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Encyclopedia > Western mystery tradition

The term Western mystery tradition (also Western Esoteric tradition) refers to the collection of the mystical, esoteric knowledge of the Western world. The tradition has no one source or unifying text, nor does it hold any specific dogma, instead placing emphasis on "inner knowledge" or Gnosis. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Mysticism (ancient Greek mysticon = secret) is meditation, prayer, or theology focused on the direct experience of union with divinity, God, or Ultimate Reality, or the belief that such experience is a genuine and important source of knowledge. ... Esoteric knowledge is knowledge that is secret or not generally known. ... The term Western world, the West or the Occident (Latin occidens -sunset, -west, as distinct from the Orient) [1] can have multiple meanings dependent on its context (e. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

History

While there is no evidence to show a direct ancient lineage of the Western mystery tradition, its followers have placed its roots in the religions of Ancient Egypt, Armenia, Chaldea, Classical Greece, and Israel. The Catholic Encyclopedia sums up its origins thus: Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... For other uses, see Chaldean. ... Parthenon This article is on the term Classical Greece itself. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

Its beginnings have long been a matter of controversy and are still largely a subject of research. The more these origins are studied, the farther they seem to recede in the past. (The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume IV: Esotericism and Gnosticism)

To make an accurate assumption of the tradition's origin and (therefore age) it would be necessary to study the origin of the various systems which have come to make up the tradition. Of these systems the Egyptian and Hellenic Mystery religion, the Armenian (known as: Intentional Architecture), the Hebrew Kabbalah, Gnosticism and Hermeticism are generally considered the oldest, though at no stage prior to the 1880's were these doctrines ever synthesized into one whole. Due to their relative geographic restrictions they were regarded very much as separate disciplines. It appears that for the most part the specific teachings were preserved via oral tradition (though not in all cases, the Nag Hammadi Library for example) passed from teacher to initiate. However, even in the ancient climates in which they flourished, the Esoteric Philosophies were still highly elusive. Manly P Hall writes: Mystery religions, or simply Mysteries, were belief systems of the Graeco-Roman world full admission to which was restricted to those who had gone through certain secret initiation rites. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Hermeticism should not be confused with the concept of a hermit. ... The Nag Hammadi library is a collection of early Christian Gnostic texts discovered near the Egyptian town of Nag Hammadi in 1945. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

In all cities of the ancient world were temples for public worship and offering. In every community also were philosophers and mystics, deeply versed in Nature's lore. These individuals were usually banded together, forming seclusive philosophic and religious schools. The more important of these groups were known as the Mysteries. Many of the great minds of antiquity were initiated into these secret fraternities by strange and mysterious rites, some of which were extremely cruel. Alexander Wilder defines the Mysteries as "Sacred dramas performed at stated periods. The most celebrated were those of Isis, Sabazius, Cybele, and Eleusis." After being admitted, the initiates were instructed in the secret wisdom which had been preserved for ages. Plato, an initiate of one of these sacred orders, was severely criticized because in his writings he revealed to the public many of the secret philosophic principles of the Mysteries. Every pagan nation had (and has) not only its state religion, but another into which the philosophic elect alone have gained entrance. (The Secret Teachings of all ages, p. 21)

After the fall of Rome, Alchemy and philosophy and other aspects of the tradition were largely preserved in the Arab and Near Eastern world and introduced into Western Europe by Jews and by the cultural contact between Christians and Muslims that occurred due to the Crusades and the reconquista. The 12th century saw the development of the kabbalah in medieval Spain. The medieval period also saw the publication of grimoires which offered often elaborate formulas for theurgy and thaumaturgy. Many of the grimoires seem to have kabbalistic influence. Figures in alchemy from this period seem to also have authored or used grimoires. For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... For other senses of this word, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ... After the disorders of the passage of the Vandals and Alans down the Mediterranean coast of Hispania from 409, the history of Medieval Spain begins with the Iberian kingdom of the Arian Visigoths (507 – 711), who were converted to Catholicism with their king Reccared in 587. ... This design for an amulet comes from the Black Pullet grimoire. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


The Renaissance saw a revival of classical learning, and not surprisingly a revival of ancient and medieval occult practices. The kabbalah exploded in popularity and influence among Jews. Many Christians began to study the kabbalah and invented Christian cabala. There was also renewed interest in magic (theurgy and thaumaturgy), alchemy, and Hermeticism. The period saw the first emergence of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood. It also saw the mass persecution of suspected witches. The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Witchcraft. ...


The Enlightenment saw another occult revival, perhaps spurred by growing rejection of mainstream religion and increased democracy and freedom of conscience. The period saw the rise of occult fraternities, most notably Speculative Freemasonry and a revived Rosicrucian Brotherhood. Academic interest in ancient mystery cults such as those of Mithras and Dionysus began to develop. Emanuel Swedenborg pulled Christianity in a more mystical or occult direction, and Franz Mesmer provided a quasi-scientific method of thaumaturgy. While both these men had profound contributions to the western mystery tradition, it appears neither was versed in it. The Count of St Germain also taught during this period, whose life and legends influenced Theosophy. Martinism also arose as an esoteric doctrine. So as well with various Rosicrucian orders. The Enlightenment (French: ; German: ) was an eighteenth-century movement in European and American philosophy, or the longer period including the Age of Reason. ... “Freemasons” redirects here. ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ... This article or section contains too much jargon and may need simplification or further explanation. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... Franz Anton Mesmer His Grave Franz Anton Mesmer (May 23, 1734 – March 5, 1815) discovered what he called animal magnetism and others often called mesmerism. ... Count of St Germain by unknown artist The Count of St. ... Theosophy, literally god-wisdom (Greek: θεοσοφία theosophia), designates several bodies of ideas. ... Martinism is the mystical tradition started in 18th century France by Louis-Claude de Saint-Martin. ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ...


