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Encyclopedia > Westminster (UK Parliament constituency)
Westminster
Borough constituency
Created: 1545
Abolished: 1918
Type: House of Commons

Westminster was a former parliamentary constituency in the Parliaments of England to 1707, Great Britain 1707-1800 and the United Kingdom from 1801. It returned two members to 1885 and one thereafter. A borough constituency (in Scotland, a burgh constituency) is a type of parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. ... Events February 27 - Battle of Ancrum Moor - Scots victory over superior English forces December 13 - Official opening of the Council of Trent (closed 1563) Battle of Kawagoe - between two branches of Uesugi families and the late Hojo clan in Japan. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... In the United Kingdom each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one or more members to a parliament or assembly. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ...


The constituency was first known to have been represented in Parliament in 1545 and continued to exist until the redistribution of seats in 1918.

Contents


Boundaries and Boundary Changes

The City of Westminster is a district of Inner London. Its southern boundary is on the north bank of the River Thames. It is located to the west of the City of London, to the south of Holborn and St. Pancras and to the east of Kensington and Chelsea. The City of Westminster is a London borough with city status, situated to the west of the City of London and north of the River Thames. ... Inner London is the name for the group of London boroughs which form the central part of Greater London and are surrounded by Outer London. ... The Thames (pronounced []) is a river flowing through southern England and connecting London with the sea. ... Coat of arms The City of London is a small area in Greater London. ... Holborn (pronounced ho-bun or ho-burn) is a place in London, named after a tributary to the river Fleet that flowed through the area, the Hole-bourne (the stream in the hollow). ... St Pancras is the name of a place in London. ... Kensington is an area to the west of Central London in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. ... Statue of Thomas More on Cheyne Walk. ...


Before 1545 the area which became this borough constituency was represented as part of the county constituency of Middlesex. Until 1885 the constituency had two representatives. A borough constituency (in Scotland, a burgh constituency) is a type of parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. ... A County constituency is a constituency in the United Kingdom that covers a predominantly rural area. ...


In the 1885 redistribution of seats the Westminster area (within the expanded boundaries of what became the Metropolitan Borough of Westminster which was created in 1900) was divided into three single-member seats. The south-eastern part, including the traditional heart of Westminster and such important centres of power as the Houses of Parliament and the seat of government in Whitehall, continued to be a constituency called Westminster. The official definition of the areas included was "the Westminster district and Close of the Collegiate Church of St. Peter". In the north-east was the constituency of Strand and to the west that of St George, Hanover Square. The Arms of The Metropolitan Borough of Westminster The Metropolitan Borough of Westminster was a metropolitan borough in the County of London from 1899 to 1965. ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday. ... The Palace of Westminster, known also as the Houses of Parliament, is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) conduct their sittings. ... Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... Westminster St Georges was a constituency created in 1885. ...


In the 1918 redistribution the Metropolitan Borough was divided into two single member constituencies, Westminster St George's in the west and Westminster Abbey in the east. The Abbey division incorporated the area of the 1885-1918 Westminster constituency. Westminster St Georges was a constituency created in 1885. ... Abbey was a parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, named for Westminster Abbey. ...


History

This was a prestigious constituency, because it represented the centre of British government and had such a large electorate that it was independent of the control of a patron.


Before the Reform Act 1832 the right to vote was held by the male inhabitants paying Scot and Lot (a kind of local property tax). This was an extensive franchise, by the standards of that era. Westminster had the largest electorate of any borough in the Kingdom. Only the largest county constituency of Yorkshire had more voters. Sedgwick estimated the electorate at about 8,000 in the first half of the eighteenth century. Namier and Brooke estimated that there were about 12,000 voters later in the century. The large size of the electorate made contested elections immensely expensive. The Reform Act of 1832 (known also as the Great Reform Act and The Parliamentary Reform Act 1832) introduced wide-ranging changes to electoral franchise legislation in the United Kingdom. ... A County constituency is a constituency in the United Kingdom that covers a predominantly rural area. ... Yorkshire, was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. ...


In the sixteenth century the Church officials associated with Westminster Abbey had a large influence in the area, but as the community became bigger that became less important. The Court (or His Majesty's Treasury) had some legitimate influence (by the standards of the age), because of the royal residences and government offices in the borough. The use of public funds to bribe the electorate was not unknown, during close elections (see the comments about the cost of the 1780 and 1784 contests below). Local landowners who were prepared to stir up ill-will by threatening to evict or raise the rents of tenants voting the wrong way, could also affect the result. The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


Unlawful means were sometimes used to make sure that the right candidates were elected. In 1722 the election of two Tories was declared void because of rioting which prevented some Whigs voting. In 1741 a Whig returning officer called upon the assistance of some troops to close the poll before the Tory candidates could catch up to the Whig votes.


The House of Commons declared the 1741 election void with the ringing resolution that "the presence of a regular body of armed soldiers at an election of members to sit in Parliament, is a high infringement of the liberties of the subject, a manifest violation of the freedom of election and an open defiance of the laws and constitution of this kingdom".


By the eighteenth century it was normal for the members to be Irish peers, the sons of peers or baronets, as it was thought appropriate for them to be of high social standing so as to be worthy to represent the seat.


The Treasury spent the enormous sums of more than £8,000 in 1780 and £9,000 in 1784, in unsuccessful attempts to defeat the opposition Whig leader Charles James Fox. So expensive were these contests that for the next general election in 1790, the government and opposition leaders reached a formal agreement for each to have one member returned unopposed. However in the event a second Whig candidate did appear, but the Tory (the famous Admiral Lord Hood) and Fox were re-elected without too much difficulty. While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Charles James Fox Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816. ...


The last MP for this constituency, William Burdett-Coutts, was connected with a family prominent in City of Westminster politics since the eighteenth century. He himself was born in the United States in 1851, his grandparents on both sides having been British subjects. After he married Baroness Burdett-Coutts in 1881 he changed his surname from Bartlett to Burdett-Coutts. He represented the area from 1885 until 1918 and continued to sit for the Abbey division until his death in 1921. Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts, Baroness Burdett-Coutts (born Angela Burdett 24 April 1814 in Piccadilly, London - 30 December 1906) was the daughter of Sir Francis Burdett, Baronet, an MP, and Sophia Coutts, who was the daughter of Thomas Coutts, the wealthy banker who founded Coutts bank. ...


Lists of Members of Parliament

Preliminary note: The English civil year started on 25 March until 1752 (Scotland having changed to 1 January in 1600). The years used in this article have been converted to the new style where necessary. It should be noted that old style dates would be a year earlier than the new style for days between 1 January and 24 March. No attempt has been made to compensate for the eleven days which did not occur in September 1752 in both England and Scotland as well as other British controlled territories (when the day after 2 September was 14 September), so as to bring the British Empire fully in line with the Gregorian calendar. March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1597 1598 1599 - 1600 - 1601 1602 1603 |- | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1570s 1580s 1590s - 1600s - 1610s 1620s 1630s |- | align=center | Centuries: 15th century - 16th century - 17th century |} // Events January January 1 - Scotland adopts January 1st as being New Years Day February February 17 - Giordano Bruno burned at the... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in Leap years). ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (246th in leap years). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Members of Parliament 1545-1660

Some of the members elected during this period have been identified. The year first given is for the initial meeting of the Parliament, with the month added where there was more than one Parliament in the year. If a second year is given this is a date of dissolution. Early Parliaments sometimes only existed for a few days or weeks, so dissolutions in the same year as the first meeting are not recorded in this list If a specific date of election is known this is recorded in italic brackets. The roman numerals in brackets, following some names, are those used to distinguish different politicians of the same name in 'The House of Commons' 1509-1558 and 1558-1603.

