mary I of England (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... A Royal Peculiar (or Royal Peculier) is a place of worship that falls directly under the jurisdiction of the British monarch, rather than a diocese. ... A monarch (see sovereignty) is a type of ruler or head of state. ... For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... Statues in the Cathedral of Saint Martin, Utrecht, attacked in Reformation iconoclasm in the 16th century. ... Motto: PAX QUÆRITUR BELLO (English: Peace is sought through war) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Language(s) English Government Republic Lord Protector  - 1649-1658 Oliver Cromwell Legislature Rump Parliament Barebones Parliament History  - Declaration of Commonwealth May 19, 1649  - Declaration of Breda April 4, 1660 Area 130,395... Oliver Cromwell (April 25, 1599–September 3, 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for making England a republic and leading the Commonwealth of England. ...


The abbey's two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. The career of Nicholas Hawksmoor (probably 1661 - 25 March 1736) formed the brilliant middle link in Britains trio of great baroque architects. ... The Cenotaph, in Whitehall, London, England, is made from Portland stone Portland stone is limestone from the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ...


Until the 19th century, Westminster was the third seat of learning in England, after Oxford and Cambridge. It was here that the first third of the King James Bible Old Testament and the last half of the New Testament were translated. The New English Bible was also put together here in the 20th century. The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... The New English Bible (NEB) was a fresh translation of the Bible into modern English directly from the original Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic texts (with some Latin in the Apocrypha); with the New Testament being published in 1961, and the Old Testament, along with the Apocrypha, being published in 1970. ...

Coronations

King Edward's Chair
King Edward's Chair

Since the coronations in 1066 of both King Harold and William the Conqueror, all English and British monarchs, except Lady Jane Grey, Edward V and Edward VIII, who did not have coronations and Henry III because Prince Louis of France had taken control of London, have been crowned in the Abbey. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the traditional cleric in the coronation ceremony. St Edward's Chair, the throne on which British sovereigns are seated at the moment of coronation, is housed within the Abbey; from 1296 to 1996 the chair also housed the Stone of Scone upon which the kings of Scotland are crowned, but pending another coronation the Stone is now kept in Scotland. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (493x730, 374 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Westminster Abbey King Edwards Chair Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (493x730, 374 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Westminster Abbey King Edwards Chair Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Harold II of England (Harold Godwinson; c. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Lady Jane Grey (October 12, 1537 – February 12, 1554), a great-granddaughter of Henry VII of England, was proclaimed Queen regnant of the Kingdom of England for nine days in 1553. ... Edward V (4 November 1470 – 1483?) was the King of England from 9 April 1483 until his deposition two months later. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... Louis VIII the Lion (French: Louis VIII le Lion) (September 5, 1187 – November 8, 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... King Edwards Chair, sometimes known as St Edwards Chair or The Coronation Chair, is the throne on which the British monarch sits for the coronation. ... The Stone of Scone, (pronounced scoon) also commonly known as the Stone of Destiny or the Coronation Stone (though the former name sometimes refers to Lia Fáil) is a block of sandstone historically kept at the now-ruined abbey in Scone, near Perth, Scotland. ...

Burials and Memorials

The Abbey at night, from Dean's Yard. Artificial light reveals the exoskeleton formed by flying buttresses
The Abbey at night, from Dean's Yard. Artificial light reveals the exoskeleton formed by flying buttresses

