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Encyclopedia > Welsh American
Welsh Americans
Americanwyr Cymreig

Notable Welsh Americans:
Jack Daniel · Abraham Lincoln · Ray Milland
James Abram Garfield · Frank Lloyd Wright
Flag of Wales Flag of the United States
Total population

Welsh
1,753,794 Americans
0.6% of the US population Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (787x1050, 731 KB) Summary Statue of Jack Daniel at the Jack Daniels Distillery, Lynchburg, Tennessee, in November 2004. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2850x3742, 1215 KB) Description Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States of America. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3182x4034, 1045 KB) Description James Garfield, 20th President of the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (403x640, 12 KB) Historic American Building Survey commons:Frank Lloyd Wright en:Frank Lloyd Wright File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Frank Lloyd Wright User:Rfrisbie/QOTD... This is a list of famous Welsh Americans. ... Founder Jack Daniel. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Ray Milland (January 3, 1905 or 1907 – March 10, 1986) was an Oscar-winning Welsh actor and director who worked primarily in the United States. ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 - September 19, 1881) was the 20th (1881) President of the United States, the first left-handed President, and the second U.S. President to be assassinated. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator, and philosopher who designed more than 1,000 projects, of which more than 500 resulted in completed works. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Wales_2. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Regions with significant populations
Northeast; Rockies; the Southern United States
Languages
American English
Religion
Predominantly Christian
Protestant
Mormon
Some Catholics
Related ethnic groups
British Americans (Scottish Americans, Scots-Irish Americans, English Americans), Irish Americans

In the 2000 Census, 1.8 million Americans reported Welsh ancestry, 0.6% of the total US population. This compares with a population of 2.9 million in Wales. Historic Southern United States. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... For more general information about religious denominations that follow the teachings of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... British Americans are citizens of the British or partial British ancestry. ... Scottish Americans or Scots Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Scotland. ... Scots-Irish (formerly Scotch-Irish) is a term used to describe inhabitants of the USA and Canada of Scots-Irish (particularly Ulster-Scots) descent, who formed distinctive communities and had distinctive social characteristics. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... This article is about Welsh people who are considered to be an ethnic group and a nation. ...