  • 1545-1547: Robert Smallwood; John Russell (II)
  • 1547-1552: (Sir) George Blagge; John Rede (I) Change: By 23 January 1552: Robert Nowell vice Blagge deceased
  • 1553 (March): (Sir) Robert Southwell; Arthur Stourton
  • 1553 (October): Robert Southwell; William Gyes
  • 1554 (April): William Gyes; Richard Hodges
  • 1554 (November)-1555: William Jennings; William Gyes
  • 1555: Arthur Stourton; Richard Hodges
  • 1558: Nicholas Newdigate; John Best (II)
  • 1559 (elected 7 January 1559): Richard Hodges; John Best (II)
  • 1563-1567 (elected 1562/3): Robert Nowell; William Bowyer (II)
  • 1571: Sir William Cordell; William Staunton
  • 1572-1583: Thomas Wilbraham; John Dodington Change: 1576: John Osborne vice Wilbraham deceased
  • 1584-1585: Hon. Robert Cecil, Thomas Knyvett (I)
  • 1586-1587: Hon. Robert Cecil, Thomas Knyvett (I)
  • 1589 (elected 20 December 1588): Thomas Knyvett (I), Peter Osborne
  • 1593: Richard Cecil, Thomas Cole
  • 1597-1598 (elected 27 September 1597): Thomas Knyvett (I), Thomas Cole Change: January 1598: Anthony Mildmay vice Cole deceased
  • 1601 (elected 26 September 1601): Thomas Knyvett (I), William Cooke (II)
  • 1604-1611: ?
  • 1614: ?
  • 1621-1622: ?
  • 1624-1625: ?
  • 1625: ?
  • 1626: ?
  • 1628-1629: ?
  • 1640 (April): ?
  • 1640 (November)-1660: ?

January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April - War between Henry II of France and Emperor Charles V. Henry invades Lorraine and captures Toul, Metz, and Verdun. ... January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... ] The Right Honourable Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury, KG, PC (1 June 1563–24 May 1612), son of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley and half-brother of Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter, statesman, spymaster and minister to Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. Lord Salisbury is the... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1588 was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 95 days remaining. ... Events 17 January - A court case in Guildford recorded evidence that a certain plot of land was used for playing “kreckett” (i. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 96 days remaining. ... Events February 8 - Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, rebels against Elizabeth I of England - revolt is quickly crushed February 25 - Robert Devereux beheaded Jesuit Matteo Ricci arrives in China Bad harvest in Russia due to rainy summer Dutch troops drive Portuguese from Málaga Battle of Kinsale, Ireland Births...

Members of Parliament 1660-1918

Key to parties: C Conservative from 1832, L Liberal from 1832, NP Non Partisan candidate (no party or no party identified), T Tory to 1832, W Whig to 1832. The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ...

From To Name (Party) Born Died
1660 1660 Gilbert Gerard (NP) c. 1618 5 November 1683
1660 1660 Thomas Clarges (NP) c. 1618 4 October 1695
1661 1679 Sir Philip Warwick (NP) 24 December 1609 15 January 1683
1661 1679 Sir Richard Everard (NP) c. 1625 29 August 1694
1679 1679 Sir Stephen Fox (NP) 27 March 1627 28 October 1716
1679 1685 Sir William Pulteney (NP) 25 March 1624 6 September 1691
1679 1680 Francis Wythens (NP) c. 1635 9 May 1704
1680 1685 Sir William Waller (NP) c. 1639 18 July 1699
1685 1687 Charles Bonython (T) c. 1653 30 April 1705
1685 1687 Michael Arnold (T) ... 31 August 1690
1689 1691 Sir William Pulteney (W) 25 March 1624 6 September 1691
1689 1690 Hon. Philip Howard (W) 5 March 1629 September 1717
1690 1695 Sir Walter Clarges, Bt (T) 4 July 1653 March 1706
1691 1698 Sir Stephen Fox (NP) 27 March 1627 28 October 1716
1695 1701 Charles Montagu (NP) 16 April 1661 19 May 1715
1698 1702 James Vernon (NP) 1 April 1646 31 January 1727
1701 1701 Sir Thomas Crosse (T) 29 November 1664 27 May 1738
1701 1702 Sir Henry Dutton Colt (NP) c. 1646 25 April 1731
1702 1705 Sir Walter Clarges, Bt (T) 4 July 1653 March 1706
1702 1705 Sir Thomas Crosse (T) 29 November 1664 27 May 1738
1705 1710 Henry Boyle (NP) 12 July 1669 14 March 1725
1705 1708 Sir Henry Dutton Colt (NP) c. 1646 25 April 1731
1708 1715 Thomas Medlycott (NP) 22 May 1662 July 1738
1710 1722 Sir Thomas Crosse, Bt (T) 29 November 1664 27 May 1738
1715 1722 Hon. Edward Wortley-Montagu (W) 8 February 1678 22 January 1761
1722 1722 Archibald Hutcheson (T) c. 1659 12 August 1740
1722 1722 John Cotton (T) 22 October 1671 December 1736
1722 1727 Charles Montagu (W) after 1695 29 May 1759
1722 1727 1st Baron Carpenter (W) 10 February 1657 10 February 1732
1727 1734 Lord Charles Cavendish (W) after 1700 28 April 1783
1727 1741 William Clayton (1st Baron Sundon) (W) 9 November 1671 29 April 1752
1734 1741 Sir Charles Wager (W) c. 1666 24 May 1743
1741 1747 Viscount Perceval (T) 24 February 1711 20 December 1770
1741 1747 Charles Edwin (T) c. 1699 29 June 1756
1747 1754 Viscount Trentham (W) 4 August 1721 26 October 1803
1747 1752 Sir Peter Warren (W) c. 1703 29 July 1752
1753 1762 Hon. Edward Cornwallis (W,NP) 22 February 1713 14 January 1776
1754 1761 Sir John Crosse, Bt (NP) c. 1700 12 March 1762
1761 1763 Viscount Pulteney (NP) c. 1731 11 February 1763
1762 1770 Hon. Edwin Sandys (NP) 18 April 1726 11 March 1797
1763 1776 Baron Warkworth (Earl Percy) (NP) 14 August 1742 10 July 1817
1770 1774 Sir Robert Bernard, Bt (NP) c. 1739 2 January 1789
1774 1780 Lord Thomas Pelham-Clinton (NP) 1 July 1752 18 May 1795
1776 1779 Viscount Petersham (NP) 20 March 1753 15 September 1829
1779 1780 Viscount Malden (NP) 13 November 1757 23 April 1839
1780 1782 Sir George Brydges Rodney, Bt (W) 13 February 1719 24 May 1792
1780 1784 Rt Hon. Charles James Fox (W) 24 January 1749 13 September 1806
1782 1784 Sir Cecil Wray, Bt (W) 3 September 1734 10 January 1805
1784 1788 1st Baron Hood (T) 12 December 1724 27 January 1816
1784 1806 Rt Hon. Charles James Fox (W) 24 January 1749 13 September 1806
1788 1790 Lord John Townshend (W) 19 January 1757 25 February 1833
1790 1796 1st Baron Hood (T) 12 December 1724 27 January 1816
1796 1806 Sir Alan Gardner, Bt (1st Baron Gardner) (T) 12 April 1742 1 January 1809
1806 1806 Earl Percy (W) 20 April 1785 11 February 1847
1806 1807 Sir Samuel Hood (T) 27 November 1762 24 December 1814
1806 1807 Richard Brinsley Sheridan (W) 30 October 1751 7 July 1816
1807 1837 Sir Francis Burdett, Bt (W,L,C) 25 January 1770 23 January 1844
1807 1818 Lord Cochrane (W) 14 December 1775 31 October 1860
1818 1818 Sir Samuel Romilly (W) 1 March 1757 2 November 1818
1819 1820 Hon. George Lamb (T) 11 July 1784 2 January 1834
1820 1833 Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Bt (W,L) 27 June 1786 3 June 1869
1833 1841 George de Lacy Evans (L) 1787 9 January 1870
1837 1847 John Temple Leader (L) 7 May 1810 1903
1841 1846 Hon. Henry John Rous (C) 23 January 1795 19 June 1877
1846 1865 Sir George de Lacy Evans (L) 1787 9 January 1870
1847 1852 Charles Lushington (L) 14 April 1785 23 September 1866
1852 1865 Sir John Villiers Shelley, Bt (L) 18 March 1808 26 January 1867
1865 1874 Hon. Robert Wellesley Grosvenor (L) 25 January 1834 13 November 1914
1865 1868 John Stuart Mill (L) 20 May 1806 8 May 1873
1868 1885 William Henry Smith (C) 24 June 1825 6 October 1891
1874 1882 Sir Charles Russell, Bt (C) 22 June 1826 14 April 1883
1882 1885 Lord Algernon Percy (C) 2 October 1851 28 December 1933
1885 1918 William L.A.B. Burdett-Coutts (C) 1851 28 July 1921
  • Constituency abolished (1918)

