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Encyclopedia > Wellesley College
Wellesley College

Motto: Non Ministrari sed Ministrare
Motto in English: Not to be ministered unto, but to minister
Established: Chartered in 1870; Opened doors in 1875
Type: Private
President: H. Kim Bottomly
Faculty: Approximately 290
Undergraduates: Approximately 2,300
Location: Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA
Campus: Suburban, 450+ acres
Endowment: $1.67 billion (June 2007)
Mascot: Blue
Website: wellesley.edu

Wellesley College is a girls school, in Wellesley, Massachusetts, that opened in 1875, founded by John Adams and his wife Pauline Fowle Adams in honor of John's cousin's son's communion. Today, the mission of the college is to "provide an excellent liberal arts education for women who will make a difference in the world." The college's motto, "Non Ministrari sed Ministrare" (not to be ministered unto but to minister), reflects this purpose. According to current U.S. News and World Report rankings, Wellesley College is the #4 liberal arts college in the United States. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... Cafe Hoop is a cooperative, student-run coffee shop at Wellesley College. ... There are several schools known as Wellesley College, including Wellesley College, a womens liberal arts school located in the United States (Massachusetts) Wellesley College (New Zealand), a boys primary school, located in New Zealand Category: ... Image File history File links Wellesley College seal This work is copyrighted. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Wellesley is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Pro-life demonstrators at the March for Life in Washington, D.C. on January 22, 2002. ... Look up republican in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wellesley is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Contents

Overview

Situated in Wellesley, Massachusetts (12 miles west of Boston), Wellesley College grants four-year baccalaureate degrees and is one of the original Seven Sisters. Approximately 2,300 students attend this highly selective school. Based on rankings by U.S. News & World Report, Wellesley consistently ranks among the top five liberal arts colleges in the United States, and is the highest ranking women's college in this category. Boston redirects here. ... The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


The current president of Wellesley College is H. Kim Bottomly, formerly of Yale University[1]. The previous president was Diana Chapman Walsh, class of 1986. Throughout its history, the college has always had female presidents. Twelfth President of Wellesley College ...


According to admissions literature, classes at Wellesley range from 12 to 24 students in size, and there are approximately 9 students for every faculty member. Wellesley's libraries contain over 1.5 million catalogued books, journals, media recordings, maps, and other items.


As of June 30, 2007, the endowment for the college was about $1.7 billion. Wellesley doesn't have a generous financial aid policy and isn't one of the most socioeconomically diverse colleges in the country. Fifty-five percent of all students receive financial aid. In February 2008, the College eliminated loans for students from families with incomes under $60,000 (and for international students and Davis Scholars) and lowered loans by a third (to a maximum of $8,600 total over 4 years) to students from families with incomes between $60,000 and $100,000. The maximum loan level for other students on aid is $12,825 total for 4 years. Wellesley is one of only a few colleges or universities to meet 100% of a student's demonstrated financial need.[1] is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Wellesley's last fundraising campaign, in 2005, set a record for liberal arts colleges with a total of $472.3 million, 18.1% more than the goal of $400 million. According to data compiled by The Chronicle of Higher Education, Wellesley’s campaign total is the largest of any liberal arts college. The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ...


The college also has a special program for non-traditionally aged women, called Davis Scholars.[2]The program allows women who, for various reasons, were unable to start or complete a bachelor's degree, to attend Wellesley.


The college is renowned for the picturesque beauty of its 500-acre (2 km²) campus which includes Lake Waban, evergreen and deciduous woodlands and open meadows. Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., Boston's preeminent landscape architect at the beginning of the 20th century, described Wellesley's landscape as "not merely beautiful, but with a marked individual character not represented so far as I know on the ground of any other college in the country." Frederick Law Olmsted (April 25, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was an American landscape designer and father of American landscape architecture, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. ...


Wellesley and MIT were the two primary institutions Benson Snyder studied in The Hidden Curriculum (1970), in which he concludes that a mass of unstated requirements and expectations thwarts students' ability to think creatively or develop independently. The Hidden Curriculum (1973 edition) The Hidden Curriculum (1970) is a book by Benson R. Snyder, the then-Dean of Institute Relations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ...


