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Encyclopedia > Wedding
Preparing for the photographs, at a wedding at Thornbury Castle, England
Preparing for the photographs, at a wedding at Thornbury Castle, England

A wedding is a ceremony that celebrates the beginning of a marriage or civil union. Wedding traditions and customs vary greatly between cultures, ethnic groups, religions, countries, and social classes. In some countries, cultures and religions, the actual act of marriage begins during the wedding ceremony. In others, the legal act of marriage occurs at the time of signing a marriage license or other legal document, and the wedding is then an opportunity to perform a traditional ceremony and celebrate with friends and family. A woman being married is called a bride, a man called a groom, and after the ceremony they become a wife or a husband, respectively. Wedding can mean several things: A formal ceremony which forms a union between two people, see Wedding. ... A wedding group preparing for the photos, at Thornbury Castle, Thornbury, near Bristol, England. ... A wedding group preparing for the photos, at Thornbury Castle, Thornbury, near Bristol, England. ... Categories: Historical stubs | Castles in England ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Part of the ceremony of the Changing of the Guard in Whitehall, London. ... Matrimony redirects here. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Social class refers to the hierarchical distinctions between individuals or groups in societies or cultures. ... Napa, California: USA A new bride humorously observes the legal signing of her marriage license by her maid of honor. ... Bride Bride in formal dress North America. ... See also: A groom is a type of officer-servant in the British royal household. ... For other uses, see Wife (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Husband (disambiguation). ...


Nuptial is the adjective of "wedding". It is used for example in zoology to denote plumage, coloration, behavior, etc related to or occurring in the mating season. In grammar, an adjective is a word whose main syntactic role is to modify a noun or pronoun (called the adjectives subject), giving more information about what the noun or pronoun refers to. ... Zoology (from Greek: ζῴον, zoion, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... Estrus (also spelled œstrus) or heat in female mammals is the period of greatest female sexual responsiveness usually coinciding with ovulation. ...

Contents

Overview

Most weddings contain wedding vows and a proclamation of marriage, usually by the officiant. Most weddings also involve wearing traditional clothes (i.e., kilts, white gown, red sari, etc.). A wedding is often followed or accompanied by a wedding reception. Wedding vows are promises made by the bride and groom to each other during a wedding ceremony. ... A wedding reception is a party held after the completion of a marriage ceremony. ...


Other elements may include music, poetry, prayer or scripture. Some elements of the traditional Western wedding ceremony symbolize the bride's departure from her father's control and entry into a new family with her husband. In modern Western weddings, this symbolism is largely vestigial.

A wedding carriage in Bristol, England
A wedding carriage in Bristol, England

The common element in a wedding is the assumption of spousal roles by the primary participants. The wedding is a special moment that marks the beginning of a new life together. Often, it is also a precursor to parenthood, marking the promise of a new family and a new generation. This moment is recognized with traditions, ceremonies and rituals including engagement and wedding ceremonies. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1336, 700 KB) A wedding carriage in Old Market, Bristol, England, on a lovely summers day. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1336, 700 KB) A wedding carriage in Old Market, Bristol, England, on a lovely summers day. ... This article is about the English city of Bristol. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The term spouse refers to either partner in marriage, generally called a husband or wife, depending on gender. ... This article is about the film Parenthood. ...


When it comes to planning a wedding, people often honor traditions, even if they do not fully understand their origin or meaning. Every culture cherishes its own wedding traditions and superstitions. Some of those are closely followed even by those who are normally not superstitious.


The figure of a bride in white is an important element of the ritual of marriage in western culture. However, new designs of gown are available so brides today may find themselves attracted to designs that do not look traditional. The symbolism behind the wedding dress, however, has not changed.


Wedding types and kinds

Double wedding

A double wedding is a single ceremony where two affianced couples rendezvous for two simultaneous or consecutive weddings. Typically, a fiancé with a sibling might plan a double wedding with that sibling. In the Philippines, however, the wedding of two siblings within the same year is considered bad luck and is called sukob.[citation needed] “Engaged” redirects here. ... Brother and Sister redirect here. ...


Destination wedding

A destination wedding is any wedding in which the engaged couple and/or a majority of their guests travel to attend the ceremony. This could be a beach ceremony in the Caribbean, a lavish event in Las Vegas, or a simple ceremony at the home of a geographically distant friend or relative.


Weekend wedding

A weekend wedding is a wedding in which couples and their guests celebrate over the course of a weekend. Special activities, such as spa treatments and golf tournaments, may be scheduled into the wedding itinerary throughout the weekend. Lodging usually is at the same facility as the wedding and couples often host a Sunday brunch for the weekend's finale.


White wedding

Main article: white wedding

A white wedding is a term for a traditional formal or semi-formal Western wedding. This term refers to the color of the wedding dress, which became popular in the Victorian era and came to symbolize purity of heart and the innocence of childhood. Later attribution suggested that the color white symbolized virginity. A Bride in a White Wedding dress A white wedding is a term for a traditional formal or semi-formal wedding in British and American, as well as Commonwealth, traditions. ... For other uses, see Wedding dress (disambiguation). ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Virgin redirects here. ...


Military wedding

A military wedding is a ceremony conducted in a military chapel and may involve a Saber Arch. In most military weddings the groom will wear a military dress uniform in lieu of civilian formalwear, although military dress uniforms largely serve the same purpose. Some retired military personnel who marry after their service has ended may opt for a military wedding.


Civil wedding

A civil wedding is a ceremony presided over by a local civil authority, such as an elected or appointed judge, justice of the peace or the mayor of a locality. Civil wedding ceremonies may use references to God or a deity (in UK law), but generally no references to a particular religion or denomination. They can be either elaborate or simple. Many civil wedding ceremonies take place in local town or city halls or courthouses in judge's chambers. This article is about the political process. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A justice of the peace (JP) is a puisne judicial officer appointed by means of a commission to keep the peace. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other senses of this word, see denomination. ...


Sneak wedding

Eloping, the act of getting married behind people's back and without consent or approval. To elope, most literally, merely means to run away. ...


Same-sex wedding

A same-sex wedding or same-gender wedding is a ceremony in which two people of the same sex are married or civilly united. This may be an official and legally recognized event, or, in places that do not allow same-sex marriage, it may simply be a symbolic ceremony designed to provide the opportunity to make the same public declarations and celebration with friends and family that any other type of wedding may afford. As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... Recognized in some regions Foreign marriages recognized Civil unions and registered partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated Same-sex marriage debated, recognition granted United States (CT, DC, HI, ME, NH, NJ, OR, VT, WA) See also This box:      Same-sex marriage (also referred to as gay...


International wedding customs

A Parsee Wedding, 1905
A Parsee Wedding, 1905

Common elements in wedding customs across cultures

A number of cultures utilize the western custom of a bride wearing a white dress. This tradition came to symbolize purity in the Victorian era (despite popular misconception, the white dress did not indicate virginity, which was symbolized by the face veil). Within the ‘white wedding’ tradition, a white dress and veil would not have been considered appropriate for a second or third wedding of a widow or a divorcee.


The custom of exchanging rings may be the oldest and most universal symbol of marriage, but the origins are unclear.[citation needed] The ring’s circular shape represents perfection and never-ending love. The rings are exchanged during the wedding ceremony and symbolize the love, faithfulness and commitment of the marriage union.[citation needed]


The wedding is often followed by a reception during which the rituals include toasting the bride and groom, the newlyweds' first dance as husband and wife, cake cutting, etc.