Events March 8 - Johannes Kepler discovers the third law of planetary motion (he soon rejects the idea after some initial calculations were made but on May 15 confirms the discovery). ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... Events March 8 - Johannes Kepler discovers the third law of planetary motion (he soon rejects the idea after some initial calculations were made but on May 15 confirms the discovery). ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events January 27 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed II to Mustafa II (1695-1703) July 17 - The Bank of Scotland is founded by an Act of Parliament of the old Scottish Parliament. ... Sir Philip Warwick (December 24, 1609 - January 15, 1683), English writer and politician, born in Westminster, was the son of Thomas Warwick, or Warrick, a musician. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ... Sir Stephen Fox (March 27, 1627 - October 28, 1716), English politician, was the son of William Fox, of Farley, in Wiltshire, a yeoman farmer. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in leap years). ... Events A Dutch ship makes the first recorded sighting of the coast of South Australia. ... 1628 - The Siege of La Rochelle, which had been ongoing for 14 months, ends with Huguenot surrender 1664 - The Duke of York and Albanys Maritime Regiment of Foot later to be known as the Royal Marines is established. ... // Events August 5 - In the Battle of Peterwardein 40. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 20 - Leislers Rebellion - New governor arrives in New York - Jacob Leisler surrenders after standoff of several hours March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender May 6... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... // Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 20 - Leislers Rebellion - New governor arrives in New York - Jacob Leisler surrenders after standoff of several hours March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender May 6... March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... Events March 4 - Massachusetts Bay Colony is granted a Royal charter. ... // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... Events March 27 - Concluding that Emperor Iyasus I of Ethiopia had abdicated by retiring to a monastery, a council of high officials appoint Tekle Haymanot I Emperor of Ethiopia May 23 - Battle of Ramillies September 7 - The Battle of Turin in the War of Spanish Succession - forces of Austria and... Sir Stephen Fox (March 27, 1627 - October 28, 1716), English politician, was the son of William Fox, of Farley, in Wiltshire, a yeoman farmer. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in leap years). ... Events A Dutch ship makes the first recorded sighting of the coast of South Australia. ... 1628 - The Siege of La Rochelle, which had been ongoing for 14 months, ends with Huguenot surrender 1664 - The Duke of York and Albanys Maritime Regiment of Foot later to be known as the Royal Marines is established. ... // Events August 5 - In the Battle of Peterwardein 40. ... Charles Montagu, 1st Earl of Halifax (April 16, 1661 - May 19, 1715) was Chancellor of the Exchequer, poet, statesman, and Earl of Halifax. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... Events January 6 - The fifth monarchy men unsuccessfully attempt to seize control of London. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... // Events July 24 - Spanish treasure fleet of ten ships under admiral Ubilla leave Havana, Cuba for Spain. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... // Events The Westminster Confession of Faith Ongoing events Wars of the Three Kingdoms, including the English Civil War (1642-1649) Births February 4 - Hans Erasmus Aßmann, Freiherr von Abschatz, German statesman and poet (d. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... // Events The Westminster Confession of Faith Ongoing events Wars of the Three Kingdoms, including the English Civil War (1642-1649) Births February 4 - Hans Erasmus Aßmann, Freiherr von Abschatz, German statesman and poet (d. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ... Events 10 Downing Street becomes the official residence of the United Kingdoms Prime Minister when Robert Walpole moves in. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... Events March 27 - Concluding that Emperor Iyasus I of Ethiopia had abdicated by retiring to a monastery, a council of high officials appoint Tekle Haymanot I Emperor of Ethiopia May 23 - Battle of Ramillies September 7 - The Battle of Turin in the War of Spanish Succession - forces of Austria and... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton (12 July 1669 - 31 March 1725) was a British politician of the early eighteenth century. ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... // Events Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ... // Events The Westminster Confession of Faith Ongoing events Wars of the Three Kingdoms, including the English Civil War (1642-1649) Births February 4 - Hans Erasmus Aßmann, Freiherr von Abschatz, German statesman and poet (d. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ... Events 10 Downing Street becomes the official residence of the United Kingdoms Prime Minister when Robert Walpole moves in. ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... Events February 1 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events August 10 - Treaty of Nijmegen ends the Dutch War. ... January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... // Events May 25 - Richard Cromwell resigns as Lord Protector of England following the restoration of the Long Parliament, beginning a second brief period of the republican government called the Commonwealth. ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ... Events January 26 - Stanislaus I of Poland abdicates his throne. ... Events January 27 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed II to Mustafa II (1695-1703) July 17 - The Bank of Scotland is founded by an Act of Parliament of the old Scottish Parliament. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (150th in leap years). ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events February 23 - First performance of Handels Orlando, in London June 9 - James Oglethorpe is granted a royal charter for the colony of Georgia. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1666 is often called Annus Mirabilis. ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... John Perceval, 2nd Earl of Egmont (1711-1770), was a British politician, political pamphleteer, and genealogist. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... // Events February 24 - The London premiere of Rinaldo by George Friderich Handel, the first Italian opera written for the London stage. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Marquess of Stafford, 2nd Earl Gower (4 August 1721 - 26 October 1803) was a British politician. ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... // Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Peter Warren (1703 or 1704 – 29 July 1752) was a British naval officer from Ireland who commanded the naval forces in the attack on Louisbourg in 1745. ... Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Edward Cornwallis (1713-1776) was a British military officer, known as “the Founder of Halifax”. He was born in London, the sixth son of Charles, fourth Baron Cornwallis, and Lady Charlotte Butler, daughter of the Earl of Arran2. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... // Events April 11 - War of the Spanish Succession: Treaty of Utrecht June 23 - French residents of Acadia given one year to declare allegiance to Britain or leave Nova Scotia Canada first Orrery built by George Graham Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in leap years). ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Events 10 Downing Street becomes the official residence of the United Kingdoms Prime Minister when Robert Walpole moves in. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Hugh Percy, 2nd Duke of Northumberland (14 August 1742 - 10 July 1817) entered the British Army in 1759, and married Lady Anne Crichton-Stuart, daughter of Lord Bute, in 1764. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Harrington (17 March 1753 - 5 September 1829) was a son of William Stanhope, 2nd Earl of Harrington and Lady Caroline Fitzroy. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Admiral Lord George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney, 1719-1792 by Jean-Laurent Mosnier, painted 1791 George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney Bt (February 1718 – May 24, 1792) – British naval officer. ... February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Charles James Fox Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years). ... Events January 8 - Premiere of George Frideric Handels opera Ariodante at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount Hood, 1724–1816 by James Northcote, painted 1784. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Charles James Fox Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount Hood, 1724–1816 by James Northcote, painted 1784. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Hugh Percy, 3rd Duke of Northumberland (20 April 1795 - 11 February 1847) was a British aristocrat and Tory politician who served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland under the Duke of Wellington from 1829 to 1830 Categories: Stub | Lords Lieutenant of Ireland | Peers | Knights of the Garter | 1795 births | 1847 deaths... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Vice Admiral Sir Samuel Hood (1762 – 1814-12-24) was an officer of the Royal Navy and cousin once removed of the more famous Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount Hood. ... November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Richard Brinsley Sheridan Richard Brinsley Sheridan (October 30, 1751 – July 7, 1816) was an Irish playwright and Whig statesman. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Francis Burdett Sir Francis Burdett, 5th Baronet (25 January 1770–23 January 1844) was an English reformist politician, the son of Francis Burdett by his wife Eleanor, daughter of William Jones of Ramsbury manor, Wiltshire, and grandson of Sir Robert Burdett, Bart. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald (14 December 1775 – 31 October 1860), styled Lord Cochrane between 1778 and 1831, was a politician and naval adventurer. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Sir Samuel Romilly was on crack and smoked weed (March 1, 1757 - November 2, 1818), was an English legal reformer. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... John Cam Hobhouse, 1st Baron Broughton and 2nd Baronet, PC (1786–1869) was the eldest son of Sir Benjamin Hobhouse, born at Redland near Bristol, educated at Westminster School and at Cambridge, where he became intimate with Lord Byron, and accompanied him in his journeys in the Peninsula, Greece, and... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Henry John Rous (23 January 1795-19th June, 1877), British admiral and sportsman, was born the second son of John Rous, 1st Earl of Stradbroke. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... John Stuart Mill (May 20, 1806 – May 8, 1873), an English philosopher and political economist, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Rt Hon. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Elections