For a long time, Wellesley has produced more women in top positions in Corporate America than any other college or university, according to an article in the New York Times in 1995 (see reference below). They included Lois Juliber, then at Colgate, Marion O. Sandler, then at Golden West Financial, Ellen Marram, then at Seagram's Beverage Group, and Donna Ecton, then at Business Mail Express. Sheila Wellington was, at the time, president of Catalyst, the women's advocacy and research group.


History

Founded by John and Pauline Fowle Adams, the charter for Wellesley College was signed on March 17, 1870 by Massachusetts Governor William Claflin. The original name of the College was the Wellesley Female Seminary, and the renaming to Wellesley College was approved by the Massachusetts legislature on March 7, 1873. Opening day was October 8, 1875. is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Claflin (1818-1905) was an industrialist and philanthropist who served as Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from 1869-1872 and as a member of Congress from 1877-1881. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


The first president was Ada Howard. There have been twelve subsequent presidents: Alice Elvira Freeman Palmer, Helen Almira Shafer, Julia Josephine Thomas Irvine, Caroline Hazard, Ellen Fitz Pendleton, Mildred H. McAfee (later Mildred McAfee Horton), Margaret Clapp, Ruth M. Adams, Barbara Wayne Newell, Nannerl Overholser Keohane (later the president of Duke University from 1993-2004), Diana Chapman Walsh and Kim Bottomly. Ada Howard was the first president of Wellesley College. ... Alice Elvira Freeman Palmer (February 21, 1855 - December 6, 1902) was an American educator. ... Ellen Fitz Pendleton (1864-1936) was an American college president. ... Mildred Helen McAfee Horton (May 12, 1900 - September 2, 1994) was the first director of the WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) in the United States Navy. ... Duke University is a private research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... Twelfth President of Wellesley College ...


The original architecture of the College consisted of one very large building, College Hall, which was approximately 150 meters in length, and up to five stories in height. Until 1914, it was both a principal academic building and a principal residential building. On March 17, 1914 College Hall was destroyed by fire. The precise cause of the fire was never officially established. The fire was first noticed by students who lived on the fourth floor near the zoology laboratory. It has been suggested that an electrical or chemical accident in this laboratory- specifically, an electrical incubator used in the breeding of beetles- triggered the fire. A group of residence halls, known as the Castle Court complex, are located on top of the hill where the old University Hall once stood. Wellesley is also home to Hetty Hall, the only building bearing the name of famed miser Hetty Green; Galen L. Stone Tower, in which a 32-bell Carillon is housed, is part of the building. is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Henrietta Hetty Howland Robinson Green (1834-1916) Henrietta Hetty Howland Robinson Green (November 21, 1834 – July 3, 1916) was an American businesswoman, remarkable for her frugality during the Gilded Age, as well as for being the first American woman to make a substantial impact on Wall Street. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ...


Wellesley's campus is uniquely site specific. After a visit in 1902, Frederick Law Franklin, Jr. wrote: I must admit that the exceedingly intricate and complex topography and the peculiarly scattered arrangement of most of the buildings somewhat baffled me. [3] The original master plan for Wellesley's campus landscape was developed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., Arthur Shurcliff, and Ralph Adams Cram in 1921. This landscape-based concept represented a break from the architecturally-defined courtyard and quadrangle campus arrangement that was typical of American campuses at the time. The 720-acre site's glaciated topography, a series of meadows, and native plant communities shaped the original layout of the campus, resulting in a campus architecture that is integrated into its landscape. The most recent master plan for Wellesley College was completed in 1998 by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc. (MVVA). According to the designers, this plan was intended to restore and recapture the original landscape character of the campus that had been partially lost as the campus evolved through the twentieth century. Federick Law Olmsted, Jr. ... Arthur Asahel Shurcliff (1865 - 1957) was a noted American landscape architect. ... Ralph Adams Cram, circa 1890 Ralph Adams Cram, (December 16, 1863 - September 22, 1942), was an American architect of collegiate and ecclesiastical buildings, often in the gothic style. ... Profile Michael Van Valkenburgh (b. ...