However, the name Jones, which is often considered distinctively Welsh, is the fourth most-common surname in America, accounting for over 0.6% of Americans [1], which when taken with others reporting typically Welsh surnames such as Bowen, Bethell, Howell, Jenkins, Davies, Edwards, Evans, Griffith, Gough, Lewis, Llewellyn, Lloyd, Meredith, Morgan, Madox/Madock, Owens, Parry, Powell, Price, Pugh, Vaughan, and Williams, suggests a much higher rate of Welsh ancestry than indicated by self-identification. However, caution must be taken given that a large proportion of the African American population have Welsh names due to the creation of surnames from fathers' forenames (e.g. John ==> Jones) in a similar style to the Welsh, and some use of former slave owners' last names following emancipation. Jones may refer to: People with the surname Jones: Jones (surname) In fictional characters: Jones, a cat in 1979 film Alien by Ridley Scott and its sequel Aliens Jones, a character in George Orwells novel Nineteen Eighty-Four In companies: David Jones Limited, Australian retailing company Dow Jones & Company... Bowen may refer to: // As a surname, originating from the Welsh, ap Owen (son of Owen), Bowen may refer to: Albert E. Bowen (1875–1953), of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Andrea Bowen (1990–), an actress Bruce Bowen (1971–), a professional basketball player Catherine Drinker Bowen... Jenkins is a surname that originated in Cornwall, England, but came to be popular in southern Wales. ... Davies is a common surname. ... John Edwards, a United States Senator from North Carolina and 2004 Vice Presidential running mate of the Democratic Presidential nominee Senator John Kerry. ... Evans is a common family name of English or Welsh origin, see Evans (surname). ... Hon Gough Whitlam Edward Gough Whitlam (born July 11, 1916), Australian politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia, was the only Australian Prime Minister to be dismissed by the Governor-General. ... Lewis is a surname. ... Llewellyn is the usual English spelling of the Welsh name Llywelyn. ... For other uses, see Lloyd. ... Morgan may refer to: // Morgan (surname), people with the surname Morgan Morgan (given name), people with the given name Morgan United Kingdom Morganston, South Wales USA Morgan, Georgia Morgan, Minnesota Morgan, Texas Morgan, Utah Morgan, Vermont Morgan, Wisconsin Morgan County, Alabama Morgan County, Colorado Morgan County, Georgia Morgan County, Illinois... Owens is a traditional Irish surname found in the UK. Bill Owens (born 1950), Republican politician and former Governor of Colorado Brick Owens (1885-1949), American baseball umpire Buck Owens (1929-2006), US country singer Dana Owens AKA Queen Latifah (born 1970), US rapper/singer and actress Dedrick Owens, a... Powell is a traditional Welsh surname said to mean Son of the Servant of St. ... Pugh is a surname, of Welsh origin (ap Hugh), and may refer to Alun Pugh Clifton Pugh Danny Pugh George E. Pugh Herbert Cecil Pugh Hugh Pugh James L. Pugh Jamin Pugh Jethro Pugh Jim Pugh John Pugh Lewis Gordon Pugh Madelyn Pugh Marc Pugh Mark Pugh Max Pugh Richie... Vaughan is a surname, and may refer to many people. ... Williams can refer to: Williams College, a liberal arts college in Williamstown, Massachusetts Williams (surname), a surname Welsh in origin, 3rd most common in the United Kingdom WilliamsF1, a Formula One racing team The Williams Companies, an oil and gas pipeline company Williams International, a manufacturer of jet turbines Williams...


There has been at least eight U.S. Presidents of Welsh extraction including Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, John Adams, John Quincy Adams, and James Garfield. Confederate President Jefferson Davis was also of Welsh extraction.[citation needed] For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was a major general in the United States Army, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and the twentieth President of the United States. ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ...

'Welsh ancestry' Dark red and brown colors indicate a higher density. (see Maps of American ancestries)

Contents

Image File history File links Welsh1346. ... Image File history File links Welsh1346. ... By county. ...

Welsh emigration to the United States

The legend of voyages to America, and settlement there in the twelfth century, led by Madog, son of Owain Gwynedd, prince of Gwynedd, are now considered to lack historical basis. For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... This article is about the legendary Welsh prince. ... Owain Gwynedd (in English, Owen) (c. ... For the fictional Kingdom of Gwynedd in the Deryni series of novels, see Gwynedd (fictional). ...


However, John Cabot an Italian navigator who was one of the earliest people to visit North America from Europe did have Welsh crew members, whom he took on board at Bristol. A folk myth connected with this suggests that the name "America" came from "ap Meuric, Welsh for the son of Maurice." [2] - but it is also possible it was derived from Amerigo Vespucci's first name. It has also been suggested that the name "America" is derived from the name of Richard Amerike or Ameryk (derived from ap Meuric, see above), a Welshman and wealthy Bristol merchant who was the chief investor in John Cabot's second transatlantic crossing in 1497. Giovanni Caboto (c. ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... Amerigo Vespucci (Américo Vespucio in Spanish) (March 8, 1454 - February 22, 1512) was an Italian merchant, explorer and cartographer. ... Richard Amerike (Ameryk or ap Meryk) (c. ... Giovanni Caboto (c. ...


