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Encyclopedia > Wellington
Wellington
Country: New Zealand

Coordinates: 41°17′20″S, 174°46′38″E
Population: 448,959
Wellington Region
(2006 Census)

179,466
Territorial-Wellington City Council
(2006 Census)
Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Wellington can refer to various things. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Wellington ... Panorama of Wellington (picture taken by myself) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Wellington_city_coa_n8129. ...

Urban Area
Extent: Inclusive of urban areas of Wellington, Lower Hutt, Upper Hutt, Porirua and the Kapiti Coast District
Territorial Authority
Name: Wellington City
Demonym: Wellingtonian
Mayor: Kerry Prendergast
Extent: N to Tawa, Grenada,
S to Cook Strait; NE to Petone; W
to Makara, Ohariu, Karori & Tasman Sea; E to Seatoun & Wellington Harbour
Land Area: 290km²
Website: http://www.wellington.govt.nz
See also: Lower Hutt, Upper Hutt, Porirua, Kapiti Coast District
Regional Council
Name: Greater Wellington Regional Council
Website: http://www.gw.govt.nz
Time Zone
Standard: NZST (UTC +12)
Daylight Saving: NZDT (UTC +13)

Wellington (unofficially Te Whanganui-a-Tara[1] or Poneke[2] in Māori) is the capital of New Zealand, the country's second largest urban area and the most populous national capital in Oceania. It is in the Wellington region at the southern tip of the North Island, near the geographical centre of the country. Statistics New Zealand defines New Zealand urban areas for statistical purposes. ... Lower Hutt is a city in the lower North Island of the country of New Zealand. ... Upper Hutt is New Zealands smallest city by population, the second largest by land area and is located in the Wellington region of New Zealand. ... Porirua is a city in New Zealand, 20 km north of Wellington. ... The Kapiti Coast District is the name of a local government district in the north-west corner of the Wellington Region, New Zealand. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Kerry Prendergast is in her second term as Mayor of Wellington. ... Lower Hutt is a city in the lower North Island of the country of New Zealand. ... Upper Hutt is New Zealands smallest city by population, the second largest by land area and is located in the Wellington region of New Zealand. ... Porirua is a city in New Zealand, 20 km north of Wellington. ... The Kapiti Coast District is the name of a local government district in the north-west corner of the Wellington Region, New Zealand. ... Regions is the formal term for the top tier of local government in New Zealand. ... The Wellington region of New Zealand occupies the southern end of the North Island. ... On November 2, 1868, New Zealand officially adopted a standard time to be observed nationally, and was perhaps the first country to do so. ... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... On November 2, 1868, New Zealand officially adopted a standard time to be observed nationally, and was perhaps the first country to do so. ... Te Whanganui a Tara is a Maori name for Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. ... Māori or Te Reo Māori, commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) is an official language of New Zealand. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Statistics New Zealand defines New Zealand urban areas for statistical purposes. ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ... The Wellington region of New Zealand occupies the southern end of the North Island. ... North Island The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ...


Like many cities, Wellington's urban area extends well beyond the boundaries of a single local authority. Greater Wellington or the Wellington Region means the entire urban area, plus the rural parts of the cities and the Kapiti Coast, and across the Rimutaka Range to the Wairarapa. The Wellington region of New Zealand occupies the southern end of the North Island. ... Kapiti Island seen from Waikanae Beach, Kapiti Coast. ... The Rimutaka Range (often referred to as the Rimutaka Ranges) is one of several mountain ranges in the North Island of New Zealand which form a ridge running parallel with the east coast of the island between East Cape and Wellington. ... Wairarapa (often known as The Wairarapa) is a geographical region of New Zealand. ...

Contents

Name

Wellington was named in honour of Arthur Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington and victor of the Battle of Waterloo. The Duke's title comes from the town of Wellington in the English county of Somerset. Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... The Dukedom of Wellington, derived from Wellington in Somerset, is a hereditary title and the senior Dukedom in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... Combatants First French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of the United Netherlands Kingdom of Hanover Duchy of Nassau Duchy of Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Prince William of Orange Strength 73,000 67,000 Coalition 60,000 Prussian... Map sources for Wellington, Somerset at grid reference ST1420 Wellington is a small industrial town in rural Somerset, England, situated seven miles south west of Taunton in the Taunton Deane district, near the border with Devon, which runs along the Blackdown Hills to the south of the town. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ...


In Māori, Wellington goes by three names. Te Whanganui-a-Tara refers to Wellington Harbour and means "the great harbour of Tara". Pōneke is a transliteration of Port Nick, short for Port Nicholson (the city's central marae, the community supporting it and its kapa haka have the pseudo-tribal name of Ngāti Pōneke). Te Upoko-o-te-Ika-a-Māui, meaning The Head of the Fish of Māui (often shortened to Te Upoko-o-te-Ika), is a more traditional name, derived from the legend in which the North Island was fished up by the demigod Māui Tikitiki-a-Taranga). Māori or Te Reo Māori, commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) is an official language of New Zealand. ... Te Whanganui a Tara is a Maori name for Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. ... Wellington Habour is the large natural habour at the south-eastern tip of the North Island, on which New Zealands capital stands. ... A Maori word now common in New Zealand English, marae refers an area of land where the Wharenui or meeting house (literally big house) sits. ... A Kapa haka is a group gathered to practise and perform the songs and dances of the Māori people of New Zealand. ... In Māori mythology, Māui is a culture hero, famous for his exploits and his trickery. ...