Student life

Wellesley's 2,400 students come from more than 95 countries and every U.S. state except Mississippi. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...


Nearly all students live on campus in one of the 36 residence halls. Some cooperative housing is available. Wellesley offers housing for Davis Scholars as well[2], though not for their children or spouses, which is an issue of constant debate on campus[3]. Additionally, despite student protests, Wellesley is currently removing overnight infirmary care for all students and expanding health clinic hours and services, bringing it in line with most other colleges and universities. Non-traditional students is an American English term referring to students at higher education institutions (undergraduate college or university) who generally fall into two categories: Students who are older than the typical undergraduate college student (usually aged 17-23) and interupted their studies earlier in life Students typical of age...


A June 03, 2008 article in The New York Times discussed the move by women's colleges in the United States to promote their schools in the Middle East. The article noted that in doing so, the schools promote the work of graduates of women's colleges such as Hillary Rodham Clinton, Emily Dickinson, Diane Sawyer, Katharine Hepburn and Madeleine K. Albright. The Dean of Admissions of Bryn Mawr College noted, "We still prepare a disproportionate number of women scientists [...] We’re really about the empowerment of women and enabling women to get a top-notch education." The article also contrasted the difference between women's colleges in the Middle East and "the American colleges [which] for all their white-glove history and academic prominence, are liberal strongholds where students fiercely debate political action, gender identity and issues like “heteronormativity,” the marginalizing of standards that are other than heterosexual. Middle Eastern students who already attend these colleges tell of a transition that can be jarring." The article further quoted a Sri Lankan student (who had attended a coeducational school in Dubai) who stated that she was "shocked by the presence of so many lesbians among the students" and the "open displays of affection."[4] June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. ... Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born May 15, 1937 in Prague, Czechoslovakia), American diplomat, served as the 64th United States Secretary of State. ... Bryn Mawr College (pronounced ) is a highly selective womens liberal arts college located in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania, ten miles northwest of Philadelphia. ... Location of Dubai in the UAE Coordinates: , Country Emirate Dubai Incorporated (town) June 9, 1833 Incorporated (emirate) December 2, 1971 Founder Maktoum bin Bati bin Suhail (1833) Seat Dubai Subdivisions Towns and villages Jebel Ali Hatta Al Hunaiwah Al Aweer Al Hajarain Al Lusayli Al Marqab Al Shindagha Al Faq...


For more than 90 years, Wellesley has had a cross-registration program with MIT. In recent years, cross-registration opportunities have expanded to include nearby Babson College, Brandeis University, and Olin College of Engineering. To facilitate cross-registration, the College operates a horseless carriage-- the Wellesley College Senate Bus -- to the MIT and Harvard campuses in Cambridge, Massachusetts as well as a bus to the Olin College campus in Needham, Massachusetts. Babson College, located in Wellesley, Massachusetts (zoned as Babson Park, ZIP code 02457),[1] is a private business school which grants all undergraduates a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. ... Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... The Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering (abbreviated as Olin College) is a private undergraduate engineering college located in Needham, Massachusetts (near Boston), adjacent to the Babson College campus. ... The Senate Bus. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... Olin College is a selective, private college for undergraduate engineering students. ... Needham is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. ...


The College has approximately 45 student organizations, ranging from cultural and political organizations to community service, campus radio, and club sports. There are also several social events on campus, most notably the Tower Court mixer and the Dyke Ball. In recent years, the administration has made attempts to de-emphasize the role of music-related social events on campus[citation needed], and as a result, the Tower Court mixer has been eliminated and the Dyke Ball has been turned into a much smaller affair than in previous years. The College has been accused of having a very over-protective attitude to alcohol consumption and partying, which is both patronising and counterproductive. Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... Refers to a set of physical activities comprising sports and games. ...

Image File history File links Question_book-new. ...

Traditions

As is the case with many colleges, especially the Seven Sisters, Wellesley College has many traditions. Each new fall semester is marked by a non-denominational service known as Flower Sunday. Upperclasswomen are matched up with first-years who become their "little sisters." On the morning of Flower Sunday, the older students give their little sisters flowers before the service. The big sisters often become friends and mentors to their little sisters. While the service itself has changed over the years, today it consists of speeches made by the college president and deans, recitation of poetry, and several songs by the Wellesley College Choir. Additionally, student representatives from each of the many religious groups present a short reading from their faith. The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ...


