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Encyclopedia > Wesley Clark
Wesley K. Clark
Born December 23 1944 ( 1944-12-23) (age 62)
General Wesley Clark
General Wesley Clark
Nickname "Wes"
Place of birth Chicago, Illinois
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1966–2000
Rank General
Commands Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe,
United States European Command,
United States Southern Command
Battles/wars Vietnam War,
Kosovo War
Awards Defense Distinguished Service Medal,
Legion of Merit,
Silver Star,
Bronze Star Medal

Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. Clark was valedictorian of his class at West Point, was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to the University of Oxford where he obtained a degree in PPE, and later graduated from the Command and General Staff College with a master's degree in military science. He spent 34 years in the Army and the Department of Defense, receiving many military decorations, several honorary knighthoods, and a Presidential Medal of Freedom. December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (358th in leap years). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1500x2100, 1191 KB) Description Photo portrait of Wesley Clark, former U.S. general and presidential candidate. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... The United States Army is one of the armed forces of the United States and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Army shoulder insignia for a full General General is the most senior rank currently used in the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps. ... Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) is the central command of NATO military forces. ... The U.S. European Command (EUCOM) is Unified Combatant Command of the United States military, headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany. ... USSOUTHCOM emblem The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM, or informally: SOUTHCOM) is a Unified Combatant Command responsible for all United States military activities in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean basin (except Cuba and Puerto Rico, which are the responsibility of United States Northern Command). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... The Defense Distinguished Service Medal is a United States military award which is presented for exceptionally distinguished performance of duty contributing to national security or defense of the United States. ... The Legion of Merit is a military decoration of the United States armed forces that is awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. ... The Silver Star is the fourth highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. ... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (358th in leap years). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Army shoulder insignia for a full General General is the most senior rank currently used in the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps. ... The United States Army is one of the armed forces of the United States and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... In the United States and Canada, the title of valedictorian (an anglicized derivation from the Latin vale dicere, to say farewell) is given to the top graduate of the graduating class (the Australia/New Zealand equivalent being dux, although some Australian universities use the American term) of an educational institution. ... USMA redirects here. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) is a popular interdisciplinary degree which combines study from the three eponymous disciplines. ... The Command and General Staff College (C&GSC) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas is a United States Army facility that functions as a graduate school for U.S. military leaders. ... Military science concerns itself with the study of the diverse technical, psychological, and practical phenomena that encompass the events that make up warfare, especially armed combat. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... Awards and decorations of the United States military are military decorations which recognize a service members service and personal accomplishments while a member of the United States armed forces. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other major civilian award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, which...


Clark commanded Operation Allied Force in the Kosovo War during his term as the Supreme Allied Commander Europe of NATO from 1997 to 2000. Some of Clark's command decisions during the conflict, such as his statements at press briefings and his actions at Priština International Airport, were heavily criticized. At times, he had a difficult relationship with Secretary of Defense William Cohen and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Hugh Shelton, which led to rumors Clark was forced into retirement, though both he and the Department of Defense said his retirement was merely standard personnel movement. Combatants NATO Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, various militias and paramilitaries, as well as international volunteers [1] Commanders Wesley Clark (SACEUR), Javier Solana (Secretary General of NATO) Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević (Supreme Commander of the Army of Yugoslavia), Vojislav Å eÅ¡elj, Dragoljub Ojdanić (Chief of Staff), Svetozar Marjanović (Deputy Chief of Staff... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) is the central command of NATO military forces. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ... PriÅ¡tina International Airport (Albanian: Aeroporti Ndërkombëtar i Prishtinës) (Serbian: MeÄ‘unarodni Aerodrom PriÅ¡tina) is an international airport located 16km outside of PriÅ¡tina, the capital of Kosovo. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and The role of the Secretary of Defense is to be the principal defense policy advisor to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense... William Sebastian Cohen (1940- ) is an author and American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer of the United States military, and the principal military advisor to the President of the United States. ... Henry H. Shelton Henry Hugh Shelton (born January 2, 1942) is a retired American career military officer. ...


Clark joined the 2004 race for the Democratic Party presidential nomination as a drafted candidate on September 17, 2003, but withdrew from the primary race on February 11, 2004 in favor of campaigning for the eventual Democratic nominee, John Kerry. Clark currently leads a political action committee — "WesPAC: Securing America" — which was formed after the primaries,[1] and used it to support numerous Democratic Party candidates in the 2006 midterm elections.[2] Clark is considered a potential candidate for the Democratic nomination in 2008, although he has not yet decided whether to run. The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... John Kerry arrives at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, where he was officially designated as the Democratic Party nominee. ... Political drafts are used to encourage or compel a certain person to enter a political race, by demonstrating a significant groundswell of support for the candidate. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... In the United States, a political action committee, or PAC, is the name commonly given to a private group organized to elect or defeat government officials in order to promote legislation, often supporting the groups special interests. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 This article lists official and potential Democratic candidates for the President of the United States in the election of 2008. ...

Contents

Early life and education

Clark's paternal great-grandfather was a Belarusian Jew who immigrated to the United States in response to the Pale of Settlement and anti-Semitic violence from Russian pogroms. Clark's father, Benjamin J. Kanne, graduated from the Chicago-Kent College of Law and served in the U.S. Naval Reserve as an ensign during World War I, although he was never assigned to a combat mission. Kanne, living in Chicago, Illinois, became involved with ward politics in the 1920s as a prosecutor and served in local offices. He went on to serve as a delegate to the 1932 Democratic National Convention that nominated Franklin D. Roosevelt as the party's presidential candidate.[3] Kanne came from the Kohen family line,[4] and Clark's son has characterized his grandparents' marriage, between Jewish Benjamin and Methodist Veneta Kanne,[5] as "about as multicultural as you could've gotten in 1944."[6] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is becoming very long. ... The Pale of Settlement (Russian: Черта оседлости - cherta osedlosti) was a western border region of Imperial Russia in which permanent residence of Jews was allowed, extending from the pale or demarcation line, to near the border with eastern/central Europe. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · Holocaust · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Supremacism Kahanism Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism · Civil rights Gays/Transsexes/Intersexes rights Womens/Universal suffrage · Feminism Mens/Fathers rights... Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centers. ... The Chicago-Kent College of Law is part of the Illinois Institute of Technology. ... The United States Navy Reserve is the reserve component of the United States Navy. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... In the United States wards usually have leaders elected by the party committee members within their boundaries. ... The 1932 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago, Illinois from June 27 - July 2, 1932. ... FDR redirects here. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... It has been suggested that Aaronites be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the Methodist school of ancient Greek medicine, see Methodism (history of medicine) Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ...


Clark was born Wesley Kanne in Chicago on December 23, 1944. His father Benjamin died on December 6, 1948, following which his mother then moved the family to Little Rock, Arkansas. This move was made for a variety of reasons, including escaping the greater cost of living in a large city such as Chicago, the support Veneta's family in Arkansas could provide, and her feeling of being an outsider to the remaining Kanne family as she did not share their religion.[7] Once in Little Rock, Veneta married Viktor Clark, whom she met while working as a secretary for a local bank.[8] Viktor raised Wesley as his son, and officially adopted him on Wesley's 16th birthday. Wesley's name was changed to Wesley Kanne Clark. Viktor Clark's name actually replaced that of Wesley's biological father on his birth certificate, something Wesley would later say that he wished they had not done.[9] Veneta raised Wesley without telling him of his Jewish ancestry to protect him from the anti-Semitic activities of the Ku Klux Klan occurring in the South at the time.[10] Although his mother was Methodist, Clark chose a Baptist church after moving to Little Rock and continued attending it throughout his childhood.[11] December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (358th in leap years). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Coordinates: Country United States State Arkansas County Pulaski Founded 1821 Incorporated 1831 Government  - Mayor Mark Stodola Area  - City  116. ... Adoption is the legal act of permanently placing a child with a parent (or parents) other than the birth parents. ... Mary Elizabeth Winblad (1895-1987) birth certificate In most countries, a birth certificate is an official legal document usually containing most of the following information: Name at birth Date and time of birth Sex Place of birth Birth registration number (NHS number in UK) Legal parent(s) (including in UK... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Baptist is a term describing a tradition within Christianity and may also refer to individuals belonging to a Baptist church or a Baptist denomination. ...


He graduated from Hall High School with a National Merit Scholarship, and helped take their swim team to the state championship, filling in for a sick teammate by swimming two legs of a relay.[6][12][13] Clark has often repeated the anecdote that he decided he wanted to go to West Point after meeting a cadet with glasses who told Clark (who wore glasses as well) that one did not need perfect vision to attend West Point as Clark had thought.[6][14] Clark applied, and received his acceptance letter on April 24, 1962. Hall High School, located in Little Rock, Arkansas, is a comprehensive four-year public high school in the Little Rock School District (LRSD) enrolling 1,464 students in grades nine through twelve. ... The National Merit Scholarship Program is an academic scholarship competition for recognition and college scholarships administered by National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC), a privately funded, not-for-profit organization. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... During a relay race, members of a team take turns swimming or running (usually with a baton) parts of a circuit or performing a certain action. ... An anecdote is a short tale narrating an interesting or amusing biographical incident. ... USMA redirects here. ... Officer Cadet is a rank held by military cadets during their training to become commissioned officers. ... Traditional Snellen chart used for visual acuity testing. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (115th in leap years). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ...


Military career

Clark's acceptance letter from West Point

Clark's military career began July 2, 1962 when he entered the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York. Clark later said an important influence on his view of the military came from Douglas MacArthur's famous "Duty, honor, country" speech given to the class of 1962, only months before Clark entered West Point. A recording of the speech was played for Clark's class when they first arrived.[6][15] Download high resolution version (520x652, 49 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (520x652, 49 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... USMA redirects here. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... USMA redirects here. ... West Point painting West Point is a federal military base (and a census-designated place) located in the Town of Highlands in Orange County, New York. ... NY redirects here. ... Douglas MacArthur (January 26, 1880 - April 5, 1964), was an American general who played a prominent role in the Pacific theater of World War II. He was poised to command the invasion of Japan in November 1945 but was instead instructed to accept their surrender on September 2, 1945. ...


Clark sat in the "first chair" in many of his classes, a position held by the highest performer in class. Clark participated heavily in debate, was consistently within the top 5% of his class as a whole (earning him a "Distinguished Cadet" patch on his uniform), and ultimately graduated as valedictorian of West Point. The valedictorian is first to choose which career field of the Army to serve in, and Clark selected armor. He met Gertrude Kingston, his future wife, at a USO dance for midshipmen and West Point cadets.[6][15] Debate (North American English) or debating (British English) is a formal method of interactive and position representational argument. ... In the United States and Canada, the title of valedictorian (an anglicized derivation from the Latin vale dicere, to say farewell) is given to the top graduate of the graduating class (the Australia/New Zealand equivalent being dux, although some Australian universities use the American term) of an educational institution. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Armoured warfare. ... The United Service Organizations The United Service Organizations (USO) is a volunteer organization that provides morale and recreational services to members of the U.S. military worldwide. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ...