The late 19th century saw a radical split in the western mystery tradition. HP Blavatsky was the main instrument of this, by reinventing the tradition in a system called Theosophy. Theosophy largely ignored the medieval traditions, such as alchemy, thaumaturgy and kabbalah, instead focusing on more ancient mystery teachings and incorporating eastern systems of yoga. The extant tradition prospered alongside Theosophy, especially under the influence of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and such teachers as Eliphas Levi, Papus, Macgregor Mathers, and Aleister Crowley. This tradition began to see itself as a complete alternative to Christianity, and, not surprisingly, began to emphasize theurgy. This occult revival lasted through World War II. Aspects of it were further revived in the 1960s. Theosophy is still available through the Theosophical Society, and western theurgy strongly influenced the development of neo-paganism. Helena Blavatsky Helena Petrovna Hahn (also Hélène) (July 31, 1831 (O.S.) (August 12, 1831 (N.S.)) - May 8, 1891 London, England), better known as Helena Blavatsky or Madame Blavatsky was the founder of Theosophy. ... Theosophy, literally god-wisdom (Greek: θεοσοφία theosophia), designates several bodies of ideas. ... The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn (or, more commonly, the Golden Dawn) was a magical order of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, practicing a form of theurgy and spiritual development. ... Eliphas Lévi Eliphas Lévi, born Alphonse Louis Constant, (February 8, 1810 - May 31, 1875) was a French occult author and magician. ... Gerard Encausse (July 13, 1865 - 1916), whose esoteric pseudonym was Papus, was the Spanish-born French physician, hypnotist, and popularizer of occultism, who founded the modern Martinist Order. ... Samuel Liddel MacGregor Mathers, in Egyptian costume, performs a ritual of Isis in the rites of the Golden Dawn. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The Theosophical Society was the organization formed to advance the spiritual doctrines and altruistic living known as Theosophy. ... Neopaganism (sometimes Neo-Paganism, meaning New Paganism) is a heterogeneous group of religions which attempt to revive ancient, mainly European pre-Christian religions. ...


The Second World War

Emergent occultic and esoteric systems found increasing popularity in the early 20th century, especially in Western Europe. Occult lodges and secret societies flowered among European intellectuals of this era who had largely abandoned traditional forms of Christianity. The spreading of secret teachings and magic practices found enthusiastic adherents in the chaos of Germany during the interwar years. Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ...


Many influential and wealthy Germans were drawn to secret societies such as the Ordo Templi Orientis and the Thule Society. Leading figures of these groups included Dietrich Eckart, Karl Haushofer, Karl Maria Wiligut and his protege Heinrich Himmler, all of whom figured prominently in the nascent Nazi Party. In Himmler's case, his personal occult fascination became a national civil religion when he promoted his racial occultism and symbology using the full authority of the Nazi state, even if Hitler was more than a little suspicious of devotion to anything beyond the Nazi Regime. Eventually, Hitler's paranoia and fear of competing institutions, coupled with Himmler's opportunism led to the Gestapo suppressing Himmler's fellow occultists who were not directly sanctioned by the state. During the Second World War, occult luminaries in Britain, most notably Aleister Crowley and the Duke of Hamilton functioned as informal intermediaries between the warring governments of Britain and Hitler's Germany. Deputy fuhrer Rudolph Hess eventually made his famous escape to Scotland during the war, hoping to strike a peace bargain with Britain using the help of the Duke of Hamilton, an old occult lodge associate. Lamen of the Ordo Templi Orientis Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.) (Order of the Temple of the East, or the Order of Oriental Templars) is an international fraternal and religious organization founded at the beginning of the 20th century. ... Thule Society emblem The Thule Society (German: Thule-Gesellschaft), originally the Studiengruppe für germanisches Altertum Study Group for Germanic Antiquity, was a German occultist and Völkisch group in Munich, named after a mythical northern country from Greek legend. ... Dietrich Eckart Dietrich Eckart (March 23, 1868 - December 26, 1923) was one of the early key members of the National-Socialist German Workers Party and one of the participants in the 1923 Beer Hall Putsch. ... General Karl Haushofer General Karl Ernst Haushofer (August 27, 1869, Munich - March 13, 1946, Pähl) was a German geopolitician. ... Karl Maria Wiligut (alias Weisthor) (December 10, 1866 - January 3, 1946) was also known as Himmlers Rasputin. He was born in Vienna in what was then Austria-Hungary. ... Heinrich Luitpold Himmler ( ; 7 October 1900–23 May 1945) was commander of the Schutzstaffel (SS) and one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany and the Nazi hierarchy. ... Nazism, or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the totalitarian ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Nazi mysticism is a quasi-religious undercurrent of Nazism; it denotes the mixture of Nazism with occultism, esotericism, cryptohistory, and/or the paranormal — especially in the traditions of Germanic mysticism. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Duke of Hamilton is a title in the Peerage of Scotland created in 1643. ...


The Collapse of the Soviet Union

Little information is known about the status of the Western mystery tradition in the officially Atheist Soviet Union and its "satellites" during the ruling of the Communist Party. It is believed by some that the Soviets had a scientific interest in subjects traditionally studied by the Western mystery tradition, such as telepathy and astrology. For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... In modern usage, the term communist party is generally used to identify any political party which has adopted communist ideology. ... Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ...


