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Encyclopedia > Welsh Guards
Welsh Guards

Cap Badge of the Welsh Guards
Active 1915-present
Country United Kingdom
Branch Army
Type Foot Guards
Role Light Role/Public Duties
Size One battalion
Part of Guards Division
Garrison/HQ RHQ - London
1st Battalion - London
Motto Cymru am Byth (Wales Forever) (Welsh)
March Quick - Rising of the Lark
Slow - Men of Harlech
Anniversaries 1 March (St David's Day)
Commanders
Colonel-in-Chief HM The Queen
Colonel of
the Regiment
HRH The Prince of Wales
Insignia
Tactical Recognition Flash

The Welsh Guards is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division. Image File history File links Welsh-Guards-Cap-Badge. ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... Three infantry battalions of the British army are currently tasked with the provision of Public Duties. ... The Guards Division is an administrative unit of the British Army responsible for the administration of all the units of Foot Guards of the Household Division. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Men of Harlech is a song and military march describing events at the battle for Harlech Castle in 1408, which pitted the forces of Owain Glyndŵr against the future Henry V of England. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor; born Windsor, 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... Image File history File links Guards_TRF.PNG Summary TRF of the regiments of Foot Guards of the British Army Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Guards Division is an administrative unit of the British Army responsible for the administration of all the units of Foot Guards of the Household Division. ...

Contents

Creation in War

The Welsh Guards came into existence on February 26, 1915 by order of His Majesty King George V in order to include Wales in the national component to the Foot Guards. They were the last of the Guards to be created, with the Irish Guards coming into being in 1900. Just two days later, the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards mounted its first King's Guard at Buckingham Palace on 1 March 1915 - St David's Day. February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... This article is about the country. ... Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ... This article deals with the current British Army regiment, for historical regiments, see Historical Irish Guards regiments. ... // The Queens Guard The guard being changed. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Saint Davids Day (Welsh: Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant - Day of the Festival of Saint David) is the day that the patron saint of Wales, Saint David, is celebrated. ...

Welsh Guards by Harry Payne (1858-1927)
Welsh Guards by Harry Payne (1858-1927)

One way to distinguish between the regiments of Foot Guards is the spacing of buttons on the tunic. The Welsh Guards have buttons arranged in groups of five. Welsh Guards by Harry Payne (1858-1927) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years or less. ... Welsh Guards by Harry Payne (1858-1927) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years or less. ... Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ...


On March 17, 1915 the 1st Welsh Guards sailed for France to join the Guards Division to commence its participation in the First World War. Its first battle was some months after its initial arrival, at Loos on September 27, 1915. The regiment's first Victoria Cross came two years later in July 1917 awarded to Sergeant Robert Bye at Pilckem. March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in leap years). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... The British Guards Division was formed in France in 1915 of battalions from the elite Guards regiments of the Regular Army. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nikolay II Aleksey Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Robert Nivelle Herbert H. Asquith D. Lloyd George Sir Douglas Haig Sir John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna... There are things that have the name Loos in France: Communes Loos, in the Nord département Related Loos-en-Gohelle, in the Pas-de-Calais département Persons Adolf Loos François Loos (José Miguel García Loos) writer, book edited in 1997 Personal Marketing in Venezuela. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Victoria Cross medal, ribbon, and bar. ... Robert James Bye was a Welsh recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ...


Inter-War

Soon after the end of the war in 1918 the 1st Welsh Guards returned home and where they would be based for much of the inter-war period, performing training and ceremonial duties, such as the Changing of the Guard and Trooping the Colour. In 1929 the 1st Welsh Guards deployed to Egypt where they joined the Cairo Brigade where they stayed for only a brief period of time, returning home in 1930. Just prior to the outbreak of World War II the 1st Welsh Guards were dispatched to Gibraltar where it remained upon the outbreak of war in September 1939. Contents // Categories: Stub | London attractions ... Elizabeth II riding to Trooping the Colour for the last time in 1986 Trooping the Colour is a military pageant or ceremony performed by regiments of the Commonwealth and the British Army. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Second World War

Welsh Guards in action near Cagny 19 July 1944
Welsh Guards in action near Cagny 19 July 1944

