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Encyclopedia > Welsh mythology
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Celtic mythology
Coventina

Celtic polytheism
Celtic deities Template:Buttface mythology Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism annas hippo butt, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts. ... Image File history File links Hope-coventina01a. ... Celtic polytheism refers to the religious beliefs and practices of the ancient Celts. ... The gods and goddesses of Celtic mythology are known from a variety of sources. ...

Ancient Celtic religion

Druids · Bards · Vates
British Iron Age religion
Celtic religious patterns
Gallo-Roman religion
Romano-British religion Two druids, from an 1845 publication, based on a bas-relief found at Autun, France. ... The Bard (ca. ... Vates - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... In the British Isles, the Iron Age lasted from about the 7th century BC until the Roman conquest and until the 5th century in non-Romanised parts. ... This article is about the European people. ... Gallo-Roman religion was a fusion of Roman religious forms and modes of worship with Gaulish deities from Celtic polytheism. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ...

British mythology

Welsh mythology
Breton mythology
Mabinogion · Taliesin
Cad Goddeu
Trioedd Ynys Prydein
Matter of Britain · King Arthur Breton mythology is the mythology or corpus of explanatory and herioc tales originating in Brittany, now in France. ... The Mabinogion is a collection of prose stories from medieval Welsh manuscripts. ... Taliesin or Taliessin (c. ... Cad Goddeu (Welsh: The Battle of the Trees) is a sixth-century Welsh poem from the Book of Taliesin. ... The Welsh Triads (Welsh, Trioedd Ynys Prydein) is used to describe any of the related Medieval collection of groupings of three that preserve a major portion of Welsh folklore and Welsh literature. ... The Matter of Britain or the Arthurian legend is a name given collectively to the legends that concern the Celtic and legendary history of the British Isles, especially those focused on King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ...

Gaelic mythology

Irish mythology
Scottish mythology
Tuatha Dé Danann
Mythological Cycle
Ulster Cycle
Fenian Cycle
Immrama · Echtrae The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity, but much of it was preserved, shorn of its religious meanings, in medieval Irish literature, which represents the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology. ... Scottish mythology consists of the myths and legends historically told by the people of Scotland. ... “Áes dána” redirects here. ... The Mythological Cycle is one of the four major cycles of Irish mythology, and is so called because it represents the remains of the pagan mythology of pre-Christian Ireland, although the gods and supernatural beings have been euhemerised by their Christian redactors into historical kings and heroes. ... The Ulster Cycle, formerly the Red Branch Cycle, is a large body of prose and verse centering around the traditional heroes of the Ulaid in what is now eastern Ulster. ... The Fenian Cycle also known as the Fionn Cycle, Finn Cycle, Fianna Cycle, Finnian Tales, Fian Tales, Féinne Cycle, Feinné Cycle, Ossianic Cycle and Fianaigecht, is a body of prose and verse centering on the exploits of the mythic hero Fionn mac Cumhaill and his warriors the Fianna Éireann. ... An Immram (pl. ... An Echtra or Echtrae (pl. ...

See also

Celt · Gaul
Galatia · Celtiberians
Early history of Ireland
Prehistoric Scotland
Prehistoric Wales
This article is about the European people. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Botorrita: Bronze plate with inscription. ... Newgrange, a famous Irish passage tomb built c3,200 BC // What little is known of pre-Christian Ireland comes from a few references in Roman writings, Irish poetry and myth, and archaeology. ... Archaeology and geology continue to reveal the secrets of prehistoric Scotland, uncovering a complex and dramatic past before the Romans brought Scotland into the scope of recorded history. ... Prehistoric Wales in terms of human settlements covers the period from about 225,000 years ago, the date attributed to the earliest human remains found in what is now Wales, to the year 48 when the Roman army began a campaign against one of the Welsh tribes. ...

Index of related articles
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Welsh mythology, the remnants of the mythology of the pre-Christian Britons, has come down to us in much altered form in medieval Welsh manuscripts such as the Red Book of Hergest, the White Book of Rhydderch, the Book of Aneirin and the Book of Taliesin. Medieval Welsh literature is the medieval literature written in the Welsh language from before 1100 to the 16th century. ... The Red book of Hergest (Welsh: Llyfr coch Hergest) is one of the most important medieval Welsh manuscripts. ... The White book of Rhydderch (Welsh: Llyfr gwyn Rhydderch) is one of the most notable and celebrated manuscripts in Welsh. ... The Book of Aneirin (Welsh: Llyfr Aneirin) is a late 13th century Welsh manuscript containing Old and Middle Welsh poetry attributed to the late 6th century Northern Brythonic poet, Aneirin. ... Book of Taliesin (Welsh: Llyfr Taliesin) is one of the most famous Welsh manuscripts. ...