Importance

Wellington is New Zealand's political centre, housing Parliament and the head offices of all government ministries and departments, plus the bulk of the foreign diplomatic missions based in New Zealand.


Wellington's compact city centre supports an arts scene, café culture and nightlife much larger than most cities of a similar size. It is a centre of New Zealand's film and theatre industry. Te Papa Tongarewa (the Museum of New Zealand), the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, the Royal New Zealand Ballet and the biennial International Festival of the Arts are all sited there. The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, branded and commonly known as Te Papa (officially translated as Our Place, but more correctly The exhibition of treasures), is the national museum of New Zealand. ...


Wellington has the 12th best quality of living in the world, according to a 2007 study by consulting company Mercer. Of cities with English as the primary language, Wellington ranked fourth.1


Settlement

Legend recounts that Kupe discovered and explored the district in about the tenth century. House carving showing Kupe (holding a paddle), with two sea creatures at his feet In the Māori mythology of some tribes, Kupe was involved in the Polynesian discovery of New Zealand. ... ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ...


European settlement began with the arrival of an advance party of the New Zealand Company on the ship Tory, on 20 September 1839, followed by 150 settlers on the Aurora on 22 January 1840. The settlers constructed their first homes at Petone (which they called Britannia for a time) on the flat area at the mouth of the Hutt River. When that proved swampy and flood-prone they transplanted the plans without regard for a more hilly terrain. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The New Zealand Company formed in 1839 to promote the colonisation of New Zealand. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Scenes from the 2006 Fair, Held 18 February. ... The Hutt River looking downstream. ...


Earthquakes

Wellington from Mount Victoria.
Wellington from Mount Victoria.

Wellington suffered serious damage in a series of earthquakes in 1848 and from another earthquake in 1855. The 1855 Wairarapa earthquake occurred on a fault line to the north and east of Wellington. It ranks as probably the most powerful earthquake in recorded New Zealand history, with an estimated magnitude of at least 8.2 on the Richter scale. It caused vertical movements of two to three metres over a large area, including raising an area of land out of the harbour and turning it into a tidal swamp. Much of this land was subsequently reclaimed and is now part of Wellington's central business district. For this reason the street named Lambton Quay now runs 100 to 200 metres from the harbour. Plaques set into the footpath along Lambton Quay mark the shoreline in 1840 and thus indicate the extent of the uplift and of subsequent reclamation. A view of Wellington, New Zealand from the top of Mount Victoria. ... A view of Wellington, New Zealand from the top of Mount Victoria. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealand. ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealand. ... The Central Business District of Sydney, Australia. ... Lambton Quay is the heart of the central business district of Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealand. ...


The area has high seismic activity even by New Zealand standards, with a major fault line running through the centre of the city, and several others nearby. Several hundred more minor fault lines have been identified within the urban area. The inhabitants, particularly those in high-rise buildings, typically notice several earthquakes every year. For many years after the 1855 earthquake, the majority of buildings constructed in Wellington were made entirely from wood. The 1996-restored Government Buildings, near Parliament is the largest wooden office building in the Southern Hemisphere. While masonry and structural steel have subsequently been used in building construction, especially for office buildings, timber framing remains the primary structural component of almost all residential construction. Residents also place their hopes of survival in good building regulations, which gradually became more stringent in the course of the twentieth century. This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ...


New Zealand's capital

The historic former High Court building, future home of the Supreme Court of New Zealand.
The historic former High Court building, future home of the Supreme Court of New Zealand.
Left: The old Government Buildings (now occupied by the Victoria University of Wellington Law Faculty); Centre: the Beehive, Parliament's Executive Wing. Parliament House is just visible to the right.
Left: The old Government Buildings (now occupied by the Victoria University of Wellington Law Faculty); Centre: the Beehive, Parliament's Executive Wing. Parliament House is just visible to the right.
360° panorama of the old Government Buildings.
360° panorama of the old Government Buildings.