Pennsylvania

In the late seventeenth century, there was a large emigration of Welsh Quakers to Pennsylvania, where a Welsh Tract was established. By 1700, the Welsh accounted for about one-third of the colony’s estimated population of twenty thousand. There are a number of Welsh place names in this area. There was a second wave of immigration in the late eighteenth century, notably a Welsh colony named Cambria established by Morgan John Rhys in what is now Cambria County, Pennsylvania. The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Welsh Tract, also called the Welsh Barony, was a portion of Pennsylvania settled largely by Welsh-speaking Quakers. ... Cambria was a Welsh colony in Pennsylvania, founded during the 18th century and given a Latin name meaning Wales. Categories: US geography stubs ... Morgan John Rhys (1760-1804) was a Baptist minister who preached the principles of the French Revolution, against slavery, and in favour of the reform of parliament. ... Cambria County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ...


On a plaque mounted on the east façade of the imposing Philadelphia City Hall, the following inscription is found: Philadelphia City Hall is the seat of government for the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...

Perpetuating the Welsh heritage, and commemorating the vision and virtue of the following Welsh patriots in the founding of the City, Commonwealth, and Nation: William Penn, 1644-1718, proclaimed freedom of religion and planned New Wales later named Pennsylvania. Thomas Jefferson, 1743-1826, third President of the United States, composed the Declaration of Independence. Robert Morris, 1734-1806, foremost financier of the American Revolution and signer of the Declaration of Independence. Governor Morris, 1752-1816, wrote the final draft of the Constitution of the United States. John Marshall, 1755-1835, Chief Justice of the United States and father of American constitutional law.

For other uses, see William Penn (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons named Robert Morris, see Robert Morris (disambiguation). ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... For other persons named John Marshall, see John Marshall (disambiguation). ...

Ohio

Mass emigration from Wales to the United States got under way in the nineteenth century with Ohio being a particularly popular destination. It is also said that around 20% of the population of Utah are of Welsh descent. This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


In the early nineteenth century most of the Welsh settlers were farmers, but later on there was emigration by coal miners to the coalfields of Ohio and Pennsylvania and by slate quarrymen from North Wales to the "Slate Valley" region of Vermont and New York State. Splitting of the slate blocks with hammer and chisel to produce roofing slates requires great skill. ... Approximate extent of North Wales North Wales (known in some archaic texts as Northgalis) is the northernmost unofficial region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...


Idaho

By the mid-nineteenth century, Malad City, Idaho was established. It began largely as a Welsh Mormon settlement and lays claim to having more people of Welsh descent per capita than anywhere outside of Wales [3]. Malad City (also commonly known as Malad) is the county seat and largest city of Oneida County, IdahoGR6. ... This article is about Welsh people who are considered to be an ethnic group and a nation. ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ...


Tennessee

Following the American Civil War, 104 Welsh immigrant famlies moved from Pennsylvania to East Tennessee. These Welsh families settled in an area now known as Mechanicsville, and part of the city of Knoxville. These families were recruited by the brothers Joseph and David Richards to work in a rolling mill then co-owned by John H. Jones. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ... Mechanicsville is a neighborhood in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Alternate uses: Knoxville (disambiguation) Knoxville is a city located in Knox County, Tennessee, United States. ...


The Richards brothers co-founded the Knoxville Iron Works beside the L&N Railroad, later to be used as the site for the World's Fair 1982. Of the original buildings of the Iron Works where Welsh immigrants worked at, only the structure housing the restaurant 'The Foundry' remains. In 1982 World's Fair the building was known as the Strohause.


Having first met at donated space at the Second Presbyterian Church, the immigrant Welsh built their own Congregational Church with the Reverend Thomas Thomas serving as the first pastor in 1870. However, by 1899 the church property was sold.


The Welsh immigrant families became successful and established other businesses in Knoxville, which included a company that built coal cars, several slate roofing companies, a marble company, and several furniture companies. By 1930 many Welsh dispersed into other sections of the city and neighboring counties such as Sevier County. Today, more than 250 families in greater Knoxville can trace their ancestry directly to these original immigrants. The Welsh tradition in Knoxville is remembered with Welsh descendants celebrating St. David's Day. Sevier County is the name of several counties in the United States: Sevier County, Arkansas Sevier County, Tennessee Sevier County, Utah This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Welsh culture in the United States

One area with a strong Welsh influence is an area in Jackson and Gallia Counties, Ohio, often known as "Little Cardiganshire".[citation needed] The Madog Center for Welsh Studies is located at the University of Rio Grande. The University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College are twin colleges in Rio Grande, Ohio. ...