The prose stories from the White and Red Books are known as the Mabinogion, a title given to them by their first translator, Lady Charlotte Guest, and also used by subsequent translators. Poems such as Cad Goddeu (The Battle of the Trees) and mnemonic list-texts like the Welsh Triads and the Thirteen Treasures of Britain, also contain mythological material. These texts also include the earliest forms of the Arthurian legend and the traditional history of post-Roman Britain. The Mabinogion is a collection of prose stories from medieval Welsh manuscripts. ... Lady Charlotte Elizabeth Guest, (nee Bertie) (May 19, 1812 – January 15, 1895), was an important figure in the history of the study of Welsh literature and language. ... Cad Goddeu (Welsh: The Battle of the Trees) is a sixth-century Welsh poem from the Book of Taliesin. ... The Welsh Triads (Welsh, Trioedd Ynys Prydein) is used to describe any of the related Medieval collection of groupings of three that preserve a major portion of Welsh folklore and Welsh literature. ... The Thirteen Treasures of Britain were as follows: Dyrnwyn the sword of Rhydderch Hael; if any man drew it except himself, it burst into a flame from the cross to the point, and all who asked it received it; but because of this property all shunned it. ... The Matter of Britain is a name given collectively to the legends that concern the Celtic and legendary history of the British Isles, centering around King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. ...


Other sources include the 9th century Latin historical compilation Historia Britonum (the History of the Britons) and Geoffrey of Monmouth's 12th century Latin chronicle Historia Regum Britanniae (the History of the Kings of Britain), as well as later folklore, such as The Welsh Fairy Book by W. Jenkyn Thomas [1908]. As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The Historia Britonum, or The History of the Britons, is a historical work that was first written sometime shortly after AD 820, and exists in several recensions of varying difference. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Geoffrey of Monmouth Geoffrey of Monmouth (c. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Generally a chronicle (Latin chronica, from Greek Χρόνος) is historical account of facts and events in chronological order. ... Geoffrey of Monmouths Historia Regum Britanniæ (English: The History of the Kings of Britain) was written around 1136. ... Folklore is the body of expressive culture, including tales, music, dance, legends, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, customs, material culture, and so forth within a particular population comprising the traditions (including oral traditions) of that culture, subculture, or group. ...

Contents

The Four Branches of the Mabinogi

The most mythological stories contained in the Mabinogion collection are collectively titled The Four Branches of the Mabinogi. The common thread running through the four Branches is the life of the hero Pryderi. He is conceived, born and named in the first Branch, fights for Bendigeidfran in Ireland in the second, loses and regains his kingdom in the third, and dies in the fourth. He was probably originally central to all four Branches, and remains so in the first and third, but is reduced to a passing mention in the second and fourth, which concentrate on the children of Llyr and the children of Dôn, two clans of characters who were probably once gods. The Four Branches of the Mabinogi are the best known tales from the medieval Welsh Mabinogion. ... In Welsh mythology, King Pryderi of Dyfed was the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. ... Bran the Blessed, also known as Bran Vendigaid, Bendigeidfran or Branovices, is a giant and king of Britain in Welsh mythology. ... In Celtic mythology, Lir (the sea) was the god of the sea, father of Manannan mac Lir, Bran, Branwen and Manawydan by Penarddun and a son of Danu and Beli. ... Dôn was a Welsh mother goddess, equivalent of the Irish Danu. ... Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Pwyll, Prince of Dyfed