A number of people associated with mysticism chose to leave the countries where Communism was installed. For example, G.I. Gurdjieff, an influential individual from Armenia, fled to France after the Bolsheviks overtook the ruling of Russia. The Universal White Brotherhood of Bulgaria, founded by Peter Deunov and extended by Omraam Mikhael Aivanhov, also chose to continue its activities in France and other Western countries after the Second world war and the introduction of Communism into Bulgaria. These two examples, although not directly associated with the core of the Western mystery tradition, demonstrate a pattern which supports the claim that the Soviet-controlled states were negative not only to mainstream religion but also to mysticism and occultism. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Georges Ivanovich Gurdjieff Georges Ivanovich Gurdjieff (January 13, 1872 - October 29, 1949), the Greek-Armenian mystic and teacher of dancing born in Alexandropol, Armenia (then of the Russian Empire, now Gyumri, Armenia), traveled to many parts of the world (i. ... For other uses, see Bolshevik (disambiguation). ... Peter Constantinov Deunov Master Beinsa Douno Master of Esoteric Christianity Peter Konstantinov Deunov (Bulgarian Петър Константинов Дънов, pronounced ) was a spiritual master and founder of a School of Esoteric Christianity. ... Omraam Mikhaël Aïvanhov (January 31, 1900, Serbtzi, Bulgaria - December 25, 1986, Fréjus, France) was a French philosopher, pedagogue, alchemist, mystic, magus, astrologer with Macedonian roots. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses of this term, see occult (disambiguation). ...


It is known that after the collapse of the Soviet Union, several mystical societies, such as the Rosicrucians, gained profound revival in Eastern Europe and Russia which resulted in the foundation of many new jurisdictions and lodges. The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ...


Today

Today, the Tradition is experiencing a revival in North America and Europe, while many Western mystical organizations have presence throughout the world. Today the tradition is undergoing an import of Eastern ideas, mainly Taoism, Tantra, Buddhism, Hinduism and Yoga, which began mainly by the Theosophical Society in the 19th century, and now is also continued by many people with syncretic or eclectic backgrounds. North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Taoism (Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... The Sri Yantra This article is an overview of Tantra and an in-depth look at the Tantra of Hinduism. ... A silhouette of a Buddha statue at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ... The Theosophical Society was the organization formed to advance the spiritual doctrines and altruistic living known as Theosophy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Eclectic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Philosophy

Today, the Western mystery tradition is a mixture of ancient philosophy, paganistic and Christian thought, medieval ideas, and also contains some imports from Asia and modern science. However, the true Tradition, seems to focus on individual spiritual progress through initiation into some sort of brotherhood, group rituals, study of philosophy and the cosmic laws and their practical application with the aims of alchemy, meditation, divination and ritual magic. For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... For other uses, see Initiation (disambiguation). ... Look up brotherhood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of a community. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see Meditation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Divination (disambiguation). ... Ritual magic is the performance of a ritual for magical purposes. ...


Initiation

The concept of Initiation plays a very important role in the Western mystical tradition, and most people who are related with this tradition are initiated in one or more mystical organisations. For other uses, see Initiation (disambiguation). ...


Initiatoric societies existed in Ancient Greece and Ancient Egypt. They were working as schools or colleges for the spreading of their secret teachings to worthly individuals. The teachings were not accessible to the general public, a tendency symbolised by the Greek phrase "Ουδείς αγεωμέτρητος εισείτω" (which may be translated as "no person without knowledge of Geometry should get in") found in Plato's Academy. Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around nine hundred years. ... Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... Calabi-Yau manifold Geometry (Greek γεωμετρία; geo = earth, metria = measure) is a part of mathematics concerned with questions of size, shape, and relative position of figures and with properties of space. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... For other uses, see Academy (disambiguation). ...


The tradition of initiation and secrecy is well-preserved today, although it is criticised by many people, mainly those related to the New Age phenomenon, where many participants have adopted the view that access to knowledge should be as open as possible. However, many New Age schools and doctrines still require a process of initiation (e.g. Transcendental Meditation) [citation needed]and the private tutelage of a guru (as with many forms of yoga) or other enlightened master (e.g., Zen Buddhism) in order for the passing of wisdom or knowledge to occur. New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... // Transcendental Meditation or TM is a trademarked meditation technique introduced in 1958 by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi that involves the mental use of specific sounds, called mantras. ... For other uses, see Guru (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ... A woodblock print by Yoshitoshi, (Japan, 1887) depicting Bodhidharma the founder of Chinese Zen. ...


Variation

Beginning in the early to mid-Nineteenth Century, and with the incorporation of Eastern mystical concepts into the existing traditions, the Western Mystery Tradition experienced a major divergence between the esoteric Hermetic rites of the Masonic and Rosicrucian traditions, and the Theosophical schools (with the major divergence occurring during the life of Madame Blavatsky). Some people considered Theosophy to be grouped under the general rubric of New Age Spirituality although others don’t agree, since they consider the New Age as an over-simplification of several theosophical concepts and having self-centered aims. The New Age schools preached an openness not seen in the esoteric Hermetic fraternal organizations, which continue to rely heavily on initiatory rites for the dissemination of spiritual information. However, although New Age spirituality is more open in its presentation, it continues to rely more or less on a syncretic and esoteric methodology in the formulation of its methods and in the transmission of its wisdom/enlightenment. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastern Mysticism is a somewhat imprecise term summarizing mystic traditions of the Middle East, India and the Far East, including mystic elements in Gnosticism] Sufism Yoga Vedanta Buddhism Taoism Category: ... Look up Esotericism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Hermeticism should not be confused with the concept of a hermit. ... “Freemasons” redirects here. ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ... Theosophy, literally god-wisdom (Greek: θεοσοφία theosophia), designates several bodies of ideas. ... Helena Blavatsky Helena Petrovna Hahn (also Hélène) (July 31, 1831 (O.S.) (August 12, 1831 (N.S.)) - May 8, 1891 London, England), better known as Helena Blavatsky or Madame Blavatsky was the founder of Theosophy. ... Theosophy, literally god-wisdom (Greek: θεοσοφία theosophia), designates several bodies of ideas. ... New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the 1986 American crime film, see Wisdom (film). ... Enlightenment (or brightening) broadly means the acquisition of new wisdom or understanding enabling clarity of perception. ...


