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Encyclopedia > Weimar
Weimar
Coat of arms Location
Coat of arms of Weimar
Administration
Country Germany
State Thuringia
District Urban district
Town subdivisions 21 districts
Lord Mayor Stefan Wolf (SPD)
Basic statistics
Area 84.26 km² (33 sq mi)
Elevation 208 m  (682 ft)
Population 64,481  (31/12/2006)[1]
Other information
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Licence plate code WE
Postal codes 99401–99441
Area codes 03643, 036453
Website www.weimar.de

Coordinates: 50°59′0″N 11°19′0″E / 50.98333, 11.31667 Weimar may refer to: Weimar, a city in Thuringia, Germany Weimar, a town in Hesse, Germany Weimar, a district of Ahnatal, Hesse, Germany Weimar, Texas, United States See also: Weimar Republic- government of Germany from 1918 to 1933 Weimar Triangle- a diplomatic group consisting of Germany, France, and Poland Category... Image File history File links Wappen_Weimar. ... Image File history File links Karte_Deutschland. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... There are 439 German districts (Kreise), administrative units in Germany. ... This is a list of urban districts in Germany. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... SPD redirects here. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... German car number plates (Kfz-Kennzeichen) show the place where the car carrying them is registered. ... German Postleitzahl map of the first two digits Postal codes in Germany, Postleitzahl (plural Postleitzahlen, abbreviated to PLZ), consist of five digits, which indicate the wider area (first two digits), and the postal district (last three digits). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Classical Weimar*
UNESCO World Heritage Site
The city hall
State Party Flag of Germany Germany
Type Cultural
Criteria iii, vi
Reference 846
Region Europe and North America
Inscription History
Inscription 1998  (22nd Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
† Region as classified by UNESCO.

Weimar (IPA: [ˈvaɪmaʁ]) is a city in Germany. It is located in the Bundesland of Thuringia (German: Thüringen), north of the Thüringer Wald, east of Erfurt, and southwest of Halle and Leipzig. Its current population is approximately 64,000. The oldest record of the city dates from the year 899. Weimar was the capital of the duchy (after 1815 the grand duchy) of Saxe-Weimar (German Sachsen-Weimar). The city also gives its name to the Weimar Republic. A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1435x1118, 1403 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Weimar ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... The Thuringian Forest (Thüringer Wald in German language) running northwest to southeast, forms a continuous stretch of rounded hills in the German state of Thuringia. ... The cathedral Mariendom at night. ... Halle (also called Halle an der Saale (literally Halle on the Saale, and in some historic references is not uncommonly called Saale after the river) in order to distinguish it from Halle in North Rhine-Westphalia) is the largest town in the German State of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Leipzig ( ; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk from the Sorbian word for Tilia) is, with a population of over 506,000, the largest city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. ... Events Edward the Elder becomes King of England. ... Saxe-Weimar (German Sachsen-Weimar) was a Duchy in Thuringia. ... Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature...

Contents

History

Weimar is one of the great cultural sites of Europe, having been home to such luminaries as Bach, Goethe, Schiller, and Herder. It has been a site of pilgrimage for the German vnf intelligentsia since Goethe first moved to Weimar in the late 18th century. The tombs of Goethe and Schiller as well as their archives, may be found in the city. It is around the city of Weimar that Goethe's famous 1809 Elective Affinities is based. The word culture, from the Latin colo, -ere, with its root meaning to cultivate, generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ...  , IPA: , (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German polymath. ... Friedrich Schiller “Schiller” redirects here. ... Johann Gottfried Herder Johann Gottfried von Herder (August 25, 1744 - December 18, 1803), German poet, critic, theologian, and philosopher, is best known for his concept of the Volk and is generally considered the father of ethnic nationalism. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Elective Affinities (in German, Die Wahlverwandtschaften) is an 1809 novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. ...


The period in German history from 1919-1933 is commonly referred to as the Weimar Republic, as the Republic's constitution was drafted here because the capital, Berlin, with its street rioting after the 1918 German Revolution, was considered too dangerous for the National Assembly to convene there. Weimar was, beside Dessau, the center of the Bauhaus movement. The city houses art galleries, museums and the German national theatre. The Bauhaus University and the Liszt School of Music Weimar attracted many students, specializing in media and design, architecture, civil engineering and music, to Weimar. This article gives an overview of the History of Germany. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Teamsters, armed with pipes, riot in a clash with riot police in the Minneapolis Teamsters Strike of 1934. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Karl Liebknecht on 9 November 1918 in the Berliner Tiergarten Statue of a revolutionary soldier, memorial to the German Revolution of 1918-1919 in East Berlin. ... Dessau is a town in Germany on the junction of the rivers Mulde and Elbe, in the Bundesland (Federal State) of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Typography by Herbert Bayer above the entrance to the workshop block of the Bauhaus, Dessau, 2005. ... The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844–1926). ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... We dont have an article called Liszt School of Music Weimar Start this article Search for Liszt School of Music Weimar in. ...