Clark eventually applied for a Rhodes Scholarship and learned in December of his senior year at West Point that he had been accepted. He spent his summer at the United States Army Airborne School at Fort Benning, Georgia. Clark worked in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) program during his Rhodes Scholarship, completing his degree at Magdalen College at the University of Oxford in August 1968. While he was at Oxford, a Jewish cousin of Clark's who lived in England telephoned Clark and informed him of his Jewish heritage (after asking his mother if she would allow it). Clark spent three months after graduation at Fort Knox, Kentucky, going through Armor Officer Basic Course, then went on to Ranger School at Fort Benning. He was promoted to captain and was assigned as commander of the A Company of the 4th Battalion, 68th Armor, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Riley, Kansas.[16] This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Airborne Trooper The Airborne School is run by the 1st Battalion (Airborne), 507th Infantry, U.S. Army Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia. ... Fort Benning is a United States Army base, located southwest of Columbus in Muscogee and Chattahoochee counties in Georgia and Russell County, Alabama It is part of the Columbus, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) is a popular interdisciplinary degree which combines study from the three eponymous disciplines. ... College name Magdalen College Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister College Magdalene College President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Jessica Jones Undergraduates 395 MCR President Kader Allouni Graduates 230 Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced ) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... The U.S. Bullion Depository at Ft. ... The United States Army Ranger School is an intense nine-week long combat leadership course, conducted in three three-week phases - at Fort Benning, Georgia, U.S.A., (the woodland terrain, Benning Phase), at Camp Rogers and Camp Darby, Georgia, (the Mountain Phase) at Camp Merrill near Dahlonega Georgia, and... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... A company is a military unit, typically consisting of 100-200 soldiers. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was constituted in the National Army as the 82nd Division on March 5, 1917, and was organized on March 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ... Fort Riley is a census-designated place and United States Army post, in Northeast Kansas, on the Kansas River. ... Official language(s) none Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ...


Vietnam

Clark's Silver Star citation

Clark was assigned a position in the 1st Infantry Division and flew to Vietnam on May 21, 1969 during the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. He worked as a staff officer, collecting data and helping in operations planning, and was awarded the Bronze Star for his work with the staff. Clark was then given command of A Company, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry of the 1st Infantry Division in January 1970. In February, only one month into his command, he was shot four times by a Viet Cong soldier with an AK-47. The wounded Clark shouted orders to his men, who counterattacked and defeated the Viet Cong force. Clark had injuries to his right shoulder, right hand, right hip, and right leg, and was sent to Valley Forge Army Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania to recuperate. He was awarded the Silver Star for his actions during the encounter.[17] Download high resolution version (520x650, 48 KB)Wesley Clarks Silver Star citation. ... Download high resolution version (520x650, 48 KB)Wesley Clarks Silver Star citation. ... The Silver Star is the fourth highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. ... The 1st Infantry Division of the United States Army —nicknamed “The Big Red One” after its shoulder patch; and also nicknamed The Fighting First—is the oldest division in the United States Army, and has seen continuous service since its organization in 1917. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ... A Viet Cong soldier, heavily guarded, awaits interrogation following capture in the attacks on Saigon during the festive Tet holiday period of 1968. ... Avtomat Kalashnikova model 1947 g. ... A counterattack is a military tactic used by defending forces when under attack by an enemy force. ... Valley Forge General Hospital is a former military hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. ... Phoenixville is a borough in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 28 miles (45 km) northwest of Philadelphia at the junction of French Creek with the Schuylkill River. ... The Silver Star is the fourth highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. ...


Clark had converted to Catholicism, his wife Gertrude's religion, while in Vietnam. He saw his son, Wesley Clark, Jr., for the first time while at the Valley Forge Hospital.[18] Clark commanded C Company, 6th Battalion, 32nd Armor, 194th Armored Brigade, a company composed entirely of wounded soldiers, at Fort Knox. Clark has said this command is what made him decide to continue his military career past the four-year commitment required by West Point, which would have concluded in 1971. Clark completed his Armor Officer Advanced Course while at Fort Knox, taking additional elective courses and writing an article that won the Armor Association Writing Award. His next posting was to the office of the Army Chief of Staff in Washington, D.C., where he worked in the "Modern Volunteer Army" program from May to July 1971. He then served as a social studies instructor at West Point for three years from July 1971 to 1974.[19][20] The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... In 1957, the 194th Armored Brigade was formed by the US Armys Combat Developments Command to test new materiel at Fort Ord, California. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for insuring readiness of the Army. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (=Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... Social studies is a term used to describe the broad study of the various fields which involve past and current human behavior and interactions. ...


Clark graduated from the Command and General Staff College (CGSC), earning his military Master of Arts degree in military science from the CGSC with a thesis on American policies of gradualism in the Vietnam War. Clark's theory was one of applying force swiftly, which was being advocated by many soldiers at the time, a concept that would eventually become established as U.S. national security policy in the form of the Weinberger Doctrine and its successor, the Powell Doctrine. Clark was promoted to major upon his graduation from the CGSC.[21] The Command and General Staff College (C&GSC) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas is a United States Army facility that functions as a graduate school for U.S. military leaders. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... Military science concerns itself with the study of the diverse technical, psychological, and practical phenomena that encompass the events that make up warfare, especially armed combat. ... A thesis (from Greek position) is an intellectual proposition. ... Gradualism, in biology, holds that evolution occurs through the accumulation of slight modifications over a period of generations. ... The Weinberger Doctrine was a list of points governing when the United States could commit troops in military engagements. ... General Colin Powell made famous the so-called Powell Doctrine as part of the run up to the 1990-1991 Gulf War. ... Insignia of a Major in the United States Military Major is a rank used in the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps, and is the equivalent of a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard. ...


Post-Vietnam

In 1975, Clark was appointed a White House Fellow in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) as a special assistant to its director, James Thomas Lynn. He was one of only 14 appointed out of 2,307 applicants.[22] Lynn also gave Clark a six-week assignment to assist John Marsh, then a counselor to the President. Clark was approached during his fellowship to help push for a memorial to the Vietnam War. He worked with the movement that ultimately helped lead to the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Clark took two commands with the 1st Armored Division based in Germany from August 1976 to February 1978, first over the 3rd Battalion 35th Armor and then the entire 3rd Brigade.[19] Clark's brigade commander while in the former position said Clark was "singularly outstanding, notably superb." Regarding his term as brigade commander, one of his battalion commanders called Clark the "most brilliant and gifted officer [he'd] ever known."[23] He was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for his work with the division. The White House Fellows program was established by American President Lyndon B. Johnson in October 1964. ... The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ... James Thomas Lynn (born 1927) was a U.S. administrator. ... John Otho Marsh, speaking at a military funeral, 1985. ... The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a national war memorial located in Washington, D.C., that honors members of the U.S. armed forces who had died in service or is unaccounted for during the Vietnam War. ... The 1st Armored Division —nicknamed “Old Ironsides”— is an armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Wiesbaden, Germany. ... The Meritorious Service Medal is a military award presented to members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguished themselves by outstanding non-combat meritorious achievement or service to the United States subsequent to January 16, 1969. ...


The brigade commander had also said that "word of Major Clark's exceptional talent spread", and in one case reached the desk of then Supreme Allied Commander Alexander Haig. Haig personally selected Clark to serve as a special assistant on his staff, a post he held from February 1978 to June 1979. While on staff at SHAPE, Clark wrote policy reports and coordinated two multinational military exercises. As a result of his work on Haig's staff, Clark was promoted to lieutenant colonel and was awarded the Legion of Merit. After his European post, he moved on to Fort Carson, Colorado where he served first as the executive officer of the 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division from August 1979 to February 1980, then as the commander of the 1st Battalion, 77th Armor, 4th Infantry Division from February 1980 to July 1982. According to the American journalist David Halberstam, the commander at Fort Carson had a reputation of disliking West Point graduates and fast-rising officers such as Clark.[24][25] After two years of not making the list to rise from battalion commander to brigade commander, Clark decided to attend the National War College. After studying there from June 1982 to 1983, Clark graduated and was promoted to full colonel in October 1983.[19][26] Supreme Allied Commander is the title given to the most senior commander of some multinational organisations. ... For other persons named Alexander Haig, see Alexander Haig (disambiguation). ... Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) is the central command of NATO military forces. ... Lieutenant Colonel of the United States Army and Air Force Lieutenant Colonel of the United States Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces which is currently used by the United States Army, United States Air Force and United States Marine Corps. ... The Legion of Merit is a military decoration of the United States armed forces that is awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. ... Fort Carson is a census-designated place and United States Army Base located in El Paso County, Colorado. ... While Executive officer literally refers to a person responsible for the performance of duties involved in running an organization, the exact meaning of the role is highly variable, depending on the organization. ... The 4th Infantry Division (Mechanized) is a combat division of the United States Army based at Fort Hood, Texas, with one maneuver brigade stationed at Fort Carson, Colorado. ... David Halberstam (born April 10, 1934), American journalist and author, was born in New York City, his father a surgeon and his mother a teacher. ... The National War College (NWC) of the United States is a school in the National Defense University. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ...

Portrait of Brigadier General Clark as a commander at Fort Irwin
Portrait of Brigadier General Clark as a commander at Fort Irwin

Following his graduation, Clark worked in Washington, D.C. from July 1983 to 1984 in the offices of the Chief and Deputy Chiefs of Staff of the United States Army, and earned a second Legion of Merit for his work. He then served as the Operations Group commander at the Fort Irwin Military Reservation from August 1984 to June 1986. He was awarded yet another Legion of Merit and a Meritorious Service Medal for his work at Fort Irwin, and was then given a brigade command at Fort Carson in 1986. He commanded the 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry there from April 1986 to March 1988. Veneta Clark, Wesley's mother, fell ill as he began this command and died on Mother's Day in 1986. After Fort Carson, Clark returned to the Command and General Staff College to direct and further develop the Battle Command Training Program (BCTP) there until October 1989. The BCTP was created to teach senior officers war-fighting skills, according to the commanding general at the time.[27] Then on November 1, 1989 Clark became a general with his promotion to brigadier general.[19][28] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (795x985, 99 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wesley Clark ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (795x985, 99 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wesley Clark ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for insuring readiness of the Army. ... The entrance to the NTC. Fort Irwin & the National Training Center or NTC is a major training area for the United States Army. ... A celebratory cookie. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ...


Clark returned to Fort Irwin and commanded the National Training Center (NTC) from October 1989 to 1991. The Gulf War occurred during Clark's command, and many National Guard brigades trained under his command were sent into the war. Multiple generals commanding American forces in Iraq and Kuwait said Clark's training helped bring about results in the field and that he had successfully begun training a new generation of the military that had moved past Vietnam-era strategy. He was awarded yet another Legion of Merit for his "personal efforts" that were "instrumental in maintaining" the NTC, according to the citation. He served in yet another planning post after this, as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Concepts, Doctrine, and Developments at Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) at Fort Monroe, Virginia. While there, he helped the commanding general of TRADOC prepare the army for war and develop new post-Cold War strategies. One of Clark's major pushes was for technological advancement in the army to establish a digital network for military command that Clark called the "digitization of the battlefield."[29] Clark was promoted to Major General in October 1992 at the end of this command.[19][30] The entrance to the NTC. Fort Irwin & the National Training Center or NTC is a major training area for the United States Army. ... Combatants UN Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf, Michel Roquejeoffre , Peter de la Billière, Khalid bin Sultan, Saleh Al-Muhaya, Mohamed Hussein Tantawi Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 378 dead, 1,000 wounded see section below The Gulf War or the Persian Gulf War (2... The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... TRADOC shoulder sleeve patch. ... Satellite Photo of Fort Monroe Fort Monroe, Virginia (also known as Fortress Monroe) is a military installation located at Old Point Comfort on the tip of the Virginia Peninsula at the mouth of Hampton Roads on the Chesapeake Bay in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ...