The first branch tells of how Pwyll, the prince of Dyfed, exchanges places for a year with Arawn, the ruler of Annwn (the underworld), defeats Arawn's enemy Hafgan, and on his return encounters Rhiannon, a beautiful maiden whose horse cannot be caught up with. He manages to win her hand at the expense of Gwawl, to whom she is betrothed, and she bears him a son, but the child disappears soon after his birth. Rhiannon is accused of killing him and forced to carry guests on her back as punishment. The child has been taken by a monster, and is rescued by Teyrnon and his wife, who bring him up as their own, calling him Gwri of the Golden hair, until his resemblance to Pwyll becomes apparent. They return him to his real parents, Rhiannon is released from her punishment, and the boy is renamed Pryderi. This article is about the Welsh hero; for the impact crater on Europa, see Pwyll (crater). ... Dyfed was one of the ancient kingdoms (or principalities) of Wales prior to the Norman Conquest. ... In Welsh mythology, Arawn was the Lord of the Underworld, which was called Annwn. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In Welsh mythology, Hafgan was a rival of Arawns for the position of the god of the underworld. ... For the Stevie Nicks/Fleetwood Mac song, see Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win). ... In Welsh mythology, Gwawl was Rhiannons fiance. ... In Welsh mythology, Teyrnon or Teirnon was the foster father of Pryderi. ... In Welsh mythology, King Pryderi of Dyfed was the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. ...


Branwen, Daughter of Llyr

In the second branch, Branwen, sister of Bendigeidfran (aka Bran the Blessed), king of Britain, is given in marriage to Matholwch, king of Ireland. Branwen's half-brother Efnisien insults Matholwch by mutilating his horses, but Bendigeidfran gives him new horses and treasure, including a magical cauldron which can restore the dead to life, in compensation. Matholwch and Branwen have a son, Gwern, but Matholwch proceeds to mistreat Branwen, beating her and making her a drudge. Branwen trains a starling to take a message to Bendigeidfran, who goes to war against Matholwch. His army crosses the Irish Sea in ships, but Bendigeidfran is so huge he wades across. The Irish offer to make peace, and build a house big enough to entertain Bendigeidfran, but inside they hang a hundred bags, telling Efnisien they contain flour, when in fact they conceal armed warriors. Efnisien kills the warriors by squeezing the bags. Later, at the feast, Efnisien throws Gwern on the fire and fighting breaks out. Seeing that the Irish are using the cauldron to revive their dead, Efnisien hides among the corpses and destroys the cauldron, although the effort costs him his life. Only seven men, all Welsh, survive the battle, including Pryderi, Manawyddan and Bendigeidfran, who is mortally wounded by a poisoned spear. Bendigeidfran asks his companions to cut off his head and take it back to Britain. Branwen dies of grief on returning home. Five pregnant women survive to repopulate Ireland. In Welsh mythology, Branwen was a daughter of Llyr and Penarddun and has been interpreted as a goddess of love and beauty. ... Bran the Blessed, also known as Bran Vendigaid, Bendigeidfran or Branovices, is a giant and king of Britain in Welsh mythology. ... Matholwch was an Irish lord in Welsh mythology. ... In Welsh mythology, Efnisien was the son of Penarddun and Eurosswydd. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwern was a son of Branwen and Matholwch. ... Genera Aplonis Mino Basilornis Sarcops Streptocitta Enodes Scissirostrum Sarroglossa Ampeliceps Gracula Acridotheres Leucopsar Sturnia Sturnus Creatophora Fregilupus (extinct) Necropsar (extinct) Coccycolius Lamprotornis Cinnyricinclus Spreo Cosmoparus Onychognathus Poeoptera Grafisia Speculipastor Neochicla Buphagus See also: Myna, Oxpecker Starlings are small to medium-sized passerine birds in the family Sturnidae. ... Relief map of the Irish Sea. ... In Welsh mythology, King Pryderi of Dyfed was the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. ... In Irish mythology, Manannan mac Lir was a sea and weather god. ...