Wedding clothing

  • Qipao or Hanfu, Chinese traditional formal wear
  • Batik and Kebaya, a garment worn by the Javanese people of Indonesia.
  • Barong Tagalog, an embroidered, formal men's garment of the Philippines.
  • Kimono, the traditional garments of Japan
  • Sari, Indian popular and traditional dress in India
  • Dashiki, the traditional West African wedding attire
  • Ao dai, traditional garments of Vietnam
  • Morning dress, men's daytime formal dress
  • Kilt, male garment particular to Scottish culture[1][2][3]
  • Kittel, a white robe worn by the groom at an Orthodox Jewish wedding. The kittel is worn only under the Chupah, and is removed before the reception.
  • Topor, a type of conical headgear
  • Tuxedo
    • Black tie ("dinner jacket" in the UK; traditionally appropriate only for evening weddings but also seen in daytime, especially in the United States)
    • Non-traditional "tuxedo" variants (colored jackets/ties, "wedding suits")
  • White tie ("evening dress" in the UK)
  • Sherwani, a long coat-like garment worn in South Asia
  • Wedding crown, worn by Scandinavian brides
  • Wedding veil
  • Wedding dress

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Han Chinese clothing, or Hanfu (TC: 漢服; SC: 汉服; pinyin: hànfú;; literally Clothing of the Han people) refers to the pre-17th century traditional clothing of the Han Chinese, the predominant ethnic group of China. ... This article is about the textile dyeing technique. ... Kebaya is an evergreen traditional blouse of Indonesian and Malaysian women made from sheer material and usually worn with the sarong, batik or other traditional knitted like songket of colorful motives. ... Javanese is a term used to describe a native of the Indonesian island of Java. ... A painting of Ramon Magsaysay, the first Philippine President to wear a barong in an official portrait A barong Tagalog (or simply barong) is an embroidered formal garment of the Philippines. ... A traditional wedding kimono The kimono literally something worn) is the national costume of Japan. ... For the city, see Sari, Iran. ... The Dashiki is a colorful mens garment widely worn in West Africa. ... The áo dài (pronounced ao yai in the south; pronounced ao zai in the north) is a traditional Vietnamese dress worn by women. ... Morning dress is a particular category of mens formal dress. ... A kilt in the Black Watch tartan A kilt is a traditional garment of modern Scottish and Celtic culture typically worn by men. ... Addressing the haggis during Burns supper : Fair fa your honest, sonsie face, Great chieftain o the puddin-race! Scottish culture is the national culture of Scotland. ... A kittel (Yiddish: קיתל, robe) is a white robe worn on special occasions by religious Jews. ... A chuppah (also spelled huppah or huppa) is a canopy traditionally used in Jewish weddings. ... A topor is a type of conical headgear traditionally worn by grooms as part of the Bengali Hindu wedding ceremony. ... Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and U.S. President Ronald Reagan wearing black tie with wives in Quebec, Canada, March 18, 1985. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Prince Phillip and President George W. Bush in white tie, in company of Queen Elizabeth II and Laura Bush, during the Queens 2007 U.S. visit. ... An old-fashioned Hyderabadi gentleman wearing a formal Sherwani and Fez hat, that is designed by a designer in Lahore, Pakistan Sherwani (Urdu: شیروانی ) is a long coat-like garment worn in South Asia, very similar to an Achkan or doublet. ... Crown names several entities associated with monarchy: A crown (headgear), the headgear worn by a monarch, other high dignitaries, divinities etcetera. ... This article is about the article of clothing, or a religious item. ... For other uses, see Wedding dress (disambiguation). ...

Music

Western weddings

Music often played at western weddings includes a processional song for walking down the aisle (ex: Wedding March) and reception dance music. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... A wedding march is a piece of music played during a wedding, usually during the entrance of the bride (processional) or the departure of the married couple at the end (recessional). ...


Music played at Western weddings includes:

The Bridal Chorus from the opera Lohengrin, by German composer Richard Wagner, is the standard march played for the brides entrance at most formal weddings in the United States and at many weddings thoughout the Western world. ... Lohengrin is a romantic opera (or music drama) in three acts by Richard Wagner. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Johann Pachelbel (pronounced , German IPA: , , or [1]) (August 28, 1653 – March 6, 1706) was a German Baroque composer, organist and teacher who brought the south German organ tradition to its peak. ... Pachelbels Canon also known as Canon in D major, or more formally, Canon and Gigue in D major for three Violins and Basso Continuo (Kanon und Gigue in D-Dur für drei Violinen und Basso Continuo) is the most famous piece of music by Johann Pachelbel. ... Mendelssohns Wedding March is one of the best known of the pieces that he wrote for A Midsummer Nights Dream in 1842. ... Portrait of Mendelssohn by the English miniaturist James Warren Childe (1778-1862), 1839 Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and generally known as Felix Mendelssohn (February 3, 1809 – November 4, 1847) is a German composer, pianist and conductor of the early Romantic period. ... Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ... Charles-Marie Jean Albert Widor (February 21, 1844 – March 12, 1937) was a French organist, composer and teacher. ... To Joy (An die Freude in German, in English often familiarly called the Ode to Joy rather than To Joy) is an ode written in 1785 by the German poet and historian Friedrich Schiller, known especially for its musical setting by Ludwig van Beethoven in the fourth and final movement... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... The Symphony No. ... Oom-pah is an onomatopoeic name for a type of Germanic music typically involving brass instruments. ... The Chicken Dance is an oom-pah song composed by a Swiss accordion (Handharmonika) player Werner Thomas from Davos, Switzerland in the 1950s and the corresponding fad dance. ... The Bridal Chorus from the opera Lohengrin, by German composer Richard Wagner, is the standard march played for the brides entrance at most formal weddings in the United States and at many weddings thoughout the Western world. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Lohengrin is a romantic opera (or music drama) in three acts by Richard Wagner. ...

Chinese weddings

Chinese music plays an important role in creating a happy, friendly environment during the wedding ceremony. A band of musicians with gongs and flute-like instruments accompanies the bride parade to groom's home. Similar music is also played at the wedding banquet.


Jewish weddings

At traditional Jewish weddings, a solemn, wordless tune is sung as the groom and then bride walk down the aisles. Chabad tradition is to sing a special tune composed by their founding Rebbe, Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, the tune is comprised of four stanzas corresponding to the four worlds of kabbalistic cosmology, and is only sung at solemn occasions[5]. During the recessional, lively Hebrew songs are sung by the guests, who escort the couple from the chuppah. For other uses, see Chabad (disambiguation). ... Shneur Zalman of Liadi (‎) (September 4, 1745 – December 15, 1812 O.S.), was an Orthodox Rabbi, and the founder and first Rebbe of Chabad, a branch of Hasidic Judaism, then based in Liadi, Imperial Russia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The tree of life Kabbalah (קבלה Reception, Standard Hebrew Qabbala, Tiberian Hebrew Qabbālāh; also written variously as Cabala, Cabalah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabalah, Kabbala, Qabala, Qabalah) is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ... An elaborate chupah A chuppah (Hebrew: חוּפָּה) (also spelled khuppa, chupah, or chuppa - plural: chuppot, Hebrew: חוּפּוֹת) is a canopy traditionally used in Jewish weddings. ...