In 1865, Wellington became the capital of New Zealand, replacing Auckland, where William Hobson had established his capital in 1841. Parliament first sat in Wellington on 7 July 1862, but the city did not become the official capital for some time. In November 1863 the Premier Alfred Domett moved a resolution before Parliament (in Auckland) that "... it has become necessary that the seat of government ... should be transferred to some suitable locality in Cook Strait." Apparently there was concern that the southern regions, where the gold fields were located, would form a separate colony. Commissioners from Australia (chosen for their neutral status) pronounced the opinion that Wellington was suitable because of its harbour and central location. Parliament officially sat in Wellington for the first time on 26 July 1865. The population of Wellington was then 4,900 [3]. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x800, 589 KB) Summary Picture taken by myself, Lewis Holden, of the proposed new Supreme Court - the Old High Court on Whitmore Street in Wellington. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x800, 589 KB) Summary Picture taken by myself, Lewis Holden, of the proposed new Supreme Court - the Old High Court on Whitmore Street in Wellington. ... The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (660x993, 237 KB) Summary Parliament buildings (2 February 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (660x993, 237 KB) Summary Parliament buildings (2 February 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x386, 158 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wellington User:Mangru ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x386, 158 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wellington User:Mangru ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealand. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... William Hobson (September 26, 1792 - September 10, 1842), was the first Governor of New Zealand and co-author of the Treaty of Waitangi. ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealand. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Alfred Domett, CMG (20 May 1811 – 2 November 1887) was an English colonial statesman and poet. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Wellington is the seat of New Zealand's highest court, the Supreme Court of New Zealand. The historic former High Court building is to be enlarged and restored for the court's use. The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ...


Government House, the official residence of the Governor-General, is in Newtown, opposite the Basin Reserve. Government House, Wellington in Wellington, New Zealand is the principal residence of the Governor-General of New Zealand. ... The Governor-General of New Zealand is the representative of the Sovereign in right of New Zealand (currently, Queen Elizabeth II). ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ...


Location and geography

Satellite photo of the Wellington conurbation: (1) Wellington; (2) Lower Hutt; (3) Upper Hutt; (4) Porirua.
Satellite photo of the Wellington conurbation: (1) Wellington; (2) Lower Hutt; (3) Upper Hutt; (4) Porirua.

Wellington stands at the south-western tip of the North Island on Cook Strait, the passage that separates the North and South Islands. On a clear day the snowcapped Kaikoura Ranges are visible to the south across the strait. To the north stretch the golden beaches of the Kapiti Coast. On the east the Rimutaka Range divides Wellington from the broad plains of the Wairarapa, a wine region of national acclaim. Download high resolution version (1280x948, 206 KB)NASA World Wind composite landsat-7 satellite image of Wellington, New Zealand. ... Download high resolution version (1280x948, 206 KB)NASA World Wind composite landsat-7 satellite image of Wellington, New Zealand. ... North Island The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ... A view of from the summit of Mount Victoria, Wellington - Cook Strait stretches to the right (west). ... The Kaikoura Ranges are two parallel ranges of mountains in the northeast of the South Island of New Zealand. ... Kapiti Island seen from Waikanae Beach, Kapiti Coast. ... The Rimutaka Range (often referred to as the Rimutaka Ranges) is one of several mountain ranges in the North Island of New Zealand which form a ridge running parallel with the east coast of the island between East Cape and Wellington. ... Wairarapa (often known as The Wairarapa) is a geographical region of New Zealand. ...


Wellington is the southernmost national capital city in the world, with a latitude of about 41°S. It is more densely populated than most other settlements in New Zealand, due to the small amount of building space available between the harbour and the surrounding hills. Wellington has very few suitable areas in which to expand and this has resulted in the development of the surrounding cities in the greater urban area. Because of its location in the roaring forties latitudes and its exposure to omnipresent winds coming through Cook Strait, the city is known to Kiwis as "Windy Wellington". This article is about the geographical term. ... The Roaring Forties is a name given, especially by sailors, to the latitudes between 40° and 50°, so called because of the boisterous and prevailing westerly winds. ... A view of from the summit of Mount Victoria, Wellington - Cook Strait stretches to the right (west). ... For other uses, see Kiwi (disambiguation). ...


More than most cities, life in Wellington is dominated by its central business district (CBD). Approximately 62,000 people work in the CBD, only 4,000 fewer than work in Auckland's CBD, despite that city having three times Wellington's population. Wellington's cultural and nightlife venues concentrate in Courtenay Place and surroundings located in the southern part of the CBD, making the inner city suburb of Te Aro the largest entertainment destination in New Zealand. For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Te Aro. ... The Central Business District of Sydney, Australia. ... Dixon Street, looking towards Courtenay Place, in the heart of Te Aro Te Aro is an inner-city suburb of Wellington, New Zealand. ...


Wellington has the highest average income of a main urban area in New Zealand and the highest percentage of people with tertiary qualifications. [citation needed] Statistics New Zealand defines New Zealand urban areas for statistical purposes. ...

Te Papa ("Our Place"), the Museum of New Zealand.
Te Papa ("Our Place"), the Museum of New Zealand.