Ethics and Morality

With the enormous variation of beliefs and methods among the proliferating spiritual and esoteric groups have come concerns from some regarding the moral quality or ethical content of certain doctrines. As a consequence, there has been an effort by some to attempt a supposed objective dichotomy between the ethical philosophies of spiritual or religious groups by categorizing them under the Left-Hand Path and Right-Hand Path modality. In particular, the distinction that is drawn is between one set of groups (those on the "Right-Hand Path") who are said to focus on the elevation of the spiritual over the carnal, faith-based worship of something greater than themselves, and the observance of strict moral codes, all of which are supposed by their adherents to bring humans closer to the Divine or a moral good, as opposed to the other set of groups (those on the "Left-Hand Path") who focus on the advancement and preservation of the self, glorification of the earthly, and the development of personal power. This usage of terms, however, is invoked almost exclusively by proponents of groups who consider themselves "on the Left-Hand Path"; opponents of this terminology (groups that are almost always described by those who subscribe to this distinction as being on the "Right-Hand Path") argue either that this distinction is invalid because it results from a mislabeled or false dichotomy, or that much of what is called "left-handed" is simply not "legitimate." Morality (from the Latin manner, character, proper behaviour) has three principal meanings. ... For other uses, see Ethics (disambiguation). ... This or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


See also

General Terms

Doctrine: The Age of Aquarius (starting around the 27th century) is one of the twelve astrological ages. ... Anthroposophy, also called spiritual science, is a spiritual philosophy based on the teachings of Rudolf Steiner,[1] which states that anyone who conscientiously cultivates sense-free thinking can attain experience of and insights into the spiritual world. ... Look up Esotericism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Freedom of thought (also called freedom of conscience and freedom of ideas) is the freedom of an individual to hold or consider a fact, viewpoint, or thought, regardless of anyone elses view. ... Freethought is a philosophical viewpoint that holds that beliefs should be formed on the basis of science and logical principles and not be compromised by authority, tradition, or any other dogma. ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Initiation (disambiguation). ... This or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This list of topics is related to spirituality, esotericism, mysticism, religion and/or parapsychology. ... List of notable occultists and mystics. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... Plato (Left) and Aristotle (right), by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome) Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the ultimate nature of reality, being, and the world. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... For other uses of this term, see occult (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of a community. ... For the Europe album, see Secret Society (Europe album). ...

Communities/Organisations: Agni Yoga, also called the Teaching of Living Ethics or (in Russian) the Zhivaya Etica, is an esoteric teaching founded by the Russian painter Nicholas Roerich (Nikolai Konstantinovitch Rerikh) and his highly adept empathic wife, Helena Roerich (Elena Ivanovna Rerikh). ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... The Buddhist doctrine of Anatta (Pāli) or Anātman (Sanskrit) specifies the absence of a permanent and unchanging self or soul (ātman). ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... Atenism (or the Amarna heresy) is one of the earliest monotheistic religions, associated above all with the eighteenth dynasty Pharaoh Amenhotep IV, better known under the name he later adopted, Akhenaten. ... Atman is a Sanskrit word, normally translated as soul or self (also ego). ... The Atman or Atma (IAST: Ä€tmā, sanskrit: आत्म‍ ) is a philosophical term used within Hinduism and Vedanta to identify the soul. ... In Buddhist philosophy, anatta (Pāli) or anātman (Sanskrit) refers to non-self or absence of separate self[1]. One scholar describes it as ...meaning non-selfhood, the absence of limiting self-identity in people and things. ... The Basilideans were a Gnostic sect founded by Basilides of Alexandria in the 2nd century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christian mysticism... For other uses, see Ceremonial Deism. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... Enneagram Figure The Enneagram is a nine-pointed geometric figure. ... Esoteric Christianity refers to the occult study and the mystic living of the esoteric knowledge related to what adherents view as the inner teachings of early Christianity, seen as a Mystery religion. ... Esoteric cosmology is cosmology that is an intrinsic part of an esoteric or occult system of thought. ... In his early lectures, as documented by P.D. Ouspensky, G.I. Gurdjieff described his approach to self-development as a Fourth Way [1][2], in contrast to teachings that emphasize the development of the body, mind, or the emotions separately, Gurdjieffs exercises worked on all three at the... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Great Architect of the Universe (GAOTU) is a term used within Freemasonry to denominate the Supreme Being which each member individually holds an adherence to. ... Hermeticism should not be confused with the concept of a hermit. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ... For other uses, see Karma (disambiguation). ... Kriya Yoga is a very specific system of Yoga that was revived in modern times by Lahiri Mahasaya, c 1861. ... This article refers to the magical system of Aleister Crowley and Thelema. ... Martinism is the mystical tradition started in 18th century France by Louis-Claude de Saint-Martin. ... Nazi mysticism is a quasi-religious undercurrent of Nazism; it denotes the mixture of Nazism with occultism, esotericism, cryptohistory, and/or the paranormal — especially in the traditions of Germanic mysticism. ... Neoplatonism (also Neo-Platonism) is the modern term for a school of religious and mystical philosophy that took shape in the 3rd century AD, based on the teachings of Plato and earlier Platonists. ... Numerology is any of many systems, traditions or beliefs in a mystical or esoteric relationship between numbers and physical objects or living things. ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... Platonic idealism is the theory that the substantive reality around us is only a reflection of a higher truth. ... Bust of Pythagoras Pythagoreanism is a term used for the esoteric and metaphysical beliefs held by Pythagoras and his followers, the Pythagoreans, who were much influenced by mathematics and probably a main inspirational source for Plato and platonism. ... The Ray of Creation is a metaphysical cosmology which was taught by G.I. Gurdjieff. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ... Not to be confused with Sabian, the Canadian cymbal manufacturing company; Sabaeans, an ancient people living in what is now Yemen; Sabbateans, followers of Sabbatai Zevi; or Sabines, a pre-Roman Italic tribe of Latium. ... Satanism is a term which has been used since the end of the Middle Ages to describe a number of different belief systems in a number of contexts. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology is a body of beliefs and related practices created by American pulp fiction author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as an outgrowth of his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. ... Sethian is also a Finnish progressive metal band. ... Setianism comprises magical, philosophical and religious concepts related to the ancient Egyptian god Set. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... The English word spirit comes from the Latin spiritus (breath). // The English word spirit comes from the Latin spiritus, meaning breath (compare spiritus asper), but also soul, courage, vigor, ultimately from a PIE root *(s)peis- (to blow). In the Vulgate, the Latin word translates Greek (πνευμα), pneuma (Hebrew (רוח) ruah), as... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... The Sri Yantra This article is an overview of Tantra and an in-depth look at the Tantra of Hinduism. ... Taoism (Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... This article is about the general history, iconography, and uses of tarot cards. ... The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon (Latin: Pauperes commilitones Christi Templique Solomonici), popularly known as the Knights Templar or the Order of the Temple, were among the most famous of the Christian military orders. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... The All is the Hermetic version of God, to some and not to others. ... Theism is the belief in the existence of one or more divinities or deities. ... Thelema is the English transliteration of the Ancient Greek noun : will, from the verb θέλω: to will, wish, purpose. ... Theosophy, literally god-wisdom (Greek: θεοσοφία theosophia), designates several bodies of ideas. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... // Transcendental Meditation or TM is a trademarked meditation technique introduced in 1958 by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi that involves the mental use of specific sounds, called mantras. ... Valentinius, more usually called Valentinus (c. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...