Asian customs

Customs vary throughout the Asian continent. For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


Arabic customs

Arabic weddings vary depending on the country and religion of the bride and groom. Although Christian weddings in the Arab World bear clear similarities to Western weddings, the Muslim weddings in the Arab countries are influenced by Muslim traditions. Muslim weddings (pre-arranged or not) start with a Shaikh and Al-Kitab (book) for the bride and groom. The groom may or may not see his bride until the wedding day. Men and women in wedding ceremonies and receptions are segregated affairs, with areas for both men and women. An old tradition, now rarely observed, involves the women at the ceremony symbolically mourning the loss of the bride by doing the "wedding wail". The bride's dress is an ornate Caftan, and the bride's hands and feet are decorated in intricate lace-like patterns painted using a henna dye. Customarily women guests do not show their hair, shoulders or legs; and all guests at a Mosque remove their shoes on entering. Guests may give gifts to the bride and groom. Also, in many Arab countries including Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and the Palestinian terroritories,the practice of carrying the bride and groom on chairs and dancing in a circle around them is still carried out today. Many times, the bride and groom hold separate corners of a handkercheif. However, these are all the old traditions; Arabs, nowadays, have Western-like weddings, but still preserve most Arab customs and traditions.[citation needed]


Bengali customs

Main article: Bengali wedding

Bengali wedding refers to both Muslim wedding and Hindu wedding in Bangladesh and West Bengal. Although Muslim and Hindu marriages have their distinctive religious rituals, there are many common cultural rituals in marriages across religion among Bengali people. Bengali wedding refers to both Muslim wedding and Hindu wedding in Bangladesh and West Bengal. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... A Hindu marriage ceremony from a Rajput wedding North Indian wedding ceremonies are traditionally conducted at least partially in Sanskrit, the language in which most holy Hindu ceremonies are conducted. ... , West Bengal (Bengali: পশ্চিমবঙ্গ Poshchim Bônggo IPA: ) is a state in eastern India. ... The Bengali people are the ethnic community from Bengal (divided between India and Bangladesh) on the Indian subcontinent with a history dating back four millennia. ...


Chinese customs

Main article: Chinese marriage
See also: Chinese tea culture and Red packet

Traditional Chinese marriage is a ceremonial ritual within Chinese societies that involve a marriage established by pre-arrangement between families. Within Chinese culture, romantic love was allowed, and monogamy was the norm for most ordinary citizens. A Qing Dynasty wedding. ... A pot of Chinese tea This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Some examples of contemporary hong bao designs. ... Marriage à-la-mode by William Hogarth: a satire on arranged marriages and prediction of ensuing disaster Arranged marriage (also called prearranged marriage) is a marriage arranged by someone other than the persons getting married, curtailing or avoiding the process of courtship. ... Chinese culture has roots going back over five thousand years. ... Faithfulness redirects here. ...


Cantonese customs
Main article: Cantonese wedding

Most Cantonese wedding rituals follow the main Chinese wedding traditions, although some rituals are unique to the Cantonese people. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Chinese marriage. ... A Qing Dynasty wedding. ...


Filipino Customs

Customs and superstitions regarding marriage in the Philippines vary. Some examples are:

  • The groom usually wears the Barong Tagalog during the wedding, along with the male attendants, though nowadays the wealthy opt to don Western attire such as a tuxedo.
  • Sukob: weddings held within the same year by two siblings, usually sisters, are frowned upon as it is regarded as bad luck.
  • Some hold it that the wedding rings dropping to the ground is a portent of bad luck (this is usually said to the ringbearer to ensure that the child is careful in handling the rings).
  • Money, in the form of paper bills, is sometimes taped or pinned to the groom and bride during the reception.

A painting of Ramon Magsaysay, the first Philippine President to wear a barong in an official portrait A barong Tagalog (or simply barong) is an embroidered formal garment of the Philippines. ... Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and U.S. President Ronald Reagan wearing black tie with wives in Quebec, Canada, March 18, 1985. ...

Indian customs

Main article: Indian wedding

Indian weddings are very bright events, filled with ritual and celebration, that continue for several days. They are not small affairs, often with 400-1000 people attending (many of whom are unknown to the bride and groom). Though arranged marriages were predominant, nowdays western influenced dating and "love" marriages have an equal following. Portrait of an Indian bride wearing a traditional red dress for her wedding. ... For other senses of this word, see ritual (disambiguation). ... The word celebration has several meanings: See celebration for a joyous event or party. ... Bride Bride in formal dress North America. ... See also: A groom is a type of officer-servant in the British royal household. ...


Rajput customs
Main article: Rajput wedding

Rajputs - one of the major Hindu Kshatriya groups from India - traditionally had their own typical rituals of marriage as it is one of the most important functions of life. It is relation which is created for seven generations between the two families of the Bride & the Groom. It comprises a ceremony each for the TILAK (engagement), the BAN (starting of the wedding ceremony, MEL the community feast, the Nikasi is the departure of the Bridegroom party for the wedding, Sehla & Dhukav reception of wedding party at the Brides place be her parents. Solemnisation of wedding Sat Fere. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Rajput constitute one of the major Hindu Kshatriya groups from India. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... For the Bollywood film of the same name see Kshatriya Kshatriya (Hindi: , from Sanskrit: , ) is one of the four varnas, or castes, in Hinduism. ...


Japanese customs

Japanese wedding customs fall predominantly into two categories: traditional Shinto ceremonies, and modern Western-style ceremonies. In either case, the couple must first be legally married by filing for marriage at their local government office, and the official documentation must be produced in order for the ceremony to be held. Shinto ) is the native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ...


Shinto ceremony
A traditional Japanese wedding ceremony
A traditional Japanese wedding ceremony

Traditional Japanese wedding customs (shinzen shiki) involve an elaborate ceremony held at a Shinto shrine. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1792x1200, 526 KB) Summary Meiji Shrine Photo taken by me in July, 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1792x1200, 526 KB) Summary Meiji Shrine Photo taken by me in July, 2006. ... Shinto ) is the native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... A torii is a gate leading to a jinja. ...

Western-style ceremony

In recent years, the "Western Style Wedding" (influenced by a Christian church wedding) has become an increasingly popular choice. To that end, an entire industry has sprung up, dedicated to providing couples with a ceremony modeled after Protestant church ceremonies. Japanese western style weddings are generally held in a chapel, either in a simple or elaborate ceremony, often at a dedicated wedding chapel within a hotel. Typically, much like in Western ceremonies, the bride and groom get their own changing rooms within the chapel, as does the bride's father and any other important guest who requires such a room. There is also a room to hold the reception afterwards.


Before the ceremony, there is a rehearsal. Often during this rehearsal, the bride's mother lowers the veil for her daughter, signifying the last act that a mother can do for her daughter, before giving her away. The father of the bride, much like in Western ceremonies, walks the bride down the aisle to her awaiting groom.


After the rehearsal comes the procession. The wedding celebrant will often wear a wedding cross, or cana, a cross with two interlocking wedding rings attached, which symbolize a couple's commitment to sharing a life together in the bonds of holy matrimony. The wedding celebrant gives a brief welcome and an introductory speech before announcing the bride's entrance. The procession ends with the groom bowing to the bride's father. The father bows in return.


The service then starts. The service is given either in Japanese or English, or, in some cases, a mix of both. It follows a traditional Protestant ceremony, relaxed and not overtly religious. The opening hymn is usually the Japanese version of "What a Friend We Have in Jesus". Part of 1 Corinthians 13 is read from the Bible. After the reading, there is a prayer and a short message, explaining the sanctity of the wedding vows (seiyaku). The bride and groom share their vows and exchange rings. The chapel register is signed and the new couple is announced. This is often followed by the traditional wedding kiss. The service concludes with another hymn and a benediction. (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ...