Wellington has a reputation for its picturesque natural harbour and green hillsides adorned with tiered suburbs of colonial villas. The CBD is sited close to Lambton Harbour, an arm of Wellington Harbour. Wellington Harbour lies along an active geological fault, which is clearly evident on its straight western coast. The land to the west of this rises abruptly, meaning that many of Wellington's suburbs sit high above the centre of the city. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (993x660, 260 KB) Summary Te Papa (Our Place), The Museum of New Zealand (1 February 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (993x660, 260 KB) Summary Te Papa (Our Place), The Museum of New Zealand (1 February 2005. ... Te Papa (Our Place), The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa is the national museum of New Zealand. ... Wellington Habour is the large natural habour at the south-eastern tip of the North Island, on which New Zealands capital stands. ... Old fault exposed by roadcut near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. ...


There is a network of bush walks and reserves maintained by the Wellington City Council and local volunteers. The Wellington region has 500 square kilometres of regional parks and forests.


In the east is the Miramar Peninsula, connected to the rest of the city by a low-lying isthmus at Rongotai, the site of Wellington International Airport. The narrow entrance to Wellington is directly to the east of the Miramar Peninsula, and contains the dangerous shallows of Barrett Reef, where many ships have been wrecked (most famously the inter-island ferry Wahine in 1968). View of Point Dorset and Breaker Bay on the Miramar Peninsula. ... Wellington International Airport (IATA: WLG, ICAO: NZWN) is an international airport located on the Rongotai isthmus, 7 km southeast of central Wellington, New Zealands capital city. ... Map of Wellington Harbour entrance showing Barrett Reef The cluster of rocks that is Barrett Reef (often known as Barretts Reef) is one of the most treacherous reefs in New Zealand. ... The TEV Wahine was a New Zealand inter-island ferry that foundered on Barrett Reef at the entrance to Wellington Harbour in a storm on 10 April 1968, and capsized near Steeple Rock. ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealand. ...


On the hill west of the city centre are Victoria University and Wellington Botanic Garden. Both can be reached by a funicular railway, the Wellington Cable Car. Victoria Universitys Kelburn Campus. ... The Wellington Botanic Garden, Wellington, New Zealand, cover 25 hectares of land on the side of the hill between Thorndon and Kelburn, near central Wellington. ... Angels Flight, Los Angeles, California with gantlet track configuration Duquesne Incline, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with full length parallel tracks The Gütschbahn in Lucerne, Switzerland – from an 1893 guidebook A funicular, also called funicular railway, inclined railway, inclined plane, or, in the United Kingdom, a cliff railway, is a system of... The Wellington Cable Car is a funicular railway in Wellington, New Zealand. ...


Wellington Harbour has three islands: Matiu/Somes Island, Makaro/Ward Island and Mokopuna. Only Matiu/Somes Island is large enough for settlement. It has been used as a quarantine station for people and animals and as an internment camp during the First and Second World Wars. It is now a conservation island, providing refuge for endangered species, much like Kapiti Island further up the coast. There is access during daylight hours by the Dominion Post Ferry. Matiu/Somes Island is the largest of several islands in the northern half of Port Nicholson (Wellington Harbour, New Zealand). ... Kapiti Island seen from Waikanae Beach, Kapiti Coast. ...


The city averages 2025 hours (or about 84 days) of sunshine per year. [citation needed]

Weather averages for Wellington, New Zealand
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C 20.3 20.6 19 16.7 14.2 12 11.4 12 13.5 15 16.6 18.5 15.8
Average low °C 13.4 13.6 12.6 10.9 8.8 6.9 6.3 6.5 7.7 9 10.3 12.2 9.9
Precipitation mm 72 62 92 100 117 147 136 123 100 115 99 86 1,249
Average high °F 69 69 66 62 58 54 53 54 56 59 62 65 60
Average low °F 56 56 55 52 48 44 43 44 46 48 51 54 50
Precipitation inch 2.8 2.4 3.6 3.9 4.6 5.8 5.4 4.8 3.9 4.5 3.9 3.4 49.2
Source: NIWA[4] Oct 2007

Energy

The energy needs of Wellington are increasing: one new source is the wind, and a large farm is approved for that purpose[5] . The project will consist of 70 turbines with a maximum capacity of 210 MW, just a few kilometres to the south-west of Wellington CBD, between Makara Beach and Cape Terawhiti.


Demographics

The population of Wellington, including the outlying areas, is approaching 450,000.


About 180,000 people reside in Wellington City. In the 2006 census, 20.4% of people were under the age of 15 and 9.9% were aged 65 and over. 67.6% (NZ 64.8%) of people in Wellington city said they were of European ethnic origin, 7.4% (NZ 14%) Māori, 12.7% (NZ 8.8%) Asian and 5% (NZ 6.6%) Pacific Island people. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... The Pacific Ocean has an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 islands; the exact number is unknown. ...


Arts and culture

Wellington is considered the arts and culture capital of New Zealand, and is the centre of the nation's film industry.