General Notes

In multi-member elections the bloc voting system was used. Voters could cast a vote for one or two candidates, as they chose. The leading candidates with the largest number of votes were elected. Bloc voting (or block voting) (also called Plurality-at-large) refers to a class of voting systems which can be used to elect several representatives from a single constituency. ...


In by-elections and all elections after 1885, to fill a single seat, the first past the post system applied. A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... The plurality voting system, also known as first past the post, is a voting system used to elect a single winner in a given election. ...


After 1832, when registration of voters was introduced, a turnout figure is given for contested elections. In two-member elections, when the exact number of participating voters is unknown, this is calculated by dividing the number of votes by two. To the extent that electors did not use both their votes this will be an underestimate of turnout.


Where a party had more than one candidate in one or both of a pair of successive elections change is calculated for each individual candidate, otherwise change is based on the party vote. Change figures at by-elections are from the preceding general election or the last intervening by-election. Change figures at general elections are from the last general election.


Candidates for whom no party has been identified are classified as Non Partisan. The candidate might have been associated with a party or faction in Parliament or consider himself to belong to a particular political tradition. Political parties before the nineteenth century were not as cohesive or organised as they later became. Contemporary commentators (even the reputed leaders of parties or factions) in the eighteenth century did not necessarily agree who the party supporters were. The traditional parties, which had arisen in the late seventeenth century, became increasingly irrelevant to politics in the eighteenth century (particularly after 1760), although for some contests in some constituencies party labels were still used. It was only towards the end of the century that party labels began to acquire some meaning again, although this process was by no means complete for several more generations.


Sources: The results for elections before 1790 were taken from the History of Parliament Trust publications on the House of Commons. The results from 1790 until the UK general election, 1832 are based on Stooks Smith and from 1832 onwards on Craig. Where Stooks Smith gives additional information to the other sources this is indicated in a note. The 1832 UK general election, the first after the Reform Act, saw the Whigs win a large majority, with the Tories winning less than 30% of the vote. ...


Dates of Westminster general and by-elections 1660-1918

  • -2 Apr 1660 GE
  • -- Apr 1661 GE
  • 27 Feb 1679 GE
  • 19 Sep 1679 GE
  • 15 Nov 1680 BE
  • 10 Feb 1681 GE
  • 23 Mar 1685 GE
  • 21 Jan 1689 GE
  • 13 Mar 1690 GE
  • -9 Nov 1691 BE
  • 29 Oct 1695 GE
  • 22 Jul 1698 GE
  • 21 Jan 1701 GE
  • -9 Dec 1701 GE
  • -6 Aug 1702 GE
  • 30 May 1705 GE
  • -7 Jul 1708 GE
  • -9 Oct 1710 GE
  • -- --- 1713 GE
  • 24 Jan 1715 GE
  • 27 Mar 1722 GE (1)
  • -3 Dec 1722 BE
  • 15 Aug 1727 GE
  • 22 Apr 1734 GE
  • -8 May 1741 GE (1)
  • 31 Dec 1741 BE
  • -1 Jul 1747 GE
  • 15 May 1750 BE
  • 16 Jan 1753 BE
  • 20 Apr 1754 GE
  • 25 Mar 1761 GE
  • 27 Apr 1762 BE
  • 15 Mar 1763 BE
  • 16 Mar 1768 GE
  • 30 Apr 1770 BE
  • 26 Oct 1774 GE
  • 17 Dec 1776 BE
  • 20 Apr 1779 BE
  • 10 Oct 1780 GE
  • -3 Apr 1782 BE
  • 12 Jun 1782 BE
  • -7 Apr 1783 BE
  • 17 May 1784 GE
  • -4 Aug 1788 BE
  • -2 Jul 1790 GE
  • 13 Jun 1796 GE
  • 15 Jul 1802 GE
  • 13 Feb 1806 BE
  • -7 Oct 1806 BE
  • 19 Nov 1806 GE
  • 23 May 1807 GE
  • -8 Oct 1812 GE
  • -5 Jul 1814 (2)
  • 16 Jul 1814 BE
  • -4 Jul 1818 GE
  • -3 Mar 1819 BE
  • 25 Mar 1820 GE
  • -- --- 1826 GE
  • -- --- 1830 GE
  • -- --- 1831 GE
  • -- Feb 1832 BE
  • -- --- 1832 GE
  • -4 Apr 1833 BE
  • 11 May 1833 BE
  • -- --- 1835 GE
  • 12 May 1837 BE
  • 27 Jul 1837 GE
  • -1 Jul 1841 GE
  • 19 Feb 1846 BE
  • 30 Jul 1847 GE
  • -9 Jul 1852 GE
  • -- --- 1857 GE
  • -- --- 1859 GE
  • 12 Jul 1865 GE
  • 18 Nov 1868 GE
  • -7 Feb 1874 GE
  • 11 Aug 1877 BE
  • -- --- 1880 GE
  • 10 Feb 1882 BE
  • 29 Jun 1885 BE
  • 26 Nov 1885 GE
  • -- --- 1886 GE
  • -- --- 1892 GE
  • -- --- 1895 GE
  • -- --- 1900 GE
  • -- --- 1906 GE
  • -- Jan 1910 GE
  • -- Dec 1910 GE