Manawyddan, son of Llyr

Pryderi and Manawyddan return to Dyfed, where Pryderi marries Cigfa and Manawyddan marries Rhiannon. However a mist descends on the land, leaving it empty and desolate. The four support themselves by hunting at first, then move to England where they make a living making saddles, shields and shoes of such quality that the local craftsmen cannot compete, and drive them from town to town. Eventually they return to Dyfed and become hunters again. While hunting, a white boar leads them to a mysterious castle. Pryderi, against Manawyddan's advice, goes inside, but does not return. Rhiannon goes to investigate and finds him clinging to a bowl, unable to speak. The same fate befalls her, and the castle disappears. Manawyddan and Cigfa return to England as shoemakers, but once again the locals drive them out and they return to Dyfed. They sow three fields of wheat, but the first field is destroyed before it can be harvested. The next night the second field is destroyed. Manawyddan keeps watch over the third field, and when he sees it destroyed by mice he catches their leader and decides to hang it. A scholar, a priest and a bishop in turn offer him gifts if he will spare the mouse, but he refuses. When asked what he wants in return for the mouse's life, he demands the release of Pryderi and Rhiannon and the lifting of the enchantment over Dyfed. The bishop agrees, because the mouse is in fact his wife. He has been waging magical war against Dyfed because he is a friend of Gwawl, whom Pwyll, Pryderi's father humiliated. Dyfed was one of the ancient kingdoms (or principalities) of Wales prior to the Norman Conquest. ... In Welsh mythology, Cigva (or Cigfa) was the wife of King Pryderi of Dyfed. ...


Math, son of Mathonwy

While Pryderi rules Dyfed in south Wales, Gwynedd in north Wales is ruled by Math, son of Mathonwy. His feet must be held by a virgin, except while he is at war. Math's nephew Gilfaethwy is in love with Goewin, his current footholder, and Gilfaethwy's brother Gwydion tricks Math into going to war against Pryderi so Gilfaethwy can have access to her. Gwydion kills Pryderi in single combat, and Gilfaethwy rapes Goewin. Math marries Goewin to save her from disgrace, and banishes Gwydion and Gilfaethwy, transforming them into a breeding pair of deer, then pigs, then wolves. After three years they are restored to human form and return. Gwynedd is an administrative county in Wales, named after the old Kingdom of Gwynedd. ... In Welsh mythology, Math ap Mathonwy was a king who needed to rest his feet in the lap of a virgin unless he was at war, or wanted to be. ... In Welsh mythology, Gilfaethwy was a son of the goddess Don. ... In Welsh mythology, Goewin was Math ap Mathonwys foot-holder; she was raped by Gilfaethwy. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwydion is a magician appearing prominently in the Fourth branch of the Mabinogi and the ancient poem Cad Goddeu. ...


Math needs a new foot-holder, and Gwydion suggests his sister, Arianrhod, but when Math magically tests her virginity, she gives birth to two sons. One, Dylan, immediately takes to the sea. The other child is raised by Gwydion, but Arianrhod tells him he will never have a name or arms unless she gives them to him, and refuses to do so. But Gwydion tricks her into naming him Llew Llaw Gyffes and giving him arms. She then tells him he will never have a wife of any race living on earth, so Gwydion and Math make him a wife from flowers, called Blodeuwedd. But Blodeuwedd falls in love with a hunter called Gronw Pebyr, and they plot to kill Llew. Blodeuwedd tricks Llew into revealing the means by which he can be killed, but when Gronw attempts to do the deed, Llew escapes, transformed into an eagle. In Welsh mythology, Arianrhod (silver wheel) was a daughter of Beli and Don. ... Dylan (or Dylan Eil Ton; sea in Welsh) is a sea-god in Welsh mythology, a son of Arianrhod and Gwydion. ... In Welsh mythology, Llew Llaw Gyffes was born a blob, a son of Arianrhod and brother of Dylan. ... In Welsh mythology, Blodeuwedd is the later name of Blodeuedd, a woman made from flowers by Math and Gwydion. ... In Welsh mythology, Goronwy was the lover of Blodeuwedd, the wife of Llew Llaw Gyffes. ...


Gwydion finds Llew and transforms him back into human form, and turns Blodeuwedd into an owl. Gronw offers to compensate Llew, but Llew denies and insists on returning the blow that was struck against him.Gronw pleads to hide behind a rock when he attemps to kills him. Llew agrees. He kills Gronw with his spear, which is thrown so hard it pierces him through the stone he is hiding behind.