Malay customs

Main article: Malay wedding

A Malay wedding ceremony spreads over two days, beginning with the akad nikah ceremony. The groom signs the marriage contract and agrees to provide the bride with a mas kahwin(dowry). After that, their hands are dyed with henna during the berinai besar ceremony. The bride's hair is also trimmed or her eyebrows shaped by a beautician known as the mak andam. Malay wedding (Malay: Perkahwinan orang Melayu) is the Malay traditional wedding. ...


Pakistani customs

Main article: Pakistani wedding

A Pakistani wedding typically consist of four ceremonies on four separate days. A Pakistani wedding typically consist of three ceremonies on three separate days. ...


Russian customs

Main article: Russian wedding

A traditional Russian wedding lasts for at least two days and some weddings last as long as a week. Throughout the celebration there is dancing, singing, long toasts, and a lot of food and drinks. The best man and maid of honor are called witnesses, “svideteli” in Russian. The ceremony and the ring exchange takes place on the first day of the wedding and on this special day many events take place. Throughout the years, Russian weddings have adopted many western cultures, including bridesmaids and flower girls. The two golden rings are a symbol of Russian marriage. ...


European customs

Customs vary throughout the European continent. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The Western custom of a bride wearing a white wedding dress, came to symbolize purity in the Victorian era (despite popular misconception and the hackneyed jokes of situation comedies the white dress did not actually indicate virginity, which was symbolized by a face veil). Within the "white wedding" tradition, a white dress and veil would not have been considered appropriate in the second or third wedding of a widow or divorcee. The specific conventions of Western weddings, largely from a Protestant and Catholic viewpoint, are discussed at "White wedding." For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... A Bride in a White Wedding dress A white wedding is a term for a traditional formal or semi-formal wedding in British and American, as well as Commonwealth, traditions. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... In Roman times, Vestal Virgins were strictly celibate or they were punished by death. ... This article is about the article of clothing, or a religious item. ... A Bride in a White Wedding dress A white wedding is a term for a traditional formal or semi-formal wedding in British and American, as well as Commonwealth, traditions. ... A Bride in a White Wedding dress A white wedding is a term for a traditional formal or semi-formal wedding in British and American, as well as Commonwealth, traditions. ...


A wedding is often followed or accompanied by a wedding reception, at which an elaborate wedding cake is served. Western traditions include toasting the couple, the newlyweds having the first dance, and cutting the cake. A bride may throw her bouquet to the assembled group of all unmarried women in attendance, with folklore suggesting the person who catches it will be the next to wed. A fairly recent equivalent has the groom throwing the bride's garter to the assembled unmarried men; the man who catches it is supposedly the next to wed. A wedding reception is a party held after the completion of a marriage ceremony. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Aristocrats gathering around Emperor Franz Joseph at a ball in the Hofburg Imperial Palace, painting by Wilhelm Gause (1900). ... Bouquet may refer to: Carole Bouquet (born 1957), French actress Henry Bouquet (1719-1765), British army officer French word for an arrangement of cut flowers - see nosegay or Flower bouquet A fragrance or odor, especially when used as a description of wine In mathematics, a bouquet is a space constructed... It has been suggested that Garters be merged into this article or section. ...


A modern tradition is for brides to wear or carry "something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue" during the service. It is considered good luck to do so. Often the bride attempts to have one item that meets all of these qualifications, such as a borrowed blue handkerchief which is "new to her" but loaned by her grandmother (thus making it old). Another addition to this custom is to wear a penny in your shoe, this will bring you prosperity.


French customs

In smaller French towns, the groom may meet his fiancée at her home on the day of the wedding and escort her to the chapel where the ceremony is being held. As the couple proceeds to the chapel, children will stretch long white ribbons across the road which the bride will cut as she passes.


At the chapel, the bride and groom are seated on two red velvet chairs underneath a silk canopy called a carre. Laurel leaves may be scattered across their paths when they exit the chapel. Sometimes small coins are also tossed for the children to gather.

A traditional French wedding celebration at Château de Hattonchâtel
A traditional French wedding celebration at Château de Hattonchâtel

At the reception, the couple customarily uses a toasting cup called a Coupe de Marriage. The origin of giving this toast began in France, when a small piece of toast was literally dropped into the couple's wine to ensure a healthy life. The couple would lift their glass to "a toast", as is common in Western culture today.


Some couples choose to serve a croquembouche instead of a wedding cake. This dessert is a pyramid of crème-filled pastry puffs, drizzled with a caramel glaze. A pastry chef presents a croquembouche. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


At a more boisterous wedding, tradition involves continuing the celebration until very late at night. After the reception, those invited to the wedding will gather outside the newlyweds' window and bang pots and pans. They are then invited into the house for some more drinks in the couple's honor, after which the couple is finally allowed to be alone for their first night together as husband and wife. A wedding reception is a party held after the completion of a marriage ceremony. ...


Another practice common at wedding celebrations is Sabrage: the "beheading" a bottle of champagne with a sabre made for the occasion. It was started as a way for the Hussars (under Napoleon's command) to celebrate victories and exhibit their horseback skills: they would "behead" the top off a bottle of champagne while on horseback. Legend has it that the skilled horsemen would ride at a full gallop while brave women held up bottles of champagne. The sabre must strike the neck of the bottle at exactly the right angle (champagne bottles have over 100 pounds of pressure per square inch). // Sabrage; Sabering the Champagne bottle. ... This article is about Champagne, the alcoholic beverage. ... French naval officers sabre of the 19th Century From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers sabre, and a carbine. ... Polish Hussar Hussar (original Hungarian spelling: huszár, plural huszárok) refers to a number of types of cavalry used throughout Europe since the 15th century. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


This practice spread throughout France as a way to celebrate special occasions. Decorative replicas of these special sabres can be purchased from artisans in Lyon, France (the French capital of cutlery). An artisan is a skilled manual worker. ... Lyons), see Lyons (disambiguation). ... Cutlery refers to any hand implement used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food in the Western world. ...


Italian customs

In some parts of Italy, a party, known as a Serenade, is thrown outside of the bride’s home by the groom. His family and friends come and wait for the bride, entertaining themselves until she appears. The groom then sings to his bride to further seduce her. Once his song is sung, the party ends.


The day of the wedding the groom’s men try their hardest to make the groom as uncomfortable as possible by saying things like “Maybe she forgot where the church is”


It is also traditional for the grooms family to give a dowry to the bride and to provide the engagement ring. The bride’s family is then responsible for receiving the guests of the wedding in their home for a reception afterward.


The color green is very important in the Italian wedding. In Italy, the tradition of some thing blue is replaced with something green. This color brings good luck to the married couple. The veil and brides maids also were important in an Italian wedding. The tradition began in Ancient Rome when the veil was used to hide the bride from any spirits that would corrupt her and the bridesmaids were to wear similar outfits so that the evil spirits were further confused.


In Sicilian customs, the dessert course is often presented as a Venetian Table, a dazzling array of pastries, fruits, coffees, cakes, (etc) presented in great quantity with much celebration. This is often called Venetian Hour. Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ...


After dessert, more dancing commences, gifts are given, and the guests eventually begin to leave. In Southern Italy, as the guests leave, they hand envelopes of money to the bride and groom, who return the gift with a wedding favor, a small token of appreciation. Wedding favors are small gifts or tokens of appriciation given to the guests at a typical United States wedding celebration. ...