Notes:

  • (1) Election declared void
  • (2) Date of expulsion from the House of Lord Cochrane

Election Results (Parliament of England) 1660-1690

General Election 2 April 1660: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Gilbert Gerard Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Thomas Clarges Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election c. April 1661: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir Philip Warwick Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sir Richard Everard Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sir Thomas Clarges Defeated N/A N/A
Non Partisan Thomas Elliot Defeated N/A N/A
  • Note (1661): Vote totals unavailable
General Election 27 February 1679: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir Stephen Fox Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sir William Pulteney Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sir Philip Matthews Defeated N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sir William Waller Defeated N/A N/A
  • Note (February 1679): Vote totals unavailable
General Election 19 September 1679: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir William Pulteney Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Francis Wythens Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sir William Waller Defeated N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sir John Cutler Defeated N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sir Philip Matthews Defeated N/A N/A
  • Note (September 1679): Vote totals unavailable
  • On petition Wythens was unseated and Sir William Waller seated on 15 November 1680
General Election 10 February 1681: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir William Pulteney Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sir William Waller Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Richard Tufton Defeated N/A N/A
  • Note (1681): Vote totals unavailable
General Election 23 March 1685: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Charles Bonython Elected N/A N/A
Tory Michael Arnold Elected N/A N/A
Whig Sir Gilbert Gerard, Bt Defeated N/A N/A
Whig Sir William Dolbern Defeated N/A N/A
  • Note (1685): Vote totals unavailable. The candidate in this election is not the Gilbert Gerard elected in 1660, nor is he the Sir Gilbert Gerard, Bt who was knight of the shire for Middlesex earlier in the century.
General Election 21 January 1689: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir William Pulteney Elected N/A N/A
Whig Hon. Philip Howard Elected N/A N/A
Tory Sir Roger Langley Defeated N/A N/A
Tory Charles Bonython Defeated N/A N/A
Radical Sir Philip Matthews Defeated N/A N/A
Tory Sir Walter Clarges, Bt Defeated N/A N/A
Radical James Dewey Defeated N/A N/A
  • Note (1689): Vote totals unavailable. Matthews and Dewey are described by Henning as radical candidates, but should not be confused with the followers of John Wilkes in the late eighteenth century or the radicals of the nineteenth century.

Sir Philip Warwick (December 24, 1609 - January 15, 1683), English writer and politician, born in Westminster, was the son of Thomas Warwick, or Warrick, a musician. ... Sir Stephen Fox (March 27, 1627 - October 28, 1716), English politician, was the son of William Fox, of Farley, in Wiltshire, a yeoman farmer. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... In English and British politics from mediaeval times until the Representation of the People Act 1884, Knights of the Shire were representatives of counties sent to advise the government of the day. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The Radicals were a left wing political grouping in Britain in the early to mid 19th century. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The Radicals were a left wing political grouping in Britain in the early to mid 19th century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Radicals were a left wing political grouping in Britain in the early to mid 19th century. ...

Election Results (Parliament of Great Britain) 1715-1800

General Election 24 January 1715: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Hon. Edward Wortley-Montagu Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Sir Thomas Crosse, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 27 March 1722: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Archibald Hutcheson 4,024 32.74 N/A
Tory John Cotton 3,853 31.35 N/A
Whig William Lowndes 2,215 18.02 N/A
Whig Sir Thomas Crosse, Bt 2,197 17.88 N/A
  • 1st Baron Molesworth (W) was proposed but withdrew before the poll.
  • Election declared void 6 November 1722.
By-Election 3 December 1722: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Charles Montagu 4,835 30.87 +30.87
Whig 1st Baron Carpenter 4,515 28.83 +28.83
Tory John Cotton 3,485 22.25 -9.10
Tory Sir Thomas Clarges 2,827 18.05 +18.05
General Election 15 August 1727: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Lord Charles Cavendish Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig William Clayton Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 22 April 1734: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Charles Wager Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig William Clayton Unopposed N/A N/A
  • Clayton created an Irish peer as 1st Baron Sundon 2 June 1735
General Election 8 May 1741: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Charles Wager 3,686 26.96 N/A
Whig 1st Baron Sundon 3,533 25.84 N/A
Tory Edward Vernon 3,290 24.07 N/A
Tory Charles Edwin 3,161 23.12 N/A
By-Election 31 December 1741: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Viscount Perceval Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Charles Edwin Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 1 July 1747: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Viscount Trentham 2,873 42.32 N/A
Whig Sir Peter Warren 2,858 42.10 N/A
Tory Sir Thomas Clarges 544 8.01 N/A
Tory Sir Thomas Dyke 514 7.57 N/A
By-Election 15 May 1750: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Viscount Trentham 4,811 50.83 +8.51
Tory Sir George Vandeput 4,654 49.17 +49.17
Majority 157 1.66 N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
  • After a scrutiny the member returned was unchanged and vote totals were amended to Trentham 4,103; Vandeput 3,933.
  • Death of Warren 29 July 1752
By-Election 16 January 1753: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Hon. Edward Cornwallis Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
General Election 20 April 1754: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Hon. Edward Cornwallis 3,385 48.09 N/A
Non Partisan Sir John Crosse, Bt 3,184 45.23 N/A
Non Partisan James Edward Oglethorpe 261 3.71 N/A
Non Partisan Earl of Middlesex 209 2.97 N/A
General Election 25 March 1761: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Hon. Edward Cornwallis Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Viscount Pulteney Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 27 April 1762: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Hon. Edwin Sandys Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
By-Election 15 March 1763: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Baron Warkworth Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General Election 16 March 1768: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Hon. Edwin Sandys Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Earl Percy Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 30 April 1770: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir Robert Bernard, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General Election 26 October 1774: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Earl Percy 4,994 33.81 N/A
Non Partisan Lord Thomas Pelham-Clinton 4,774 32.32 N/A
Non Partisan 2nd Viscount Mountmorres 2,531 17.13 N/A
Non Partisan Viscount Mahon 2,342 15.86 N/A
Non Partisan Humphrey Cotes 130 0.88 N/A
By-Election 17 December 1776: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Viscount Petersham Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
By-Election 20 April 1779: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Viscount Malden Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
  • Pelham-Clinton was known by the courtesy title of Earl of Lincoln, following the death of his brother in 1779
General Election 10 October 1780: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir George Brydges Rodney, Bt 4,994 35.60 +35.60
Whig Hon. Charles James Fox 4,878 34.77 +34.77
Tory Earl of Lincoln 4,157 29.63 -2.69
By-Election 3 April 1782: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Rt Hon. Charles James Fox Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
By-Election 12 June 1782: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Cecil Wray, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
By-Election 7 April 1783: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Rt Hon. Charles James Fox Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
General Election 17 May 1784: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory 1st Baron Hood 6,588 35.40 +35.40
Whig Rt Hon. Charles James Fox 6,126 32.92 -1.85
Whig Sir Cecil Wray, Bt 5,895 31.68 +31.68
  • Note (1784): Poll 40 days; 12,301 voted. After a scrutiny the members returned were unchanged and vote totals were amended to the figures as above. Original votes Hood 6,694; Fox 6,234; Wray 5,998. (Source: Stooks Smith)
  • Hood and Fox were declared elected 4 March 1785
  • Appointment of Hood as a Commissioner of the Admiralty 16 July 1788
By-Election 4 August 1788: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Lord John Townshend 6,392 53.44 +53.44
Tory 1st Baron Hood 5,569 46.56 +11.16
Majority 823 6.88 N/A
Whig gain from Tory Swing N/A
  • Note (1788): Poll 15 days. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 2 July 1790: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Rt Hon. Charles James Fox 3,516 41.80 +8.88
Tory 1st Baron Hood 3,217 38.24 +2.84
Whig John Horne Tooke 1,679 19.96 +19.96
  • Note (1790): Poll 15 days. Mr Tooke proposed himself. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 13 June 1796: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Rt Hon. Charles James Fox 5,160 40.33 -1.47
Tory Sir Alan Gardner, Bt 4,814 37.63 -0.61
Whig John Horne Tooke 2,819 22.04 +2.08