Fort Hood and the Waco Siege

See also: Waco Siege

Clark's final divisional command came with the 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas. Clark was in command during three separate deployments of forces from Fort Hood for peacekeeping in Kuwait. The Mount Carmel compound in flames during the final assault On February 28, 1993, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) raided the Branch Davidian ranch at Mount Carmel, a property located nine miles east-northeast of Waco, Texas. ... The 1st Cavalry Division (1st Cav Div) is a heavy armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Fort Hood, Texas. ... Fort Hood is a census-designated place and US Army post located outside of Killeen Texas. ... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...

Once promoted to a full 4-star general, Clark assumed command of USSOUTHCOM in June 1996.
Once promoted to a full 4-star general, Clark assumed command of USSOUTHCOM in June 1996.

Some critics, such as CounterPunch and FrontPageMag.com, have made allegations that Clark was, to some degree, involved in the Waco Siege, where 74 Branch Davidian followers were killed during the final raid, including their leader David Koresh. Groups making allegations of Clark's involvement note that Clark's second-in-command at the time, future General Peter Schoomaker, met with Texas governor Anne Richards and then-Attorney General Janet Reno, who were also allegedly involved with the siege. They also note that some military technology and personnel from Fort Hood, including two M1 Abrams tanks, were lent[31] to the FBI for the operation. Some also suggest that, given the sensitive nature of the materials lent for the operation, Clark had some knowledge of and perhaps a hand in planning the Waco Siege.[32] Others, such as James Ridgeway, dismiss the allegations as conspiracy theories with little evidence to substantiate them.[33] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1870x2850, 2742 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wesley Clark ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1870x2850, 2742 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wesley Clark ... CounterPunch is a biweekly newsletter published in the United States that covers politics from a left-wing perspective. ... FrontPage Magazine is a conservative internet publication edited by David Horowitz Link [1] Categories: Computer stubs | Magazines stubs ... The Mount Carmel compound in flames during the final assault On February 28, 1993, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) raided the Branch Davidian ranch at Mount Carmel, a property located nine miles east-northeast of Waco, Texas. ... The Branch Davidians are a religious sect who originated from a schism in 1955 from the Davidian Seventh Day Adventists, themselves former members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church who were excommunicated during the 1930s. ... David Koresh (born Vernon Wayne Howell) (August 17, 1959 – April 19, 1993) was the leader of the Branch Davidians religious sect, believing himself to be the final prophet, until a 1993 raid by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and subsequent siege by the Federal Bureau... General Peter Schoomaker (b. ... Ann Willis Richards (born September 1, 1933), born Dorothy Ann Willis, is an American politician from Texas. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Janet Reno (born July 21, 1938) was the first female Attorney General of the United States (1993–2001). ... The M1 Abrams main battle tank is the principal combat tank of the United States Army and the United States Marine Corps, with three main versions being deployed starting in 1980: the M1, M1A1, and M1A2. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... James Ridgeway is a prominent American investigative journalist. ... A conspiracy theory attempts to attribute the ultimate cause of an event or chain of events (usually political, social, or historical events), or the concealment of such causes from public knowledge, to a secret, and often deceptive plot by a covert alliance of powerful or influential people or organizations. ...


His final Officer Performance Report for his command at Fort Hood called him "one of the Army's best and brightest"; Clark was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for his work at Fort Hood and was promoted to lieutenant general at the end of his command in April 1994. Clark's next assignment was an appointment as the Director, Strategic Plans and Policy (J5), on the staff of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS), from April 1994 to June 1996.[19][34] The Distinguished Service Medal is a high level military and civilian decoration of the United States of America which is issued for meritorious service to the government of the United States in either a senior government service position or as a senior officer of the United States armed forces. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a grouping comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ...


United States Southern Command

Army regulations set a so-called "ticking clock" upon the promotion to a three-star general, essentially requiring that Clark be promoted to another post within 2 years from his initial promotion or retire. This deadline ended in 1996 and Clark said he was not optimistic about receiving such a promotion because rumors at the time suggested General Dennis Reimer did not want to promote him although "no specific reason was given".[35] General Robert Scales admitted that it was likely Clark's reputation of intelligence within the military was responsible for feelings of resentment against him from other generals. Clark was named to the United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) post despite these rumors. Congress approved his promotion to full general in June 1996, and General John M. Shalikashvili signed the order. Clark said he was not the original nominee, but the first officer chosen "hadn't been accepted for some reason."[35][36] Dennis J. Remier Dennis J. Reamer was Chief of Staff of the United States Army from June 20, 1995 to June 21, 1999. ... USSOUTHCOM emblem The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM, or informally: SOUTHCOM) is a Unified Combatant Command responsible for all United States military activities in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean basin (except Cuba and Puerto Rico, which are the responsibility of United States Northern Command). ... Army shoulder insignia for a full General General is the most senior rank currently used in the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps. ... John Malchase David Shalikashvili (born June 27, 1936) is a retired American general who served as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1993 to 1997. ...


The Balkans

Bosnia and Herzegovina

See also: War in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Dayton Agreement

Clark began planning work for responses to the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina upon his appointment in 1994 as the Director, Strategic Plans and Policy (J5) on the JCS staff. While collecting information to outline military options for resolving the conflict, Clark met with Bosnian military leaders including Ratko Mladić, who was later accused of war crimes and genocide. Clark was photographed exchanging hats with Mladić, and the photo drew controversy in the United States. A Washington Post story was published claiming Clark had made the visit despite a warning from the U.S. ambassador.[37] Some Clinton administration members privately said the incident was "like cavorting with Hermann Göring."[38] Clark had actually listed the visit in the itinerary he submitted to the ambassador, but says he only learned afterwards that the visit had never been approved. He also said there had been no warning and no one had told him to cancel the visit, although two Congressmen called for Clark's dismissal regardless. Clark later said he regretted the exchange,[39] and the issue was ultimately resolved as President Clinton sent a letter defending Clark to the Congress and the controversy subsided.[40] Clark said it was his "first experience in the rough and tumble of high visibility... and a painful few days."[41] Conservative pundit Robert Novak later referred to the hat exchange in a column during Clark's 2004 presidential campaign, citing it as a "problem" with Clark as a candidate.[42] Combatants  Bosnia and Herzegovina Volunteers from Islamic countries HVO  Croatia Volunteers from Western Europe Republika Srpska  Yugoslavia Various paramilitary units from Serbia and Montenegro Volunteers from Eastern Europe Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim Delić (Army chief of Staff... General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, i. ... Combatants  Bosnia and Herzegovina Volunteers from Islamic countries HVO  Croatia Volunteers from Western Europe Republika Srpska  Yugoslavia Various paramilitary units from Serbia and Montenegro Volunteers from Eastern Europe Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim Delić (Army chief of Staff... Bosnian Serb Army, officially Army of the Republika Srpska (Serbian Војска Републике Српске/Vojska Republike Srpske, ВРС/VRS) is the military of the Bosnian Serb political entity of Republika Srpska. ... General Ratko Mladić during UN-mediated talks at Sarajevo airport in 1993. ... In the context of war, a war crime is a punishable offense under International Law, for violations of the laws of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Genocide is the mass killing of a group of people as defined by Article 2 of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (CPPCG) as any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... This is a list of ambassadors from the United States. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Hermann Wilhelm Göring ( ) (also Goering in English) (January 12, 1893 – October 15, 1946) was a German politician and military leader, a leading member of the Nazi Party, second in command of the Third Reich, and commander of the Luftwaffe. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives United States Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military, opposition to internationalism,[4] and promotion of states rights. ... Robert David Sanders Novak (born February 26, 1931) is a conservative American political commentator and political figure. ...


Clark was sent to Bosnia by Secretary of Defense William Perry to serve as the military advisor to a diplomatic negotiating team headed by assistant Secretary of State Richard Holbrooke. Holbrooke later described Clark's position as "complicated" because while it presented him with future possibilities it "might put him into career-endangering conflicts with more senior officers."[43] While the team was driving along a mountain road during the first week, the road gave way, and one of the vehicles fell over a cliff carrying passengers including Holbrooke's deputy, a deputy assistant Secretary of Defense, and an Air Force colonel. Clark and Holbrooke attempted to crawl down the mountain, but were driven back by sniper fire. Once the fire ceased, Clark rappelled down the mountain to collect the bodies of two dead Americans left by Bosnian forces that had taken the wounded to a nearby hospital. After returning to Washington D.C. for funeral services, the negotiations continued and the team eventually reached the Dayton Agreement at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio and later signed it in Paris on December 14, 1995.[44] The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and The role of the Secretary of Defense is to be the principal defense policy advisor to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense... Secretary of Defense William Perry talks to reporters at Kigali Airport, Rwanda after his arrival to check on status of the relief operation, 1994. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Richard Charles Albert Holbrooke (born April 24, 1941) is an American diplomat, magazine editor, author, Peace Corps official, and investment banker. ... The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... Australian rappel demonstrated at a dam in Norway In British English, abseiling (from the German abseilen, to rope down) is the process of descending on a fixed rope. ... General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, i. ... Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a U.S. Air Force base in Greene and Montgomery counties, adjacent to Riverside, Fairborn, Beavercreek, and Dayton, Ohio. ... Nickname: Coordinates: Country United States State Ohio County Montgomery Founded April 1, 1796 Incorporated 1805 Government  - Mayor Rhine L. McLin Area  - City  56. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Clark's official portrait as SACEUR, courtesy of NATO

Clark returned to the European theater and the Balkans following his USSOUTHCOM position when he was appointed to U.S. European Command in the summer of 1997 by President Clinton. He was, as with SOUTHCOM, not the original nominee for the position. The Army had already selected another general for the post. Because President Clinton and General Shalikashvili believed Clark was the best man for the post, Clark eventually got the nomination. Shalikashvili noted he "had a very strong role in [Clark's] last two jobs."[45] Clark noted during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services committee of the 105th Congress that he believed NATO had shifted since the end of the Cold War from protecting Europe from the Soviet Union to working towards more general stability in the region. Clark also addressed issues related to his then-current command of USSOUTHCOM, such as support for the School of the Americas and his belief that the United States must continue aid to some South American nations to effectively fight the War on Drugs.[39] Clark was quickly confirmed by a voice vote the same day as his confirmation hearing,[46] giving him the command of 109,000 American troops, their 150,000 family members, 50,000 civilians aiding the military, and all American military activities in 89 countries and territories of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East.[47] The position made Clark the Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR), which granted him overall command of NATO military forces in Europe. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1808x2160, 417 KB) The image was proposed for deletion as a replaceable fair use image. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1808x2160, 417 KB) The image was proposed for deletion as a replaceable fair use image. ... USSOUTHCOM emblem The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM, or informally: SOUTHCOM) is a Unified Combatant Command responsible for all United States military activities in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean basin (except Cuba and Puerto Rico, which are the responsibility of United States Northern Command). ... The U.S. European Command (EUCOM) is Unified Combatant Command of the United States military, headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany. ... US Capitol Building. ... The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... Members of the 105th United States Congress: // States Alabama Senators Richard C. Shelby (R) Jefferson B. Sessions III (R) Representatives 1. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Former logo of the School of Americas, now the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation at Fort Benning, Georgia The Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHISC or WHINSEC), formerly School of the Americas (SOA; Spanish: Escuela de las Américas), is a United States Army facility at Fort Benning... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Massive mark-ups for drugs, UK Govt report Prevalance of drug use 1991-2006 The War on Drugs is an initiative undertaken by the United States with the assistance of participating countries, which is intended to combat the illegal drug trade —to curb supply and diminish demand for certain psychoactive... A voice vote in a legislative body refers to a vote taken on a topic where the participants respond to a question with yea (yes), nay (no), or present (abstain). ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) is the central command of NATO military forces. ...