The regiment was increased to three Battalions during WWII. The 1st Battalion fought valiantly in all the campaigns of the North-West European Theatre. The 2nd Battalion fought in Boulogne in 1940 whilst the 1st fought in Belgium as part of the British Expeditionary Force. In May 1940 at the Battle of Arras, the Welsh Guards gained their second Victoria Cross by Lieutenant The Hon. Christopher Furness who was killed in the action. The Welsh Guards were subsequently part of the legendary Evacuation of Dunkirk that saw over 340,000 British and French troops return to the UK against all odds. In 1943 the 3rd Battalion fought throughout the arduous Tunisian and Italian Campaigns. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... There are communes beginning with Cagny in France: Cagny, in the Calvados département Cagny, in the Somme département This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Boulogne-sur-Mer is a city and commune in northern France, in the Pas-de-Calais département of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was the British army sent to France and Belgium in World War I and British Forces in Europe from 1939–1940 during World War II. The BEF was established by Secretary of State for War Richard Haldane following the Second Boer War in case the... The Battle of Arras, was an Allied counter-attack to the German blitzkrieg through France during World War II. // Background Early on during the Battle of France, German forces managed to repel Allied forces and push them back considerably. ... Victoria Cross medal, ribbon, and bar. ... Christopher Furness, 1st Baron Furness (23 April 1852-10 November 1912), was a British businessman and Liberal politician. ... This article is about a Second World War battle in 1940, for the 1658 battle of the same name see Battle of the Dunes (1658) Combatants United Kingdom France Belgium Germany Commanders Lord Gort General Weygand Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Ewald von Kleist (Panzergruppe von Kleist) Strength approx. ...


While they battled on in those theatres the 1st and 2nd joined the Guards Armoured Division, with the 1st Battalion being infantry and the 2nd armoured. The two battalions worked closely, being the first troops to re-enter Brussels on 3 September 1944 after an advance of 100 miles in one day in what was described as 'an armoured lash unequalled for speed in this or any other war'. The Guards Armoured Division was a World War II British Army formation. ... Nickname: The Capital Of Europe, Comic City City of a 100 Museums[] Map showing the location of Brussels in Belgium Coordinates: Country Belgium Region Brussels-Capital Region Founded 979 Founded (Region) June 18, 1989  - Mayor (Municipality) Freddy Thielemans Area    - City 162 (Region) km²  (62. ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ...


Post-War

Shortly after the end of the war the 3rd Battalion was disbanded while the 2nd Battalion was placed in suspended animation. In 1947 the 1st Welsh Guards were dispatched to Palestine, then under British control, while it was in a volatile and violent situation. The Welsh Guards were part of the 1st Guards Brigade and performed internal security (IS) duties while there, before leaving in 1948 during the British withdrawal and the state of Israel was declared. Map of the territory under the British Mandate of Palestine. ... The 1st Infantry Brigade is a British Army formation with a long history including service during the Second World War . ...


In 1950 the regiment arrived in West Germany as part of the 4th Guards Brigade, part of the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR). In 1952 the regiment joined the Berlin Brigade in West Berlin, an enclave in Communist East Germany during tense times between the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the Warsaw Pact. The Welsh Guards returned home the following year and soon after deployed to the British-controlled Suez Canal Zone (SEZ) in Egypt. As in Palestine the Welsh Guards time in Egypt was quite turbulent where they performed internal security duties. They remained in the SEZ until the British withdrawal in 1956, though only shortly afters the UK would be embroiled in the Suez War with Egypt though the Welsh Guards would not participate. There have been two formations named British Army on the Rhine (BAOR). ... After the end of World War II, under the conditions of the Yalta and Potsdam agreements, Allied forces occupied West Berlin. ... Boroughs of West Berlin West Berlin was the name given to the western part of Berlin between 1949 and 1990. ... GDR redirects here. ... NATO 2002 Summit The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on April 4, 1949. ... Unofficial Seal of the Warsaw Pact Distinguish from the Warsaw Convention, which is an agreement about airlines financial liability and the Treaty of Warsaw (1970) between West Germany and the Peoples Republic of Poland. ... 1881 drawing of the Suez Canal The Suez Canal (Arabic, Qanā al-Suways), west of the Sinai Peninsula, forms a 163 km (118 miles) ship canal in Egypt between Port Said (Būr Saīd) on the Mediterranean and Suez (al-Suways) on the Red Sea. ... The Suez Crisis, also known as the Suez War, Suez Campaign or Kadesh Operation was a war fought on Egyptian territory in 1956. ...