Henry III rebuilt the Abbey in honour of the Royal Saint Edward the Confessor whose relics were placed in a shrine in the sanctuary. Henry III was interred nearby in a superb chest tomb with effigial monument, as were many of the Plantagenet kings of England, their wives and other relatives. Subsequently, most Kings and Queens of England were buried here, although Henry VIII and Charles I are buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, as are all monarchs and royals after George II. In 2005 the original ancient burial vault of Edward the Confessor was discovered, beneath the 1268 Cosmati mosaic pavement, in front of the High Altar. A series of royal vaults dating back to the 13th and 14th centuries was also discovered using ground-penetrating radar. Download high resolution version (1162x784, 229 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1162x784, 229 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... An exoskeleton, in contrast to an endoskeleton, is an external anatomical feature that supports and protects an animals body. ... Flying buttresses at Bath Abbey, Bath, England. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... A tomb is a small building (or vault) for the remains of the dead, with walls, a roof, and (if it is to be used for more than one corpse) a door. ... A church monument is an architectural or sculptural memorial to a dead person or persons, often in the form of an effigy or a wall tablet, located within a Christian church. ... Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 - 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland, and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... St Georges Chapel, Windsor St. ... Windsor castle, a thousand-year-old fortress transformed into a royal palace. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... A burial vault is a structural underground tomb. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Cosmati were a Roman family, seven members of which, for four generations, were skilful architects, sculptors and workers in mosaic. ... A ground-penetrating radar data image, generated as part of the search for the head of Yagan within a grave site in Everton Cemetery in 1997. ...


Aristocrats were buried inside chapels and monks and people associated with the Abbey were buried in the Cloisters and other areas. One of these was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was buried here as he had apartments in the Abbey where he was employed as master of the Kings Works. Other poets were buried around Chaucer in what became known as Poets' Corner. Abbey musicians such as Henry Purcell were also buried in their place of work. Subsequently it became an honour to be buried or memorialised here. The practice spread from aristocrats and poets to generals, admirals, politicians, scientists, doctors, etc. These include: Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Poets corner Poets Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey due to the number of poets, playwrights and writers now buried and commemorated there. ... Henry Purcell Henry Purcell (IPA: [1]; September 10 (?) [2], 1659–November 21, 1695), a Baroque composer, is generally considered to be one of Englands greatest composers. ...


Buried

Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath, by Canaletto, 1749
Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath, by Canaletto, 1749
  • See also: Category:People buried in Westminster Abbey

Download high resolution version (1008x984, 184 KB)Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath, by Canaletto, 1749. ... Download high resolution version (1008x984, 184 KB)Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath, by Canaletto, 1749. ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-11, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Stonemasons Yard, painted 1726-30. ...

English Monarchs and their Consorts

-1... A consort is somebodys spouse, usually a royalty. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Edith of Wessex, (c. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who tried to do the same to Scotland. ... for others known sometimes by same name, see Leonora of Castile For other Eleanors of England, see Eleanor of England (disambiguation) Eleanor of Castile (1241 – 28 November 1290) was the first Queen consort of Edward I of England. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Philippa of Hainault Philippa of Hainault (~1314 - August 15, 1369) was the Queen consort of Edward III of England. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan The Fair Maid of Kent. He was born in Bordeaux and became his fathers successor when his elder brother died in infancy. ... Anne of Bohemia Anne of Bohemia (1366 - 1394) was the daughter of Emperor Charles IV, King of Bohemia and Elisabeth of Pomerania. ... Henry V of England (16 September 1387 – 31 August 1422) was one of the great warrior kings of the Middle Ages. ... Catherine of Valois (27 October 1401 – 3 January 1437) was the Queen consort of England from 1420 until 1422. ... Edward V (4 November 1470 – 1483?) was the King of England from 9 April 1483 until his deposition two months later. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder and first patriarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) became King of England, King of France (in practice only the town and surrounding district of Calais) and Ireland on 28 January 1547, and crowned on 20 February, at just nine years of age. ... Queen Mary I of England (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... James Stuart (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old. ... Anna of Denmark (October 14, 1574 – March 4, 1619) was queen consort of King James I of England and VI of Scotland. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and as Queen of Scots (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... William III of England (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Hampton Court, 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) followed Englands only joint monarchy to become Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702 after the passing of both William and Mary. ... Prince George of Denmark Prince George of Denmark (April 2, 1653 - October 28, 1708) was the Prince consort of Queen Anne of Great Britain. ... George II King of Great Britain and Ireland George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... Caroline of Ansbach (later Queen Caroline; Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) was the Queen Consort of George II // Margravine Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach was born on 1 March 1683, at Ansbach in Germany, the daughter of Johann Friedrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach and his second wife...