Kosovo War

See also: Kosovo War

The largest event of Clark's tenure as SACEUR was NATO's confrontation with the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in the Kosovo War. The United Nations Security Council introduced Resolution 1199 calling for an end to hostilities in Kosovo, and Richard Holbrooke again tried to negotiate a peace. This process came to an unsuccessful end, however, following the Račak incident. Then U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright tried to force Yugoslavia into allowing separation of Kosovo with the Rambouillet Agreement, which Yugoslavia refused. Clark was at the Rambouillet talks and tried to convince Yugoslavian president Slobodan Milošević by telling him "there's an activation order. And if they tell me to bomb you, I'm going to bomb you good." Clark later said Milošević launched into an emotional tirade against Albanians and said that they'd been "handled" in the 1940s by killing large numbers of them.[48][49] The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbian Government Republic President  - 1992 - 1993 Dobrica Ćosić  - 1993 - 1997 Zoran Lilić  - 1997 – 2000 Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević  - 2000 - 2003 Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Prime Minister  - 1992 - 1993 Milan Panić  - 1993 - 1998 Radoje Kontić  - 1998 - 2000 Momir Bulatović  - 2000 - 2001 Zoran Žižić  - 2001 - 2003 DragiÅ¡a Pe... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... “UNSC” redirects here. ... For uses of the name Kosova, see Kosova (disambiguation). ... The Račak incident (also called the Račak massacre or Račak operation) was a clash in the village of Račak, Kosovo, (known as Reçak in Albanian) on January 15, 1999 between Yugoslav security forces and Kosovo Liberation Army guerillas, in which 45 Albanian civilians died. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born Marie Jana Korbelová, IPA: , on May 15, 1937) was the first woman to become United States Secretary of State. ... The Rambouillet Agreement is the name of a proposed peace agreement between Yugoslavia and the Kosovo Albanian delegation. ... Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević (Požarevac, Nedićs Serbia, 20 August 1941 – The Hague, 11 March 2006) was President of Serbia and of Yugoslavia. ... Armenian civilians, being cleansed from their homeland during the Armenian Genocide. ...

Clark briefing two fighter squadrons deployed to Aviano Air Base in Italy on May 9, 1999
Clark briefing two fighter squadrons deployed to Aviano Air Base in Italy on May 9, 1999

Clark started the bombings codenamed Operation Allied Force on March 24, 1999 on orders to try and enforce UN Resolution 1199 following Yugoslavia's refusal of the Rambouillet Agreement. Secretary of Defense William Cohen felt that Clark had powerful allies at the White House such as President Clinton and Secretary of State Madeleine Albright that were allowing him to circumvent The Pentagon in promoting his strategic ideas, while Clark felt he was not being included enough in discussions with the National Command Authority, leading Clark to describe himself as "just a NATO officer who also reported to the United States".[50] This command conflict came to a ceremonial head when Clark was not initially invited to a summit in Washington, D.C. to commemorate NATO's 50th anniversary, despite being its supreme military commander. Clark eventually secured an invitation to the summit, but was told by Cohen to say nothing about ground troops, and Clark agreed.[51] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2250x1492, 893 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wesley Clark ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2250x1492, 893 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wesley Clark ... US F-16s at Aviano Aviano Air Base is a base of the United States Air Force, in the northeastern part of Italy, at the foot of the Italian Alps, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) north of Pordenone. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (130th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Combatants NATO Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, various militias and paramilitaries, as well as international volunteers [1] Commanders Wesley Clark (SACEUR), Javier Solana (Secretary General of NATO) Slobodan Milošević (Supreme Commander of the Army of Yugoslavia), Vojislav Šešelj, Dragoljub Ojdanić (Chief of Staff), Svetozar Marjanović (Deputy Chief of Staff... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... William Sebastian Cohen (1940- ) is an author and American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. military building. ... The term National Command Authority (or NCA) is used in United States military and government circles to refer to the ultimate lawful source of military orders. ...

The flag lowered at the United States Consulate General in Hong Kong in respect for the victims of the embassy bombing
The flag lowered at the United States Consulate General in Hong Kong in respect for the victims of the embassy bombing[52]

Clark returned to SHAPE following the summit and briefed the press on the continued bombing operations. A reporter from the Los Angeles Times asked a question about the effect of bombings on Serbian forces, and Clark noted that merely counting the number of opposing troops did not show Milošević's true losses because he was bringing in reinforcements. Many American news organizations capitalized on the remark in a way Clark said "distorted the comment" with headlines such as "NATO Chief Admits Bombs Fail to Stem Serb Operations" in The New York Times. Clark later defended his remarks, saying this was a "complete misunderstanding of my statement and of the facts," and President Clinton agreed Clark's remarks had been misconstrued. Regardless, Clark received a call the following evening from General Hugh Shelton who said he had been told by Secretary Cohen to deliver a piece of guidance verbatim. "Get your fucking face off the TV. No more briefings, period. That's it."[53][54] Image File history File links Flagloweredinrespect. ... Image File history File links Flagloweredinrespect. ... Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) is the central command of NATO military forces. ... The Los Angeles Times (also known as the LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Henry H. Shelton Henry Hugh Shelton (born January 2, 1942) is a retired American career military officer. ...


Operation Allied Force reached another problem when NATO accidentally bombed the Chinese embassy in Belgrade on May 7, 1999. The operation had been organized against numerous Serbian targets, including "Target 493, the Federal Procurement and Supply Directorate Headquarters", although the intended target building was actually 300 meters away from the targeted area. The embassy was located at this mistaken target, and three Chinese journalists were killed. Clark's intelligence officer called Clark taking full responsibility and offering to resign, but Clark declined, saying it was not the officer's fault. Secretary Cohen and CIA Director George Tenet took responsibility the next day. Tenet would later explain in testimony before the United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on July 22, 1999 that the targeting system used street addresses which gave inaccurate positions for air bombings and that the various databases of off-limit targets did not have the up-to-date address for the relatively new embassy location.[55][56] On May 12, the flag at the United States Consulate General in Hong Kong was lowered in respect and sorrow for the Chinese people for a day as the plane carrying the bodies of victims of the embassy bombing came home to Beijing. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The metre (or meter, see spelling differences) is a measure of length. ... Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (D/CIA) serves as the head of the Central Intelligence Agency, which is part of the United States Intelligence Community. ... George Tenet George John Tenet (born January 5, 1953) is Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at Georgetown University and was previously the Director of Central Intelligence for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. ... The U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence is a committee of the United States House of Representatives, currently chaired by Peter Hoekstra. ... July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


The bombing campaign was ended on June 10, 1999 on the order of Secretary General of NATO Javier Solana after Milošević complied with conditions the international community had set and Yugoslav forces began to withdraw from Kosovo.[57] United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 was adopted that same day, placing Kosovo under United Nations administration and authorizing a Kosovo peacekeeping force.[58] NATO claimed to have suffered zero deaths in combat[59] and two deaths overall, coming from an Apache helicopter crash which NATO attributed to engine failure.[60] The bombing was noted for its high degree of accuracy, with estimated 495 civilian deaths and 820 wounded reported to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia as a result of the entire campaign.[59][61] Yugoslavia estimated that number of civilians killed is higher than 2,000 and that more than 5,000 have been wounded[62]. Human Rights Watch estimates the number of civilian deaths due to NATO bombings as somewhere between 488 and 527.[63] June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Secretary General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer meeting George Bush on March 20, 2006 The Secretary General of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) is the chair of the North Atlantic Council, the supreme decision-making organisation of the defence alliance. ... Javier Solana Francisco Javier Solana Madariaga (born July 14, 1942 in Madrid, Spain) is the High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and the Secretary-General of both the Council of the European Union (EU) and the Western European Union (WEU). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with UN General Assembly Resolution 1244. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Pocket badge of the KFOR The Kosovo Force (KFOR) is a NATO-led international force responsible for establishing and maintaining security in Kosovo. ... The AH-64 Apache is the United States Armys principal attack helicopter, and is the successor to the AH-1 Cobra. ... The Tribunal building in The Hague. ... Human Rights Watch Banner Human Rights Watch is a United States-based international non-government organization that conducts research and advocacy on human rights. ...


Milošević's term in office in Yugoslavia was coming to an end, and he began enacting a series of policies seen merely as attempts to preserve his power. The elections came on September 24, 2000, but protests grew from allegations of fraud and rigged elections that came to a head on October 5 in the so-called Bulldozer Revolution. Milošević resigned on October 7. The Democratic Opposition of Serbia won a majority in parliamentary elections that December. Milošević was taken into custody on April 1, 2001, and transferred to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia on June 28 to face charges of war crimes and genocide. Clark was called to testify in a closed session of Milošević's trial in December 2003. He testified on issues ranging from the Srebrenica massacre to conversations Clark had had with Milošević over his career.[64] Some groups also label Clark and Bill Clinton (along with several others) as war criminals for NATO's entire bombing campaign, saying the entire operation was in violation of the NATO charter.[65][66][67][68] September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (279th in leap years). ... The front page of the first issue of the Politika daily newspaper after the 5th October overthrow, released around midnight October 6, 2000. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Democratic Opposition of Serbia was an alliance of political parties in Serbia, formed as an alliance against the ruling Socialist Party of Serbia and its leader, Slobodan Milosevic. ... The first free democratic elections after the fall of Milosevic were held in the Republic of Serbia (a constituent state of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) on 23 December 2000. ... It has been suggested that April Fools Day be merged into this article or section. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... Burial of 505 identified Bosniak civilians (July 11, 2006) Burial of 610 identified Bosniak civilians (July 11, 2005 The Srebrenica Massacre, also known as Srebrenica Genocide,[1] was the July 1995 killing of an estimated 8,000 Bosniak males, in the region of Srebrenica in Bosnia and Herzegovina by units... The NATO bombing of Yugoslavia took place during the Kosovo War. ...