In 1960 the regiment deployed to West Germany again. In 1965 the regiment arrived in Aden, another part of the UK's declining Empire and would return home the following year. In 1970 the regiment arrived in Munster, West Germany as part of 4th Armoured Brigade. Port of Aden (around 1910). ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Statistics Area: 24,607. ... The 4th Armoured Brigade was a British Army brigade during the Second World War. ...


In 1972 the regiment deployed to Northern Ireland (NI), them embroiled in violence that became known as "The Troubles". During their tour-of-duty the regiment lost Sergeant Phillip Price in a terrorist attack by the Provisional Irish Republican Army on the Oxford Street Bus Depot in Belfast, one of a series of terrorist attacks in the city which became known as "Bloody Friday". The following year the Welsh Guards were dispatched to NI again and during their deployment lost Guardsman David Roberts in a landmine explosion. Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official languages English (de facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3, BSL, NISL, ISL Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Ian Paisley  - Deputy First Minister... For the UK post-rock band, see Troubles (band) The Troubles is a term used to describe the latest installment of periodic communal violence involving Republican and Loyalist paramilitary organisations, the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), the British Army and others in Northern Ireland from the late 1960s until the late... A Republican mural in Belfast depicting the hunger strikes of 1981. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Bloody Friday is the name given to July 21, 1972, due to bombing by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) in and around Belfast, Northern Ireland on that day. ... “Minefield” redirects here. ...


In 1976 the Welsh Guards were part of the British contingent of the United Nations force deployed to Cyprus in the aftermath of the Turkish invasion of the island in 1974. The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ...


In 1977 the regiment arrived in West Berlin again. In 1979 while the regiment was once more in the volatile situation in Northern Ireland, they lost Sergeant Paul Fryer to a booby trap bomb.


Falklands War

In 1982, the Welsh Guards (CO Lieutenant-Colonel John Rickett) formed part of the 5th Infantry Brigade of the British Task Force sent to liberate the Falkland Islands from Argentinian occupation during the Falklands War. On 7 June they were onboard the ill-fated Sir Galahad, which was accompanied by Sir Tristram, waiting to be landed at Bluff Cove though they were delayed from doing so. However, attack was imminent after the landing craft were spotted by Argentinian observers. At 2:00pm, five Dagger and five A-4 Skyhawk aircraft were seen over the Falklands. Shortly afterwards, the Daggers were the first to attack. They hit the frigate HMS Plymouth with cannon fire as well as bombs, igniting a depth charge aboard the ship, causing slight damage. She survived this engagement, indeed the conflict itself, and is now a museum ship at Birkenhead. The 5th Infantry Brigade was a regular British Army formation from the First World War to disbandment in 1999. ... Combatants United Kingdom Argentina Commanders Sir John Fieldhouse Sir John Woodward Margaret Thatcher Leopoldo Galtieri Mario Menéndez Ernesto Crespo Casualties 258 killed[1] 777 wounded 59 taken prisoner 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner The Falklands War (Spanish: ) was fought in 1982 between Argentina and the... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Sir Galahad (L3005) was the name of a LSL (landing ship logistical) belonging to the Royal Fleet Auxiliary, part of the British fleet. ... RFA Sir Tristram (L3505) is a Landing Ship Logistics of the Round Table class. ... Sea inlet of East Falkland. ... The IAI Nesher is an Israeli-built military aircraft based on the French Mirage 5 Dassault had developed the Mirage 5 at the request of the Israelis. ... The A-4 Skyhawk was an attack aircraft originally designed to operate from United States Navy aircraft carriers. ... HMS Plymouth was a Rothesay class frigate in the Royal Navy from 1959 to 1988. ... Depth Charge used by U.S. Navy later in World War II The depth charge is the oldest anti-submarine weapon. ... Map sources for Birkenhead at grid reference SJ3088 Birkenhead is a town on The Wirral Peninsula, Merseyside, on the left bank of the River Mersey, opposite Liverpool. ...