During World War II, there was a concentration camp near Weimar, at Buchenwald, a little wood that Goethe had loved to frequent only 8 kilometers from the city center. More than 55,000 prisoners entered the gates bearing the mottos "Jedem das Seine" ("to each his due") and "Recht oder Unrecht—Mein Vaterland" ("right or wrong—my fatherland").[citation needed] The Buchenwald concentration camp provided slave labour for local industry.[2] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... Slave laborers in the Buchenwald concentration camp (Elie Wiesel is second row, seventh from left). ... Gate with the words Jedem das Seine (literally, “to each his own”, but figuratively “everyone gets what he deserves”) Buchenwald concentration camp was a Nazi concentration camp established on the Ettersberg (Etter Mountain) near Weimar, Thuringia, Germany, in July 1937, and one of the largest such camps on German soil. ... Slavery is any of a number of related conditions involving control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or other clear forms of coercion. ...


The European Council of Ministers selected the city as a European Capital of Culture for 1999. The Council of the European Union forms, along with the European Parliament, the legislative arm of the European Union (EU). ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...


On September 3, 2004, a fire broke out at the Duchess Anna Amalia Library. The library contains a 13,000-volume collection including Goethe's masterpiece Faust, in addition to a music collection of the Duchess. An authentic Lutheran Bible from 1534 was saved from the fire. The damage stretched into the millions of dollars. The number of books in this historic library exceeded 1,000,000, of which 40,000 to 50,000 were destroyed past recovery. The library, which dates back to 1691, belongs to UNESCO world heritage, and is one of the oldest public libraries in Europe. The fire, with its destruction of much historical literature, amounts to a huge cultural loss for Germany, Europe, and indeed the world. A number of books were shock-frozen in the city of Leipzig to save them from rotting. is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A forest fire Fire is a rapid oxidation process that releases energy in varying intensities in form of light (with wavelength not also in the visual part of the spectrum) and heat and often creates smoke. ... The Library in Flames in 2004, Associated Press The Duchess Anna Amalia Library in Weimar, Thuringia, Germany houses a major collection of German literature and historical documents. ... Faust depicted in an etching by Rembrandt van Rijn (circa 1650) Faust or Faustus (the Latin for auspicious or lucky) is the protagonist of a popular German legend in which a mediæval scholar makes a pact with the Devil. ... // Music is an art form consisting of sound and silence expressed through time. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ...