Hoop rolling is also a highly competitive annual tradition at the college dating back to 1895[5]. Each upperclasswoman has a wooden hoop, often passed down to her from her “big sister.” Before graduation, the seniors, wearing their graduation robes, run a short race while rolling their hoops. The winner of the race is said to be the first woman in her class to achieve success however she defines it, though this title has itself changed over the years. She is also awarded flowers by the college president and tossed into Lake Waban. The tossing of the winner into the lake began several decades ago when a Harvard University male, dressed as a Wellesley student, won the race. When, upon his victory, it was discovered that he wasn’t a Wellesley student, he was thrown into the lake. The night before the race, many “little sisters” will camp out on the racecourse near the Library to save a good starting position for their “big sisters.” Ganymede rolling a hoop and bearing aloft a cockerel - a love gift from Zeus (in pursuit, on obverse of vase). ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Some other traditions include step-singing, dorm and class crew races, Lake Day, and Marathon Monday. Each graduation class plants a tree during their sophomore year. Class trees, as they are called, can be found all over the campus, marked with each class’ year on a stone at the trees’ base.


Wellesley College’s crew team is known to be the first female collegiate crew team in the country. While today the team itself is a NCAA varsity sport, crew is widely experienced by many students by their participation in dorm and class crew regattas. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Step-singing is one of the college’s oldest traditions and occurs multiple times throughout the year. Each graduation class has their own color (purple, red, green, or yellow). Students dress in their class' color and sing songs on the steps of the chapel. In-between some of the songs, the classes shout cheers that make fun of the other classes.


Each fall, on a date that is not announced until the night before, students celebrate Lake Day. The event consists of fun outdoor activities ranging from fried-dough stands to moonwalks and is deejayed by the college radio station.


One of the most popular traditions is the celebration of Marathon Monday which occurs on Patriots Day each spring, and is highlighted by the Boston Marathon. The marathon course passes the college, which marks its halfway point. Students line up along the street with posters and cheer for the runners. Since they are so loud, the students have created what is widely known as the “Wellesley Scream Tunnel.” Patriots Day (sometimes spelled Patriots Day or without the apostrophe) is a holiday in the U.S. states of Massachusetts, Maine, and Wisconsin. ... The 100th running of the Boston Marathon, 1996 The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event hosted by the city of Boston, Massachusetts, on Patriots Day, the third Monday of April. ...


Since 1970 three alumnae are honored at the Alumnae Achievement Awards every February for outstanding achievements in their respective fields.


Wellesley in popular culture

Image File history File links Question_book-new. ...

Literature

  • In John Irving's novel The World According to Garp, the protagonist's mother, Jenny Fields, attended Wellesley but dropped out in an act of rebellion against her upper-class parents.
  • In Francisco Goldman's novel The Long Night of White Chickens, the character Flor de Mayo Puac, a Guatemalan orphan who is adopted by a Jewish/Guatemalan family living in Massachusetts, graduates from Wellesley.
  • It's allegedly the inspiration for Beardsley Women's College in Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita.[citation needed]
  • In Flannery O'Conner's short story "Revelation", Mary Grace is a student of Wellesley College.
  • In Rishi Reddi's short story collection, entitled "Karma and Other Short Stories," a character has her heart broken while walking around Lake Waban of Wellesley College.
  • In J.D. Salinger's short story "The Laughing Man", the character Mary Hudson attended Wellesley College.

John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... The World According to Garp book cover The World According to Garp is a novel by John Irving. ... Francisco Goldman is a famous author born of a Guatemalan mother and a Jewish-American father. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This page is about the novelist. ... This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for The Catcher in the Rye, a classic coming-of-age story that has enjoyed enduring popularity since its publication in 1951. ...

Print media

  • A widely-read 2001 article in Rolling Stone entitled "The Highly Charged Erotic Life of the Wellesley Girl" explored sexuality and sexual behavior at Wellesley College. [4]

This article is about the magazine. ...