Film

Peter Jackson famous for the Lord of the Rings, Richard Taylor, and a growing team of creative professionals have turned the eastern suburb of Miramar into one of the world's most acclaimed film-making infrastructures. Directors like Jane Campion and Vincent Ward have managed to reach the world's screens with their independent spirit. Emerging Kiwi film-makers, like Robert Sarkies, Taika Waititi, Costa Botes and Jennifer Bush-Daumec, are extending the Wellington-based lineage and cinematic scope. For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... Dust jacket of the 1968 UK edition The Lord of the Rings is an epic fantasy story by J. R. R. Tolkien, a sequel to his earlier work, The Hobbit. ... Richard Taylor, 2003 Richard Taylor is the creator and head of New Zealand movie prop and special effects company Weta Workshop. ... Miramar is a suburb of Wellington, New Zealand, located southeast of the city centre. ... Jane Campion (born April 30, 1954 in Wellington, New Zealand) is an Academy Award-winning film maker. ... Vincent Ward, ONZM (born Greytown, New Zealand, in 1956) is a film director and screenwriter. ... Robert Sarkies is a New Zealand scriptwriter and film director. ... Taika Waititi is a New Zealand born film director, writer and actor of Maori descent who hails from the East Coast region of New Zealand. ... Costa Botes is a writer, director, and cinematographer. ...


Museums and Cultural Institutions

Wellington is home to Te Papa Tongarewa (the Museum of New Zealand), the Museum of Wellington City and Sea, the Katherine Mansfield Birthplace Museum, Colonial Cottage, the New Zealand Cricket Museum, the Cable Car Museum, Old St Pauls Cathedral, and the Law School (largest wooden building in the southern hemisphere) and the Wellington City Art Gallery. Te Papa (Our Place), The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa is the national museum of New Zealand. ... The City Gallery Wellington is an art gallery in Wellington, New Zealand. ...


Food

Wellington's cafe culture is extremely strong. The city has more cafes per head of population than New York.[6]


Festivals

Wellington has become home to a myriad of high-profile events and cultural celebrations, including a biennial International Festival of the Arts, annual International Jazz Festival, and major events such as Cuba Street Carnival, New Zealand Fringe Festival, Summer City, New Zealand Affordable Art Show, numerous film festivals, and World of Wearable Art. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 795 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 795 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Wellington Cable Car is a funicular railway in Wellington, New Zealand. ... The Wellington Botanic Garden, Wellington, New Zealand, cover 25 hectares of land on the side of the hill between Thorndon and Kelburn, near central Wellington. ... The Cuba Street Carnival is the major street parade and creative celebration in Wellington, New Zealand. ... Wearable Art, also known as Artwear, describes the making of individually designed pieces of usually hand-made clothing as artistic expressions. ...


Music

The local music scene has produced bands such as The Aviators, The Phoenix Foundation, Shihad, Fly My Pretties, Fat Freddy's Drop, The Black Seeds, Fur Patrol, and Trinity Roots. The New Zealand School of Music was established in 2005 through a merger of the conservatory and theory programmes at Massey University and Victoria University of Wellington. New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, Nevine String Quartet and Chamber Music New Zealand are based in Wellington. The Phoenix Foundation are an indie rock band formed in Wellington, New Zealand. ... Shihad is an alternative rock and post heavy metal band (with elements of Industrial Rock) originally from Wellington, New Zealand, where they formed in 1988. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Fat Freddys Drop Fat Freddys Drop are a 7 piece New Zealand roots/dub/reggae/jazz/soul band. ... The Black Seeds The Black Seeds are a band from Wellington, New Zealand. ... Fur Patrol is a rock band, originally from Wellington, New Zealand, now based in Melbourne, Australia. ... Trinity Roots (1998-2005) were a successful band from Wellington, New Zealand. ... Massey University (Māori: ) is New Zealands largest university with approximately 40,000 students. ... Victoria Universitys Kelburn Campus. ... This 90 player orchestra is a Crown Entity owned by the Government of New Zealand. ... String Quartet in Wellington formed in 1995 from the ranks of the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. ...


Performing Arts

Wellington is home to the National Opera Company, City Gallery, the Royal New Zealand Ballet, St James' Theatre, Downstage Theatre, Bats Theatre, the Arts Foundation of New Zealand and the New Zealand International Arts Festival. The Royal New Zealand Ballet is based in Wellington, New Zealand. ... The St. ... The Downstage Theatre is a theatre in Wellington, New Zealand. ... Bats Theatre is New Zealands leading venue for the development of new theatre practitioners and plays. ...


Wellington is also home to groups that perform Improvised Theatre and Improvisational comedy, including Wellington Improvisation Troupe (WIT), The Improvisors and youth group, Joe Improv. Poet Bill Manhire, director of the International Institute of Modern Letters, has turned the Creative Writing Programme at Victoria University of Wellington into a forge of new literary activity. Te Whaea, New Zealand's university-level school of dance and drama, and tertiary institutions such as The Learning Connexion, offer training and creative development. Improvisational comedy (also called improv) is comedy that is performed with a little to no predetermination of subject matter and structure. ... The Wellington Improvisation Troupe (WIT) is Wellington’s not-for-profit, community-based improvisational theatre group. ... Bill Manhire (born in Invercargill in 1946) is an award-winning New Zealand poet and short story writer. ... Victoria Universitys Kelburn Campus. ... Te Whaea: National Dance and Drama Centre, the home to the New Zealand School of Dance and Toi Whakaari: NZ Drama School Category: ...