While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... // Events Abraham De Moivre states De Moivres theorem connecting trigonometric functions and complex numbers Publication of the first book of Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier Fall of Persias Safavid dynasty during a bloody revolt of the Afghani people. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... June 2 is the 153rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (154th in leap years), with 212 days remaining. ... Events April 16 - The London premiere of Alcina by George Frideric Handel, his first the first Italian opera for the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... // Events April 10 - Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz August 10 - Raja of Travancore defeats Dutch East India Company naval expedition at Battle of Colachel December 19 - Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 - Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... John Perceval, 2nd Earl of Egmont (1711-1770), was a British politician, political pamphleteer, and genealogist. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Marquess of Stafford, 2nd Earl Gower (4 August 1721 - 26 October 1803) was a British politician. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Sir Peter Warren (1703 or 1704 – 29 July 1752) was a British naval officer from Ireland who commanded the naval forces in the attack on Louisbourg in 1745. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The office of Lord High Admiral had been created in about 1400 to oversee the Royal Navy. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Marquess of Stafford, 2nd Earl Gower (4 August 1721 - 26 October 1803) was a British politician. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Edward Cornwallis (1713-1776) was a British military officer, known as “the Founder of Halifax”. He was born in London, the sixth son of Charles, fourth Baron Cornwallis, and Lady Charlotte Butler, daughter of the Earl of Arran2. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... Edward Cornwallis (1713-1776) was a British military officer, known as “the Founder of Halifax”. He was born in London, the sixth son of Charles, fourth Baron Cornwallis, and Lady Charlotte Butler, daughter of the Earl of Arran2. ... James Edward Oglethorpe (22 December 1696 - 30 June 1785) was an English general and philanthropist, a founder of the state of Georgia. ... Edward Cornwallis (1713-1776) was a British military officer, known as “the Founder of Halifax”. He was born in London, the sixth son of Charles, fourth Baron Cornwallis, and Lady Charlotte Butler, daughter of the Earl of Arran2. ... Flag of the Governor of Gibraltar The Governor of Gibraltar is the representative of the British monarch in the United Kingdoms overseas territory of Gibraltar. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Hugh Percy, 2nd Duke of Northumberland (14 August 1742 - 10 July 1817) entered the British Army in 1759, and married Lady Anne Crichton-Stuart, daughter of Lord Bute, in 1764. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... A courtesy title is a form of address in the British peerage system used for wives, children, and other close relatives of a peer. ... The title Duke of Northumberland was created in 1551 for John Dudley. ... Hugh Percy, 2nd Duke of Northumberland (14 August 1742 - 10 July 1817) entered the British Army in 1759, and married Lady Anne Crichton-Stuart, daughter of Lord Bute, in 1764. ... Baron Sandys is a title that has been created in the Peerage of Great Britain and the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (112th in leap years). ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... Hugh Percy, 2nd Duke of Northumberland (14 August 1742 - 10 July 1817) entered the British Army in 1759, and married Lady Anne Crichton-Stuart, daughter of Lord Bute, in 1764. ... Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl Stanhope (August 3, 1753 – December 15, 1816) was a British statesman and scientist. ... The title Baron Percy has been created several times in the Peerage of England. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Harrington (17 March 1753 - 5 September 1829) was a son of William Stanhope, 2nd Earl of Harrington and Lady Caroline Fitzroy. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The title of Earl of Harrington was created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1742 for the former Secretary of State and then Lord President, William Stanhope, 1st Baron Harrington. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Admiral Lord George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney, 1719-1792 by Jean-Laurent Mosnier, painted 1791 George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney Bt (February 1718 – May 24, 1792) – British naval officer. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Charles James Fox Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Charles James Fox Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... Baron Rodney is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Charles James Fox Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount Hood, 1724–1816 by James Northcote, painted 1784. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Charles James Fox Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount Hood, 1724–1816 by James Northcote, painted 1784. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Charles James Fox Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount Hood, 1724–1816 by James Northcote, painted 1784. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... John Horne Tooke (June 25, 1736 - March 18, 1812), was an English politician and philologist. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Charles James Fox Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... John Horne Tooke (June 25, 1736 - March 18, 1812), was an English politician and philologist. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

Election Results (Parliament of the United Kingdom)