Contemporary Figures: Agni Yoga, also called the Teaching of Living Ethics or (in Russian) the Rerikhovtsi, is an esoteric group founded by the Russian symbolist painter Nicholas Roerich (Nikolai Konstantinovitch Rerikh) and his wife, Helena Roerich(Elena Ivanova Rerikha). ... The Rosicrucian Order, Ancient Mystical Order Rosæ Crucis (AMORC) is a worldwide mystical, Rosicrucian, educational, humanitarian and fraternal organization that was founded by Harvey Spencer Lewis in 1915. ... Rosycross Antiquus Ordo Rosicrucianis - Ancient Order of the Rosicrucians The Antiquus Ordo Rosicrucianis (A.O.R.) (Ancient Order of the Rosicrucians) is an Initiatory Order, an Aquarian Age mystery school in the western tradition. ... Based on the ideas of Rudolf Steiners spiritual science, Anthroposophy (based on Greek words meaning man-wisdom) is a philosophy (or, as some opponents claim, a religion) that was born within the setting of Helena Blavatskys Theosophy movement. ... Argenteum Astrum, also known as Argentinum Astrum, Argentinium Astrum (Latin for silver star), Astron Argon (Greek for shining star), or simply A∴A∴(According to the Thelema Website, A..A.. stands for Arcanum Arcanorum; Latin for Secret of Secrets or Mystery of Mysteries), is a magical order created by Aleister... The Basilideans were a Gnostic sect founded by Basilides of Alexandria in the 2nd century. ... The Brethren of Purity (اخوان الصفا; also translated as Brethren of Sincerity) were an obscure and mysterious organization of neo-Platonic Arabic philosophers in Basra, Iraq (then seat of the Abbasid Caliphate) sometime during the 900s CE. They are remembered primarily because of a work they produced- the Encyclopedia of the Brethren... The Bridge to Freedom was established in 1951 by Geraldine Innocente and other Students of the Ascended Masters, after she received what was believed to be an Anointing to become a Messenger for the Great White Brotherhood. ... B.O.T.A. (Builders of the Adytum), which is registered as a non-profit tax-exempt religious organisation, is a worldwide mystery school based in Los Angeles. ... Satanism Associated organizations The Church of Satan First Satanic Church Prominent figures Anton LaVey | Blanche Barton | Peter H. Gilmore | Peggy Nadramia | Karla LaVey Associated concepts Left-Hand Path | Pentagonal Revisionism | Suitheism | Survival of the fittest | Might is Right Books and publications The Satanic Bible | The Satanic Rituals | The Satanic Witch... Scientology cross Symbol Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The Church of Scientology is the largest religious organization devoted to the practice and the promotion of Scientology belief system. ... The Church Universal and Triumphant is a New Age new religious movement and organization founded by Mark L. Prophet and Elizabeth Clare Prophet. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica (EGC), or the Gnostic Catholic Church, is the ecclesiastical arm of Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO), an international fraternal initiatory organization devoted to promulgating the Law of Thelema. ... The Essenes (sg. ... “Freemasons” redirects here. ... The Grand College of Rites is a Masonic organization dedicated to the collection and publication of various ritual texts from both Masonic ritual not currently used in the United States, and non-Masonic rituals used by other fraternities and societies of a ritualistic nature who generally keep their rituals private. ... // Esoteric Christianity In the teaching of the Master Beinsa Douno (Peter Deunov), the Universal White Brotherhood is the equivalent of the Angelic hierarchy in traditional Christianity: Seraphims - Brothers of Love; Cherubims - Brothers of Harmony; Thrones - Brothers of Will; Dominions - Brothers of intelligence and joy; Virtues - Brothers of movement and growth... Harran, also known as Carrhae, is a district of Şanlıurfa Province in the southeast of Turkey, near the border with Syria, 24 miles (44 kilometres) southeast of the city of Şanlıurfa, at the end of a long straight road across the roasting hot plain of Harran. ... The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn (or, more commonly, the Golden Dawn) was a magical order of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, practicing a form of theurgy and spiritual development. ... The I AM Activity is a religious movement of the early 20th century, founded and led by Guy Ballard and his wife Edna in the United States of America. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon (Latin: Pauperes commilitones Christi Templique Solomonici), popularly known as the Knights Templar or the Order of the Temple, were among the most famous of the Christian military orders. ... Homes in the Mandala One Village in Vedic City Vedic City, or Maharishi Vedic City, is a city located in Jefferson County, Iowa. ... Whilst there is no degree in Freemasonry higher than that of Master Mason[1], there are a number of related organisations which have as a prerequisite to joining that one be a Master Mason or have some relation to a Master Mason[2]. These bodies are commonly referred to as... Nasoraean or Nasaraean is the name of a pre-christian Jewish sect described by Epiphanius. ... Lamen of the Ordo Templi Orientis Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.) (Order of the Temple of the East, or the Order of Oriental Templars) is an international fraternal and religious organization founded at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The Rosicrucian Fellowship Emblem The Rosicrucian Fellowship - An International Association of Christian Mystics - was founded in 1909/11 by Max Heindel as herald of the Aquarian Age and with the aim of promulgating the Rosicrucian teachings of the Mystery School of the West, the invisible Rosicrucian Order (which, according to... Not to be confused with Sabaeans, who were ancient people living in what is now Yemen. ... It has been suggested that Knight Kadosh be merged into this article or section. ... Gateway to the Self-Realization Fellowship Temple in Hollywood (Los Angeles, California) The Self-Realization Fellowship is a religious organization founded by Paramahansa Yogananda in 1920 and based in Los Angeles, California. ... The Servants Of the Light School of Occult Science (SOL) is an occult mystery school, registered as a non-profit organization, founded in 1965 by W. E. Butler in England. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The Swedish Rite is a variation of Freemasonry that is worked in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. ... Forms of Satanism LaVeyan Satanism | Luciferianism | Religious Satanism | Sat/Tan Satanism | Setianism Associated Organizations First Satanic Church | Misanthropic Luciferian Order | Church of Satan | First Church of Satan | Order of Mars | Order of Nine Angles | Order of the Left Hand Path | Temple of Set Symbols and Figures Baphomet | Anton LaVey | Karla... The Temple of the Presence is a syncretic belief system and was founded in 1995 by Monroe and Carolyn Shearer following Monroes excommunication from Church Universal and Triumphant, or CUT. CUT is one of the largest new American religions to branch off Theosophy (Madame Blavatskys Theosophical Society) and... The Theosophical Society was the organization formed to advance the spiritual doctrines and altruistic living known as Theosophy. ... // History According to the lore of the Thomasine Church, Thomas the Apostle was called the Twin of the Savior because Christ referred to him as his spiritual twin and as an intimate confidant; according to the Church, the Thomasine movement began in Edessa, a city in eastern Syria. ... Thule Society emblem The Thule Society (German: Thule-Gesellschaft), originally the Studiengruppe für germanisches Altertum Study Group for Germanic Antiquity, was a German occultist and Völkisch group in Munich, named after a mythical northern country from Greek legend. ... Peter Constantinov Deunov Master Beinsa Douno Master of Esoteric Christianity Peter Konstantinov Deunov (Bulgarian Петър Константинов Дънов, pronounced ) was a spiritual master and founder of a School of Esoteric Christianity. ... Valentinius more usually called Valentinus (c. ...