Film

  • Wellesley is the college in which the 2003 film Mona Lisa Smile was set; some of the outdoor scenes were filmed on campus.
  • Mentioned in the movie Girl, Interrupted as the school Winona Ryder's character's former classmate will be attending instead of Radcliffe.
  • Mentioned in the movie Slap Her, She's French in which a full ride to Wellesley College for a broadcasting major is offered to the competing contestants
  • Sigourney Weaver's character in the movie Working Girl, Katherine Parker, is a graduate of Wellesley.
  • Kim Novak's character (a witch) from the 1958 film Bell, Book and Candle claimed to be responsible for the "terrible thunder-storms" at Wellesley College while Gillian Holroyd and Merle Kittridge were students.
  • The school is also mentioned in the film Wonder Boys by the father in law of Professor Grady Tripp.

Mona Lisa Smile is a 2003 American film that was produced by Revolution Studios and Columbia Pictures, directed by Mike Newell, written by Lawrence Konner and Mark Rosenthal, and starring Julia Roberts, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Kirsten Dunst, and Julia Stiles. ... This article is about the 1999 film. ... Radcliffe College was a liberal arts womens college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, closely associated with Harvard University. ... Working Girl is an Academy Award nominee for Best Picture and an Academy Award winner for Best Song (Let the River Run by Carly Simon), which tells the story of a Staten Island-raised secretary, Tess McGill, working in the mergers and acquisitions department of a Wall Street investment bank. ... For the religious phrase, see Bell, book, and candle. ... Wonder Boys is a 2000 motion picture starring Michael Douglas, Tobey Maguire, Frances McDormand, Katie Holmes, and Robert Downey Jr. ...

Television

Shirley Schmidt is a fictional character in the ABC Television Network series Boston Legal. ... Candice Patricia Bergen (born May 9, 1946) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning American actress and former fashion model, primarily for her roles in sitcoms and television. ... Boston Legal is a Golden Globe, Peabody and Emmy Award winning American legal drama comedy created by David E. Kelley that has aired since October 3, 2004. ... Miranda Bailey is the name of a fictional character on the ABC television series Greys Anatomy. ... Chandra Wilson (born August 27, 1969) is an American actress. ... This article is about the television series. ... Lucy Alexis Liu (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; born December 2, 1968) is an Emmy Award-nominated American actress. ... Cashmere Mafia is an American television dramedy which ran on ABC from January 6, 2008 to February 20, 2008. ... Im Spelling as Fast as I Can is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons fourteenth season. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Lisa Marie Simpson is a character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Yeardley Smith; Lisa is the only character Smith voices on a regular basis. ... The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ... George Ames Plimpton (March 18, 1927 – September 25, 2003) was an American journalist, writer, editor, and actor. ... Little Big Girl is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons eighteenth season, which originally aired on February 11, 2007. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This article is about a television show. ... Julia Sugarbaker is a fictional character in the long-running television series, Designing Women. ... Dixie Carter in a 1986 Designing Women episode Dixie Virginia Carter (born May 25, 1939) is an American actress noted for her portrayals of Southern women. ... Allison Sugarbaker is a character in the television series, Designing Women. ... For the fictional character in the Axis of Time trilogy, see Julia Duffy (Axis of Time). ... “The Story on Page One” is an episode from the second season of the FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Megan Meg Griffin is a fictional character from the animated television series Family Guy. ... SNL redirects here. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is about the TV series. ...

Honorary Degrees awarded

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Serena Jameka Williams, (born September 26, 1981) is an American female tennis player who has won eight Grand Slam singles titles and an Olympic gold medal in womens doubles. ... McCain redirects here. ... Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Jr. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... For other persons named John Connor, see John Connor (disambiguation). ...

Notable alumnae and faculty

A number of Wellesley students/alumnae have gone on to become notable in their respective fields. For example: The following is a list of individuals associated with Wellesley College through attending as a student, or serving as a member of the faculty or staff. ... Image File history File links Question_book-new. ...