General Election 15 July 1802: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Hon. Charles James Fox 2,671 39.31 -1.02
Tory 1st Baron Gardner 2,431 35.78 -1.85
Radical John Graham 1,693 24.92 +24.92
By-Election 13 February 1806: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Rt Hon. Charles James Fox Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
By-Election 7 October 1806: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Earl Percy Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
General Election 19 November 1806: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Sir Samuel Hood 5,478 37.22 +1.44
Whig Richard Brinsley Sheridan 4,758 32.33 -6.98
Radical James Paull 4,481 30.45 +5.53
  • Note (1806): Poll 15 days; 10,277 voted. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 23 May 1807: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Francis Burdett, Bt 5,134 37.03 +37.03
Whig Lord Cochrane 3,708 26.75 +26.75
Whig Richard Brinsley Sheridan 2,615 18.86 -13.47
Tory John Elliot 2,137 15.42 -21.80
Radical James Paull 269 1.94 -28.51
  • Note (1807): Poll 15 days; 8,622 voted. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 8 October 1812: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Francis Burdett, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Lord Cochrane Unopposed N/A N/A
  • Expulsion of Cochrane from the House of Commons, after being convicted of conspiracy, 5 July 1814
By-Election 16 July 1814: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Lord Cochrane Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
General Election 4 July 1818: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Samuel Romilly 5,339 34.32 N/A
Whig Sir Francis Burdett, Bt 5,238 33.67 N/A
Tory Sir Murray Maxwell 4,808 30.91 N/A
Radical Henry Hunt 84 0.54 N/A
Whig Hon. Douglas James William Kinnaird 65 0.42 N/A
Radical John Cartwright 23 0.15 N/A
  • Note (1818): Poll 15 days; 10,277 voted. (Source: Stooks Smith)
  • Death of Romilly 2 November 1818
By-Election 3 March 1819: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Hon. George Lamb 4,465 53.38 +22.47
Whig John Cam Hobhouse 3,861 46.16 +46.16
Radical John Cartwright 38 0.45 +0.30
Majority 604 7.22 N/A
Tory gain from Whig Swing N/A
  • Note (1819): Poll 15 days. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 25 March 1820: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Francis Burdett, Bt 5,327 36.37 +2.70
Whig John Cam Hobhouse 4,882 33.34 +33.34
Tory Hon. George Lamb 4,436 30.29 -0.62
  • Note (1820): Poll 15 days; 9,280 voted. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 1826: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Francis Burdett, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig John Cam Hobhouse Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 1830: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Francis Burdett, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig John Cam Hobhouse Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 1831: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Francis Burdett, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig John Cam Hobhouse Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election February 1832: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Rt Hon. Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
General Election 1832: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Sir Francis Burdett, Bt 3,248 43.09 N/A
Liberal Rt Hon. Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Bt 3,214 42.64 N/A
Liberal George de Lacy Evans 1,076 14.27 N/A
Turnout 11,576 38.47 N/A
  • Note (1832): 4,453 voted. Burdett and Hobhouse were classified as Whigs and Evans as a Radical. (Source: Stooks Smith)
  • Appointment of Hobhouse as Chief Secretary for Ireland
By-Election 4 April 1833: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Rt Hon. Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
  • Note (1833 April): Hobhouse was classified as a Whig. (Source: Stooks Smith)
  • Resignation of Hobhouse after he left the Ministry in opposition to the House and Window taxes.
By-Election 11 May 1833: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal George de Lacy Evans 2,027 44.07 +29.80
Liberal Rt Hon. Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Bt 1,835 39.89 -2.75
Conservative Bickham Escott 738 16.04 +16.04
Majority 192 4.17 N/A
Turnout 11,576 39.74 +1.27
Liberal hold Swing N/A
  • Note (1833 May): Evans was classified as a Radical, Hobhouse as a Whig and Escott as a Tory. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 1835: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Sir Francis Burdett, Bt 2,747 40.03 -3.06
Liberal George de Lacy Evans 2,588 37.71 +23.44
Conservative Sir Thomas James Cochrane 1,528 22.26 +22.26
Turnout 13,268 32.06 -6.41
  • Note (1835): 4,254 voted. Burdett was classified as a Whig, Evans as a Radical and Cochrane as a Tory. (Source: Stooks Smith)
  • Resignation of Burdett to seek re-election on changing parties.
By-Election 12 May 1837: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir Francis Burdett, Bt 3,567 53.89 +31.63
Liberal John Temple Leader 3,052 46.11 +46.11
Majority 515 7.78 N/A
Turnout 15,262 43.37 +11.31
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing N/A
  • Note (1837): Burdett was classified as a Tory and Leader as a Radical. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 27 July 1837: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal John Temple Leader 3,793 37.45 +37.45
Liberal George de Lacy Evans 3,715 36.68 -1.03
Conservative Sir George Murray 2,620 25.87 +3.61
Turnout 15,262 41.61 +9.55
  • Note (1837): 6,350 voted. Leader and Evans were classified as Radicals and Murray as a Tory. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 1 July 1841: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Hon. Henry John Rous 3,338 33.80 +7.93
Liberal John Temple Leader 3,281 33.22 -4.23
Liberal George de Lacy Evans 3,258 32.99 -3.69
Turnout 13,767 47.91 +6.30
  • Note (1841): 14,254 registered (Craig's figure above used for the turnout calculation); 6,596 voted. Leader and Evans were classified as Radicals (pink and white colours) and Rous as a Tory (blue colour). (Source: Stooks Smith)
  • Appointment of Rous as a Lord Commissioner of the Admiralty
By-Election 19 February 1846: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Sir George de Lacy Evans 3,843 56.94 +23.95
Conservative Hon. Henry John Rous 2,906 43.06 +9.26
Majority 937 13.88 N/A
Turnout 14,801 45.60 -2.31
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
  • Note (1846): Evans was classified as a Radical and Rous as a Tory. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 30 July 1847: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Sir George de Lacy Evans 3,139 29.13 -3.86
Liberal Charles Lushington 2,831 26.28 +26.28
Liberal Charles Cochrane 2,819 26.16 +26.16
Conservative Viscount Mandeville 1,985 18.42 -15.38
Turnout 14,572 49.31 +1.40
  • Note (1847): 14,125 registered (Craig's figure above used for the turnout calculation); 7,185 voted. Evans was classified as a Radical, Lushington and Cochrane as Whigs and Rous as a Tory. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 9 July 1852: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Sir John Villiers Shelley, Bt 4,199 32.19 +32.19
Liberal Sir George de Lacy Evans 3,756 28.79 -0.34
Conservative Viscount Mandeville 3,373 25.86 +7.44
Liberal William Coningham 1,716 13.16 +13.16
Turnout 14,883 43.82 -5.49
  • Note (1852): In earlier elections Evans and Coningham were classified as Radicals, Shelley as a Whig and Mandeville as a Tory. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 1857: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Sir George de Lacy Evans Unopposed N/A N/A
Liberal Sir John Villiers Shelley, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
  • Note (1857): In earlier elections Evans was classified as a Radical and Shelley as a Whig. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 1859: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Sir George de Lacy Evans Unopposed N/A N/A
Liberal Sir John Villiers Shelley, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
  • Note (1859): In earlier elections Evans was classified as a Radical and Shelley as a Whig. (Source: Stooks Smith)
General Election 12 July 1865: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Hon. Robert Wellesley Grosvenor 4,534 35.19 N/A
Liberal John Stuart Mill 4,525 35.12 N/A
Conservative William Henry Smith 3,824 29.68 N/A
Turnout 12,546 51.34 N/A
General Election 12 November 1868: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William Henry Smith 7,648 37.28 +7.60
Liberal Hon. Robert Wellesley Grosvenor 6,584 32.09 -3.10
Liberal John Stuart Mill 6,284 30.63 -4.49
Turnout 18,879 54.35 +3.01
General Election 7 February 1874: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William Henry Smith 9,371 35.72 -1.56
Conservative Sir Charles Russell, Bt 8,681 33.09 +33.09
Liberal Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, Bt 4,749 18.10 +18.10
Liberal Sir William John Codrington 3,435 13.09 +13.09
Turnout 19,845 66.10 +11.75
By-Election 11 August 1877: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Rt Hon. William Henry Smith Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General Election 1880: Westminster (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Rt Hon. William Henry Smith 9,093 29.30 -6.42
Conservative Sir Charles Russell, Bt 8,930 28.78 -4.31
Liberal John Morley 6,564 21.15 +21.15
Liberal Sir A. Hobhouse 6,443 20.76 +20.76
Turnout 21,081 73.60 +7.50
  • Resignation of Russell
By-Election 10 February 1882: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Lord Algernon Percy Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
By-Election 29 June 1885: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Rt Hon. William Henry Smith Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
  • Constituency reduced to one seat and boundaries changed in the redistribution of 1885
General Election 26 November 1885: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William L.A.B. Burdett-Coutts 3,991 69.69 +69.69
Liberal Prof. E.S. Beesly 1,736 30.31 +30.31
Majority 2,255 39.37 N/A
Turnout 7,670 74.67 +1.07
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General Election 1886: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William L.A.B. Burdett-Coutts Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General Election 1892: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William L.A.B. Burdett-Coutts 3,548 64.93 N/A
Liberal Leif Jones 1,916 35.07 N/A
Majority 1,632 29.87 N/A
Turnout 7,971 68.55 N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General Election 1895: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William L.A.B. Burdett-Coutts Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General Election 1900: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William L.A.B. Burdett-Coutts 2,715 86.08 N/A
Ind. Conservative H.H. Montague-Smith 439 13.92 N/A
Majority 2,276 72.16 N/A
Turnout 7,367 42.81 N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General Election 1906: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William L.A.B. Burdett-Coutts 3,167 60.66 -25.42
Liberal Claud Vere Cavendish Hobart 2,054 39.34 +39.34
Majority 1,113 21.32 -50.84
Turnout 7,539 69.25 +26.44
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General Election January 1910: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William L.A.B. Burdett-Coutts 3,917 69.11 +8.45
Liberal Claud Vere Cavendish Hobart 1,751 30.89 -8.45
Majority 2,166 38.21 +16.89
Turnout 7,284 77.81 +8.56
Conservative hold Swing +8.45
  • Positive swing is Liberal to Conservative
General Election December 1910: Westminster
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William L.A.B. Burdett-Coutts 3,397 73.45 +4.34
Liberal H. de Pass 1,228 26.55 -4.34
Majority 2,169 46.90 +8.69
Turnout 7,284 63.50 -14.31
Conservative hold Swing +4.34
  • Constituency abolished in the redistribution of 1918