Lludd and Llefelys

Another mythological story included in the Mabinogion collection is the tale of Lludd and Llefelys. Lludd is king of Britain, and his brother, Llefelys, is king of France. Lludd's kingdom is beset by three menaces: the Coraniaid, a demonic people who can hear everything; a terrible scream that is heard every May Eve that terrifies the people; and the continual disappearance of the provisions of the king's court. Lludd asks Llefelys for help, speaking to him through a brass tube so the Coraniaid can't hear. Llefelys creates a potion of crushed insects in water which destroys the Coraniaid when sprinkled on them. The scream, he discovers, comes from two dragons fighting. He gets the dragons drunk on mead and buries them in the centre of Britain. He then overcomes the wizard who is stealing all of Lludd's provisions and makes him serve Lludd. Lludd Llaw Eraint, Lludd of the Silver Hand, son of Beli Mawr, is a legendary hero from Welsh mythology. ... Llefelys (also Llevelys, Lleuelys) is a character in Welsh mythology, namely the story of Lludd and Llefelys. Llefelys is king of France while his brother Lludd is king of Britain. ... Chinese dragon, color engraving on wood, Chinese school, 19th Century The dragon is a mythical creature typically depicted as a large and powerful serpent or other reptile with magical or spiritual qualities. ... Mead Mead is a fermented alcoholic beverage made of honey, water, and yeast. ...


Culhwch and Olwen

While Culhwch and Olwen, also found in the Mabinogion collection, is primarily an Arthurian tale, in which the hero Culhwch enlists Arthur's aid in winning the hand of Olwen, daughter of Ysbaddaden the Giant, it is packed with background detail, much of it mythological in nature. Characters such as Amaethon, the divine ploughman, Mabon ap Modron, the divine son, and the psychopomp Gwyn ap Nudd make appearances, the latter in an endless seasonal battle with Gwythr ap Greidawl for the hand of Creiddylad. The conditions placed on Culhwch by his mother are similar to those placed on Llew Llaw Gyffes by Arianrhod, and Culhwch's arrival at Arthur's court is reminiscent of the Irish god Lug's arrival at the court of king Nuada in Cath Maige Tuireadh. Culhwch and Olwen is a Welsh story that survives in only two manuscripts: a complete version in the Red Book of Hergest, ca. ... King Arthur is an important figure in the mythology of Britain. ... In Welsh mythology, Culhwch (pronounced Kilhooch, the ch sound being the same as the Scottish Loch) was a hero who rescued Mabon from Annwn. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ... In Welsh mythology, Olwen (white track) was a daughter of Ysbaddaden. ... In Welsh mythology, Ysbaddaden was the father of Olwen. ... In Welsh mythology, Amaethon was a god of agriculture, a son of the goddess Don. ... In Welsh mythology, Mabon (divine son) was the son of Modron (divine mother). He was a hunter god who was stolen from his mother three days after his birth. ... Many sets of religious beliefs have a particular spirit, deity, demon or angel whose responsibility is to escort newly-deceased souls to the afterlife, such as Heaven or Hell. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwyn or Gwynn ap Nudd was the ruler of Annwn (the Underworld). ... In Welsh mythology, Gwythr ap Greidawl was a rival of Gwynn, the god of the underworld. ... In Welsh mythology, Creiddylad was a goddess, daughter of Llyr. ... In Welsh mythology, Llew Llaw Gyffes was born a blob, a son of Arianrhod and brother of Dylan. ... In Welsh mythology, Arianrhod (silver wheel) was a daughter of Beli and Don. ... Lugh (earlier Lug, modern Irish Lú, pronounced //) is an Irish deity represented in mythological texts as a hero and High King of the distant past. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cath Maige Tuireadh (the (second) Battle of Magh Tuiredh) is a tale of the Irish Mythological Cycle in which the Tuatha Dé Danann defeat their enemies, the Fomorians. ...


Characters

The Welsh had been Christian for many centuries before their former mythology was written down, and their gods had long been transformed into kings and heroes of the past. Many of the characters who exhibit divine characteristics fall into two rival families, the Plant Dôn (Children of Dôn) and the Plant Llyr (Children of Llyr). Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dôn was a Welsh mother goddess, equivalent of the Irish Danu. ... In Celtic mythology, Lir (the sea) was the god of the sea, father of Manannan mac Lir, Bran, Branwen and Manawydan by Penarddun and a son of Danu and Beli. ...


The children of Dôn

Dôn, daughter of Mathonwy, was the matriarch of one family. Her husband is usually given as Beli. Her children include: Beli Mawr (Beli the Great) was a Welsh ancestor deity. ...