  • Filiz Akın, actress
  • Ekrem Bora, actor
  • Jules Verne, author
  • Emin Çölaşan, journalist
  • Umit Gorgulu, architect
  • Can Dündar, journalist

Notable former faculty members include Tom Lehrer, Vladimir Nabokov, Richard Rorty, Jorge Guillén, David Ferry, and Alice Walker. Filiz Akın (born as Suna Akın in 1943, Ankara) is a [Turkish]] actress. ... This article is about the French author. ... Emin ÇölaÅŸans daily column in Hürriyet Emin ÇölaÅŸan is a Turkish investigative journalist and a daily columnist in the mass-circulation newspaper Hürriyet. ... Can Dündar (Born July 16, 1961, Ankara) is a Turkish journalist, columnist and documentarian. ... Erdal Ä°nönü, born on June 6, 1926 in Ankara, Turkey is a Turkish physicist and politician. ... Vehbi Koç, born on July 20, 1901 in Çoraklı, Ankara, Turkey was a Turkish businessman and philanthropist. ... Kartal Tibet (born 1938 in Ankara) is a Turkish actor. ... Soong May-ling or Soong Mei-ling, also known as the Madame Chiang Kai-shek (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; ca 1897 [1] – October 23, 2003) was the youngest of the three Soong sisters. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... For the American explorer, see Harriet Chalmers Adams. ... For the film, see Nancy Drew (2007 film). ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born Marie Jana Korbelová on May 15, 1937) was the first woman to become United States Secretary of State. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... President Clintons Cabinet, circa 1993 Headed by President of the United States Bill Clinton, the Clinton Administation was the executive branch of the federal government of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... Laura Allen (born March 21, 1974 in Portland, Oregon) is an American actress. ... All My Children (AMC) is a popular American soap opera that has been broadcast Monday through Friday on the ABC TV network since January 5, 1970. ... Dirt (styled d!rt for logos) is an American television serial presented by the FX network. ... For other uses, see Julia Roberts (disambiguation). ... Mona Lisa Smile is a 2003 American film that was produced by Revolution Studios and Columbia Pictures, directed by Mike Newell, written by Lawrence Konner and Mark Rosenthal, and starring Julia Roberts, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Kirsten Dunst, and Julia Stiles. ... Ordal Demokan (January 13, 1946 - October 29, 2004) was a Turkish physicist. ... Yasemin Dalkılıç, born May 2, 1979 in Ankara, is a Turkish free diver. ... Vedat Dalokay (November, 1927 - March 21, 1991) was a renowned Turkish architect. ... Katharine Lee Bates, (August 12, 1859 - March 26, 1929), is remembered as the author of the words to the anthem America the Beautiful. ... Emilie Benes Brzezinski is an American sculptor. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ... Nora Ephron Nora Ephron (born May 19, 1941 in New York City, New York) is an American film director, producer, screenwriter and novelist. ... Rape victim Susan Estrich (born Susan Estrich December 16, 1952) is a lawyer, professor, author, political operative, feminist advocate and commentator for Fox News who was raped. ... The Editor in chief is a publications primary editor. ... The Harvard Law Review is a journal of legal scholarship published by an independent student group at Harvard Law School. ... In the United States, Canada and Brazil, a law clerk is a person who provides assistance to a judge in researching issues before the court and in writing opinions. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is currently the most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... In United States and other democracies, political campaigns larger than a few individuals generally include a campaign manager whose role is to coordinate the campaigns operations. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and was the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 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Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ... Lynn Sherr is a broadcast journalist, known as a correspondent for the ABC news magazine 20/20. ... This article is about the television show. ... Elisabeth Judson Shue (born October 6, 1963) is an Academy Award-nominated American film actress. ... Wang Peng (Chinese:王鹏) is a Chinese football player who currently plays for Dalian Shide. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Linda Wertheimer is a radio journalist for National Public Radio (NPR). ... NPR redirects here. ... Bing Xin (Chinese: 冰心; pinyin: BÄ«ng XÄ«n) (October 5, 1900-February 28, 1999) was a Chinese writer and poet. ... Patricia Zipprodt (February 24, 1925 - July 17, 1999) was a Tony Award-winning American costume designer. ... 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External links