Priština International Airport

One of Clark's most argued decisions during his SACEUR command was his attempted operation at Priština International Airport immediately after the end of the Kosovo War. Russian forces had arrived in Kosovo and were heading for the airport on June 12, 1999, two days after the bombing campaign ended, expecting to help police that section of Kosovo. Clark, on the other hand, had planned for the Kosovo Force to police the area. Clark called then-Secretary General of NATO Javier Solana, and was told "of course you have to get to the airport" and "you have transfer of authority" in the area. The British commander of the Kosovo Force, General Mike Jackson, however refused to block the Russians through military action saying "I'm not going to start the Third World War for you." Jackson has said he refused to take action because he did not believe it was worth the risk of a military confrontation with the Russians. American General Hugh Shelton called Jackson's refusal "troubling," and hearings in the United States Senate suggested it may amount to insubordination, with Senator John Warner suggesting holding hearings regarding whether the refusal was legal and potentially changing those rules if it was.[69] British Chief of the Defence Staff Charles Guthrie, however, agreed with Jackson and told Clark this on the day Jackson refused the order.[70] Russian military action in Kosovo was eventually stopped peacefully, as some NATO nations were convinced to disallow Russian aircraft to fly over their territory, halting their ability to bring in forces.[71][72] PriÅ¡tina International Airport (Albanian: Aeroporti Ndërkombëtar i Prishtinës) (Serbian: MeÄ‘unarodni Aerodrom PriÅ¡tina) is an international airport located 16km outside of PriÅ¡tina, the capital of Kosovo. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Pocket badge of the KFOR The Kosovo Force (KFOR) is a NATO-led international force responsible for establishing and maintaining security in Kosovo. ... Javier Solana Francisco Javier Solana Madariaga (born July 14, 1942 in Madrid, Spain) is the High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and the Secretary-General of both the Council of the European Union (EU) and the Western European Union (WEU). ... General Sir Michael Mike Jackson, GCB, CBE, DSO, ADC Gen (born 21 March 1944) is a British army officer, currently Chief of the General Staff. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Henry H. Shelton Henry Hugh Shelton (born January 2, 1942) is a retired American career military officer. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Insubordination is the act of a subordinate deliberately disobeying a lawful order. ... John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American statesman and politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972-1974 and has served as the Republican senior U.S. Senator from Virginia since 1979. ... The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) is the professional head of the British Armed Forces. ... General Baron Guthrie of Craigiebank. ...


Retirement

Clark received another call from General Shelton in July 1999 in which he was told that Secretary Cohen wanted Clark to leave his command in April 2000. Clark was surprised by this, as he saw SACEURs as being expected to serve at least 3 years and often asked to stay on for a 4th, while this date would give him less than 3 years of service at the post.[73] Clark was told that this was necessary because General Joseph Ralston was leaving his post as the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and would need another 4-star command within 60 days or he would be forced to retire. Ralston was not going to be appointed Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff due to an extramarital affair in his past, and the SACEUR position was said to be the last potential post for him.[74] Clark said this explanation "didn't wash" because he believed the legalities could have been sorted out to let him serve a full 3 years.[75] Clinton signed onto Ralston's reassignment, although David Halberstam wrote that both he and Madeleine Albright were angered at Clark's treatment. Clark spent the remainder of his time as SACEUR overseeing peacekeeper forces and, without a new command to take, was forced into retirement from the military on May 2, 2000.[76][77] Joseph Ralston was a general of the United States Air Force. ... The position of Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was created by the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986. ... The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer of the United States military, and the principal military advisor to the President of the United States. ... David Halberstam (born April 10, 1934), American journalist and author, was born in New York City, his father a surgeon and his mother a teacher. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rumors persisted that Clark was forced out due to his contentious relationship with some in Washington D.C.; however, he has dismissed them, calling it a "routine personnel action," and the Department of Defense said it was merely a "general rotation of American senior ranks."[78] However, a NATO ambassador told the International Herald Tribune that Clark's dismissal seemed to be a "political thing from the United States."[79] General Hugh Shelton would say of Clark during his 2004 campaign that "the reason he came out of Europe early had to do with integrity and character issues, things that are very near and dear to my heart. I'm not going to say whether I'm a Republican or a Democrat. I'll just say Wes won't get my vote,"[80][81] though Shelton never elaborated further on what these issues were.[82]
The International Herald Tribune is a widely read English language international newspaper. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ...


Civilian career

Clark had earned an average of US$40,000 per year over the course of his military career and, according to The New York Times, retired with "precious little in the bank to show for years of public service."[83] Clark set himself three initial goals in civilian life—to earn $40 million in the business world to let him practice philanthropy, to become a professor, and to become a professional golfer. Clark's inspiration for philanthropy came from billionaire George Soros. Clark began a public speaking tour in the summer of 2000 and approached several former government officials for advice on work after life in government, including House Speaker Newt Gingrich, White House Chief of Staff Mack McLarty, and Richard Holbrooke. Clark took McLarty's advice to move back to Little Rock, Arkansas, and took a position with the Stephens Group, an investment firm headquartered there. He took several other board positions at defense-related firms, and in March 2003 he amicably left the Stephens Group to found Wesley K. Clark & Associates. Clark began writing, publishing two books—Waging Modern War and Winning Modern War—along with writing the forewords for a series of military biographies, as well as a series of editorials.[84] He had only amassed roughly $3.1 million towards his $40 million goal by 2003, but began considering running for public office instead of pursuing his business career.[85] ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, time, or effort to support a charitable cause, usually over an extended period of time and in regard to a defined objective. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... In golf the distinction between amateurs and professionals is rigorously maintained. ... George Soros (pronounced ) [Shorosh] (born August 12, 1930, in Budapest, Hungary, as György Schwartz) is a American financial speculator, stock investor, philanthropist, and political activist. ... It has been suggested that After dinner speaker be merged into this article or section. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... Newton Leroy Gingrich (born June 17, 1943) served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... Thomas F. (Mack) McLarty III, (born 1946) is a prominent Arkansas business and political leader and former White House Chief of Staff for US President Bill Clinton, and current President of Kissinger McLarty Associates (his consulting company with Henry Kissinger) and President and Chief Executive Officer of Asbury Automotive Arkansas... Coordinates: Country United States State Arkansas County Pulaski Founded 1821 Incorporated 1831 Government  - Mayor Mark Stodola Area  - City  116. ... In relation to a company, a director is an officer of the company charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ... A foreword is a literary device that is often found in the beginning of a piece of literature, before the introduction. ... Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


2004 presidential campaign

See also: Democratic Party (United States) presidential primaries, 2004 and United States presidential election, 2004

Clark has said that he only began to truly define his politics after his military retirement in 2000 around the 2000 presidential election that would give George W. Bush the presidency. Clark had a conversation with Condoleezza Rice. She told him that the war in Kosovo would have never taken place under a Bush administration, as they adhered more to realpolitik. Clark found such an administration unsettling, as he had been selected for the SACEUR position because he believed more in the interventionist policies of the Clinton administration. He said he would see it as a sign that things were "starting to go wrong" with American foreign policy if Bush was elected.[86] Clark supported the administration's War in Afghanistan in response to the September 11, 2001 attacks but did not support the expansion of the War on Terrorism to the Iraq War. Clark continued to warn people as a commentator on CNN that he believed the United States was undermanned in Iraq, and has said the war was "never [about]... WMD or regime change," and believes "the connection to the War on Terrorism was not shown."[87][88] John Kerry arrives at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, where he was officially designated as the Democratic Party nominee. ... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential election results map: Red denotes states won by Bush/Cheney; Blue denotes those won by Gore/Lieberman. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Realpolitik (German: real (realistic, practical or actual) and Politik (politics)) is a term that is synonomous to Machiavellianism and is used to describe politics based on strictly practical rather than ideological notions, and practiced without any sentimental illusions. Realpolitik is usually used pejoratively as a term to imply politics imposed... Interventionism is a term for a policy of non-defensive (proactive) activity undertaken by a nation-state, or other geo-political jurisdiction of a lesser or greater nature, to manipulate an economy or society. ... Combatants Taliban al-Qaeda IMU Hezbi Islami Afghanistan Northern Alliance United Nations: United States ISAF NATO, including: Canada United Kingdom Netherlands France Commanders Osama bin Laden Mohammed Omar Obaidullah Akhund Mullah Dadullah Bismillah Khan Tommy Franks Dan McNeill David Fraser Strength Unknown Afghan Army: 70,000 U.S.: 27,000... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... This article is about U.S. actions after September 11, 2001. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... For the album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ...


Clark met with a group of wealthy New York Democrats including Alan Patricof to tell them he was considering running for the presidency in the 2004 election. Patricof, a supporter of Al Gore in 2000, met with all the Democratic candidates and ultimately supported Clark in 2004. Clark has said that he voted for Al Gore in 2000, but has voted for Republicans such as Ronald Reagan, held equal esteem for Dwight D. Eisenhower and Harry S. Truman, and had been a registered independent voter throughout his military career. Ultimately as Clark himself put it, however, he decided he was a Democrat because "I was pro-affirmative action, I was pro-choice, I was pro-education... I'm pro-health care... I realized I was either going to be the loneliest Republican in America or I was going to be a happy Democrat."[89] Clark said he liked the Democratic party, which he saw as standing for "internationalism", "ordinary men and women", and "fair play."[90][91] NY redirects here. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 - March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953-1961). ... President Truman announces that Germany had surrendered (May 8 1945) Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Affirmative action refers to concrete steps that are taken both to increase the representation of underrepresented and arguably underprivileged minorities and to redress the effects of past discrimination. ... Pro-choice describes the political and ethical view that a woman should have complete control over her fertility and pregnancy. ... Health care in the United States is provided by legal entities. ... Internationalism is a political movement which advocates a greater economic and political cooperation between nations for the benefit of all. ...


A "Draft Clark" campaign began to grow with the launch of DraftWesleyClark.com on April 10, 2003.[92] DraftWesleyClark signed up tens of thousands of volunteers, made 150 media appearances discussing Clark, and raised $1.5 million in pledges for his campaign. DraftClark2004.com, another website in support of drafting Clark, was the first organization to register as a political action committee in June 2003 to persuade Clark to run. They had earlier presented him with 1000 emails in May 2003 from throughout the country asking Clark to run. One of DraftClark2004's founders, Brent Blackaby, said of the draft effort: "Just fifty-two years ago citizens from all over the country were successful in their efforts to draft General Eisenhower. We intend to do the same in 2004 by drafting General Clark. If he runs, he wins."[93][94] Political drafts are used to encourage or compel a certain person to enter a political race, by demonstrating a significant groundswell of support for the candidate. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Threshold pledge is a system designed to solve the classic problem of distributed funding, which is that each contributor wants reassurance that others are also contributing, before putting in her own money. ... In the United States, a political action committee, or PAC, is the name commonly given to a private group organized to elect or defeat government officials in order to promote legislation, often supporting the groups special interests. ... The Draft Eisenhower movement was the first successful political draft to take a private citizen to the Oval Office. ...


Clark spent time during these early stages of the draft movement deciding whether to run, a decision he said was based heavily on deciding whether to expose his family to a presidential campaign. His wife, Gert, said she was "initially... not delighted about it," but later changed her mind after hearing their son Wesley Clark, Jr. say that "things have to change, and we're willing to do it. And I want my son to grow up in a different world."[95] Clark went on Meet the Press in June 2003 and said he was "seriously consider[ing]" running for president.[93] Clark believes Bill Clinton encouraged him to run when he attended a party hosted by the Clintons, and Clinton toasted his wife Hillary and Clark as the two "stars" of the Democratic Party. Clark's repeated connections with Bill Clinton led pundits to speculate that Clark was being maneuvered by the Clintons to change the Democratic field and clear a path for Hillary to enter the race. This theory lasted only a few months, and Antonia Felix speculated in her biography of Clark that it came from the largely unexplained connection between Clark and Bill Clinton which led to speculation.[96] Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Wesley Clark announces his candidacy on September 17, 2003.
Wesley Clark announces his candidacy on September 17, 2003.