This family also includes Arianrhod's sons Dylan and Llew Llaw Gyffes. Caswallawn (the historical Cassivellaunus), is often named as a son of Beli. In Welsh mythology, Arianrhod (silver wheel) was a daughter of Beli and Don. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwydion is a magician appearing prominently in the Fourth branch of the Mabinogi and the ancient poem Cad Goddeu. ... In Welsh mythology, Gilfaethwy was a son of the goddess Don. ... In the Welsh mythology, Govannon of Gofannon was a smith and the son of the goddess Don. ... In Welsh mythology, Amaethon was a god of agriculture, a son of the goddess Don. ... Dylan (or Dylan Eil Ton; sea in Welsh) is a sea-god in Welsh mythology, a son of Arianrhod and Gwydion. ... In Welsh mythology, Llew Llaw Gyffes was born a blob, a son of Arianrhod and brother of Dylan. ... In Welsh mythology, Caswallawn son of Beli was a legendary king of Britain who fought Julius Caesar. ... Cassivellaunus was a historical British chieftain who led the defence against Julius Caesars second expedition to Britain in 54 BC. He also appears in British legend as Cassibelanus, one of Geoffrey of Monmouths kings of Britain, and in the Mabinogion and Welsh Triads as Caswallawn, son of Beli...


The children of Llŷr

Llŷr, the patriarch of the other family, is possibly a borrowing of the Irish sea-god Lír. A foreign origin is further suggested by his epithet Llediaith ("half-speech"). His wife is usually given as Penarddun, and their children include: The Children of Lir, sculpture in the Garden of Remembrance (Dublin) Look up lir, ler in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An epithet (Greek - επιθετον and Latin - epitheton; literally meaning imposed) is a descriptive word or phrase. ... In Welsh mythology, Penarddun was the wife of Llyr. ...

Penarddun also had two sons, Nisien and Efnisien, by Eurosswydd. Caradawg (the historical Caratacus) is named as a son of Bendigeidfran. In Welsh mythology, Manawydan, son of Llyr, is the equivalent of the Irish Manannan mac Lir and a presumed sea god. ... Bran the Blessed, also known as Bran Vendigaid, Bendigeidfran or Branovices, is a giant and king of Britain in Welsh mythology. ... In Welsh mythology, Branwen was a daughter of Llyr and Penarddun and has been interpreted as a goddess of love and beauty. ... In Welsh mythology, Nisien was the son of Penarddun and Eurosswydd and twin of Efnisien. ... In Welsh mythology, Efnisien was the son of Penarddun and Eurosswydd. ... In Welsh mythology, Eurossydd held Llyr hostage until his wife, Penarddun slept with him. ... Caratacus (Brythonic *Caratācos, Greek Καράτακος; variants Latin Caractacus, Greek Καρτάκης) was a historical British chieftain of the Catuvellauni tribe, who led the British resistance to the Roman conquest. ...


Other probable deities

In Welsh mythology, Arawn was the Lord of the Underworld, which was called Annwn. ... In Welsh mythology, Avalloc was the father of Modron. ... In Welsh mythology, Blodeuwedd is the later name of Blodeuedd, a woman made from flowers by Math and Gwydion. ... In Welsh mythology, Ceridwen was a magician, mother of Taliesin, Morfran, and a beautiful daughter. ... In Welsh mythology, Creiddylad was a goddess, daughter of Llyr. ... In Welsh mythology, Cyhiraeth was a goddess of streams. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwenn Teir Bronn was the patron goddess of mothers. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwyn or Gwynn ap Nudd was the ruler of Annwn (the Underworld). ... Llefelys (also Llevelys, Lleuelys) is a character in Welsh mythology, namely the story of Lludd and Llefelys. Llefelys is king of France while his brother Lludd is king of Britain. ... Lludd Llaw Eraint, Lludd of the Silver Hand, son of Beli Mawr, is a legendary hero from Welsh mythology. ... In Welsh mythology, Mabon (divine son) was the son of Modron (divine mother). He was a hunter god who was stolen from his mother three days after his birth. ... In Welsh mythology, Modron (divine mother) was a daughter of Avalloc, derived from the Gaul goddess Dea Matrona. ... For the Stevie Nicks/Fleetwood Mac song, see Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win). ...