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This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... John Cam Hobhouse, 1st Baron Broughton and 2nd Baronet, PC (1786–1869) was the eldest son of Sir Benjamin Hobhouse, born at Redland near Bristol, educated at Westminster School and at Cambridge, where he became intimate with Lord Byron, and accompanied him in his journeys in the Peninsula, Greece, and... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... John Cam Hobhouse, 1st Baron Broughton and 2nd Baronet, PC (1786–1869) was the eldest son of Sir Benjamin Hobhouse, born at Redland near Bristol, educated at Westminster School and at Cambridge, where he became intimate with Lord Byron, and accompanied him in his journeys in the Peninsula, Greece, and... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The 1835 UK general election saw Robert Peels Conservatives make large gains from their low of the 1832 election, but the Whigs maintained a large majority. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir Francis Burdett Sir Francis Burdett, 5th Baronet (25 January 1770–23 January 1844) was an English reformist politician, the son of Francis Burdett by his wife Eleanor, daughter of William Jones of Ramsbury manor, Wiltshire, and grandson of Sir Robert Burdett, Bart. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Sir Francis Burdett Sir Francis Burdett, 5th Baronet (25 January 1770–23 January 1844) was an English reformist politician, the son of Francis Burdett by his wife Eleanor, daughter of William Jones of Ramsbury manor, Wiltshire, and grandson of Sir Robert Burdett, Bart. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The 1837 UK general election saw Robert Peels Conservatives close further on the position of the Whigs, who won their third election of the decade. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Right Hon. ... The 1841 UK general election saw a big swing as Robert Peels Conservatives took control of the House of Commons. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Henry John Rous (23 January 1795-19th June, 1877), British admiral and sportsman, was born the second son of John Rous, 1st Earl of Stradbroke. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Henry John Rous (23 January 1795-19th June, 1877), British admiral and sportsman, was born the second son of John Rous, 1st Earl of Stradbroke. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The 1847 UK general election saw candidates calling themselves Conservatives win the most seats, in part because they won a number of uncontested seats. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... William Drogo Montagu, 7th Duke of Manchester KP (October 15, 1823 – 22 March 1890) was the son of George Montagu, 6th Duke of Manchester. ... The 1852 UK general election was very close, Lord John Russells Whigs again winning the popular vote, but once again Conservative candidates won a very slight majority. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... William Drogo Montagu, 7th Duke of Manchester KP (October 15, 1823 – 22 March 1890) was the son of George Montagu, 6th Duke of Manchester. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The 1857 UK general election saw the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, finally win a majority in the House of Commons as the Conservative vote fell significantly. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The 1859 UK general election saw the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, hold their majority in a much enlarged House of Commons over the Earl of Derbys Conservatives. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir George de Lacy Evans (1787 - 1870) was a British general. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The 1865 UK general election saw the Liberals, led by Lord Palmerston, increase their large majority over the Earl of Derbys Conservatives. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... John Stuart Mill (May 20, 1806 – May 8, 1873), an English philosopher and political economist, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Rt Hon. ... The 1868 UK general election was the first after passage of the Reform Act 1867, which enfranchised all male householders, thus greatly increasing the number of men who could vote in elections in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Rt Hon. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... John Stuart Mill (May 20, 1806 – May 8, 1873), an English philosopher and political economist, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... The 1874 UK general election ended with the Liberals, led by William Gladstone, winning a majority of the votes cast, but Benjamin Disraelis Conservatives winning the majority of seats in the House of Commons, largely because they won a number of uncontested seats. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Sir William John Codrington (1800 — 1884) was a British general who served in the Crimean war, and Commander-in-Chief after the death of General Simpson. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... In the UK general election of 1880, also known as the Midlothian Campaign, the Liberals, led by the fierce oratory of retired former Liberal leader William Gladstone in attacking the supposedly immoral foreign policy of the Beaconsfield government, secured one of their largest ever majorities, leaving the Conservatives a distant... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... John Morley, 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn (1838 - 1923), known for the first part of his life simply as John Morley, was an English statesman and writer. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The 1885 UK general election was from the 24th November - 18th December 1885. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The 1886 UK general election took place from July 1-27, 1886. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The 1892 UK general election was held from 4th - 26th July 1892. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The UK general election of 1895 was held from 13th July - 7th August 1895. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The UK general election of 1900 was from 25th September - 24th October 1900. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The UK general election of 1906 was from 12th January – 8th February 1906. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The UK general election of January 1910 was held from 15th January – 10th February 1910. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ... The UK general election of December 1910 was the last held over several days, from 3rd – 19th December 1910. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Swing in a British political context is a single figure used as an indication of the scale of voter change in a single constituency. ...

See also

The adminstrative region and ceremonial county of Greater London, together with the enclave of the City of London, is divided into 74 Parliamentary constituencies (all Borough constituencies). ...

References

  • Boundaries of Parliamentary Constituencies 1885-1972, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Political Reference Publications 1972)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (The Macmillan Press 1977)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1885-1918, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (The Macmillan Press 1974)
  • The House of Commons 1509-1558, by S.T. Bindoff (Secker & Warburg 1982)
  • The House of Commons 1558-1603, by P.W. Hasler (HMSO 1981)
  • The House of Commons 1660-1690, by Basil Duke Henning (Secker & Warburg 1983)
  • The House of Commons 1715-1754, by Romney Sedgwick (HMSO 1970)
  • The House of Commons 1754-1790, by Sir Lewis Namier and John Brooke (HMSO 1964)
  • The House of Commons 1790-1820, by R.G. Thorne (Secker & Warburg 1986)
  • The Parliaments of England by Henry Stooks Smith (1st edition published in three volumes 1844-50), second edition edited (in one volume) by F.W.S. Craig (Political Reference Publications 1973)
  • Who's Who of British Members of Parliament: Volume I 1832-1885, edited by M. Stenton (The Harvester Press 1976)
  • This page incorporates information from Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page.

 
 

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