Famous residents of Weimar

Bach in a 1748 portrait by Haussmann Johann Sebastian Bach (pronounced ) (21 March 1685 O.S. – 28 July 1750 N.S.) was a prolific German composer and organist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it... Portrait of Berlioz by Signol, 1832 Louis Hector Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer, best known for his compositions Symphonie Fantastique (first performed in 1830) and Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem). ... Hans von Bülow. ... A self portrait Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472 – October 16, 1553) was a German painter. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer, and entertainer. ... Lyonel Charles Feininger (July 17, 1871 - January 13, 1956); was a German-American painter and caricaturist. ...  , IPA: , (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German polymath. ... Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (May 18, 1883 – July 5, 1969) was a German architect and founder of Bauhaus. ... Nina Hagen (born Catharina Hagen on March 11, 1955) is a singer from Berlin, Germany. ... Johann Gottfried Herder Johann Gottfried von Herder (August 25, 1744 – December 18, 1803), German poet, critic, theologian, and philosopher, is best known for his influence on authors such as Goethe and the role he played in the development of the larger cultural movement known as romanticism. ... Johann Nepomuk Hummel Johann Nepomuk Hummel or Jan Nepomuk Hummel (14 November 1778 – 17 October 1837) was a composer and virtuoso pianist of Austrian origin who was born in Pressburg (present-day Bratislava, Slovakia). ... Johannes Itten (November 11, 1888 - May 27, 1967) was a Swiss painter, designer teacher, writer and theorist associated with the Bauhaus school. ... Joseph Joachim Joseph Joachim (June 28, 1831 – August 15, 1907) (pronounced YO-a-chim) was a violinist, conductor, composer and teacher. ... Wassily Kandinsky (Russian: Василий Кандинский, first name pronounced as [vassi:li]) (December 16 [O.S. December 4] 1866 – December 13, 1944) was a Russian painter, printmaker and art theorist. ... Harry Kessler (1868 – 1937) was an Anglo-German count, a writer and patron of modern art. ... For other persons named Klee, see Klee (disambiguation). ... Portrait by Henri Lehmann, 1839 Franz Liszt (Hungarian: Liszt Ferenc; pronounced , in English: list) (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a Hungarian [1] virtuoso pianist and composer of the Romantic period. ... László Moholy-Nagy (probably July 28, 1895 – November 24, 1946) was a Hungarian painter and photographer as well as professor in the Bauhaus school. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a 19th-century German philosopher. ... Friedrich Preller (25 April 1804 - 23 April 1878) was a German landscape painter He was born at Eisenach. ... Joseph Joachim Raff (May 27, 1822 - June 24 or June 25, 1882) was a composer and pianist. ... Friedrich Schiller “Schiller” redirects here. ... Oskar Schlemmer (September 4, 1888 – April 13, 1943) was a German painter, sculptor and designer associated with the Bauhaus school. ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher. ... Frédéric Soret, (*1795, †1865), Swiss private scholar in physics and Oriental numismatics. ... Rudolf Steiner. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Henry Van de Velde (3 April 1863 – 15 October 1957) was a Belgian painter, architect and interior designer. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Christoph Martin Wieland (September 5, 1733 _ January 20, 1813), was a German poet and writer. ... Carl Zeiss (September 11, 1816 – December 3, 1888) was an optician commonly known for the company he founded, Zeiss. ...

Districts

Goethe and Schiller in front of the Deutsche Nationaltheater,
Goethe and Schiller in front of the Deutsche Nationaltheater,
  • Ehringsdorf
  • Gaberndorf
  • Gelmeroda
  • Holzdorf
  • Legefeld
  • Niedergrunstedt
  • Oberweimar
  • Possendorf
  • Schöndorf
  • Süßenborn
  • Taubach
  • Tiefurt
  • Tröbsdorf

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2051x2914, 4255 KB) Other versions File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Weimar ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2051x2914, 4255 KB) Other versions File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Weimar ...

Education

The Bauhaus-Universität Weimar (BUW) is a university for creative studies in Weimar. ... We dont have an article called Liszt School of Music Weimar Start this article Search for Liszt School of Music Weimar in. ...

Transportation

It is connected by one motorway and two routes:

  • Autobahn
  • Routes:
    • 7
    • 85

Map of the A 4 in Germany Bundesautobahn 4 (translates from German as Federal Motorway 4, short form Autobahn 4, abbreviated as BAB 4 or A 4) is an Autobahn that crosses Germany in a west-east direction. ...

Sister cities

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Blois is a city in France, the préfecture (capital) city of the Loir-et-Cher département, situated on the banks of the lower river Loire between Orléans and Tours. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... View of Lake Vanajavesi, next to Hämeenlinna. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Sawtry is a large village in the district of Huntingdonshire in the county of Cambridgeshire, England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Piazza del Campo Siena is a city in Tuscany, Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Trier (French: ; Luxembourgish Tréier) is a city in Germany on the banks of the Moselle River. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Thüringer Landesamt für Statistik. Population data. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  2. ^ Edward Victor.Alphabetical List of Camps, Subcamps and Other Camps.www.edwardvictor.com/Holocaust/List %20 of %20 camps.htm

  Results from FactBites:
 
Weimar, Texas (162 words)
DiscoverWeimar.com is sponsored by the Weimar Chamber of Commerce of Weimar, Texas.
Weimar's picturesque downtown bustles with businesses, shops, great eateries, antique shops and a tavern where locals play dominoes and German card games.
Weimar is rich in history and culture as a farm and ranching community.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1398 words)
Spiritual ministration was supplied, as far as possible, by the Benedictines and secular priests of the city of Erfurt, which remained a secular possession of the Archbishop of Mainz until 1802, when it fell to Prussia.
In 1819 the seat of the parish was transferred to Weimar.
Negotiations between the Catholic primary schools and the Supreme School Board are effected through the medium of the Immediatkommission for the Catholic Church and Catholic Schools.
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