Other characters

In Welsh mythology, Cigva (or Cigfa) was the wife of King Pryderi of Dyfed. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwern was a son of Branwen and Matholwch. ... In Welsh mythology, Math ap Mathonwy was a king who needed to rest his feet in the lap of a virgin unless he was at war, or wanted to be. ... Matholwch was an Irish lord in Welsh mythology. ... In Welsh mythology, King Pryderi of Dyfed was the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. ... This article is about the Welsh hero; for the impact crater on Europa, see Pwyll (crater). ... Taliesin or Taliessin (c. ... In Welsh mythology, Teyrnon or Teirnon was the foster father of Pryderi. ...

Arthurian characters

Ambrosius Aurelianus, called Aurelius Ambrosius in the Historia Regum Britanniae and elsewhere, was a leader of the Romano-British who won an important battle against the Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century, according to Gildas. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ... How Sir Bedivere Cast the Sword Excalibur into the Water. ... Sir Kay, son of Sir Ector, was one of the Knights of the Round Table and King Arthurs foster brother. ... Cador (Latin: Cadorius) was a legendary Duke of Cornwall, known chiefly through Geoffrey of Monmouths pseudo-historical History of the Kings of Britain and related Welsh sources. ... The name Caradoc may refer to: In Arthurian legend, Sir Caradoc was one of the Knights of the Round Table. ... In Welsh mythology, Culhwch (pronounced Kilhooch, the ch sound being the same as the Scottish Loch) was a hero who rescued Mabon from Annwn. ... Tristan and Iseult as depicted by Herbert Draper (1864 -1920). ... Iseult of Ireland as portrayed Sophia Myles in Tristan & Isolde, 2006. ... Geraint is a character from Welsh folklore and Arthurian legend, a king of Dumnonia and a valiant warrior. ... Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Gawain (Gwalchmei, Gawan, Gauvain, Walewein etc. ... Gwenhwyfach or Gwenhwyvach, sometimes Anglicized as Guinevak, is a sister of Gwenhwyfar (Guinevere) in early Welsh Arthurian legend. ... Queen Guinevere, by William Morris Guinevere was the legendary queen consort of King Arthur. ... In Welsh mythology, Mabon (divine son) was the son of Modron (divine mother). He was a hunter god who was stolen from his mother three days after his birth. ... In Welsh mythology, Modron (divine mother) was a daughter of Avalloc, derived from the Gaul goddess Dea Matrona. ... Magnus Maximus. ... Mordred or Modred (Welsh: Medraut) is a legendary figure of Britain, known in Arthurian legend as a notorious traitor who fought King Arthur at the Battle of Camlann, where he was killed and Arthur fatally wounded. ... Merlin Ambrosius (Welsh: Myrddin Emrys (Merlin the Wise); also known as Myrddin Wyllt (Merlin the Wild), Merlin Caledonensis (Scottish Merlin), Merlinus, and Merlyn) is the personage best known as the mighty wizard featured in Arthurian legends, starting with Geoffrey of Monmouths Historia Regum Britanniae. ... Merlin Ambrosius (Welsh: Myrddin Emrys (Merlin the Wise); also known as Myrddin Wyllt (Merlin the Wild), Merlin Caledonensis (Scottish Merlin), Merlinus, and Merlyn) is the personage best known as the mighty wizard featured in Arthurian legends, starting with Geoffrey of Monmouths Historia Regum Britanniae. ... In Welsh mythology, Olwen (white track) was a daughter of Ysbaddaden. ... Owain mab Urien (or Owein) (d. ... Ywain rescues the lion Sir Ywain (also called Owain, Yvain, Ewain or Uwain) is a Knight of the Round Table and the son of King Urien in Arthurian legend. ... Peredur Arueu Dur, King of Ebrauc (c. ... Percival or Perceval is one of King Arthurs legendary Knights of the Round Table. ... Urien, father of Owain mab Urien (later known as Ywain), was an historical king of Rheged in northern England and southern Scotland during the 6th century. ... Uther Pendragon (pen-dragon = head of the dragons) is the legendary father of King Arthur in the Arthurian legend. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Orthography

Variations in the spelling of names are due to the fact that many English translations use the original Middle Welsh orthography of the texts instead of Modern Welsh orthography for their spelling. Middle Welsh (Cymraeg Canol) is the label attached to the Welsh language of the 12th to 14th centuries, of which much more remains than for any earlier period. ... The orthography of a language specifies the correct way of writing in that language. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


See also

Template:Buttface mythology Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism annas hippo butt, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts. ...

External links


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