Other Monarchs

Anne Neville (June 11, 1456–March 16, 1485) was Queen consort of King Richard III of England 1483-1485. ... Anne of Cleves, painted by Hans Holbein the Younger Queen Anne of England née Anne of Cleves (September 22, 1515–July 16, 1557) also known as The Flanders Mare (see below)—was the fourth queen consort of Henry VIII of England from January 6, 1540 to July 9, 1540. ... Mary I of Scotland; known as Mary, Queen of Scots Mary I of Scotland (Mary Stuart or Stewart) (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587), better known as Mary, Queen of Scots, was the ruler of Scotland from December 14, 1542 – July 24, 1567. ... Elisabeth, Electress Palatine and (briefly) queen of Bohemia (August 19, 1596 – February 13, 1662), born Princess Elizabeth Stuart of Scotland, was born as the eldest daughter to King James VI of Scotland and his Queen consort Anne of Denmark. ...

Nave

Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1945 to 1951. ... Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts, Baroness Burdett-Coutts (born Angela Burdett 24 April 1814 in Piccadilly, London - 30 December 1906) was the daughter of Sir Francis Burdett, Baronet, an MP, and Sophia Coutts, who was the daughter of Thomas Coutts, the wealthy banker who founded Coutts bank. ... Thomas Alexander Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, GCB (14 December 1775 – 31 October 1860), styled Lord Cochrane between 1778 and 1831[1] , was a politician and naval adventurer. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... George Graham (1674?-1751) was an English clockmaker and inventor and a member of the Royal Society. ... Benjamin Jonson (circa June 11, 1572 – August 6, 1637) was an English Renaissance dramatist, poet and actor. ... David Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 4 May 1873) was a Scottish Presbyterian pioneer medical missionary with the London Missionary Society and explorer in central Africa. ... James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish mathematician and theoretical physicist. ... Sir Isaac Newton, (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist, regarded by many as the greatest figure in the history of science. ... Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson OM PC FRS (30 August 1871 - 19 October 1937), widely referred to as Lord Rutherford, was a nuclear physicist who became known as the father of nuclear physics. ... Statue of Robert Stephenson at Euston Station, London Robert Stephenson FRS (October 16, 1803–October 12, 1859) was an English civil engineer. ... Ludovic Stewart, 2nd Duke of Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond (September 29, 1574–February 16, 1624) was the son of Esmé Stewart, 1st Duke of Lennox. ... George Edmund Street (20 June 1824 – 18 December 1881), English architect, was born at Woodford in Essex. ... William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, OM, GCVO, PC, PRS, FRSE, (26 June 1824 – 17 December 1907) was a mathematical physicist, engineer, and outstanding leader in the physical sciences of the 19th century. ... Thomas Tompion Thomas Tompion(1639-1713) was an English master clocksmith known today as the father of English watchmaking. ... The British tomb of The Unknown Warrior holds an unidentified British soldier killed on a European battlefield during World War I. He was buried in Westminster Abbey, London on November 11, 1920, the earliest such tomb honouring the unknown dead of World War I. Even the battlefield the Warrior came... The Duke of Buckingham by Rubens George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (28 August 1592 – 23 August 1628) was a favorite of King James I and VI of England and Scotland, and one of the most rewarded royal courtiers in all history. ... Charles Lyell The frontispiece from Principles of Geology Sir Charles Lyell, 1st Baronet, KT, (November 14, 1797 – February 22, 1875), Scottish lawyer, geologist, and populariser of uniformitarianism. ...

North Transept

Cathedral ground plan. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (15 November 1708–11 May 1778) was a British Whig statesman who achieved his greatest fame as Secretary of State during the Seven Years War (aka French and Indian War) and who was later Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a British politician of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... William Wilberforce (24 August 1759 – 29 July 1833) was a British politician, philanthropist, and abolitionist who led the parliamentary campaign against the slave trade. ... Sir John Malcolm (1769‑1833) was a Scottish soldier, statesman, and historian, born at Burnfoot, Dumfriesshire. ...

South Transept

The North entrance of Westminster Abbey
The North entrance of Westminster Abbey

Poets' Corner Download high resolution version (500x661, 136 KB)The north entrance of Westminster Abbey. ... Download high resolution version (500x661, 136 KB)The north entrance of Westminster Abbey. ... Poets corner Poets Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey due to the number of poets, playwrights and writers now buried and commemorated there. ...

