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Encyclopedia > Welf

The House of Welf (or House of Guelph) is a European dynasty that has included many German and British monarchs from the 11th century until the 20th century. A dynasty is a family or extended family which retains political power across generations, or more generally, any organization which extends dominance in its field even as its particular members change. ... A monarch is a type of ruler or head of state, whose titles and ascent are often inherited, not earned, and who represents a larger monarchical system which has established rules and customs regarding succession, duties, and powers. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


The House of Welf is the older branch of the House of Este, a dynasty whose oldest known members lived in Lombardy in the 9th century. For this reason, it is sometimes also called Welf-Este. The first member of this branch was Welf IV; he inherited the property of the Elder House of Welf when his maternal uncle Welf, Duke of Carinthia, died in 1055. In 1070, Welf IV became duke of Bavaria. For Tolkiens fictional character, see Estë To know more about the city, see Este The House of Este is a European princely dynasty. ... Lombardy (in Italian Lombardia) is a region in northern Italy between the Alps and the Po Valley. ... This earthenware dish was made in 9th century Iraq. ... Welf I (died about 9 November 1101, Paphos) was duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. ... The elder House of Welf was a dynasty of European rulers in the 9th through 11th centuries. ... Events January 11 - Theodora becomes Reigning Empress of the Eastern Roman Empire. ... Events Hereward the Wake begins a Saxon revolt in the Fens of eastern England. ... The Free State of Bavaria (German: Bayern or Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ...


Welf V married countess Matilda of Tuscany who died childless and left him her possessions: Tuscany, Ferrara, Modena, Mantua, Reggio, and so on, which played a role in the Investiture controversy. Since the Welfs sided with the Pope in this controversy, partisans of the Pope came to be known as "Guelphs" in Italian; see Guelphs and Ghibellines. Welf II (1072 – 24 September 1120, Kaufering), or Welfhard, called Welf the Fat, was duke of Bavaria from 1101 until his death. ... Matilda of Tuscany from (1115) Matilda, countess of Tuscany (1046 – July 24, 1115), was the principal Italian supporter of Pope Gregory VII during the investiture controversy, and is one of the few medieval women to be remembered for her military accomplishments. ... Tuscany (Italian Toscana) is a region in central Italy, bordering on Latium to the south, Umbria and Marche to the east, Emilia-Romagna and Liguria to the north, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west. ... Ferrara, a town, an archiepiscopal see and a province in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. ... Location within Italy Modena is a city and a province on the south side of the Po valley, in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. ... Mantua (in Italian Mantova) is a city in Lombardy, Italy and capital of the province with the same name. ... Reggio Emilia is a town of North Italy, in the Emilia-Romagna region. ... The Investiture Controversy was the most significant conflict between secular and religious powers in medieval Europe. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th and 13th centuries. ...


Henry the Black, duke of Bavaria from 1120-1126, was the first of the three Henrys of the Welf dynasty. His son, Henry the Proud, duke of Bavaria and also of Saxony, was the favoured candidate in the imperial election against Conrad III of the Hohenstaufens. He lost the election, as the other princes feared his power and temperament, and was dispossessed of his duchies by Conrad III. Henry IX (died 13 December 1126), called the Black, a member of the House of Welf, was duke of Bavaria from 1120 to 1126. ... Events Welcher of Malvern creates a system of measurement for the earth using degrees, minutes, and seconds of latitude and longitude. ... Events Rutherglen becomes one of the first Royal Burghs in Scotland. ... Henry II, known as the Proud (1108 - October 20, 1139) was Duke of Saxony (1138-1139) and Duke of Bavaria (1126-1139) as Henry X. He was the son of Henry the Black Duke of Bavaria, and Wulfhild, daughter of Magnus Billung, Duke of Saxony, and thus a member of... With an area of 18,413 km² and a population of 4. ... King Conrad III (Miniature, 13th century) Conrad III (1093-1152), the first German king of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was the son of Frederick I, Duke of Swabia. ... Hohenstaufen was a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ...


Henry the Lion recovered his father's two duchies, Saxony in 1142, Bavaria in 1156. In 1158 he married Matilda (1156-1189), the daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine and sister of Richard Lionheart. Dispossessed of his duchies after the Battle of Legnano in 1176 by Emperor Frederick I and the other princes of the German Empire eager to claim parts of his vast territories, he was exiled to the court of his father-in-law Henry II in Normandy in 1180, returned to Germany three years later as duke of a part of Saxony, the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and died there in 1195. Coronation of Henry the Lion and Matilda of England (1188) Henry the Lion (face of statue on his tomb in Brunswick Cathedral) Henry the Lion (1129 - August 6, 1195; in German, Heinrich der Löwe) was a member of the Welf dynasty and Duke of Saxony as Henry III since... Categories: Stub | 1156 births | 1189 deaths ... Henry II (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine Eleanor of Aquitaine (Bordeaux, France, 1124 – March 31, 1204 in Fontevrault, Anjou) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the Middle Ages. ... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... The Battle of Legnano, fought in 1176, marked the culmination of the futile attempts of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa to dominate the Italian city states of Lombardia. ... Events May 22 - Murder attempt by the Hashshashin on Saladin near Aleppo Raynald of Chatillon released from prison in Aleppo May 29 - Frederick Barbarossa is defeated in the Battle of Legnano by the Lombard League leading to the pactum Anagninum (the Agreement of Anagni) September 17 - Seljuk Turks defeat Manuel... Frederick in a 13th century Chronicle Friedrich I. von Hohenstaufen (1122 – June 10, 1190), also known as Friedrich Barbarossa (Frederick Redbeard) was elected king of Germany on March 4, 1152 and crowned Holy Roman Emperor on June 18, 1155. ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... Brunswick-Lüneburg was an historical state within the Holy Roman Empire. ... Events Priory of St Marys, Bushmead, founded. ...