Historical/Mythical Figures: Johann Adam Weishaupt (* 6 February 1748 in Ingolstadt; † 18 November 1830 in Gotha) was a German who founded the Order of the Illuminati. ... Arthur Edward Waite (October 2, 1857 _ May 19, 1942) was an occultist and co-creator of the Rider-Waite Tarot deck. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Alice A. Bailey Shown here on the cover of a Danish translation of her autobiography, her work has been translated into over 50 languages. ... Shrine of Baháulláh Baháulláh (ba-haa-ol-laa Arabic: Glory of God) (November 12, 1817 - May 29, 1892), born Mírzá usayn-`Alí (Persian: ), was the founder of the Baháí Faith. ... C.W. Leadbeater (1847 or 1854-1934), English clergyman and Theosophical author, contributed to world thought mostly through his work as a clairvoyant. ... Violet Mary Firth Evans, born Violet Mary Firth (December 6, 1890[1] - 1946) and better known as Dion Fortune, was a British occultist and author[2]. Her pseudonym was inspired by her family motto Deo, non fortuna (Latin for God, not fate)[3]. // She was born at Bryn-y-Bia... Eliphas Lévi Eliphas Lévi, born Alphonse Louis Constant, (February 8, 1810 - May 31, 1875) was a French occult author and magician. ... Elizabeth Clare Prophet Elizabeth Clare Prophet (born April 8, 1939) is an American who became the leader of the new religious movement The Summit Lighthouse, an organization encompassing the branches of Church Universal and Triumphant, Summit University, Summit University Press, and Montessori International, after her husband, Mark L. Prophet, died... Geraldine Innocente (died June 21, 1961) is the founder of a New Age church she named The Bridge to Freedom, which was established in 1951 by her and other Students of the Ascended Masters, after she received what was believed to be an Anointing to become a Messenger for the... Georges Ivanovich Gurdjieff Georges Ivanovich Gurdjieff (January 13, 1872 - October 29, 1949), the Greek-Armenian mystic and teacher of dancing born in Alexandropol, Armenia (then of the Russian Empire, now Gyumri, Armenia), traveled to many parts of the world (i. ... Guy Warren Ballard (July 28, 1878 - December 29, 1939) was an American mining engineer who became, with his wife, Edna Anne Wheeler Ballard, the founder of the I AM Activity. ... Harvey Spencer Lewis F.R.C., S.·.I.·., 33°66°95°, Ph. ... Cornelius Agrippa, as portrayed in Libri tres de occulta philosophia. ... Israel Regardie (Francis Israel Regudy) was born on November 17, 1907 in London, England to poor Jewish immigrant parents. ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was an American pulp fiction writer,[2][3][4] creator of Dianetics, and founder of the Church of Scientology. ... Samuel Liddel MacGregor Mathers, in Egyptian costume, performs a ritual of Isis in the rites of the Golden Dawn. ... Helena Blavatsky Helena Petrovna Hahn (also Hélène) (July 31, 1831 (O.S.) (August 12, 1831 (N.S.)) - May 8, 1891 London, England), better known as Helena Blavatsky or Madame Blavatsky was the founder of Theosophy. ... Maharishi Mahesh Yogi (b. ... Manly Palmer Hall (1901_1990) was a prolific American author and mystic. ... Max Heindel (1865-1919) Max Heindel - born Carl Louis von Grasshoff in Aarhus, Denmark on July 23, 1865 - was a Christian occultist, astrologer, and mystic. ... Rabbi Moses ben Shem-Tov de Leon (c. ... Guests from Overseas, 1899 (Varangians in Russia) Longships Are Built in the Land of the Slavs (1903) Nicholas Roerich, (October 9, 1874 - December 13, 1947) also known as Nikolai Konstantinovich Rerikh (Russian: Николай Константинович Рёрих), was a Russian painter and spiritual teacher. ... Gerard Encausse (July 13, 1865 - 1916), whose esoteric pseudonym was Papus, was the Spanish-born French physician, hypnotist, and popularizer of occultism, who founded the modern Martinist Order. ... Presumed portrait of Paracelsus, attributed to the school of Quentin Matsys. ... Paramahansa Yogananda (Bengali: পরমহংস যোগানন্দ Pôromôhongsho Joganondo, Hindi: परमहंस योगानन्‍द; January 5, 1893–March 7, 1952), was an Indian yogi and guru. ... P.D. Ouspensky Peter D. Ouspensky (March 4, 1878, Moscow - October 2, 1947, Lyne Place, Surrey, England), (Pyotr Demianovich Ouspenskii, also Uspenskii or Uspensky) was a Russian philosopher who invoked geometry in his discussions of psychology and higher dimensions of existence. ... Peter Constantinov Deunov Master Beinsa Douno Master of Esoteric Christianity Peter Konstantinov Deunov (Bulgarian Петър Константинов Дънов, pronounced ) was a spiritual master and founder of a School of Esoteric Christianity. ... Ramon Llull. ... René Jean Marie Joseph Guénon (November 15, 1886 – January 7, 1951) also named Sheikh Abd al-Wahid Yahya upon his acceptance of Islam, was a French-born author. ... Rudolf Steiner. ... Rudolf Freiherr von Sebottendorf was the alias of Adam Alfred Rudolf Glauer (November 9, 1875 – May 8, 1945), who also occasionally used another alias, Erwin Torre. ... Rumi (born November 29, 1982) is a Persian-Canadian Singer-songwriter and a Photographer who is currently based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Samuel Liddel MacGregor Mathers, in Egyptian costume, performs a ritual of Isis in the rites of the Golden Dawn. ... Samael Aun Weor Samael Aun Weor (March 16, 1917 - December 24, 1977) was a prolific writer, lecturer and teacher of occultism. ... René A. Schwaller de Lubicz (1887 – 1961), born in Alsace-Lorraine, was best known for his 15-year study of the art and architecture of Temple of Luxor in Egypt and his subsequent book The Temple of Man (ISBN 0892810211). ...