Dame Peggy Ashcroft (December 22, 1907–June 14, 1991) was an English actress. ... Robert Adam Robert Adam (3 July 1728 - 3 March 1792) was a Scottish architect, interior designer and furniture designer, born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. ... Image:Nishon- Project Gutenberg eText 13103. ... William Camden William Camden (May 2, 1551 - November 9, 1623) was an English antiquarian and historian. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... William Congreve (January 24, 1670 – January 19, 1729) was an English playwright and poet. ... Abraham Cowley (1618 - July 28, 1667), English poet, was born in the city of London late in 1618. ... William Davenant Sir William Davenant (February 28, 1606 - April 7, 1668), also spelled DAvenant, was an English poet and playwright. ... Dickens redirects here. ... John Dryden John Dryden (August 19 {August 9 O.S.}, 1631 - May 12 {May 1 O.S.}, 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright, who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles... Canon Adam Fox (1883–1977) was the Dean of Divinity at C.S. Lewiss Magdalen College, Oxford. ... Portrait of David Garrick David Garrick (February 19, 1717 – January 20, 1779) was an English actor, dramatist, theatrical producer and theatrical manager, and a friend and pupil of Samuel Johnson. ... John Gay John Gay (30 June 1685 - 4 December 1732) was an English poet and dramatist. ... George Frideric Handel (German Georg Friedrich Händel), (February 23, 1685 – April 14, 1759) was a German-born British Baroque music composer. ... Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) — an English novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement — delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... Henry Irving, as Hamlet, in a 1893 illustration from The Idler magazine John Henry Brodribb Irving (February 6, 1838–October 13, 1905), better known as Sir Henry Irving, was one of the most famous stage actors of all time. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British author. ... Quotes His imagination resembled the wings of an ostrich. ... John Edward Masefield, OM, (1 June 1878 – 12 May 1967), was an English poet and writer, and Poet Laureate from 1930 until his death in 1967. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Thomas Parr was an English man who supposedly lived for 152 years, often referred to simply as Old Parr, or Old Tom Parr. He was said to have been born in 1483 near Shrewsbury, possibly at Winnington, and joined the army around 1500. ... Richard Brinsley Sheridan Richard Brinsley Sheridan (October 30, 1751 – July 7, 1816) was an Irish playwright and Whig statesman. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ...

Cloisters

Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A cloister (from latin claustrum) is a part of cathedral, monastic and abbey architecture. ... A sketch of Aphra Behn by George Scharf from a portrait believed to be lost. ... The Revd Dr Percy Dearmer MA (Oxon), DD, in 1911. ... John Burgoyne General John Burgoyne (1722 – June 4, 1792) was a British general and playwright. ...

North Choir Aisle

Henry Purcell Henry Purcell (IPA: [1]; September 10 (?) [2], 1659–November 21, 1695), a Baroque composer, is generally considered to be one of Englands greatest composers. ... Ralph Vaughan Williams Ralph Vaughan Williams, OM (October 12, 1872 – August 26, 1958) was an influential English composer. ...

Chapel of St Paul

Rowland Hill Sir Rowland Hill KCB, FRS (December 3, 1795 - August 27, 1879) was a British teacher and social reformer. ...

Commemorated

Christian martyrs from across the world are depicted in statues above the Great West Door
Christian martyrs from across the world are depicted in statues above the Great West Door