Arts

The city's new arts centre, Toi Poneke, serves as a nexus of creative projects, collaborations, and multi-disciplinary production. Arts Programmes and Services Manager Eric Vaughn Holowacz and a small team based in the Abel Smith Street facility have produced ambitious new initiatives such as Opening Notes, Drive by Art, the annual Artsplash Festival, and new public art projects. The city is also home to experimental arts publication White Fungus Magazine. The Wellington Arts Centre (61-69 Abel Smith Street, Te Aro, Wellington), is the New Zealand capitals primary creative production facility and support complex. ... Opening Notes, or the Opening Notes Project, is a cultural initiative begun in Wellington, New Zealand. ... Drive by Art is an on-going community public art project in the city of Wellington, New Zealand. ... Wellingtons annual Artsplash Festival is New Zealands largest student arts festival, and comprises over 100 primary and intermediate schools from the lower North Island and over 18,000 students and audience memebers. ... The term public art properly refers to works of art in any media that has been planned and executed with the specific intention of being sited or staged in the public domain, usually outside and accessible to all. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...


Sport

Wellington is the home to:

Sporting events hosted in Wellington include: The Hurricanes (formerly known as the Wellington Hurricanes) are a New Zealand rugby union team based in Wellington and representing the East Coast, Poverty Bay, Hawkes Bay, Taranaki, Wanganui, Manawatu, Wairarapa-Bush, Horowhenua-Kapiti and Wellington unions. ... The Super 14 is the largest rugby union football club championship in the southern hemisphere, consisting of provincial teams from Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. ... The Wellington Rugby Football Union (WRFU) is the official governing body of rugby union in the city of Wellington, the capital of New Zealand. ... The Air New Zealand Cup (also referred to by its previous name of the National Provincial Championship, its abbreviation of NPC, or for sponsorship reasons as the Air New Zealand NPC) is New Zealands professional domestic rugby union competition. ... Wellington Phoenix is a football (soccer) team based in Wellington, New Zealand, competing in the Australian A-League. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Wellington Firebirds are a New Zealand first-class cricket team based in Wellington. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... Wellington Rugby League The Wellington Orcas are a franchise in the Bartercard Cup rugby league competition in New Zealand. ... The Bartercard Cup (successor of the Lion Red Cup) is the top level rugby league club competition in New Zealand. ... Wally Lewis passing the ball in Rugby League State of Origin. ... The Capital Shakers is a New Zealand netball team based in Wellington that competes in the The National Bank Cup competition. ... The National Bank Cup is New Zealands principal womens netball competition. ... A Netball game in Australia Netball is a sport similar to and derived from basketball, and was originally known in its country of origin, the United States, as womens basketball. Invented by Clara Gregory Baer[1], a pioneer in womens sport, it is now the pre-eminent women... Team Wellington are one of the franchises in the New Zealand Football Championship (NZFC). ... The New Zealand Football Championship (NZFC) is the national football league in New Zealand. ... The Wellington Saints are a basketball team that play in the New Zealand National Basketball League . ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with National Basketball League ( NBL ) New Zealand. ... This article is about the sport. ...

The Wellington Sevens or The AXA New Zealand International Sevens (known in 2007, however, as the NZI Sevens) is an annual rugby sevens tournament held in Wellington, New Zealand. ... The IRB logo. ... The IRB Sevens World Series, known officially as the IRB Sevens before the 2006-07 season and also sometimes called the World Sevens Series, is a series of international rugby union sevens tournaments organised for the first time in the 1999-2000 season. ... External shot of the main entrance to Westpac Stadium, emphasising the Cake Tin aspect. ... Bold text // Rugby sevens being played at the 2006 Commonwealth Games, which was held at Melbournes Telstra Dome. ... The Wellington 500 is a 500km street race for touring cars which took place at Wellington City in Wellington, New Zealand. ... Touring car racing is a general term for a number of distinct auto racing competitions in heavily-modified street cars. ...

Gallery

Night panorama of the city centre taken from Mt. Victoria.
Night panorama of the city centre taken from Mt. Victoria.
Panorama from Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn.
Panorama from Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn.
View from the Brooklyn Wind Turbine, Brooklyn, 2005.
View from the Brooklyn Wind Turbine, Brooklyn, 2005.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (13939x1788, 4404 KB) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (13939x1788, 4404 KB) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (9104x1728, 2511 KB) Summary 180 degree panorama taken from the 5th floor of the Cotton building on the Kelburn Campus of the Victoria University of Wellington. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (9104x1728, 2511 KB) Summary 180 degree panorama taken from the 5th floor of the Cotton building on the Kelburn Campus of the Victoria University of Wellington. ... Victoria Universitys Kelburn Campus. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Brooklyn is a suburb of Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. ...