Clark announced his candidacy for the Democratic presidential primary elections from Little Rock on September 17, 2003, months after the other candidates. He acknowledged the influence of the Draft Clark movement, saying they "took an inconceivable idea and made it conceivable".[97] Clark's early campaign staff took on many figures prominent in the 1992 and 1996 Clinton-Gore campaigns, including Mickey Kantor. He also hired one of the founders of DraftWesleyClark.com, John Hlinko, to be his director of Internet strategy. The campaign raised $3.5 million in the first two weeks.[98][99] The internet campaign would also establish the Clark Community Network of blogs[100] which is still used today and made heavy use of Meetup.com, where DraftWesleyClark.com had established the second-largest community of Meetups at the time.[101] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Kerry arrives at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, where he was officially designated as the Democratic Party nominee. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Michael Mickey Kantor (born August 7, 1939 in Nashville, Tennessee) is an American politician and lawyer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Meetup. ...


Clark's loyalty to the Democratic Party was questioned by some as soon as he entered the race. Senator Joe Lieberman, another 2004 candidate, called Clark's party choice a matter of "political convenience, not conviction." Republican Governor Bill Owens of Colorado and University of Denver president Marc Holtzman have claimed Clark once said "I would have been a Republican if Karl Rove had returned my phone calls." Clark later claimed he was simply joking, but both Owens and Holtzman said the remark was delivered "very directly" and "wasn't a joke." Katharine Q. Seelye wrote that many believed Clark had only chosen to be a Democrat in 2004 because it was "the only party that did not have a nominee."[90] On May 11, 2001, Clark also delivered a speech to the Pulaski County Republican Party in Arkansas saying he was "very glad we've got the great team in office, men like Colin Powell, Don Rumsfeld, Dick Cheney, Condoleezza Rice, Paul O'Neill — people I know very well — our president George W. Bush."[102] U.S. News and World Report ran a story two weeks later claiming Clark might be considered some form of political run as a Republican.[103] Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ... This article is about the former Governor of Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... The University of Denver (DU) is an independent, coeducational, four-year university in Denver, Colorado. ... Marc Holtzman, at podium, as Secretary of Technology. ... Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush. ... Katharine Q. Seelye is a political reporter for the New York Times. ... Pulaski County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a U.S. politician and businessman, who was the 13th Secretary of Defense under President Gerald Ford from 1975–1977, and the 21st Secretary of Defense under President George W. Bush from 2001–2006. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Paul Henry ONeill (born December 4, 1935) served as the 72nd United States Secretary of the Treasury for part of President George W. Bushs first Administration. ...

Clark speaking to a group of college students during the 2004 campaign
Clark speaking to a group of college students during the 2004 campaign

Clark, coming from a non-political background, had no position papers to define his agenda for the public. Once in the campaign, however, several volunteers established a network of connections with the media, and Clark began to explain his stances on a variety of issues. He was, as he had told The Washington Post in October, pro-choice and pro-affirmative action. He called for a repeal of recent Bush tax cuts for people earning more than $200,000 and suggested providing healthcare for the uninsured by altering the current system rather than transferring to a completely new universal health care system. He backed environmental causes such as promising to reverse "scaled down rules" the Bush administration had applied to the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts and dealing with global warming by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Clark also proposed a global effort to strengthen American relations with other nations, reviewing the PATRIOT Act, and investing $100 billion in homeland security. Finally, he put out a budget plan that claimed to save $2.35 trillion over ten years through a repeal of the Bush tax cuts, sharing the cost of the Iraq War with other nations, and cutting government waste.[104] Clark had testified before the House Committee on Armed Services on September 26, 2002[105] that while he supported the Iraq Resolution he believed the country should try other options before the more immediate war President Bush had been calling for at the time, and this testimony was later used during his presidential campaign to portray Clark as pro-war although FactCheck called this a "classic case of ripping quotes out of their full context in order to create a false picture."[106] Clark testified before this committee again in 2005,[107] a hearing Dana Milbank of The Washington Post characterized as having a "different tune" as some of Clark's 2002 testimony that had been portrayed by some committee members as "fuzzy stuff" and "dumb clichés" had proven itself true in the ensuing two and a half years.[108] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... Universal health care is a state in which all residents of a geographic or political entity have access to health care by means of provision of health insurance or direct provision of health care. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. Â§ 1251, et seq. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1850 to 2006 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades and the projected... The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an American act which President Bush signed into law on October 26, 2001. ... For the NBC TV Movie starring Tom Skeritt, see Homeland Security (TV Movie). ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services, commonly known as the House Armed Services Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Iraq Resolution and Iraq War Resolution are popular names for the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public law 107-243, 116 Stat. ... FactCheck home page. ... Dana T. Milbank (born 27 April 1968) is an American political reporter for the Washington Post. ...


Some, such as Clark's biography writer Antonia Felix,[109] have speculated that Clark's inexperience at giving "soundbite" answers hurt him in the media during his primary campaign.[110] The day after he launched his campaign, for example, he was asked if he would have voted for the Iraq War Resolution which granted President Bush the power to wage the Iraq War, a large issue in the 2004 campaign. Clark said, "At the time, I probably would have voted for it, but I think that's too simple a question," then "I don't know if I would have or not. I've said it both ways because when you get into this, what happens is you have to put yourself in a position — on balance, I probably would have voted for it." Finally, Clark's press secretary clarified his position as "you said you would have voted for the resolution as leverage for a UN-based solution." After this series of responses, although Clark opposed the war, The New York Times ran a story with the headline "Clark Says He Would Have Voted for War".[111] Clark was repeatedly portrayed as unsure on this critical issue by his opponents throughout the primary season, being forced to continue to clarify his position such as at the second primary debate when he said, "I think it's really embarrassing that a group of candidates up here are working on changing the leadership in this country and can't get their own story straight... I would have never voted for war. The war was an unnecessary war, it was an elective war, and it's been a huge strategic mistake for this country."[112] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A press secretary is a senior advisor (usually to a politician) who provides advice on how to deal with the media and, using news management techniques, helps them to maintain a positive public image and avoid negative media coverage. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...


Another media incident started during the New Hampshire primary September 27, 2003, when Clark was asked by space shuttle astronaut Jay C. Buckey what his vision for the space program was after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster. Clark responded he was a great believer in the exploration of space but wanted a vision well beyond that of a new shuttle or space plane. "I would like to see mankind get off this planet. I'd like to know what's out there beyond the solar system." Clark thought such a vision could probably require a lifetime of research and development in various fields of science and technology. Then at the end of his remarks, Clark dropped a bombshell when he said "I still believe in E = mc². But I can't believe that in all of human history we'll never ever be able to go beyond the speed of light to reach where we want to go. I happen to believe that mankind can do it. I've argued with physicists about it. I've argued with best friends about it. I just have to believe it. It's my only faith-based initiative."[113] This led to a series of headlines deriding the response, such as "Beam Us Up, General Clark" in The New York Times, "Clark is Light-Years Ahead of the Competition" in The Washington Post, "General Relativity (Retired)" on the U.S. News & World Report website, and "Clark Campaigns at Light Speed" in Wired magazine.[114][115] NASAs Space Shuttle, officially called Space Transportation System (STS), is the United States governments current manned launch vehicle. ... Dr. Jay Clark Buckey, Jr. ... The Space Shuttle Columbia disaster occurred on February 1, 2003, when the Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated over Texas during re-entry into the Earths atmosphere, shortly before concluding its 28th mission, STS-107. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Clark (center) with his wife Gertrude (right) in Seattle, Washington on August 19, 2004
Clark (center) with his wife Gertrude (right) in Seattle, Washington on August 19, 2004

Several polls from September to November of 2003 showed Clark leading the Democratic field of candidates or as a close second to Howard Dean. The John Edwards campaign brought on Hugh Shelton — the general who had said Clark was made to leave the SACEUR post early due to "integrity and character issues" — as an advisor, a move that drew criticism from the Clark campaign.[116] Since Dean consistently polled in the lead in the Iowa caucuses, Clark opted out of participating in the caucuses entirely to focus on later primaries instead. The 2004 Iowa caucuses marked a turning point in the campaign for the Democratic nomination, however, as front-runners Dean and Dick Gephardt garnered results far lower than expected, and John Kerry and John Edwards campaigns' benefited in Clark's absence. Although Clark performed reasonably well in later primaries, such as a tie for third place with Edwards in the New Hampshire primary and narrowly winning the Oklahoma primary over Edwards, he saw his third-place finish in Tennessee and distant third in Virginia as signs that he had lost the South which his campaign had been centered on. He withdrew from the race on February 11, 2004 and announced his endorsement of John Kerry at a rally in Madison, Wisconsin on February 13.[117] Clark believed his opting out of the Iowa caucus was one of his campaign's biggest mistakes, saying to one supporter the day before he withdrew from the race that "everything would have been different if we had [been in Iowa]."[118] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 547 pixel Image in higher resolution (1895 × 1295 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 547 pixel Image in higher resolution (1895 × 1295 pixel, file size: 1. ... Nickname: The Emerald City Location of Seattle in King County and Washington Coordinates: Country United States State Washington County King County Incorporated December 2 1869 Government  - Mayor Greg Nickels (NP) Area  - City  142. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards[1] (born June 10, 1953) was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004, and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ... In the United States, the 2004 Iowa Democratic caucuses (held January 19) were the first major test of some of the leading contenders for the Democratic Partys nomination as its candidate for the 2004 presidential election. ... Richard Andrew Dick Gephardt (born January 31, 1941) is senior counsel at the global law firm DLA Piper and a former prominent American politician of the Democratic Party. ... Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... The New Hampshire primary marks the opening of the quadrennial U.S. presidential election. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... Historic Southern United States. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location of Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin Coordinates: Municipality City Incorporated 1848 Government  - Mayor Dave Cieslewicz Area  - City 219. ... February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Post-2004 campaign

A woman holds a Clark sign with one of his 2004 slogans at a Ned Lamont rally Clark attended in 2006.
A woman holds a Clark sign with one of his 2004 slogans at a Ned Lamont rally Clark attended in 2006.

Clark continued to speak in support of Kerry (and the eventual Kerry/Edwards ticket) throughout the remainder of the 2004 presidential campaign, including speaking at the 2004 Democratic National Convention on the final evening.[119] He founded his current political action committee, WesPAC, in April 2004.[120] Fox News Channel announced in June 2005 that they had signed General Clark as a military and foreign affairs analyst.[121] He joined the Burkle Center for International Relations at UCLA as a senior fellow. A managing partner of the companies which support the Center, Ronald Burkle, described Clark's position as "illuminat[ing] the center's research" and "teaching [the] contemporary role of the United States in the international community."[122] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1097x1700, 812 KB) Source: Myself Summary: Woman holding a sign for Wesley Clark at a Ned Lamont rally. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1097x1700, 812 KB) Source: Myself Summary: Woman holding a sign for Wesley Clark at a Ned Lamont rally. ... Edward Miner Lamont, Jr. ... 2004 Democratic National Convention logo The 2004 Democratic National Convention culminated in the arrival of John Kerry on July 29 to address the delegates. ... In the United States, a political action committee, or PAC, is the name commonly given to a private group organized to elect or defeat government officials in order to promote legislation, often supporting the groups special interests. ... The Fox News Channel (FNC), sometimes called Fox News or even just Fox, is a United States-based cable and satellite news channel. ... International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs of and relations among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... The University of California, Los Angeles, generally known as UCLA, is a public university whose main campus is located in the affluent Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Clark campaigned heavily throughout the 2006 midterm election campaign, supporting numerous Democrats in a variety of federal, state-wide,[123] and state legislature campaigns.[124] Ultimately his PAC aided 42 Democratic candidates who won their elections, including 25 who won seats formerly held by Republicans and 6 newly elected veteran members of the House and Senate.[125] Clark was the most-requested surrogate of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee throughout the 2006 campaign,[126] and sometimes appeared with the leadership of the Democratic Party when they commented on security issues.[127][128] Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... Former crewmembers of the battleship Missouri pose for photos shortly after the Anniversary of the End of World War II ceremony, held aboard the famous ship. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Categories: Politics stubs ...