Image File history File links Westminster_Abbey_C20th_martyrs. ... Image File history File links Westminster_Abbey_C20th_martyrs. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the musician, see Baden Powell de Aquino. ... Nyeri, Kenya is the headquarters of Central Province (click to enlarge map) Nyeri is a town in Kenya about 180km north of the capital Nairobi. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British statesman, soldier, and author. ... Bladon is a village and civil parish in the West Oxfordshire district of Oxfordshire, England. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, OM, FRS (IPA: [dɪræk]) (August 8, 1902 – October 20, 1984) was a British theoretical physicist and a founder of the field of quantum physics. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC, FRS (December 21, 1804 – April 19, 1881), born Benjamin DIsraeli was a British Conservative statesman and literary figure. ... Hughenden Valley (formerly called Hughenden or Hitchendon) is an extensive village in Buckinghamshire, England, just to the north of High Wycombe. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Adam Lindsay Gordon - Melbourne monument Adam Lindsay Gordon (October 19, 1833 – 24 June 1870) was an Australian poet, jockey and politician. ... John Harrison John Harrison (March 24, 1693–March 24, 1776) was an English clockmaker, who designed and built the worlds first successful chronometer (maritime clock), one whose accuracy was great enough to allow the determination of longitude over long distances. ... Hampstead is a suburb of north London in the London Borough of Camden, located four miles (6. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. ...   Settled: 1630 â€“ Incorporated: 1636 Zip Code(s): 02138, 02139, 02140, 02141, 02142 â€“ Area Code(s): 617 / 857 Official website: http://www. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Stratford-upon-Avon Stratford-upon-Avon is a town in Warwickshire, England. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and short story writer. ... General Jim Wolfe, *www. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Maximilian Kolbe (January 8, 1894–August 14, 1941), also known as Maksymilian or Massimiliano Maria Kolbe and Apostle of Consecration to Mary, born as Rajmund Kolbe, was a Polish Conventual Franciscan friar who volunteered to die in place of a stranger in the Nazi concentration camp of Auschwitz in Poland. ... She lived in Marishane, a small village next to Pietersburg. ... Janani Luwum (1922 – 1977), was the archbishop of Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Boga-Zaire (1974 – 1977). ... Grand Duchess Elizabeth Fyodorovna Grand Duchess Elizabeth Fyodorovna as a nun after her husbands death Grand Duchess Elizabeth Fyodorovna of Russia (Russian: ), née Her Grand Ducal Highness Princess Elisabeth Alexandra Luise Alice of Hesse and by Rhine (1 November 1864–18 July 1918), was the wife of Grand... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... Óscar Arnulfo Romero y Galdámez (August 15, 1917 – March 24, 1980), commonly known as Monseñor Romero, was a priest of the Roman Catholic Church in El Salvador. ... Dietrich Bonhoeffer Dietrich Bonhoeffer [] (February 4, 1906 – April 9, 1945) was a German Lutheran pastor, theologian and participant in the German resistance movement against Nazism and founding member of the Confessing Church. ...

Removed

The following were buried in the abbey but later removed on the orders of Charles II: Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ...

Oliver Cromwell (April 25, 1599–September 3, 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for making England a republic and leading the Commonwealth of England. ... Lord Protector is a particular English title for Heads of State, with two meanings (and full styles) at different periods of history. ... Robert Blake, General at Sea, 1598–1657 by Henry Perronet Briggs, painted 1829. ... John Pym (1584 – December 8, 1643) was an English parliamentarian, leader of the Long Parliament and a prominent critic of James I and then Charles I. Pym was born in Brymore, Somerset, into minor nobility. ...

Schools

Westminster School and Westminster Abbey Choir School are also in the precincts of the Abbey. It was natural for the learned and literate monks to be entrusted with education, and Benedictine monks were required by the Pope to maintain a charity school in 1179; Westminster School may have been founded even earlier for children or novices, and the legendary Croyland Chronicle relates a story of 11th century king Edward the Confessor's Queen Editha chatting to a schoolboy in the cloisters, and sending him off to the Palace larder for a treat. The Royal College of large men at Westminster (almost always known as Westminster School) is one of Britains top boys independent schools and one of the nine British public schools, as set out in the Public Schools Act 1868. ... Westminster Abbey Choir School (WACS) is a small British prep school and is the only school in the United Kingdom exclusively for the education of boy choristers. ... Munichs city symbol celebrates its founding by Benedictine monks—the origin of its name A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... The Croyland Chronicle (or Crowland Chronicle) is an important, if not always reliable, primary source for English medieval history, in particular the late 15th century. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Edith of Wessex, (c. ...