Only a short time later, the Skyhawks reached Fitzroy, with three of the aircraft hitting the Sir Galahad two or more times with horrific consequences. Sir Tristram was also hit which killed two crewmen, both ships were ablaze. The attack on Sir Galahad culminated in dreadfully high casualties, 48 dead, 32 of them Welsh Guards, 11 other Army personnel and five crewmen from Sir Galahad herself. There were many wounded, many suffering from horrendous burns caused by fire from the burning ships most notably, Simon Weston. The burnt-out Sir Galahad was later scuttled at sea to allow her to become a war grave. Sir Tristram herself was repaired and rebuilt in 1985. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The Welsh Guards returned home soon after the war concluded. They had performed with valour and courage in their involvement in a war 8,000 miles from home, all the more astonishing with the fact they were more adjusted to the numerous ceremonial duties they performed in London. Members of the regiment were awarded 1 Military Cross (MC) and 3 Military Medals (MM). The regiment' was awarded the theatre honour "Falkland Islands 1982". The Military Cross (MC) is the third level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Army and formerly also to officers of other Commonwealth countries. ... The Military Medal was (until 1993) a military decoration awarded to personnel of the British Army and other services, and formerly also to personnel of other Commonwealth countries, below commissioned rank, for bravery in battle on land. ...


See Casualties of the Battle of Bluff Cove On the 24 May 1982, at the height of the Falklands War, a very heavy Argentine airstrike was launched against British shipping in San Carlos Water between the islands. ...


Present-day

In 1984 the Welsh Guards arrived in Hohne, West Germany as part of the 22nd Armoured Brigade and two years later arrived in Northern Ireland for another tour-of-duty before returning to Germany. The regiment returned home in 1988 and in 1992 arrived in NI for a 2-year deployment as part of 8th Infantry Brigade. Hohne is a town in Germany, to the north of Hannover. ...


In 2002 the regiment arrived in Bosnia as part of SFOR, a NATO-led force intended to ensure peace and stability reigns supreme in the Balkan nation. During their deployment HM the Queen Mother died. A number of officers of the Welsh Guards stood in vigil around the Queen Mother's coffin which was lying in state in Westminster Hall, one of a number of regiments to do so. The regiment returned home from their deployment to Bosnia later in the year. They were involved in Operation Fresco, the British armed forces response to the firefighters strike; the Welsh Guards covered the Midlands area, primarily in Birmingham using the antiquated Army Green Goddess fire engine. Motto: none Anthem: Intermeco Bosnia and Herzegovina() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city)  Sarajevo Official languages Bosnian Croatian Serbian Government Parliamentary democracy  -  Presidency members NebojÅ¡a Radmanović1 Haris Silajdžić2 Željko KomÅ¡ić3  -  Chairman of the Council of Ministers Nikola Å pirić  -  High Representative Christian Schwarz... Members of the Dutch, French, German and U.S. military watch as an Italian honour guard hoists the new Stabilisation Force flag during the Stabilisation Force (SFOR) activation ceremony in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on the 20 of December 1996 Pocket badge of the SFOR The Stabilisation Force (SFOR) was... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was the Queen Consort of King George VI from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Lying-in-state is the term used during a major funeral procession when the coffin is placed on public view to allow members of the public to pay their respects to the deceased. ... Clock Tower and New Palace Yard from the west The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Operation Fresco or Op FRESCO is the codename for the provision of basic emergency cover during the industrial action (strike) by civilian firefighters of the United Kingdom, in late 2003 and early 2004. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In general, the midlands of a territory are its central regions. ... The city from above Centenary Square. ... The Green Goddess is the colloquial name for the Bedford RLHZ Self Propelled Pump, a fire engine used by the British Armed Forces. ...


In 2003 the Welsh Guards experienced a unique moment in the Welsh Guards history when they moved from Aldershot to RAF St Athan, Wales the first time the regiment has been based in Wales. This does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that St Athan be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the country. ...