Notable Wellingtonians

(Alphabetically by surname)

Ivan Bootham is a New Zealand novelist, short story writer, poet and composer. ... John Campbell John Campbell is the presenter of Campbell Live, a primetime 7. ... Jane Campion (born April 30, 1954 in Wellington, New Zealand) is an Academy Award-winning film maker. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Jemaine Clement (born January 10, 1974 in New Zealand) is an actor, comedian and writer, best known for being half of the comedy duo Flight of the Conchords with Bret McKenzie. ... For the HBO series based on the band, see Flight of the Conchords (series). ... The Right Honourable Robin Brunskill Cooke, Baron Cooke of Thorndon of Wellington in New Zealand and of Cambridge in the County of Cambridgeshire. ... Russell Ira Crowe (born April 7, 1964) is a New Zealand-Australian[1] actor. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Lauris Dorothy Edmond (April 2, 1924 - January 28, 2000) was a New Zealand poet and writer. ... Brooke Gabrielle Fraser (born December 15, 1983 in Wellington, New Zealand) is an award-winning New Zealand singer-songwriter. ... Patricia Grace (born in Wellington, New Zealand in 1937) is a notable Māori writer of novels, short stories, and childrens books. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Lloyd Jones (born in Lower Hutt, 23 March 1955) is a New Zealand author who currently resides in Wellington. ... Elizabeth Knox was born in 1959 in Wellington, New Zealand. ... Melanie Jayne Lynskey (b. ... Alan Graham MacDiarmid ONZ, (born April 24, 1927) is a chemist. ... Katherine Mansfield (14 October 1888 – 9 January 1923) was a prominent New Zealand modernist writer of short fiction. ... Right Honourable Sir John Ross Marshall GBE (March 5, 1912 – August 30, 1988), generally known as Jack Marshall, was a New Zealand politician. ... Bret McKenzie (born 29 June, 1976 in New Zealand) is a singer and actor, and a member of The Black Seeds. ... For the HBO series based on the band, see Flight of the Conchords (series). ... Sam Morgan is the founder and managing director of TradeMe, New Zealands largest online auction site. ... Anna Helene Paquin (born July 24, 1982) is an Academy Award-winning and Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated Canadian actress. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Willam H. Pickering, JPL/NASA Photo Sir William Hayward Pickering ONZ KBE (December 24, 1910—March 15, 2004) was a New Zealand-American who headed Pasadena, Californias Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for 22 years, retiring in 1976. ... Antonia Mary Prebble is a New Zealand actress most famous for her role as Trudy in the teen-drama The Tribe. ... John Psathas (born 1966) is a New Zealand composer. ... Jonathan D. Sarfati (born October 1, 1964) is a creationist who was trained as a scientist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... There are different people named Tom Scott: Tom Scott, Scottish poet. ... Richard Taylor, 2003 Richard Taylor is the creator and head of New Zealand movie prop and special effects company Weta Workshop. ... Jonathan Charles Toogood (born in Wellington, New Zealand, on August 9, 1971) is a member of the New Zealand band Shihad. ... Shihad is an alternative rock and post heavy metal band (with elements of Industrial Rock) originally from Wellington, New Zealand, where they formed in 1988. ... Ionatana Falefasa Tana Umaga, ONZM, (IPA: , born May 27, 1973) is a New Zealand rugby union footballer and former captain of the national team, the All Blacks. ... First international  Australia 3 - 22 New Zealand  (15 August 1903) Largest win  New Zealand 145 - 17 Japan  (4 June 1995) Worst defeat  Australia 28 - 7 New Zealand  (28 August 1999) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 1987 The All Blacks are New Zealands national rugby... Karl-Heinz Urban (born June 7, 1972) is a New Zealand actor. ... Fran Walsh and her husband Peter Jackson Frances Walsh MNZM is an Academy Award-winning screenwriter and film producer and also a musician. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...

See also

203. ... Civic Square is an open public area at the centre of Wellington, New Zealand. ... Wellywood is an informal name for the city of Wellington, New Zealand. ... Public transport in Wellington, the capital of New Zealand, is well developed compared to other parts of the country. ... The bucket fountain The Bucket Fountain can be found in Cuba Mall, Wellington, New Zealand. ... Cuba Street is one of the most prominent streets in Wellington, New Zealand. ... Near the south end of Lambton Quay, at Hunter St Lambton Quay is the heart of the central business district of Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. ... Dixon Street, looking towards Courtenay Place, in the heart of Te Aro Te Aro is an inner-city suburb of Wellington, New Zealand. ...