Organ

The organ was built by Harrison & Harrison in 1937, with four manuals and 84 speaking stops, and was used for the first time at the Coronation of King George VI. Some pipework from the previous five-manual Hill organ was revoiced and incorporated in the new scheme. The two organ cases, designed in the late nineteenth century by John Loughborough Pearson, were re-instated and coloured in 1959. New organ at St Davids Cathedral built by Harrison & Harrison in 2000. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George) (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952. ... John Loughborough Pearson (1817-1897) was a 19th century architect renowned for his work on churches and cathedrals. ...


Link to details of the organ on the National Pipe Organ Register.


Organists

  • 1549 John Howe
  • 1560 Master Whitt
  • 1562 John Taylor
  • 1570 Robert White
  • 1575 Henry Leeve
  • 1585 Nathaniel Giles and John Mundy (joint organists)
  • 1606 Edmund Hooper
  • 1621 John Parsons
  • 1623 Orlando Gibbons
  • 1625 Thomas Day
  • 1633 Richard Portman
  • 1660 Christopher Gibbons

John Mundy (c. ... Edmund Hooper (ca 1553 – 1621) was an English composer and organist. ... Orlando Gibbons Orlando Gibbons (baptised December 25, 1583 – June 5, 1625) was an English composer and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods. ... Thomas Day (22 June 1748 - 28 September 1789), was a British author. ... John Blow (1649 - October 1, 1708) was an English composer and organist. ... Henry Purcell Henry Purcell (IPA: [1]; September 10 (?) [2], 1659–November 21, 1695), a Baroque composer, is generally considered to be one of Englands greatest composers. ... John Blow (1649 - October 1, 1708) was an English composer and organist. ... William Croft (December 30 (baptism), 1678 - August 14, 1727) was an English composer and teacher. ... Benjamin Cooke (1734-1793) was a British composer and musician. ... Samuel Arnold (1740 - October 22, 1802) was an English composer. ... Thomas Greatorex (1758-1831) was an English composer, astronomer and mathematician. ... James Turle (1802-1882) was an English organist and composer, was born at Taunton, Somerset, and started as a choirboy at Wells Cathedral. ... Sir John Frederick Bridge (December 5, 1844 – March 18, 1924) was an English composer and organist at Westminster Abbey, (1875-1918) He composed special music for Queen Victorias Jubilee and King Edward VIIs coronation, in addition to other choral, instrumental and organ music. ... Sir Sydney Hugo Nicholson (February 9, 1875 – May 30, 1947) was an English choir director, organist and composer, now chiefly remembered as the founder of the Royal School of Church Music. ... Sir Ernest Bullock (15 September 1890, Wigan, England – 24 May 1979, Aylesbury, England) was an English organist, composer, and educator. ... Simon Preston (b. ... Martin Neary is an English organist and celebrated choral conductor. ...

Transport

The London Underground is an electric railway system that covers much of Greater London and some neighbouring areas. ... Entrance to St Jamess Park Underground station St Jamess Park is a London Underground station by St Jamess Park in the City of Westminster. ... For other items relating to Westminster, see Westminster (disambiguation) Westminster tube station on the London Underground serves the Circle, District and Jubilee lines. ...