Original Esoteric Texts: For other uses, see Akhenaten (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Basilides redirects here. ... Cerinthus was the leader of a late first-century or early 2nd century sect, an offshoot of the Ebionites yet similar to Gnosticism in some respects, interesting in that it demonstrates the wide range of conclusions that could be drawn from the life and teachings of Jesus. ... Christian Rosenkreuz (1378 [1] - 1484 [2]) is the possibly legendary founder of the Rosicrucian Order. ... Count of St Germain by unknown artist The Count of St. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... Franz Anton Mesmer His Grave Franz Anton Mesmer (May 23, 1734 – March 5, 1815) discovered what he called animal magnetism and others often called mesmerism. ... Image:StandngBuddha. ... Hermes Trismegistus (Greek: , thrice-great Hermes; Latin: Mercurius ter Maximus) is the syncretism of the Greek god Hermes and the Egyptian god Thoth. ... For other uses, see Horus (disambiguation). ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... This article discusses the ancient goddess. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... St. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... Lao Zi (also spelled Laozi, Lao Tzu, or Lao Tse) was a famous Chinese philosopher who is believed to have lived in approximately the 4th century BC, during the Hundred Schools of Thought and Warring States Periods. ... Guru Nanak (गुरु नानक) (20 October 1469 - 7 May 1539), the founder of Sikhism and the first of the ten Gurus of the Sikhs, was born in the village of Talwandi, now called Nankana Sahib, near Lahore in present-day Pakistan. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... Plotinus Plotinus (ancient Greek: ) (ca. ... Pythagoras of Samos (Greek: ; between 580 and 572 BC–between 500 and 490 BC) was an Ionian (Greek) philosopher[1] and founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism. ... In Egyptian mythology, Set (also spelled Sutekh, Setesh, Seteh, Seth) is an ancient god, who was originally the god of the desert, one of the two main biomes that constitutes Egypt, the other being the small fertile area on either side of the Nile. ... For the film, see Simon Magus (film). ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Thales of Miletos (, ca. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      St Thomas... -Quevedo Valentinius, also called Valentinus (c. ... Zoroaster (Greek Ζωροάστρης, ZōroastrÄ“s) or Zarathustra (Avestan: ZaraθuÅ¡tra), also referred to as Zartosht (Persian: ), was an ancient Iranian prophet and religious poet. ...