Potential 2008 presidential campaign

This section documents a current event.
Information may change rapidly as the event progresses.
See also: United States presidential election, 2008 and Official and potential 2008 United States presidential election Democratic candidates

Clark is mentioned as a potential 2008 presidential candidate on the Democratic ticket. He is ranked within the top Democratic candidates according to some Internet polls.[129][130] However, in national polling, Clark usually garners between 1 and 4 percent of the vote and is sometimes not even included in the list of possible nominees.[131] Democratic Party activist George Soros held a fund-raiser for Clark at his Manhattan home in April 2006, and has donated more personal funds to Clark's candidacy than he has to any other potential Democratic nominee for 2008.[132] The Arkansas Times reported on November 9, 2006 that Clark would likely decide whether or not to run in 2008 "within the next two months" from then, and Clark's spokesperson commented that "that's true, but [they] don't have a timeline for when a decision will be made just yet."[126] Later in the month on November 28 he spoke with The Brown Daily Herald and said "I haven't said I won't run" for president.[133] Clark spoke in Huntsville, Alabama on January 15, 2007 and hinted at a presidential run, saying "When I run I'll be the national security candidate", although the remark was removed from the transcript of the event on Clark's WesPAC website.[134] Clark also spoke at the Democratic National Committee Winter Meeting on February 2, 2007,[135] where numerous potential Democratic presidential candidates spoke, though Clark did not himself speak as a candidate. Clark, along with VoteVets.org, founded the website StopIranWar.com in February 2007 which opposes an attack on Iran.[136] When asked about a presidential run by Amy Goodman on Democracy Now! on March 2, 2007, Clark said "I think about it every day."[137] Image File history File links Current_event_marker. ... Presidential electoral votes by state On November 4, 2008, the United States of America will hold its 55th consecutive quadrennial election for President and Vice President of the United States. ... Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 This article lists official and potential Democratic candidates for the President of the United States in the election of 2008. ... George Soros (pronounced ) [Shorosh] (born August 12, 1930, in Budapest, Hungary, as György Schwartz) is a American financial speculator, stock investor, philanthropist, and political activist. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Brown Daily Herald is the student newspaper of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Nickname: Rocket City Watercress Capital of the World Coordinates: Country United States State Alabama County Madison, Limestone Government  - Mayor Loretta Spencer Area  - City 174. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Opposition to a perceived risk of a military attack on Iran by the United States is known to have started during 2005-2006. ... Amy Goodman on Democracy Now! Amy Goodman (b. ... Democracy Now! logo. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ...