Polish customs

In Polish weddings the celebrations may continue for two or three days. In the past, the engagement ceremony was organized by the future groom as a formal family gathering, during which he asked his chosen lady to marry him. In the recent years this custom has changed and today an engagement is much more personal and intimate. An elegant dinner party afterwards is still a nice way to inform the closest family members about the couples' decision to get married.


In some regions of Poland the tradition to invite the wedding guests in person is still upheld. Many young couples, accompanied by the parents, visit their family and friends to hand them the wedding invitations personally.


According to the old tradition a groom arrives with his parents at the house of a bride just before the wedding ceremony. At that time both parents and parents-in-law give a young couple their blessing. The couple enter the church together and walks up to the altar followed by two witnesses and the parents. In Poland it is quite unusual for the bride to be walked down the aisle or to have bridesmaids and groomsmen in a wedding. The couple is assisted by two witnesses, a man (usually grooms' side) and a woman (usually brides' side) who are either family members or close friends.


The Polish bride traditionally wears a white dress and a veil. The groom, on the other hand usually wears a fitted suit with a bow tie and a boutonnière that matches the brides' bouquet. During the ceremony wedding rings are exchanged and both the husband and wife wear them on their right hand. When they leave the church the guests toss rice or coins at the married couple for good and prosperous future together. Right after the ceremony the closest family and all the guest form a line in the front of the church to congratulate the newlyweds and wish them love and happiness. As soon as the married couple leave the church they get showered with rice for luck or guests drop coins at their feet for them to pick up. A boutonnière, also butt hole (British English), is a flower or floral decoration which was traditionally pushed through the butt hole of a jacket, but in modern times is most often pinned onto a gentleman’s butt hole. ...


Once all the guests have showered the couple with kisses, hugs and flowers everyone heads to the reception. It is a custom in Poland to prepare "passing gates" on the way to the reception for the newlyweds, who in order to pass have to give the "gate keepers" some vodka. This is a misinterpretation of an earlier tradition, when the "passing gates" were built when the bride was an orphan and money collected by "gate keepers" from the guests was handed over to the bride as her dowry (being orphan implied usually poverty). A dowry (also known as trousseau) is the money, goods, or estate that a woman brings to her husband in marriage. ...


The married couple is welcomed at the reception place by the parents with bread and salt. The bread symbolizes the prosperity, salt stands for hardship of life, the parents wish the young couple that they never go hungry and learn how to deal with every day hardships together. The wedding party lasts (and the bride and groom remain) until the last guest leaves, usually until morning.


In Poland, movements like Human Liberties Crusade [6] [7] or Wedding of the Weddings promote non-alcoholic wedding celebrations. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Romanian customs

Main article: Lăutari

Lăutari are musicians performing traditional songs. The music of the lăutari establishes the structure of the elaborate Romanian peasant weddings. The lăutari also function as guides through the wedding rituals and moderate any conflicts that may arise during what can be a long, alcohol-fueled party. Over a period of nearly 48 hours, this can be very physically strenuous. Lăutari are traditional musicians performing traditional Gypsy songs. ...


Following custom almost certainly dating back at least to the Middle Ages, most lăutari spend the fees from these wedding ceremonies on extended banquets for their friends and families over the days immediately following the wedding. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... State Banquet. ...


Scottish customs

Scotland is a popular place for young English couples to get married since, in Scotland, parents' permission is not required if both the bride and groom are old enough to legally be married (16). In England it was the case that if either was 16 or 17 then the permission of parents had to be sought. Thus Scotland, and especially the blacksmith's at Gretna Green, became a very popular place for couples to elope to, especially those under 18 and usually living in England. Gretna Green now hosts hundreds of weddings a year and is Scotland's third most popular tourist attraction. This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Gretna Green is a small village on the west coast in the south of Scotland. ...


Customs:

  • The bride's family sends invitations on behalf of the couple to the wedding guests, addressed by hand. The couple may send the invitations themselves, especially if they are more middle-aged. The invites will specify if the invitation is for ceremony and/or reception and/or evening following the meal at the reception.
  • Guests send or deliver wedding gifts to the bride's family home before the wedding day. Alternatively, the couple may register at department store and have a list of gifts there. The shop then organizes delivery, usually to the bride's parents' house or to the reception venue.
  • A wedding ceremony takes place at a church, register office or possibly another favorite location, such as a hilltop. In this regard Scotland differs significantly from England where only pre-approved public locations may be used for the wedding ceremony. Most ceremonies take place mid afternoon and last about half an hour during which the marriage schedule is signed by the couple and two witnesses, usually the best man and chief bridesmaid.
  • The newly wed couple usually leave the ceremony to the sound of bagpipes.
  • There is a wedding reception following the ceremony, usually at a different venue.
  • The bridal party lines up in a receiving line and the wedding guests file past, introducing themselves.
  • Usually a drink is served while the guests and bridal party mingle. In some cases the drink may be whisky or wine with a non alcoholic alternative.
  • The best man and bride's father toast the bride and groom with personal thoughts, stories, and well-wishes, usually humorous. The groom then follows with a response on behalf of his bride. Champagne is usually provided for the toast.
  • There is nearly always dancing following the meal. Often in Scotland this takes the form of a ceilidh, a night of informal traditional Scottish dancing in couples and groups to live traditional music. The first dance is led by the bride and groom, followed by the rest of the bridal party and finally the guests.
  • The cake-cutting ceremony takes place; the bride and groom jointly hold a cake cutter and cut the first pieces of the wedding cake.
  • Gifts are not opened at the reception; they are either opened ahead of time and sometimes displayed at the reception, or if guests could not deliver gifts ahead of time, they are placed on a table at the reception for the bride and groom to take home with them and open later.
  • A sprig of white heather is usually worn as a buttonhole for good luck.
  • It is the norm for the groom and much of the male bridal party and guests to wear kilts, although suits are also worn. Kilts and Highland dress are often hired for this purpose.

Love gift Man presents a cut of meat to a youth with a hoop. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... In England and Wales, The Register Office is primarily the local office for the registration of births, deaths and marriages (BD&M), and for the conducting of civil marriages. ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... A wedding reception is a party held after the completion of a marriage ceremony. ... For other uses, see Whisky (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Champagne, the alcoholic beverage. ... Céilí (Irish reformed spelling), or Ceilidh (Scottish and older Gaelic spelling), pronounced Kay-Lee in either case, is the traditional Gaelic social dance in Ireland and Scotland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Binomial name (L.) Hull Heather redirects here. ... In a wedding, the wedding party refers to the group of people participating in the ceremony with the bride and groom. ... A kilt in the Black Watch tartan A kilt is a traditional garment of modern Scottish and Celtic culture typically worn by men. ...

Handfasting

Main article: Handfasting

Handfasting is an ancient Celtic wedding ritual in which the bride's and groom's hands are tied together — hence the phrase "tying the knot". "Handfasting" is favored by practitioners of Celtic-based religions and spiritual traditions, such as Wicca and Druidism.[citation needed] Handfasting is an ancient Celtic wedding ritual in which the brides and grooms hands are tied together —hence the phrase tying the knot. It was a part of the normal marriage ceremony in the time of the Roman Empire. ... Handfasting is an ancient Celtic wedding ritual in which the brides and grooms hands are tied together —hence the phrase tying the knot. It was a part of the normal marriage ceremony in the time of the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ... Druidry or Druidism was the religion of the ancient druids, the priestly class in ancient Celtic and Gallic societies through much of Western Europe north of the Alps and in the British Isles. ...