In 2005 The Welsh Guards were part of Op Telic and were based in Basra, Southern Iraq. Here they used valuable relationship-building skills, learnt from their time in Bosnia, to build a bond between the Regiment and the locals.


In 2006, the regiment returned to London as a public duties battalion. It will alternate this role with the Grenadier Guards. The regiment is due to deploy to Bosnia in October 2006, replacing the 2nd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment. Three infantry battalions of the British army are currently tasked with the provision of Public Duties. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... Motto: none Anthem: Intermeco Bosnia and Herzegovina() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city)  Sarajevo Official languages Bosnian Croatian Serbian Government Parliamentary democracy  -  Presidency members NebojÅ¡a Radmanović1 Haris Silajdžić2 Željko KomÅ¡ić3  -  Chairman of the Council of Ministers Nikola Å pirić  -  High Representative Christian Schwarz... The Green Howards (Alexandra, Princess of Waless Own Yorkshire Regiment) is an infantry regiment of the British Army. ... The Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) is one of the large infantry regiments of the British Army. ...


Battle honours

World War I:


Loos, Bapaume 1918, Somme 1916–1918, Arras 1918, Ginchy, Albert 1918, Flers-Courcelette, Drocourt-Quéant, Morval, Hindenburg Line, Ypres 1917, Havrincourt, Pilckem, Canal Du Nord, Poelcappelle, Selle, Passchendaele, Sambre, Cambrai 1917–1918, France and Flanders 1915–1918 There are things that have the name Loos in France: Communes Loos, in the Nord département Related Loos-en-Gohelle, in the Pas-de-Calais département Persons Adolf Loos François Loos (José Miguel García Loos) writer, book edited in 1997 Personal Marketing in Venezuela. ... Bapaume is a chief town of canton of northern France, in the département of Pas-de-Calais, arrondissement of Arras. ... Somme is a French département, named after the Somme River, located in the north of France. ... Arras (Dutch: ) is a town and commune in northern France, préfecture (capital) of the Pas-de-Calais département. ... Albert is a commune of the Somme département, in northern France. ... The Hindenburg Line was a vast system of defences in Northern France constructed by the Germans during the winter of 1916– 17 during World War I; the Germans called it the Siegfried Line. ... Ypres municipality and district in the province West Flanders Ypres (French, pronounced generally used in English1) or Ieper (official name in Dutch, pronounced ) is a Belgian municipality located in the Flemish province of West Flanders. ... Havrincourt is a commune in France, situated in the département of Pas-de-Calais (62) and in the région Nord-Pas-de-Calais. ... Combatants British Empire Australia Canada New Zealand United Kingdom France German Empire Commanders Douglas Haig Hubert Gough Herbert Plumer Arthur Currie Max von Gallwitz Erich Ludendorff Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties 448,000 killed and wounded 260,000 killed and wounded The 1917 Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third... The Sambre is a river rising in northern France and flowing into southern Belgium. ... Cambrai (Dutch: Kamerijk) is a French city and commune, in the Nord département, of which it is a sous_préfecture. ... Flanders (Dutch: ) has several main meanings: the social, cultural and linguistical, scientific and educational, economical and political community of the Flemings; generally called the Flemish community (others refer to this as the Flemish nation) which is, with over 6 million inhabitants, the majority of all Belgians; the constituent governing institution...


World War II:


Defence of Arras, Djebel el Rhorab, Boulogne 1940, Tunis, St Omer-La-Bassee, Hammam Lif, Bourguebus Ridge, North Africa 1943, Cagny, Monte Ornito, Mont Pincon, Liri Valley, Brussels, Monte Piccolo, Hechtel, Capture of Perugia, Nederrijn, Arezzo, Lingen, Advance to Florence, Rhineland, Gothic Line, North West Europe 1940 and 1944–1945, Battaglia, Fondouk, Italy 1944–1945 Arras (Dutch: ) is a town and commune in northern France, préfecture (capital) of the Pas-de-Calais département. ... Boulogne-sur-Mer is a city and commune in northern France, in the Pas-de-Calais département of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Hammam-Lif (Arabic: ‎, pronounced hammam lanf in Tunisian Arabic) is a coastal town about 20 Km south of Tunis, the capital of Tunisia,it is famous since antiquity for its natural thermal sources originating in mount boukornine. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, generally divided by the formidable barrier of the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... Cagny is a commune of the Calvados département, in the Basse-Normandie France. ... The Liri is a river located in southern Italy. ... Nickname: The Capital Of Europe, Comic City City of a 100 Museums[] Map showing the location of Brussels in Belgium Coordinates: Country Belgium Region Brussels-Capital Region Founded 979 Founded (Region) June 18, 1989  - Mayor (Municipality) Freddy Thielemans Area    - City 162 (Region) km²  (62. ... Perugia is the capital city in the region of Umbria in central Italy, near the Tiber river, and the capital of the province of Perugia. ... Categories: Netherlands geography stubs | Rivers of the Netherlands | Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta ... Arezzo (Latin Arretium) is an old city in central Italy, capital of the province of the same name, located in Tuscany. ... Lingen is a town in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... The Rhineland (Rheinland in German) is the general name for the land on both sides of the river Rhine in the west of Germany. ... German defensive positions in Northern Italy 1944 370th Infantry Regiment walking toward the mountains at north of Prato - april 1945 The Gothic Line, also known as Linea Gotica, formed Field Marshal Albert Kesselrings last major line of defence in the final stages of World War II along the summits... Battaglia Terme is a town in the Veneto region of Italy, in the province of Padua. ...


Post WWII


Falkland Islands 1982


Other details

The Colonel-In-Chief of the Regiment is Queen Elizabeth II. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...


The Colonel of the Regiment is Charles, Prince of Wales. The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor; born Windsor, 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ...


The Motto of the regiment is CYMRU AM BYTH (Wales for Ever).


The capbadge is a Leek, which is the national emblem of Wales. Binomial name Allium ampeloprasum (Linnaeus) J. Gay The Leek (Allium ampeloprasum var. ... This article is about the country. ...


The Regimental Quick March is the "Rising of the Lark".


The Regimental Slow March is "Men of Harlech". Men of Harlech is a song and military march describing events at the battle for Harlech Castle in 1408, which pitted the forces of Owain Glyndŵr against the future Henry V of England. ...


The Welsh Guards' colours were trooped at Trooping the Colour 2006. Elizabeth II riding to Trooping the Colour for the last time in 1986 Trooping the Colour is a military pageant or ceremony performed by regiments of the Commonwealth and the British Army. ...


Victoria Cross winners

Robert James Bye was a Welsh recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ...

Order of Precedence

Preceded by:
Irish Guards
Infantry Order of Precedence Succeeded by:
Royal Regiment of Scotland

This article deals with the current British Army regiment, for historical regiments, see Historical Irish Guards regiments. ... For the purposes of parading, the regular army of the British Army is listed according to an order of precedence. ... The Royal Regiment of Scotland is the senior line infantry regiment and only Scottish regiment of the British Army Infantry. ...

Alliances

Image File history File links Flag_of_Australia. ... Soldiers and a M113 from 5/7 RAR during an exercise in 2003. ... Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... HMS Campbeltown (F86) is a Type 22 frigate of the Royal Navy. ...

External Links

  • The Guards MuseumContaining the history of the five regiments of Foot Guards, Wellingon Barracks, London.

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Welsh Guards (518 words)
The Guards Division is an administrative unit of the British Army responsible for the administration of all the units of Foot Guards of the Household Division.
The Welsh Guards, by Brad Chappell (The Regimental Warpath 1914-1918)
The Prince of Wales The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor) (born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.
::Fitzroy and the Welsh Guards:: (735 words)
It is probable that many more Welsh Guards would have been injured if it had not been for the skill of nearby Sea King helicopter pilots who took their helicopters over the deck of ‘Sir Galahad’ despite the exploding ammunition on board to allow their winchmen to pick up the injured.
The Welsh Guards were meant to have been part of the final drive on Port Stanley – however, the attack effectively knocked out their ability as a fighting unit as so much of their kit had been lost.
At the time when the Royal Marine officer urged the Welsh Guards to leave their ships as quickly as possible (about midday), he was told that the sea conditions made the use of the landing craft very difficult especially as some were carrying ammunition.
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