Awards and honors

See also: List of Wesley Clark awards and honors

Wesley Clark has been awarded numerous honors, awards, and knighthoods over the course of his military and civilian career. Notable military awards include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal with four oak leaf clusters, the Legion of Merit with three oak leaf clusters, the Silver Star, and the Bronze Star Medal with an oak leaf cluster.[138] Internationally Clark has received numerous military honors such as the Grand Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany and the Grand Cross of the Medal of Military Merit from Portugal and knighthoods.[139] Clark has been awarded some honors as a civilian, such as the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2000.[140] The people of Đakovica, Kosovo named a street after him for his role in helping their city and country.[141][142] Alabama has also named a boulevard after Clark in the city of Madison.[143][144] Municipal approval has been granted for the construction of a new street to be named "General Clark Court" in Virginia Beach, Virginia.[145]
Wesley Clark in full uniform, which displays his U.S. military awards and honors The following is a list of awards and honors awarded to Wesley Clark. ... The Defense Distinguished Service Medal is a United States military award which is presented for exceptionally distinguished performance of duty contributing to national security or defense of the United States. ... Bronze and Silver oak leaf clusters An Oak leaf cluster is a common device which is placed on military awards and decorations to denote those who have received more than one bestowal of a particular decoration. ... The Legion of Merit is a military decoration of the United States armed forces that is awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. ... The Silver Star is the fourth highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. ... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ... The Bundesverdienstkreuz (the official name is Verdienstorden der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany) is the only general Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other major civilian award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, which... Gjakova, also Djakovica, (Serbian cyrillic: Ђаковица, Albanian Gjakova) is a city located in Kosovo, at 42. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Madison is a city located primarily in Madison County, Alabama with a small portion in Limestone County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... Location in the Commonwealth o Virginia. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ WesPAC — Securing America, WesPAC History. Retrieved November 2, 2006.
  2. ^ List of all endorsed candidates from WesPAC — Securing America. Retrieved November 16, 2006.
  3. ^ Felix, Antonia, Wesley Clark: A Biography. Newmarket Press; New York, New York, 2004. pp. 7–9.
  4. ^ Felix, pp. 12–13.
  5. ^ Clark 2004 biography by Clark For President. Retrieved November 2, 2006.
  6. ^ a b c d e American Son by Linda Bloodworth. Produced by Linda Burstyn, Cathee Weiss and Douglas Jackson; edited by Gregg Featherman.
  7. ^ Felix, pp. 14–15.
  8. ^ Felix, p. 22.
  9. ^ Felix, p. 25.
  10. ^ Felix pp. 16–17.
  11. ^ Felix, p. 21.
  12. ^ Felix, p. 41.
  13. ^ Felix, p. 52.
  14. ^ Felix, p. 49.
  15. ^ a b Felix, pp. 54–68.
  16. ^ Felix, pp. 69–80.
  17. ^ Felix, pp. 80–84.
  18. ^ Felix, pp. 85–87.
  19. ^ a b c d e f Detailed resume included with his nomination before the Senate Armed Services Committee, First Session, 105th Congress. July 9, 1997.
  20. ^ Felix, pp. 88–95.
  21. ^ Felix, pp. 95–97.
  22. ^ "White House Assigns Fellow to OMB Office," Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, June 29, 1975.
  23. ^ Felix, pp. 97–102.
  24. ^ Felix, p. 105. "The commander at Fort Carson, Gen. John Hudacheck, had a well-known aversion to West Point cadets and fast-risers like Clark. Even though Clark made quick and outstanding progress with the armor unit, Hudacheck expressed his attitude towards Clark by omitting him from a list of battalion commanders selected to greet a congressional delegation visiting the base."
  25. ^ War in a Time of Peace: Bush, Clinton, and the Generals, by David Halberstam, New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001, pp. 432–433.
  26. ^ Felix, pp. 102–110.
  27. ^ Further information on the BCTP can be found at Warfighter / Battle Command Training Program Exercises. Global Security. Retrieved February 9, 2007.
  28. ^ Felix, pp. 110–116.
  29. ^ "Digitization: Key to Landpower Dominance," by Wesley Clark for Army magazine, November 1993.
  30. ^ Felix, pp. 116–120.
  31. ^ Wesley Clark: General Issues by Lowell Pointe for Frontpage Magazine on August 25, 2003. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
  32. ^ Delta Force at Waco by Alexander Cockburn and Jeffrey St. Clair for CounterPunch on June 1, 1999. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
    From Waco To Belgrade: Wesley K. Clark and America's "Army of the Future" by Ken McCarthy for BrassCheck in 1999. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
    Waco.. the Wesley Clark Connection by Don Stacey on January 24, 2004. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
    Clark tanks used in Waco siege by Kelly Patricia O'Meara on October 16, 2003. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
    General Wesley Clark from Waco to Yugoslavia from The 7th Fire. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
    US Army used tanks in Waco siege and Violated Posse Comitatus for DOJgov.net on October 16, 2003. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
  33. ^ General Alarm — Conspiracy Theorists See Clark as Another Piece of the Waco Puzzle by James Ridgeway for the Village Voice September 24–30, 2003. Retrieved February 3, 2003.
  34. ^ Felix, pp. 120–122.
  35. ^ a b Clark, Waging, p. 68.
  36. ^ Felix, pp. 131–134.
  37. ^ Clark, Waging, p. 38
  38. ^ Clark's Military Record by KATHARINE Q. SEELYE and ERIC SCHMITT for The New York Times on September 20, 2003. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
  39. ^ a b Nominations before the Senate Armed Services Committee, First Session, 105th Congress. July 9, 1997.
  40. ^ Felix, pp. 125–126.
  41. ^ Clark, Waging, p. 40.
  42. ^ The Trouble with Wes by Robert Novak on Townhall.com on September 22, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  43. ^ To End a War by Richard Holbrooke, New York: Random House, 1999, p. 9.
  44. ^ Felix, pp. 126–129
  45. ^ "Wesley K. Clark, A Candidate in the Making, Part 2: An Arkansas Alliance and High-Ranking Foes" by Michael Kranish for The Boston Globe on November 17, 2003.
  46. ^ Nomination: PN382-105 on July 9, 1997. Retrieved December 14, 2006 from Thomas.gov.
  47. ^ Felix, p. 137.
  48. ^ Interview with Wesley Clark for PBS Frontline.
  49. ^ Felix, pp. 138–140.
  50. ^ Clark, Waging, p. 342.
  51. ^ Clark, Waging, p. 269.
  52. ^ Consulate General of the United States Hong Kong & Macau (1999-08-02). Statements on NATO Bombing of China's Embassy in Belgrade (english) (HTML). U.S. Department of State. Retrieved on 2006-10-04. (no longer available at source, text can be found here)
  53. ^ Clark, Waging, p. 273.
  54. ^ Felix, pp. 140–143.
  55. ^ Tenet, George (1999-07-22). DCI Statement on the Belgrade Chinese Embassy Bombing House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Open Hearing (english) (HTML). Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved on 2006-10-04.
  56. ^ Clark, Waging, pp. 296–297.
  57. ^ Press Briefing by Javier Solana on June 10, 1999 from the NATO website.
  58. ^ Resolution 1244 adopted by the United Nations Security Council on June 10, 1999.
  59. ^ a b The Impact of the Laws of War in Contemporary Conflicts (PDF) by Adam Roberts on April 10, 2003 at a seminar at Princeton University titled "The Emerging International System – Actors, Interactions, Perceptions, Security". Retrieved January 25, 2007.
  60. ^ Two die in Apache crash by BBC News on May 5, 1999. Retrieved January 25, 2007.
  61. ^ International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, Final Report to the Prosecutor by the Committee Established to Review the NATO Bombing Campaign Against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, para. 53. Available on the ICTY website. Also published in 39 International Legal Materials 1257-83 (2000).
  62. ^ "Ubijeno više od 2.000 civila, više od 5.000 ranjeno", Glas Javnosti, 1999-06-10. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. (in Serbian) 
  63. ^ Civilian Deaths in the NATO Air Campaign by Human Rights Watch in February 2000. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
  64. ^ Felix, p. 152.
  65. ^ An Open Letter to Michael Moore: You Are Way Off Base About Wesley Clark by Terry Lodge for CounterPunch on September 17, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  66. ^ Don't Be Fooled Again: Gen. Wesley Clark: War Criminal by Mitchel Cohen for CounterPunch on September 17, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  67. ^ Citizen Clark? — Or, Why Electing a Mass Murderer Is a Really Bad Idea by Nebojsa Malic on September 18, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  68. ^ Indictment accusing Bill Clinton, General Wesley Clark and others for war crimes against Yugoslavia on SerbiaInfo on July 22, 1999. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  69. ^ Top U.S. General Calls Command Standoff in Kosovo 'Troubling' : Disobeying Orders: NATO Veil Lifted by Joseph Fitchett for the International Herald Tribune on September 11, 1999. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
  70. ^ Online Newshour: Waging Modern War interview by Margaret Warner for PBS on June 15, 2001. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
  71. ^ Confrontation over Pristina airport for BBC News on March 9, 2000. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  72. ^ Wesley Clark's 'High Noon' Moment for Katrina vanden Heuvel of The Nation on September 17, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  73. ^ Clark, Waging, p. 408.
  74. ^ Ralston withdraws name from consideration by Wolf Blitzer and Carl Rochelle on June 9, 1997. Retrieved March 3, 2007.
  75. ^ Clark, Waging, p. 409.
  76. ^ Ralston's bio from the NATO website. Last updated January 20, 2003. When Ralston is listed as taking the USEUROCOM position (May 2, 2000) Clark no longer has a command.
  77. ^ Felix, pp. 147–150.
  78. ^ Nato commander denies snub for BBC News on July 29, 1999. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  79. ^ General's Early Exit Upsets NATO by Joseph Fitchett for the International Herald Tribune on July 29, 1999. Retrieved February 3, 2007.
  80. ^ Town Crier's Gen. Shelton comments picked up by national media by Bruce Barton for the Los Altos Town Crier on October 1, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  81. ^ Hugh Shelton smears Wes Clark by William Saletan for Slate on September 29, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  82. ^ Felix, p. 202.
  83. ^ "General Clark and the Hustings: Complexity and Contradiction," The New York Times, November 23, 2003.
  84. ^ Op-eds from Securing America. Retrieved January 8, 2007.
  85. ^ Felix, pp. 154–173.
  86. ^ "The Last Word: Wesley Clark from Newsweek. July 14, 2003.
  87. ^ General Wesley Clark: A Call to Arms from NewsMax by Dave Eberhart on August 25, 2003.
  88. ^ Felix, pp. 189–190.
  89. ^ "In His Own Words". The Washington Post, October 19, 2003.
  90. ^ a b "To Find Party, General Marched to His Own Drummer," The New York Times, October 5, 2003.
  91. ^ Felix, pp. 190–191.
  92. ^ Archived Clark bio from his 2004 campaign site and Clark for President. Clark For President — P.O. Box 2959, Little Rock, AR 72203. This version is from the Internet Archive on December 5, 2003.
  93. ^ a b "Draft Clark 2004 for President Committee Files with FEC," US Newswire, June 18, 2003.
  94. ^ Felix, pp. 191–193.
  95. ^ Gertrude Clark interview on C-Span's "American Journal," January 25, 2004.
  96. ^ Felix, pp. 195–196.
  97. ^ Clark's Announcement speech in Little Rock by Wesley K. Clark hosted on Clark04 on September 17, 2003. Retrieved February 4, 2007.
  98. ^ "Wesley Clark Raises More than $3.5M in Fortnight," Forbes, October 6, 2003.
  99. ^ Felix, pp. 196–197.
  100. ^ The Clark Community Network from WesPAC — Securing America. Retrieved January 29, 2007.
  101. ^ Case Studies: Draft Wesley Clark by Grassroots Enterprises. Retrieved January 29, 2007.
  102. ^ Was Wesley Clark a Republican? from FactCheck.org on January 14, 2004. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  103. ^ The Chameleon Candidate by Doug Ireland for the LA Weekly on September 25, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  104. ^ Felix, pp. 197–199.
  105. ^ Clark's 2002 testimony (warning, large file, may be slow to load), from the House Armed Services Committee on September 26, 2002. Retrieved January 29, 2007
  106. ^ RNC's Gillespie Gets It Wrong on Clark and Iraq from FactCheck.org on January 22, 2004. Retrieved January 29, 2007.
  107. ^ Clark's 2005 testimony from WesPAC — Securing America on April 6, 2005. Retrieved January 29, 2007.
  108. ^ Same Committee, Same Combatants, Different Tune by Dana Milbank for The Washington Post on April 7, 2005. Retrieved January 29, 2007.
  109. ^ Felix, p. 199, "Clark learned that his intellectual style of considering an issue from every angle and ruminating on several alternatives would not serve him well in the sound-bite format of modern political rhetoric."
  110. ^ Wesley Clark: Mending our torn country into a nation again by Jerseycoa on the DemocraticUnderground on January 19, 2004. Retrieved January 28, 2007.
  111. ^ "Clark Says He Would Have Voted for War," The New York Times, September 19, 2003.
  112. ^ "Clark Under Sharp Attack in Democratic Debate," The Washington Post, October 10, 2003.
  113. ^ transcript of remarks
  114. ^ Felix, pp. 174–175.
  115. ^ Clark Campaigns at Light Speed by Brian McWilliams on September 30, 2003. Retrieved January 28, 2007.
  116. ^ Clark Communications Director questions John Edwards retaining Hugh Shelton by Matt Bennett, hosted on Clark04.com on November 11, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007.
  117. ^ Wes Clark Endorses John Kerry by Wesley Clark on February 13, 2004. Retrieved November 2, 2006.
  118. ^ Felix, pp. 203–206.
  119. ^ Video of Clark's speech from The Washington Post website on July 29, 2004. Retrieved January 31, 2007. Full schedule can be seen here.
  120. ^ History section of WesPAC: Securing America. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  121. ^ Gen. Wesley Clark Joins FNC as Foreign Affairs Analyst from TVWeek by Michele Greppi on June 15, 2005. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  122. ^ Gen. Wesley Clark to Join UCLA Burkle Center for UCLA News by Judy Lin on September 16, 2006. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  123. ^ All Endorsed Federal/Statewide candidates from WesPAC: SecuringAmerica. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  124. ^ All Endorsed State/Local candidates from WesPAC: SecuringAmerica. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  125. ^ Time to Lead from WesPAC: SecuringAmerica on November 8, 2006. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  126. ^ a b Clark considering presidential bid by the Arkansas Times Staff for the Arkansas Times on November 19, 2006. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  127. ^ DEMOCRATS—JOINED BY GENERAL WESLEY CLARK—RELEASE NEW REPORT ON BUSH NATIONAL SECURITY FAILURES from WesPAC: Securing America on September 5, 2006. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  128. ^ Democratic Leadership Call for a New Direction on Security from Securing America: WesPAC on September 13, 2006. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  129. ^ Web Poll results from ChooseOurPresident2008 by Alex Christensen. Retrieved October 3, 2006.
  130. ^ 2008 straw poll by kos for DailyKos on January 16, 2007. Retrieved January 26, 2007.
  131. ^ Summary of 2008 Democratic Nomination Polling from PollingReport.com. Retrieved November 15, 2006.
  132. ^ "Billionaire Soros Gives Financial Boost to General Clark" by Gerstein, Josh for The New York Sun on October 13, 2006.
  133. ^ Q & A with Clark: "I haven't said I won't run" for President by Abe Lubetkin for the Brown Daily Herald on November 28, 2006. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  134. ^ General Wesley Clark at UAW Local 1314 in Huntsville, AL, Transcript by Melange, on SecuringAmerica. Retrieved January 26, 2007. (The phrase is still in the hosted video, and was in the original transcript posted.)
  135. ^ General Wesley Clark at the 2007 Democratic National Committee Winter Meeting from WesPAC: Securing America on February 2, 2007. Retrieved February 13, 2007.
  136. ^ "StopIranWar.com" at the Huffington Post
  137. ^ Gen. Wesley Clark Weighs Presidential Bid: "I Think About It Everyday" by Amy Goodman from Democracy Now! on February 27, 2007 at the 92nd St. Y in New York City. Retrieved March 2, 2007.
  138. ^ U.S. Military decorations from SecuringAmerica. Retrieved October 3, 2006.
  139. ^ International honors from SecuringAmerica. Retrieved October 3, 2006
  140. ^ Civilian honors from SecuringAmerica. Retrieved October 3, 2006.
  141. ^ 4th image down from A Wes Clark Democrat, May 26, 2006. Retrieved December 13, 2006.
  142. ^ Former NATO commander, retired Gen. Wesley Clark to visit Kosovo from Kosava Report on May 24, 2006. Retrieved December 13, 2006.
  143. ^ Google search results containing real estate listings for Wesley Clark Blvd in Madison, Alabama.
  144. ^ Transcript of Countdown with Keith Olbermann show on MSNBC where he mentions road named after Clark in Alabama.
  145. ^ Announcement by architect upon completion of negotiations granting muncipal approval for construction of "General Clark Court" in Northern Village subsection in Virginia Beach area of the state of Virginia.

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June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (126th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Glas javnosti is a daily newspaper published in Belgrade. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (69th in leap years). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (279th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 29th 137 732 km² 385 km 420 km 2. ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 16 is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The New York Sun is a contemporary daily newspaper published in New York City. ... 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March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

References

  • Clark, Wesley K. (foreword) (2006). Great Generals series. Palgrave Macmillan. 
  • Clark, Wesley K. (2001). Waging Modern War: Bosnia, Kosovo, and the Future of Combat. New York: PublicAffairs. ISBN 1-58648-277-7. 
  • Clark, Wesley K. (2004). Winning Modern Wars: Iraq, Terrorism, and the American Empire. New York: PublicAffairs. ISBN 1-58648-043-X. 
  • Felix, Antonia (2004). Wesley K. Clark: A Biography. New York: Newmarket Press. ISBN 1557046255. 

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Preceded by
Gen. George Joulwan
Supreme Allied Commander Europe (NATO)
1997—2000
Succeeded by
Gen. Joseph Ralston
Persondata
NAME Clark, Wesley Kanne
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American general and former Democratic Party presidential candidate
DATE OF BIRTH December 23, 1944
PLACE OF BIRTH Chicago, Illinois
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gen Wesley Clark - From Waco to Yugoslavia (794 words)
General Wesley Clark was involved in the siege and final assault near Waco, Texas that killed, by a combination of toxic gas and fire, at least 82 people including some three dozen women, children and infants.
Further, there is substantial circumstantial evidence that, Clark, in addition to acting as a tactical consultant, may, in fact, have been the prime architect and commander of the entire operation.
General Wesley Clark) have insisted that that NATO, not the UN, would be the commanding force in Kosovo and everyone else, like the Russians, would have to submit to NATO orders.
Wesley Clark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6142 words)
Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general in the U.S. Army.
Clark's testimony was sought because he had spoken with Milosevic for a total of more than 100 hours, in his role as the head of the U.S. military team during the Dayton Agreement negotiations and as NATO's Supreme Allied Commander in Europe.
Clark stated that his order to block the runways was refused by an emotional Jackson and that he took the matter up the British chain of command.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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