Chapter

The Abbey is a collegiate church organised into the College of St Peter, which comprises the Dean and four residentiary Canons (one of whom is also Rector of St Margaret's Church, Westminster, and Speaker's Chaplain), and seventeen other persons who are members ex officio, as well as twelve lay vicars and ten choristers. The seventeen are the Receiver-General and Chapter Clerk, the Registrar, the Auditor, the Legal Secretary and the Clerk of the Works (the administrative officers). Those more directly concerned with liturgical and ceremonial operations include the Precentor, the Chaplain and Sacrist, the Organist, and the (honorary) High Steward and High Bailiff. The Abbey and its property is in the care of the Librarian, the Keeper of the Muniments, and the Surveyor of the Fabric. Lastly, the educational role of the Abbey is reflected in the presence of the Headmaster of the Choir School, the Headmaster and Under Master of Westminster School, and the Master of The Queen's Scholars. The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... The Anglican church of St. ... Chapter Clerk is the title usually given to the officer responsible for the administrative support to the Chapter of a cathedral or collegiate church in the Church of England. ... Registrar may refer to: In education, a registrar or registry is an official in an academic institution (a college, university, or secondary school) who handles student records. ... Audit can refer to: Telecommunication audit Financial audit Performance audit Completion of a course of study for which no assessment is completed or grade awarded; especially audit is awarded to those who have elected not to receive a letter grade for a course in which letter grades typically awarded. ... The Clerk of the Works or Clerk of Works (often abbreviated CoW) is a person employed by the client on the site of a building construction project to represent his interests and verify that the design brief and quality standards are complied with. ... A Precentor is a person, usually a clergy member, who is in charge of preparing worship services. ... A sacristy is a room for keeping vestments (such as the cassock and chasuble) and other church furnishings, sacred vessels, and church treasures. ... The terms steward or stewardess can refer to a number of different professional roles. ... Bailiff (from Late Latin bajulivus, adjectival form of bajulus) is a governor or custodian (cf. ... The Royal College of large men at Westminster (almost always known as Westminster School) is one of Britains top boys independent schools and one of the nine British public schools, as set out in the Public Schools Act 1868. ... A Presidents Scholar is a recipient/awardee of the most prestigious class of university undergraduate scholarships handed out to Junior College students with Singaporean citizenship annually, with approximately only 2-4 being handed out each year. ...


The Abbey is governed by the Dean and Chapter established under the Elizabethan statute of 1560. This consists of the Dean and the four residentiary Canons.


Gallery

See also

A list of abbots of Westminster Abbey. ... A list of the holders of the office of Dean of Westminster. ... St. ... This is a list of famous cemeteries, mausoleums and other places people are buried, world-wide. ... The British tomb of The Unknown Warrior holds an unidentified British soldier killed on a European battlefield during World War I. He was buried in Westminster Abbey, London on November 11, 1920, the earliest such tomb honouring the unknown dead of World War I. Even the battlefield the Warrior came... The Abbey or The Abbey with Alan Bennett (1995) is a three-part BBC TV documentary written and hosted by playwright Alan Bennett and directed by Jonathan Stedall. ...

Notes

References

  • Simon Bradley and Nikolaus Pevsner: The Buildings of England - London 6: Westminster pp. 105–207. Yale University Press 2003. ISBN 0-300-09595-3.
  • Barbara Harvey, 1993. Living and Dying in England 1100-1540: The Monastic Experience (Oxford: Clarendon Press). Daily life in Westminster Abbey.
  • H.V. Morton, 1951. In Search of London (London: Methuen).
  • Musical Times article on Westminster Abbey organists (subscription access)

Sir Nikolaus Pevsner CBE (January 30, 1902 – August 18, 1983) was a German-born British historian of art and, especially, architecture. ... Henry Vollam (H. V.) Morton (1892–18 June 1979) was a journalist and travel writer from Birmingham, England. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Carved Crests for the Knights of the Bath; http://www.heraldicsculptor.com/bathcres.html Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Westminster Abbey. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Ship of Fools is the name of a UK-based Christian website, which was first launched as a magazine in 1977. ...

Coordinates: 51°29′58″N, 0°07′39″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Westminster Abbey (1616 words)
Westminster, to distinguish it apparently from the minster of St. Paul's to the east.
Westminster Abbey is designated a "Royal peculiar", its officials are appointed by the Crown, and the abbey itself is extra-diocesan, that is, exempt from the jurisdiction of the Bishop of London in whose
buried within the abbey, so that it has become a national honour to be given a resting place there, though unfortunately it cannot be said that their tombs do anything but mar the beauty of the building.
Westminster-Abbey.html (2964 words)
Westminster Abbey, or to call it by its correct name, The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, is unusual amongst churches in England in being a 'Royal Peculiar'.
The Abbey was gaining importance in the affairs of the crown and in the reign of King Henry II, the whole of the royal treasury moved to London.
Westminster Abbey is famous throughout the world as one of the greatest churches in Christendom, and draws visitors from all corners of the globe.
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