External links

See also

United States Portal
Wales Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Irish and Scottish music have long been a major part of American music, at least as far back as the 19th century. ... The Welsh Tract, also called the Welsh Barony, was a portion of Pennsylvania settled largely by Welsh-speaking Quakers. ... British Americans are Americans whose ancestry stems, either wholly or in part, from one of the four constituent nations of the United Kingdom. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... Scottish Americans or Scots Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Scotland. ... Scots-Irish (formerly Scotch-Irish) is a term used to describe inhabitants of the USA and Canada of Scots-Irish (particularly Ulster-Scots) descent, who formed distinctive communities and had distinctive social characteristics. ... By county. ... Welsh colonization of the Americas began in the 19th century. ...

Further reading

Edward G. Hartmann, Ph.D., Americans from Wales, Octagon Books, New York, copyright 1983.boo

European American is a term for an American of European descent, who are usually referred as White or Caucasian. ... Northern Europe Northern Europe is the northern part of the European continent. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... Scots-Irish or Scotch-Irish Americans are inhabitants of the USA of Ulster-Scots descent who formed distinctive communities in the New World and had distinctive social characteristics. ... Scottish Americans or Scots Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Scotland. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... A Frisian American is an inhabitant of the United States with full or partial Frisian ancestry. ... The Acadians (French: Acadiens) are the descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia (located in the Canadian Maritime provinces — Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island — and some of the American state of Maine). ... Cajuns are an ethnic group mainly living in Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles and peoples of other ethnicities with whom the Acadians eventually intermarried on the semitropical frontier. ... This article is about Old Order Amish, but also refers to other Amish sects. ... Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... The Pennsylvania Dutch (perhaps more strictly Pennsylvania Deitsch or Pennsylvanian German) are the descendants of German immigrants who came to Pennsylvania prior to 1800. ... Eastern Europe is a concept that lacks one precise definition. ... A Romanian-American is a citizen of the United States who has significant Romanian heritage. ... Rusyn Americans refer to individuals who were born on, or who descended from, the territory of the historic Carpathian Ruthenia, western Ukraine, northeastern Slovakia, and southeastern Poland. ... The southern half of Europe is shown in shades of red. ... Americans of Croatian Descent Bill Belichick Nick Saban Categories: | ... Sicilian Americans are a subset of Italian Americans from Sicily. ... Montenegrin Americans are citizens of the United States who are of Montenegrin ancestry. ... Serbian Americans are citizens of the United States who are of Serbian ancestry. ... Basque-Americans are citizens of the United States who are of Basque ancestry. ... Catalan Americans are residents of the United States who acknowledge Catalan ancestry and self-identify with it. ... Language(s) American English Spanish Spanish in the United States Ladino Religion(s) Predominantly Roman Catholic Protestant Agnostic or Atheist Jewish minorities Related ethnic groups French Americans Italian Americans Portuguese American Footnotes Excludes those not identified as Hispanic or Latino. ... Isleños (from the Spanish, meaning islanders) are descendants of Canary Islanders who came to America and settled in the lower Mississippi Valley of Louisiana between 1778 and 1783. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... American Jews, or Jewish Americans, are Jews who are American citizens or resident aliens. ... Languages Romany, languages of native region Religions Romanipen, combined with assimilations from local religions Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) This article is about the Indo-Aryan ethnic group. ... The Azeri (also known as Azerbaijani) population of Iran is mainly found in the northwest provinces: East Azarbaijan, West Azarbaijan, Ardabil, Zanjan, and as a minority some regions of Kordestan, Hamadan and Markazi. ...

 
 

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