Bahir or Sefer Ha-Bahir סֵפֶר הַבָּהִיר (Hebrew, Book of the Brightness) is an anonymous mystical work, attributed pseudepigraphically to a first century rabbinic sage Nehunya ben ha-Kanah (a contemporary of Yochanan ben Zakai) because it begins with the words, R. Nehunya Ben Ha-Kanah said. It is also known as... The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz (Chymische Hochzeit Christiani Rosencreutz anno 1459), ISBN 0933999356, was edited in 1616 in Strasbourg (annexed by France in 1681), and its anonymous authorship is attributed to Johann Valentin Andreae. ... The Confessio Fraternitatis (Confessio oder Bekenntnis der Societät und Bruderschaft Rosenkreuz), or simply The Confessio, printed in Kassel (Germany) in 1615, is the second of a trio of Rosicrucian pamphlets (manifestos) declaring the existence of a secret brotherhood of alchemists and sages who were thought to be preparing to... The Fama Fraternitatis Rosae Crucis (Fama fraternitatis Roseae Crucis oder Die Bruderschaft des Ordens der Rosenkreuzer), or simply the Fama Fraternitatis, is a Rosicrucian manifesto published in 1614 in Kassel (Germany). ... The Gnostic Gospels are a class of writings about the life of Jesus which are associated with the early mystical trend of Gnostic Christianity. ... Hermetica refers to a category of popular Late Antique literature purporting to contain secret wisdom, and generally attributed to Hermes Trismegistus. ... Alternative meaning: I Ching (monk) The I Ching (Traditional Chinese: 易經, pinyin y jīng; Cantonese IPA: jɪk6gɪŋ1; Cantonese Jyutping: jik6ging1; alternative romanizations include I Jing, Yi Ching, Yi King) is the oldest of the Chinese classic texts. ... Sefer Yetzirah (Hebrew, Book of Creation[1], ספר יצירה) is the title of the earliest book on Jewish esotericism. ... The Tao Te Ching (道德經, Pinyin: D Jīng, thus sometimes rendered in recent works as Dao De Jing; archaic pre-Wade-Giles rendering: Tao Teh Ching; roughly translated as The Book of the Way and its Virtue (see dedicated chapter below on translating the title)) is... Zanoni is an 1842 book by Edward Bulwer-Lytton that tells a complicated story of love and occult aspiration. ... The Zohar (Hebrew: זהר Splendor, radiance) is widely considered the most important work of Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism. ...

References

  • The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VI
  • The Secret Teachings Of All Ages by Manly P. Hall ISBN 1-58542-250-9
  • The Occult Philosophy In The Elizabethen Age by Frances Yates ISBN 0-415-25409-4
  • The Inner West: An Introduction to the Hidden Wisdom of the West by Jay Kinney ISBN 1-58542-339-4
  • Three Books of Occult Philosophy: A Complete Edition by Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa ISBN 0-87542-832-0

The Catholic Encyclopedia is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the Roman Catholic Church, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. Starting in 1993, the encyclopedia (now in the public domain) was placed on the Internet through a world-wide... Manly Palmer Hall (1901_1990) was a prolific American author and mystic. ... Dame Frances Amelia Yates (1899-1981) was a noted British historian. ... Jay Kinney (born 1950) is an American underground cartoonist. ... Cornelius Agrippa, as portrayed in Libri tres de occulta philosophia. ...

External links

  • University of Amsterdam Center for Study of Western Esotericism Research & BA/MA programs in Western esotericism.
  • University of Exeter Centre for the Study of Esotericism (EXESESO)
    • Exeter Centre for the Study of Esotericism (EXESESO): Staff
    • MA in Western Esotericism at the University of Exeter
  • ESSWE European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism, with many links to associated organizations, libraries, scholars etc.
  • An Esoteric Archive
  • Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition
  • A History of the Western Mystery Tradition by J. S. Kupperman
  • The Western Mystery Traditions by Jacquelyn Small
  • The Western Esoteric Tradition Research Site
  • American Gnostic Association Understanding the Western Mystery Tradition through its origin in Universal Esotericism

  Results from FactBites:
 
Western world at AllExperts (3001 words)
Originally defined as Western Europe, most modern uses of the term refer to the societies of Europe and their close genealogical, linguistic, and philosophical colonial descendants, typically included are those countries whose dominant culture is derived from European culture, such as North and South America, Australia and New Zealand.
Western society is sometimes claimed to trace its cultural origins to both Greek thought and Christian religion, thus following an evolution that began in ancient Greece, continued through the Roman Empire and, with the coming of Christianity (which has its origins in the Middle East), spread throughout Europe.
As the eastern and western churches spread their influence, the line between "East" and "West" can be described as moving, but generally followed a cultural divide that was defined by the existence of the Byzantine empire and the fluctuating power and influence of the church in Rome.
Servants of the Light School of Occult Science, a fully contacted Mystery School teaching throughout the world by ... (4761 words)
The Western aim is the integration of the whole person, not a casting away of the physical, but a recognition of its vitality, its powers and potential.
The values, ideals, and principles of the Western Mysteries may appear strange to some, for they are used to a world where everything must be seen to have a high monetary value in order to have worth.
The Mysteries follow the law that stipulates that those who come to the Gate of the Mysteries are judged on their abilities and their capacity for hard work, not what they may or may not have in worldly wealth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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