North American customs

United States customs

A Christian or other mainstream wedding and reception (including a Jewish wedding) in the United States follow a similar pattern to the Italian wedding. Customs and traditions vary but components include the following:

  • The bride wears “something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue.” (See also Ceremonial clothing in Western cultures.)
  • The bride usually wears a white dress.
  • A color scheme is often used so that the invitation matches the bridesmaids' dresses and the table settings.
  • Rice is sometimes thrown at the newlyweds as they leave the ceremony. [1]
  • The bride's family sends engraved invitations to the wedding guests, addressed by hand (or in an elegant font) to show the importance and personal meaning of the occasion.
  • Guests send or deliver wedding gifts to the bride's family home before the wedding day.
  • A wedding ceremony takes place at a church or other location, such as an outdoor venue.

At the wedding reception following the ceremony, sometimes at the same location but sometimes at a different venue: Ceremonial clothing in Western cultures, life cycle celebrations associated with particular occasions are manifested by certain types of ceremonial clothing. ... A bridesmaid is a girl or young woman who attends to the bride during or after a wedding or marriage ceremony. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Love gift Man presents a cut of meat to a youth with a hoop. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... A wedding reception is a party held after the completion of a marriage ceremony. ...

  • The bridal party lines up in a receiving line and the wedding guests file past, introducing themselves.
  • Usually snacks or a meal are served while the guests and bridal party mingle.
  • Often the best man and/or maid of honor toast the bride and groom with personal thoughts, stories, and well-wishes; sometimes other guests follow with their own toasts. Champagne, sparkling cider, or nonalcoholic carbonated drinks are usually provided for this purpose.
  • Clinking silverware against glassware obliges the newlyweds to kiss.
  • If dancing is provided, the bride and groom first dance together. Often further protocol is followed, where they dance first with their respective mother and father, then possibly with the maid of honor and best man; then the bride and groom rejoin while the parents of the bride and groom join the dance and the best man and maid of honor dance together; then other attendants join in; then finally everyone is entitled to dance. Dancing continues throughout the reception. Music is sometimes provided by a live band or musical ensemble, sometimes by a disc jockey.
  • In some cultures, the dollar dance takes place, in which it is expected and encouraged for guests to pin money onto the young bride and groom to help them get started in their new lives.
  • The cake-cutting ceremony takes place; the bride and groom jointly hold a cake cutter--often a special silver keepsake cutter purchased or given as a gift for the occasion--and cut the first pieces of the wedding cake. They then entwine arms and feed each other a bite of cake. In some social groups, the bride and groom smear cake on each other's faces at this time.
  • The bride tosses her bouquet over her shoulder to the assembled unmarried women; the woman who catches it, superstition has it, will be the next to marry. In some social groups, the process is repeated for unmarried men with the groom tossing the bride's garter for the same purpose.
  • Gifts are not opened at the reception; they are either opened ahead of time and sometimes displayed at the reception, or if guests could not deliver gifts ahead of time, they are placed on a table at the reception for the bride and groom to take home with them and open later.

A snack food is seen in Western culture as a type of food that is not meant to be eaten as part of one of the main meals of the day (breakfast, lunch, supper). ... For the coarsely ground flour, see flour. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Napa, California: USA A new bride humorously observes the legal signing of her marriage license by her maid of honor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Champagne, the alcoholic beverage. ... Cider has different meanings in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Carbonated bubbles in a soda float to the surface. ... Starch-polyester disposable cutlery Cutlery refers to any hand utensil used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food. ... Glassware includes: Drinkware (for beverages) Vases Pitcher (container)s Art glass Art marbles Laboratory glassware Stained glass is not directly glassware, but is closely related. ... Napa, California: USA A new bride humorously observes the legal signing of her marriage license by her maid of honor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In music, a band is a group of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of a musical arrangement. ... A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who perform instrumental or vocal music. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... Dollar Dance is a wedding reception tradition, Polish in its roots, whereby guests at a reception pay to dance with the bride or groom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An example of a cascading flower bouquet. ...

Wedding gifts

The purpose of inviting guests was to have them witness a couple's marriage ceremony and vows and to share in the bride and groom's joy and celebration. Gifts for the bride and groom are optional, although most guests attempt to give at least a token gift of their best wishes. Some brides and grooms and families feel, contrary to proper etiquette, that for the expense and effort they put into showing their guests a good time and to wine and dine them, the guests should reciprocate by providing nice gifts or cash.


The couple often registers for gifts at a store well in advance of their wedding. This allows them to create a list of household items, usually including china, silverware and crystalware; often including linen preferences, pots and pans, and similar items. With brides and grooms who might already be independent and have lived on their own, even owning their own homes, they sometimes register at hardware or home improvement stores. Registries are intended to make it easy for guests who wish to purchase gifts to feel comfortable that they are purchasing gifts that the newlyweds will truly appreciate. The registry information should, according to etiquette, be provided only to guests who request it. Some couples register with services that enable money gifts intended to fund items such as a honeymoon, home purchase or college fund. A bridal registry is a system designed by department stores for the purpose of allowing a newlywed couple to manage the purchase of gifts for their wedding. ... A honeymoon registry is a service, typically on the Internet, that assists engaged and married couples in financing their honeymoons. ...


Some guests may find bridal registries inappropriate. They can be seen as an anathema to traditional notions behind gift buying, such as contravening the belief that "one should be happy for what they receive", taking away the element of surprise, and leading to present buying as a type of competition, as the couple knows the costs of each individual item. It may also be seen by some as inappropriate to invite people who do not know either the bride or groom well enough to be able to pick out an appropriate gift. A bridal registry is a system designed by department stores for the purpose of allowing a newlywed couple to manage the purchase of gifts for their wedding. ...


African-American customs
Main article: Jumping the broom

Jumping the broom developed out West African Asante custom. The broom in Asante and other Akan cultures also held spiritual value and symbolized sweeping away past wrongs or warding off evil spirits. Brooms were waved over the heads of marrying couples to ward off spirits. The couple would often but not always jump over the broom at the end of the ceremony. Jumping the broom is a Black American wedding custom. ... A shrunken Ashanti Confederacy near the end of its existence in 1896 The Ashanti Kingdom or Confederacy was a powerful state in West Africa in the years prior to European colonization. ...


The custom took on additional significance in the context of slavery in the United States. Slaves had no right to legal marriage; slaveholders considered slaves property and feared that legal marriage and family bonds had the potential to lead to organization and revolt. Marriage rituals, however, were important events to the Africans, who came in many cases come from richly-ceremonial African cultures. Slavery in the United States began soon after English colonists first settled Virginia and lasted until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ...


Taking marriage vows in the presence of a witness and then leaping over the handle of a broom became the common practice to create a recognized union. Brooms are also symbols of the hearth, the center of the new family being created. Jumping the broom has become a practice in many modern weddings between Black Americans.[citation needed] Wedding vows are promises made by the bride and groom to each other during a wedding ceremony. ... This article is about witnesses in law courts. ... broom A broom is a cleaning tool consisting of stiff fibres attached to, and roughly parallel to, a cylindrical handle, the broomstick. ... In common historic and modern usage, a hearth (Har-th) is a brick- or stone-lined fireplace or oven used for cooking and/or heating. ...


There are also traditions of broom jumping in Europe, in the Wicca and Celtic communities especially. They are probably unconnected with the African practice.[citation needed]


African customs

Pygmy wedding traditions

Pygmy engagements were not long and usually formalized by an exchange of visits between the families concerned. The groom to be would bring a gift of game or maybe a few arrows to his new in-laws, take his bride home to live in his band and with his new parents. His only obligation is to find among his relatives a girl willing to marry a brother or male cousin of his wife. If he feels he can feed more than one wife, he may have additional wives.