His son Otto of Brunswick was elected elected king and crowned emperor as Otto IV. Otto IV of Brunswick (died 1218) was King of Germany (1208-1215) and Holy Roman Emperor from 1209 - 1215. ...


The Welfs of Brunswick-Lüneburg continued to rule in that area until the fall of the German monarchies in 1918. In 1692 the head of the cadet Calenberg line was raised to the status of an imperial elector, and became known as the Elector of Hanover. His son, Georg Ludwig, inherited the British throne in 1714 as a result of the Act of Settlement 1701. Members of the Welf dynasty continued to rule in Britain until the death of Queen Victoria in 1901; in Britain they were known as the House of Hanover. Brunswick-Lüneburg was an historical state within the Holy Roman Empire. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Hanover (German Hannover) is a historical territory in todays Germany. ... George I (Georg Ludwig) (28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) from 23 January 1698, and King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 1 August 1714, until his death. ... // Events August 1 - George, elector of Hanover becomes King George I of Great Britain. ... The Electress Sophia The Act of Settlement (12 & 13 Wm 3 c. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and Empress of India from 1 January 1877 until her death. ... 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) were a German royal dynasty which succeeded the House of Stuart as kings of Great Britain in 1714. ...


Hanover itself was raised to a kingdom in 1814, but was annexed by Prussia following the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, in which Hanover had sided with Austria. The senior line of the dynasty ruled the much smaller Duchy of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. This line became extinct in 1884. Although the Duchy should have been inherited by the Duke of Cumberland, son of the last king of Hanover, suspicions of his loyalty led the duchy's throne to remain vacant until 1913, when Cumberland's son, Ernst August, married the daughter of Kaiser Wilhelm II and was allowed to inherit the duchy. His rule there was short-lived, however, as the monarchy came to an end following the First World War in 1918.-1... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (German: Preußen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: PrÅ«sai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad exclave of Russia and... It has been suggested that Gastein Convention be merged into this article or section. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... Brunswick-Lüneburg was an historical state within the Holy Roman Empire. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... Prince Ernst August (II) of Hanover, 3rd Duke of Cumberland (1878-1919) and Crown Prince of Hanover (1851-1866), Ernst August Wilhelm Adolf Georg Friedrich (21 September 1845-14 November 1923), was the eldest child and only son of King George V of Hanover and his wife, Princess Marie of... Link title1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Ernst August (17 November 1887-30 January 1953), reigning Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (2 November 1913-8 November 1918), was a grandson of King George V of Hanover, whom the Prussians deposed in 1866. ... Wilhelm II of Germany (born Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albert von Preußen 27 January 1859–4 June 1941), was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and the last King (König) of Prussia, ruling from 1888 to 1918. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


The Welf dynasty continues to exist. Its current head, named, like many of his ancestors, Ernst August, is most famous as the third and present husband of Princess Caroline of Monaco. Ernst August, Prince of Hanover (German: Prinz von Hannover, in English also known as Ernest Augustus of Hanover), styled His Royal Highness The Prince of Hanover; born 26 February 1954 in Hanover, Lower Saxony, Germany) is the eldest son of Ernest Augustus IV, Prince of Hanover (1914–1987) and his... The Princess of Hanover is the eldest child of the late Prince Rainier III of Monaco and is currently heir presumptive to the principalitys throne. ...


External links

  • Official site (in German)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/House of Welf (635 words)
The House of Welf is the older branch of the House of Este, a dynasty whose oldest known members lived in Lombardy in the 9th century.
Welf V married countess Matilda of Tuscany who died childless and left him her possessions: Tuscany, Ferrara, Modena, Mantua, Reggio, and so on, which played a role in the Investiture controversy.
Members of the Welf dynasty continued to rule in Britain until the death of Queen Victoria in 1901; in Britain they were known as the House of Hanover.
NetIQ: Security Management (1217 words)
Global Technology Associates' firewall family, appliance-based GB-1000 and RoBoX and software-based GB-Flash and GB-Pro firewalls, are certified to the WELF log file standard for accurate analysis and reporting using NetIQ's firewall reporting solutions.
Ingate's family of SIP-capable enterprise firewalls support the WELF log file standard for accurate firewall analysis and reporting using NetIQ's firewall reporting solutions.
SecureSoft's SUHOSHIN firewall is certified to the WELF log file standard for accurate analysis and reporting using NetIQ's firewall reporting solutions.
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