References

  1. ^ Te Āti Awa ki Te Whanganui-a-Tara (Māori). Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand.
  2. ^ Poneke. New Zealand Department of Conservation.
  3. ^ Phillip Temple: Wellington Yesterday
  4. ^ NIWA Climate Data 1971-2000 (English).
  5. ^ Makara Wind Farm
  6. ^ Living and working in Wellington

This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... Te Ara Encylopedia of New Zealand, is an online encylopedia created by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage of the New Zealand Government. ... The Department of Conservation (In Māori, Te Papa Atawhai), commonly known by its acronym, DOC, is the state sector organisation of New Zealand which deals with the conservation of New Zealand’s natural and historic heritage. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wellington
  • Greater Wellington Regional Council
  • Official NZ Tourism website for Wellington
  • Wellington City Council
  • Wellington travel guide from Wikitravel

Coordinates: 41°17′20″S, 174°46′38″E Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... // New Zealand Main Articles: Main article on New Zealand, New Zealand Wikiportal and Category:New Zealand Main Articles Māori History of New Zealand Politics of New Zealand Geography of New Zealand Māori culture Economy of New Zealand Demographics of New Zealand Culture of New Zealand New Zealand English... The history of New Zealand dates back at least seven hundred years to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians. ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealand. ... One of the few extant copies of the Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Tiriti o Waitangi) is a treaty signed on February 6, 1840 by representatives of the British Crown, and Māori chiefs from the North Island of New Zealand. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The military history of New Zealand spans several hundred years. ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealands involvement with Antarctica. ... On November 2, 1868, New Zealand officially adopted a standard time to be observed nationally, and was perhaps the first country to do so. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... New Zealand has a total of nineteen marine reserves spread around the North and South Islands, and two on outlying island groups. ... Lake Wakatipu This is a list of lakes in New Zealand. ... This is a list of all waterways named as rivers in New Zealand. ... The following is a list of some of the more well known caves and caverns in New Zealand. ... A map showing the major cities and towns of New Zealand. ... This is a list of towns in New Zealand. ... The biodiversity of New Zealand, a large Pacific archipelago, is one of the most unusual on Earth, due to its long isolation from other continental landmasses. ... Politics of New Zealand takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic monarchy. ... New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm, with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch, since February 6, 1952. ... The Parliament of New Zealand consists of the Queen of New Zealand and the New Zealand House of Representatives and, until 1951, the New Zealand Legislative Council. ... The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... New Zealand national politics feature a pervasive party system. ... Members of New Zealands House of Representatives, commonly called Parliament, normally gain their seats in nationwide general elections, or (less frequently) in by-elections. ... The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... New Zealand’s foreign policy is oriented chiefly toward developed democratic nations and emerging Pacific economies. ... The term Rogernomics, a portmanteau of Roger and economics, was created by analogy with Reaganomics to describe the economic policies followed by New Zealand Finance Minister Roger Douglas from his appointment in 1984. ... New Zealand receives two million tourists per year. ... This is a list of companies based in New Zealand. ... Communications in New Zealand are fairly typical for an industrialized nation. ... There is no one culture of New Zealand. ... Wharenui, Ohinemutu village, Rotorua. ... New Zealand English (NZE) is the English spoken in New Zealand. ... New Zealand claims as its own many writers, even those immigrants born overseas or those emigrants who have gone into exile. ... New Zealand music is a vibrant expression of the culture of New Zealand. ... Holidays in New Zealand can refer to publicly observed holidays or to a vacation period. ... A map showing the major cities and towns of New Zealand. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christchurch (disambiguation). ... Hamilton (Kirikiriroa in Māori) is the centre of New Zealands fourth largest urban area, and is the countrys seventh largest city. ... Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... The T & G Building (Atkin & Mitchell, Wellington, 1936) Napier (Ahuriri in Māori) is an important port city in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand. ... Hastings is the administrative centre of the Hastings District in the Hawkes Bay Region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Tauranga (population 109,100 — 2006 census) is the largest city of the Bay of Plenty region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... // New Zealand Main Articles: Main article on New Zealand, New Zealand Wikiportal and Category:New Zealand Main Articles Māori History of New Zealand Politics of New Zealand Geography of New Zealand Māori culture Economy of New Zealand Demographics of New Zealand Culture of New Zealand New Zealand English... This is a list of well-known people associated with New Zealand. ... Queen Elizabeth II wearing the sash and the star of the New Zealand Order of Merit, as well as the badges on her shoulder of the Order of New Zealand and the Queens Service Order. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Duke of Wellington (1750 words)
Wellington was appointed Colonel of the 33rd Regiment of Foot in January 1806.
Wellington was blamed for the Convention although he was cleared of responsibility by a military enquiry in Britain whence he returned in October 1808.
Wellington's speech in response to Grey's question caused such a furore that he was obliged to resign on 16 November; Earl Grey formed the first Whig ministry since 1783 and brought in the so-called Great Reform Bill in 1832.
Wellington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2272 words)
Wellington is in the Wellington Region and stands at the southern tip of the North Island in the geographical centre of the country.
Wellington was named in honour of Arthur Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington and victor at the Battle of Waterloo.
Wellington is the southernmost national capital city in the world, with a latitude about 41°S. It is more densely populated than most other settlements in New Zealand, due to the small amount of building space available between the harbour and the surrounding hills.
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