Religious aspects of weddings

In virtually all religions, marriage is a long-term union between two or more people and is established with ceremonies and rituals. The people are most commonly one man and one woman[citation needed], though some religions have permitted polygamous marriages and some faiths and denominations recognize same-sex marriages. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Matrimony redirects here. ... For other senses of this word, see ritual (disambiguation). ... This article is about adult human males. ... Diverse women. ... Polygamy, literally many marriages in ancient Greek, is a marital practice in which a person has more than one spouse simultaneously (as opposed to monogamy where each person has a maximum of one spouse at any one time). ... Recognized in some regions Foreign marriages recognized Civil unions and registered partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated Same-sex marriage debated, recognition granted United States (CT, DC, HI, ME, NH, NJ, OR, VT, WA) See also This box:      Same-sex marriage (also referred to as gay...


In marriage, Christians see a picture of the relationship between Jesus Christ and His Church. In Judaism, marriage is so important that remaining unmarried is deemed unnatural. Islam also recommends marriage highly; among other things, it helps in the pursuit of spiritual perfection. The Bahá'í Faith sees marriage as a foundation of the structure of society, and considers it both a physical and spiritual bond that endures into the afterlife.[8] Hinduism sees marriage as a sacred duty that entails both religious and social obligations. By contrast, Buddhism does not encourage or discourage marriage, although it does teach how one might live a happily married life and emphasizes that married vows are not to be taken lightly (see separate article for details). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... Baháí marriage is union of a man and a women. ... For other uses, see Afterlife (disambiguation). ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Buddhism is a Dharmic religion and philosophy[1] with between 230 to 500 million adherents worldwide. ... While Buddhist practice varies considerably among its various schools, Marriage is one of the few concepts specifically mentioned in the context of Sila (Buddhist behavior discipline). ...


Different religions have different beliefs as regards the breakup of marriage. For example, the Roman Catholic Church believes it is morally wrong to divorce, and divorcées cannot remarry in a church marriage, though they can do in the eyes of the law. In the area of nullity, religions and the state often apply different rules, meaning that a couple, for example, could have their marriage annulled by the Catholic Church but still be married in the eyes of the law because the state disagrees with the church over whether an annulment can be granted in a given case. This produces the phenomenon of Catholics getting church annulments simultaneously with civil divorces, so that they may remarry both legally and sacramentally. The Catholic Church will not, in fact, grant an annulment petition unless the marriage has also been dissolved or annulled under civil law. Catholic Church redirects here. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ... In Conflict of Laws, the issue of nullity (known as annulment in the United States) in Family Law inspires a wide response among the laws of different states as to the circumstances in which a marriage will be valid, invalid or null. ...


Detailed viewpoints on various wedding customs

Handfasting is an ancient Celtic wedding ritual in which the brides and grooms hands are tied together —hence the phrase tying the knot. It was a part of the normal marriage ceremony in the time of the Roman Empire. ...

Religious customs

Christian customs

Many religions have extensive teachings regarding marriage. Most Christian churches give some form of blessing to a marriage; the wedding ceremony typically includes some sort of pledge by the community to support the couple's relationship. A church wedding is a ceremony presided over by a Christian priest or pastor. Ceremonies are based on reference to God, and are frequently embodied into other church ceremonies such as Holy Mass [9]. Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article is about religious workers. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) presiding at the 2005 Easter Vigil Mass in place of the dying Pope John Paul II. Mass is the term used of the celebration of the Eucharist in the Latin rites of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Customs may vary widely between denominations. In the Roman Catholic Church "Holy Matrimony" is considered to be one of the seven sacraments, in this case one that the spouses bestow upon each other in front of a priest and members of the community as witnesses. An argument for the institution of the sacrament of Matrimony by Christ Jesus himself, and its occasion, is advanced by Bernard Orchard in his article The Betrothal and Marriage of Mary to Joseph. [2] [3] [4] In the Eastern Orthodox church, it is one of the Mysteries, and is seen as an ordination and a martyrdom.


Quaker customs
Main article: Quaker wedding

A Quaker wedding ceremony in a Friends meeting is similar to any other Meeting for Worship, and therefore often very different from the experience expected by non-Friends. Quaker weddings are the traditional ceremony of marriage within the Religious Society of Friends. ... Quaker weddings are the traditional ceremony of marriage within the Religious Society of Friends. ...


Hindu customs

Main article: Hindu wedding

North and South Indian wedding ceremonies are conducted at least partially in Sanskrit, the language in which most holy Hindu ceremonies are conducted. The local language of the people involved is also used since most Hindus cannot understand Sanskrit. They may have rituals that differ fom the modern western wedding ceremony and also among the different regions, families, and castes such as Rajput Wedding, Aggarwal Weddings, Iyer Weddings and Tamil Weddings. The ceremonies are colourful and extend for several days. A Hindu marriage ceremony from a Rajput wedding North Indian wedding ceremonies are traditionally conducted at least partially in Sanskrit, the language in which most holy Hindu ceremonies are conducted. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Iyers (Tamil : அய்யர் Malayalam:അയ്യര) also called Sastri[4], Sarma or Bhattar is the name given to Hindu Brahmins of Tamil or Telugu origin who are followers of the Advaita philosophy propounded by Adi Shankara[5]. They are found mostly in Tamil Nadu as they are generally native to the Tamil country. ...


Jewish customs

The traditions used in a Jewish wedding vary based on the denomination of Judaism of the people being married. Some of the most common are listed below. Judaism considers marriage to be the ideal state of existence; a man without a wife, or a woman without a husband, are considered incomplete. ... Several groups, sometimes called denominations, branches, or movements, have developed among Jews of the modern era, especially Ashkenazi Jews living in anglophone countries. ...


The bride (kallah) and groom (chatan) sign a Ketubah (marriage contract). Originally, the Ketubah detailed the husband's obligations to his wife, and provided for monetary payment to her in case of divorce. In modern times, the Ketubah can be a decorative keepsake that sets out expectations for both the bride and groom. In Conservative homes it is typically framed and displayed, while in Orthodox homes it is kept hidden away. An illustrated ketubah A ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. ...


The Jewish ceremony generally starts with the bride and groom being escorted to the Chuppa (Jewish wedding canopy) by both sets of parents. The ceremony takes place under the Chuppa, and is presided over by someone who can read Hebrew and knows Jewish law, usually, but not necessarily, a rabbi. The wedding officiant or another honored guest recites the two wedding blessings, and reads out the ketubah (marriage contract). The couple then recite their vows and share a cup of wine. After the vows, seven marriage blessings Sheva Brachot are read. The ceremony traditionally concludes with the groom breaking the wine glass underfoot as the wedding guests shout mazel tov (good luck). (Often, a lightbulb is smashed instead because it offers a more satisfying crunch). A chupah A chuppah (Hebrew: חוּפָּה) (also spelled khuppa, chupah, or chuppa - plural: chuppot, Hebrew: חוּפּוֹת) is a canopy traditionally used in Jewish weddings. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... An illustrated ketubah A ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. ... Sheva Brachot (Hebrew: שבע ברכות ) literally the seven blessings also known as brichot Nesuin (Hebrew: ברכות נישואים ), the wedding blessings in Halakha (Jewish religious law) are blessings that are recited for the bride and the groom in a Jewish Wedding ceremony under the chupah over a second cup of wine. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


The bride and groom spend time together alone before the reception, which is traditionally a joyous celebration with much music and dancing.