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.wellesley.edu/sfs/UnderstandingFinAid.html
  2. ^ http://www.wellesley.edu/NSP/davisProgram.html
  3. ^ Campbell, Robert, "Center of Attention on a Centerless Campus," Boston Globe, November 2005
  4. ^ ‘Sisters’ Colleges See a Bounty in the Middle East
  5. ^ Rachel Goldstein Wins Wellesley's 113th Annual Hoop Rolling Contest. http://www.wellesley.edu/PublicAffairs/Releases/2008/042608a.html
  6. ^ Chira, Susan. "HARRIET ADAMS DIES; NANCY DREW AUTHOR WROTE 200 NOVELS", The New York Times, March 29, 1982. Accessed October 7, 2007. "Mrs. Adams was born in Newark, and was graduated from Wellesley College in 1914."
  • Converse, Florence (1915). The Story of Wellesley]. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company. (Project Gutenberg E Text)
  • Glasscock, Jean et al. (Eds.) (1975). Wellesley College 1875-1975: A Century of Women. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College. 
  • Hackett, Alice Payne (1949). Wellesley: Part of the American Story. New York: E.P. Dutton & Co. 
  • Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz. Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women's Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the 1930s, Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1993 (2nd edition).
  • Kingsley, Florence Morse (1924). The Life of Henry Fowle Durant. New York: The Century Co. 
  • "Wellesley College Public Information". Wellesley College. Retrieved on April 16, 2005.
  • How to Succeed? Go to Wellesley by Judith H. Dobrzynski, The New York Times, Oct. 29, 1995
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Colleges and universities in metropolitan Boston include: // Berklee College of Music Boston Architectural College Boston Baptist College Boston Conservatory Boston University Emerson College Emmanuel College Massachusetts College of Art Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences New England College of Optometry New England Conservatory of Music New England School of... Babson College, located in Wellesley, Massachusetts (zoned as Babson Park, ZIP code 02457),[1] is a private business school which grants all undergraduates a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. ... Bay State College is a small private college in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology (BFIT) in Boston, Massachusetts is one of New Englands oldest colleges of engineering and technologies. ... Bentley College is located at 175 Forest Street in Waltham, Massachusetts, 10 miles west of Boston. ... Berklee College of Music, founded in 1945, is an independent music college in Boston, Massachusetts with many prominent faculty, staff, alumni, and visiting artists. ... The Boston Architectural College (the BAC), formerly known as the Boston Architectural Center, is New Englands largest independent design college, located on beautiful Newbury Street in Bostons historic Back Bay neighborhood. ... Boston Baptist College was founded in 1976 by Dr. A.V. Henderson (he served as the first President), and Dr. John Rawlings (then president of BBFI, Baptist Bible Fellowship International). ... Boston College (BC) is a private university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ... The Boston Conservatory is an arts conservatory located in the Fenway-Kenmore region of Boston, Massachusetts, United States. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... Bunker Hill Community College is a two-year college located in Charlestown, Massachusetts, which is a neighborhood of Boston. ... Cambridge College is a university in Cambridge, Massachusetts specializing in adult education. ... Founded in 1879, Curry College is a private, four-year, co-educational[2] liberal arts-based institution located on a wooded 137-acre (0. ... Eastern Nazarene College is a small liberal arts college south of Boston in Quincy, Massachusetts. ... Emerson College was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as a school of oratory, in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Emmanuel College is a four-year Catholic liberal arts college located on The Fenway in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Fisher College is a two-year college located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Harvard redirects here. ... 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  Results from FactBites:
 
Wellesley College :: Travel Directions to Wellesley College (1098 words)
Wellesley College is situated between Washington Street (Route 16) and Central Street (Route 135) to the west of the center of Wellesley, MA.
Cross the street to the entrance of the College.
Fare to the College will be approximately $4.00.
Wellesley College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1658 words)
Wellesley College is a women's liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant.
Wellesley and MIT were the two primary institutions Benson Snyder studies in The Hidden Curriculum (1970), in which he concludes that a mass of unstated requirements and expectations thwarts students' ability to think creatively or develop independently.
Wellesley is the college in which the 2003 film Mona Lisa Smile was set; some of the outdoor scenes were filmed on campus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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