There are several activities that may take place during the reception:

  • The wedding breakfast.
  • A dance in which the bride and groom hold opposite corners of a handkerchief while they are lifted up on chairs by the guests and whirled around.
  • The Krenzl, in which the bride's mother is crowned with a wreath of flowers as her daughters dance around her (traditionally at the wedding of the mother's last unwed daughter).
  • The Mizinke, a dance for the parents of the bride or groom when their last child is wed.
  • The gladdening of the bride, in which guests dance around the bride, and can include the use of "shtick" -- silly items such as signs, banners, costumes, confetti, and jump ropes made of table napkins.
  • The singing of Aishet Chayil to the bride by the groom accompanied by his friends.

Confusingly, the Wedding Breakfast is not a morning meal (breakfast), but is the traditional name for the dinner given to the bride, bridegroom and guests at the Wedding reception that follows a wedding in the United Kingdom (and elsewhere?). The name apparently arises from the fact that the bride and...

LDS customs

Main article: Celestial marriage

Within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also known as Mormons), the act of marriage is regarded as an eternal affair. As such, there are two kinds of marriages recognized by the Church, civil marriage and celestial marriage. Civil marriages are those legally contracted under local law and are dissolved upon the death of the participants, while celestial marriages, also known as sealings, bind the participants as husband and wife for all eternity if both are righteous. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... Celestial marriage (also called the New and Everlasting Covenant) is a doctrine peculiar to Mormonism, particularly The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and branches of Mormon fundamentalism. ... For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ... In Mormonism, a sealing is an ordinance (ritual), performed in temples by a person holding the sealing power. ...


Celestial marriages can only be performed by Priesthood authority within a Sealing Room in a dedicated temple. Only members of the LDS church who have a temple recommend may attend an LDS wedding. The wedding is often referred to as a sealing, in which husband and wife are sealed beyond death into the next life. Space is limited in sealing rooms so only family and close friends attend. In the Latter Day Saint movement, priesthood is considered to be the power and authority of God, including the authority to act as a leader in the church and to perform ordinances (sacraments), and the apostolic power to perform miracles. ... The Salt Lake Temple, operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is the best-known Mormon temple. ...


The sealing can be performed at the same approximate time as the civil marriage or for a couple civilly married for at least one year. In the latter case, if the couple already has children, they may also accompany the ceremony to be sealed to their parents. Children who are born to parents who have already been sealed need no such ceremony, as they have been "born in the covenant."


Many LDS couples will then hold wedding receptions or open houses after the wedding ceremony in another venue that is open to all family and friends. Some couples choose to recreate a more traditional wedding ceremony, or will simply perform certain traditional acts, such as the throwing of the bouquet, first dance, etc.


Economic aspects

In the United Kingdom, the average wedding cost approximately £20,000 in 2005[10]. This means that couples wait longer before getting married, with the average age of those getting married 6.7 years higher than 20 years previously.


Gallery

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wedding ceremonies
Look up wedding in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...

Wedding traditions

A white gold wedding band with a diamond studded yellow gold engagement ring. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into forced marriage. ...

Ceremony aspects

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wedding videography is the documentation of a wedding on video. ... Wedding photography is a major commercial endeavor that supports the bulk of the efforts for many photography studios or independent photographers. ... Personal Wedding Websites are a relatively new tradition in which engaged couples employ the use of a website to aid in planning and communication for their wedding. ...

Related travel

  • Honeymoon
  • Wedding trip (traveling to meet a bride or groom in an arranged marriage)

A honeymoon is the traditional holiday taken by newlyweds to celebrate their marriage in intimacy and seclusion. ... Wedding trip -- a trip taken to consummate an arranged marriage or to meet and propose to a mail-order bride before applying for a visa to bring the betrothed back home. ...

Religious aspects

Allegory of chastity by Hans Memling. ... Celibacy refers either to being unmarried or to sexual abstinence. ... Spiritual marriage comes from the idea of love without sex. ... The traditional marriage movement is a social movement whose participants believe that marriage should only be defined as a union between one man and one woman. ... Major religious groups as a percentage of the world population in 2005. ...

Related events and social processes

A bachelor party (also called a stag party, stag night (UK, Ireland, Canada, and NZ), bulls party (South Africa) or bucks party, bucks night (Australia)) is a party held for a bachelor shortly before he enters marriage, to make the most of his final opportunity to engage in activities a... The banns of marriage or, simply the banns, (from an Old English word meaning to summon) are the public announcement from the pulpit that a marriage is going to take place in that church between two specified persons at a specified time. ... Betrothal is a formal state of engagement to be married. ... Party given for the bride before the wedding to be usually coordinated by the bridesmaids to offer gifts for the bride and groom for their new home. ... Bride price also known as bride wealth or a dower is an amount of money or property paid to the parents of a woman for the right to marry their daughter. ... Brideservice has traditionally been portrayed in the anthropological literature as the service rendered to the bride’s family by the bridegroom as a brideprice or part of one. ... A dowry (also known as trousseau) is the money, goods, or estate that a woman brings to her husband in marriage. ... Dower (Lat. ... Handfasting is an ancient Celtic wedding ritual in which the brides and grooms hands are tied together —hence the phrase tying the knot. It was a part of the normal marriage ceremony in the time of the Roman Empire. ... A Sikh Family during the Batna Ceremony Mayian is the term used for the wedding ceremony one day before a Sikh Wedding (Anand Karaj). ... A prenuptial agreement or antenuptial agreement, commonly abbreviated to prenup or prenupt, is a contract entered into by two people prior to marriage or civil union. ... A wedding anniversary is an anniversary which falls on the month and day a particular wedding took place, and which recurs every subsequent year, except for those who were married on February 29th. ... A Pakistani wedding typically consist of three ceremonies on three separate days. ... Shaadi (English: Wedding) is an 1962 Indian film directed by R. Krishnan and S. Pandu. ...

References

  1. ^ Kilts: tightly woven into Scots culture. Scotsman (2005-02-10). Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  2. ^ The Scottish Kilt. Visit Scotland. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  3. ^ Jim Murdoch. Scottish Culture and Heritage: The Kilt. Scotsmart. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  4. ^ Britannica article: Richard Wagner
  5. ^ see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chabad_Niggunim#Niggunim_of_Rabbi_Shneur_Zalman_of_Liadi
  6. ^ http://www.kwc.oaza.org.pl/dokument.php?id=224 Krucjata Wyzwolenia Człowieka
  7. ^ http://www.spontana.fora.pl/diakonia-wyzwolenia,44/wesela-bezalkoholowe-gazeta-wyborcza-o-kulturze-niepicia,505.html Lepiej łyknij wody [Gazeta Wyborcza - DUżY FORMAT] Witold Szabłowski
  8. ^ Smith, Peter (2000). "Marriage". A concise encyclopedia of the Bahá'í Faith. Oxford: Oneworld Publications, p. 232-233. ISBN 1-85168-184-1. 
  9. ^ http://www.holyspiritchurch.com/weddingarr.htm Making Wedding Arrangements at Holy Spirit Church
  10. ^ Weddings - the Burden of Cost (pdf). Alliance Trust (2007-03-01). Retrieved on 2008-04-08.

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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COMMENTARY     

Mark Smith
6th November 2010
The perfect wedding location is Château Hattonchâtel in Lorraine in France.The ambiance and atmosphere at the castle is stunning.

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